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The GIS (Geographical Information Science) MSc provides an education in the theoretical, scientific and practical aspects of GIS. Read more
The GIS (Geographical Information Science) MSc provides an education in the theoretical, scientific and practical aspects of GIS. It prepares students for technical and analytical GIS roles and is in high demand; we have very close links with industry and the majority of our students find employment prior to contemplating their degree.

Degree information

Students gain a solid grounding in the scientific principles underpinning the computational and analytical foundations of GISc. Our staff are world-leading experts in the areas of programming location-enabled Apps, spatial and 3D databases, big spatio-temporal analytics, citizen science and and human computer interaction, and the MSc therefore is able to offer a wide range of options and specialisations.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months is offered.

Core modules - core modules introduce the theory underpinning GIS, along with programming skills (python) and the basics of spatial analysis and statistcs. You'll learn to critically engage with GIS rather than just pushing buttons - how does the way data is captured and modelled influence the results of your analysis? Do you get the same results from two different GIS packages? Knowing what is inside the 'black box' means you understand analytical results and their limitations.
-GIS Principles and Technology
-Principles of Spatial Analysis
-Mapping Science
-Representations, Structures and Algorithms

Optional modules - term two is where you start to specialise, chosing modules that fit your interests, intended career choice and/or prepare you for your dissertation. At this point you can chose a heavilty technical route (e.g. databases, programming, human computer interaction) a more analytical route (spatio-temporal data mining, network and locational analysis, databases) or a mixture of the two routes. You will need to chose four modules in total. At least 30 credits of optional modules selected from :
-Geographical Information System Design
-Spatio-Temporal Analysis and Data Mining
-Web and Mobile GIS – Apps and Programming
-Spatial Databases and Data Management

Plus no more than 30 credits of optional modules (all term two) selected from :
-Airborne Data Acquisition
-Applied Building Information Modelling
-Network and Locational Analysis
-Image Understanding
-Ocean and Coastal Zone Management
-Positioning
-Research Methods
-Terrestrial Data Acquisition

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–15,000 words. Where appropriate, this may be undertaken in conjunction with one of our many industrial partners, including Arup, Joint Research Centre, British Red Cross, Transport for London.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, practical classes, demonstrations and tutorials, and is supported by a series of external speakers from industry and visits to industrial who give weekly seminars describing how GIS is used in their field as well as what they are looking for when recruiting graduate GIS students. Assessment is through unseen examinations, group and individual coursework, formal and oral presentations, and the dissertation.

Careers

There are excellent employment prospects for our graduates, with starting salaries of around £25,000. Recent GIS graduates have found openings with large engineering design firms (such as Arup or WSP), specialist consultancy firms such as Deloitte or Informed Solutions, in leading professional software companies (such as ESRI or Google), with local authorities, for organisations such as Shell, Tesco, the Environment Agency, Transport for London, NHS and the Ordnance Survey.

Employability
Students will develop specific skills including a fundamental understanding of GIS and its application to real-world problems, through theoretical lectures covering the foundations of the science – how data is captured, map creation, generalisation, spatial data management, spatial analysis, data quality and error, and spatial algorithms. Students will develop strong technical (python, R, Java, HTML, Javascript, SQL) and analytical skills (data mining, human computer interaction and usability), and in order to fully understand the principles behind GIS will make use of multiple GIS packages, both proprietary and free/open source (ArcGIS, QGIS).

Why study this degree at UCL?

This highly regarded MSc has been running for nearly 30 years and is taught by internationally recognised academics. Our specialist GIS laboratory offers the latest open source and proprietary software and our unique dual focus on the computer science and analytical aspects of GIS means that you will be able to develop your skills in multiple directions.

Our close links with industry (a strong alumni group and weekly industrial seminars) mean that you will be able to directly link your classroom learning with your future career as a GIS professional; you can also undertake your dissertation with an industrial partner.

As well as weekly industrial seminars, you will have the option to do an industry-linked project, and you will be able to attend our annual GIS careers event, which is co-organized with the UK Assocation of Geographic Infrormation.

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You may already be working professionally in the field you wish to research or you may already have extensive knowledge of your field. Read more
You may already be working professionally in the field you wish to research or you may already have extensive knowledge of your field. Alternatively, you may be a business professional with the basis of your research in mind, looking for a way to formalise and extend your knowledge and skills within the framework of a research degree.

The award of a UK doctorate is based solely upon individual research, presented in the form of a thesis.

We expect prospective candidates to have a good honours degree or its equivalent in a relevant discipline. You may also have an appropriate masters degree, or other demonstrable research experience and writing skills.

The doctorate-level programmes at the BLIS Research Centre are intended for professionals, graduates and career-minded individuals seeking to develop as a managerial, industrial, or academic professional in their chosen field of study. You should be seeking the knowledge that will allow you to respond operationally and strategically to the demands of, and function effectively within, a wide range of business and academic environments, and have a desire to make a significant contribution to knowledge in the field and to your own career development.

Research topics

- supply chain management

- global logistics

- information systems for supply chain and logistics

- use of open systems in business and management

- information systems and management

- strategic exploitation of ICT

- e-business

- strategy

- knowledge management

- operations management

- process modelling

- SME research

- risk management

- virtual learning environments (VLEs)

- music and creative technologies business.

Available projects

Projects which are currently being undertaken by research degree candidates include:

The use of open source ERP system in SMEs;

North West Aerospace supply chain restructuring;

Knowledge portals for SMEs;

The use of open source product development management tools;

Applying patterns to web services based solutions of Internal Enterprise Applications Integration (EAI) within small to medium businesses (SMEs);

The role of customer service in B2B marketing;

Portfolio incomes and the live music industry;

Artist development in the dance music genre;

E-marketing in the UK grocery retailing sector.

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Cybercrime is a relatively new and growing area for both civil and criminal investigation. Read more
Cybercrime is a relatively new and growing area for both civil and criminal investigation. This course has been developed by law enforcement practitioners to enhance knowledge and practical skills in the areas of behavioural psychology, criminal investigation and the technical aspects of obtaining computer-based evidence.

Aimed at personal professional development for current investigators in the criminal and private sector and as a natural progression for graduates in Computer Forensics, Psychology or Policing.

Modules include Research Skills, Behavioural Dynamics of Cybercrime, Digital Forensic Technology, Open Source Internet Investigation, Policing of cybercrime and a research project for your dissertation.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The course is taught as a combination of lectures, practicals and self-directed study to understand criminal behaviour in the area of cybercrime, including the use of computers, mobile devices, networks and open source internet intelligence in a cybercrime investigation. Module assessments are undertaken by means of coursework, workshops, examination and dissertation.

The course is delivered and taught by experienced academics and former law enforcement investigators with specialist knowledge in computing, psychology and criminal investigation.

FACILITIES

-Computer Forensic Laboratory
-Well-developed plans for a Hydra Suite

OPPORTUNITIES

A range of potential careers are available to those studying MSc Cybercrime including working in the fields of Policing,Civil investigation, the military, and National Crime Agency.

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Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. Read more
Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. To impress employers you need the flexibility to learn on the job, leverage open data and program open source software. This MSc draws on UCL's unparalleled concentration of expertise to equip you for future research or significantly enhance your employability.

Degree information

Students learn about a wide range of concepts that underpin computational approaches to archaeology and human history. Students become proficient in the archaeological application of both commercial and open source GIS software and learn other practical skills such as programming, data-mining, advanced spatial analysis with R, and agent-based simulation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Archaeological Data Science
-Complexity, Space and Human History

Optional modules
-Agent-based Modelling of Human History
-Exploratory Data Analysis in Archaeology
-GIS Approaches to Past Landscapes
-GIS in Archaeology and History
-Remote Sensing
-Spatial Statistics, Network Analysis and Human History
-The Archaeology of Complex Urban Sites: Analytical and Interpretative Technology
-Web and Mobile GIS (by arrangement with the UCL Department of Civil and Geomatic Engineering
-Other options available within the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Careful provision is made to facilitate remote access to software, tutorials, datasets and readings through a combination of dedicated websites and virtual learning environments. Assessment is through essays, practical components, project reports and portfolio, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Approximately one third of graduates of the programme have gone on to do PhDs at universities such as Cambridge, Leiden, McGill, Thessaloniki and Washington State. Of these, some continue to pursue GIS and/or spatial analysis techniques as a core research interest, while others use the skills and inferential rigour they acquired during their Master's as a platform for more wide-ranging doctoral research. Other graduates have gone to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations worldwide. These include specialist careers in national governmental or heritage organisations, commercial archaeological units, planning departments, utility companies and consultancies.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Database Administrator, Deloitte
-Data Science Analyst, M2M
-Graphical Information Systems (GIS) Technician, BSG Ecology

Employability
This degree offers a considerable range of transferable practical skills as well as instilling a more general inferential rigour which is attractive to almost any potential employer. Graduates will be comfortable with a wide range of web-based, database-led, statistical and cartographic tasks. They will be able to operate both commercial and oper source software, will be able to think clearly about both scientific and humanities-led issues, and will have a demonstrable track record of both individual research and group-based collaboration.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The teaching staff bring together a range and depth of expertise that enables students to develop specialisms including industry-standard and open-source GIS, advanced spatial and temporal statistics, computer simulation, geophysical prospection techniques and digital topographic survey.

Most practical classes are held in the institute's Archaeological Computing and GIS laboratory. This laboratory contains two Linux servers, ten powerful workstations running Microsoft Windows 7, a digitising table and map scanner.

Students benefit from the collaborations we have established with other institutions and GIS specialists in Canada, Germany, Italy and Greece together with several commercial archaeological units in the UK.

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The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. Read more
The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry.

We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/construction-project-management/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients.

- Students are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.

- There are four intensive study periods during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers. Whether you have a degree in a construction related discipline such as Civil Engineering or Architecture, or have a strong background working in construction, if you want to be a Construction Project Manager this is the course for you.

- Our graduates have an exemplary employment record and now span the globe, working in countries including India, Pakistan, South Africa, Canada, Australia, Peru, Middle East and China.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

- Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. Students will normally hold degrees in fields within the realm of the built environment including Civil Engineering, Construction, Architecture and Building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects.

Our students hail from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the open-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that Construction Project Managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house-builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

Careers

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector. Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module
Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), our Unit of Assessment (UoA 16) ranked 4th within the University in terms of its Grade Point Average (GPA). We hold the 11th position in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- Building Information Modelling (BIM)
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

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MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas. Read more

Introduction

MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas: interaction design, design prototyping, physical computing, user centered design, open source digital platforms, design research, foresight and insight, experience design, communication design, speculative and critical design, interactive design and digital arts.

Content

MA Interaction Design Communication provides an opportunity for experimental practice in an area of design that increasingly explores the intersection of the physical and digital domains. With a focus on synthesising thought through rigorous design prototyping (making), digital processes and user perspectives, the course is highly reflective of interdisciplinary practice within the contemporary design, media and communications industries.

The integrated approach of the course to critical thinking provides you with the opportunity to work with critical ideas in an applied design context – for example psycho-geographic practice as empirical research or engaging with other critical theories of space to generate user perspectives. This ensures that ideation processes take on both the macro as well as micro opportunities for innovation and speculation crucial to building a portfolio of highly engaged work.

As well as placing you in a position to work across the board spectrum of interaction, design and communication the course is just as interested in design questions as design answers. This means that the course also prepares you for progression to further design research at MPhil/PhD level as well as to advanced self-directed experimental practice.

LCC has an outstanding team of practitioners and published researchers and enjoys a powerful programme of visiting speakers. The course also benefits from a cross-European collaboration with design industry professionals and higher education institutions and there is an opportunity to visit at least one other centre in Europe during the course.

Structure

Phase 1

1.1 Theories and Technologies of Interaction Design (40 credits)
1.2 Research Practice and Human Centered Design (20 credits)

Phase 2

2.1 Interaction Futures and Speculative Design (40 credits)
2.2 Physical Computing and Design Prototyping (20 credits)

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Final Major Research Project

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Intelligence and International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. Read more
Intelligence and International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. Students will develop an awareness of the ways in which intelligence issues manifest themselves in security issues in peace and war. Understanding of ethical dilemmas associated with intelligence activity.

Key benefits

- Intelligence & International Security is excellent preparation for employment in government service or in commercial risk management and open source intelligence providers.

- Students will be taught by visiting academics, serving and former officials and other intelligence experts who give regular public lectures and seminars.

- Enables students to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security.

- Students have the advantage of attending events run by the Intelligence and International Security Research Group which provides a platform for sharing ideas.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/intelligence-and-international-security-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Issues of intelligence have assumed increasing prominence in world affairs as analysts and policymakers attempt to assess the nature of new threats in the international system. Our programme will enable you to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security.

In examining the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century our programme offers a unique multidisciplinary approach based on the strengths of the department. We aim to provide a framework in which to understand the nature and role of intelligence in its relationship to wider issues in war and international security; an understanding of the processes, practices and institutions that have characterised intelligence in the modern era; an understanding of the problems connected with intelligence collection, assessment and ability to predict events in world affairs; and an appreciation of the particular ethical concerns generated by intelligence-related phenomena.

- Course purpose -

Our programme is for graduates and professionals with an interest in understanding the nature and role of intelligence. It is designed to have broad-ranging appeal if you are interested in pursuing graduate studies in intelligence and security studies. You will also find this programme of interest if you are a graduate in politics, history, international relations and strategic studies; if you have practical experience in the intelligence community and wish to reflect on the wider issues and implications of your experience; or are a professional in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2,000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Whilst this is not a vocational programme, students on our MA programmes have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching and the armed forces.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules & Structure

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme:

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing
Interactive Media Critical Theory- 15 or 30 credits
Physical Computing: Arduino and Related Technologies- 30 credits

In Year 2 you will study the following:

Studio Practice- 120 credits
Computational Arts Critical Studies- 60 credits

Assessment

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & Careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Master Quantitative Finance will provide you with an excellent academic and practical education to become an expert in financial methodology. Read more
The Master Quantitative Finance will provide you with an excellent academic and practical education to become an expert in financial methodology. It is your ideal starting point for a future career in today’s challenging and dynamic financial markets.

Visit the website: https://www.wu.ac.at/en/programs/masters-programs/quantitative-finance/overview/

Course detail

The well-balanced curriculum builds strong quantitative skills combined with a solid knowledge base of the underlying theory of finance. Students acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to use mathematical models to understand complex financial problems.

A special focus lies on using the software 'R', an open source implementation of the language S for data analysis and visualisation. Students benefit from the expertise of the programs' faculty, which is strongly involved in the international development community of R.

Specialize in Science or Industry

The Science Track prepares students for an academic career in the field of finance, while the Industry Track focuses on a career as quants (analysts) in the finance industry, combining financial models with computational skills. You can specialize in the second year of your studies. In both tracks you will benefit from working together with our experienced faculty and from their strong academic networks and links to the finance industry.

A truly international program

The Master Quantitative Finance attracts students from many places around the world which gives you the chance to experience a unique educational culture. The courses of the program have an international orientation and provide all the necessary knowledge and skills to start an international career.

An exclusive, high-quality post-graduate education

Only the best applicants can join the program. An important part is learning in small groups which offers many possibilities to be in contact with and get support from the faculty – both inside and outside the classroom.

Career Prospects

Graduates of the Master Quantitative Finance are qualified to be tomorrow's experts in the increasingly complex world of finance, e.g. in:

- asset management

- credit and market risk management

- treasury and trading

- financial engineering

- research and technical analysis

- corporate finance

Graduates also qualify for a relevant Doctoral or PhD program. Students who want to pursue an academic career are strongly encouraged to choose the Science Track to be well qualified.

How to apply: https://www.wu.ac.at/en/programs/masters-programs/quantitative-finance/application-admission/

Funding

Information on funding can be found at the following webpage: https://www.wu.ac.at/en/students/my-degree-program/masters-student-guide/grants-and-scholarships/

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This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a year (full-time) or two years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing- N/A

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Would you like to expand your knowledge on an environmental topic at masters level -. These are all 15 credit point masters level modules. Read more
Would you like to expand your knowledge on an environmental topic at masters level -

These are all 15 credit point masters level modules.

Short courses running 2016/2017

Principles of GIS - start date 26th September 2016

This module introduces the theory and practice of Geographic Information Systems, and is intended to provide an understanding of the breadth of potential GIS applications and to equip students with key concepts and skills relating to the input, management, manipulation, analysis and output of spatial data. Lecture-based teaching of key concepts is reinforced by linked practical exercises which allow students to develop competence in ESRI’s ArcGIS package. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Remote Sensing - start date 26th September 2016

This postgraduate module offers students the opportunity to study the principles and applications of remote sensing and image analysis and to explore links between remote sensing and GIS. Students are expected to become familiar with theoretical foundations and are allowed to demonstrate technical principles through a series of software-based practical exercises using ERDAS Imagine 2013.

GIS Databases - start date 7th November 2016

This module examines the role of databases within the GI industry. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for database skills that are used in GIS applications. The module is interactive and discussions about a range of spatial issues are incorporated within the lectures. A range of database skills are introduced which equip the student with knowledge of the potential and scope of databases within various applications. Students will be introduced to a range of open source DBMS and GIS software including MySQL, PostgreSQL, PostGIS and Quantum GIS.

GIS in Business & Society- start date 30th January 2017

This module introduces GIS-relevant management and decision making concepts in business and society. The module investigates the various decision-making capabilities of GIS, within management and spatial data analysis. Planning, design, error handling, decision support techniques and advanced spatial analysis are examined within the overall implementation of GIS projects, using lecture material, tutorial discussion and group work to enable students to gain an understanding of the potential value of GIS across a broad range of application areas. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Web-based GIS - start date 13th March 2017

This module examines the role of programming within the GI industry. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for programming skills that can be used to customise and develop applications. The module is interactive and discussions about a range of programming issues are incorporated within the lectures. A range of programming skills is introduced which equip the student with knowledge of the potential and scope of programming within various applications.

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The Sunday Times University Guide 2013 rated Sunderland fourth in the UK for teaching excellence. Read more
The Sunday Times University Guide 2013 rated Sunderland fourth in the UK for teaching excellence.

Course overview

This course develops advanced research skills that will be very valuable whether you aspire to be a chartered psychologist or whether you intend to work in any sector that puts a premium on evidence-based methods of decision-making. These sectors include health, Human Resources and general management.

For those who would like to progress towards becoming a chartered psychologist, this course provides a rigorous preparation for the additional postgraduate research and professional training that are necessary for chartered status.

As part of the course we will teach you advanced quantitative research methods and data analysis techniques. For example you will receive hands-on training in SPSS software, the ‘R’ open source environment, Q-sort and interpretative phenomenological analysis. You will become increasingly creative in solving problems, autonomous in delivering projects and expert in communicating complex topics and outcomes.

A unique feature of our course is the inclusion of two research placements on live research projects within our psychology department. As an example, you might find yourself undertaking an empirical study that involves specialist methods of collecting and analysing psychometric data.

Throughout the course you will receive enthusiastic support from the University’s research-active academic team. Our research areas include social psychology, well-being and evolutionary psychology.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
-Professional Research Skills for Psychologists (30 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Research 1 (30 credits)
-Research Experience (15 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Research 2 (15 credits)
-Advanced Qualitative Research (15 credits)
-Postgraduate Literature Review (15 credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, workshops, postgraduate conferences and one-to-one research supervisions.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. Your modules will be assessed by portfolios which include problem-based research scenarios, individual and group presentations, data exercises, written project reports, project logs and reflective commentaries.

Facilities & location

Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on health studies with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so that you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your studies include:
-SocINDEX with full-text articles – probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database
-Professional Development Collection, which features hundreds of education journals and reports
-Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Database, which includes full-text journal articles on topics spanning emotional and behavioural sciences, psychiatry and psychology
-Lexis Library, which covers UK and international legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Community Care Inform, which helps professionals who work with children and young people to make, and evidence, their decisions

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

At the end of this course you will be able to make a strong application for doctoral programmes that lead to chartered status as a psychologist. There are nine types of psychology in which it is possible to become chartered: clinical, educational, forensic, occupational, counselling, sport & exercise and health psychology, as well as neuropsychology and teaching/researching in psychology. As an example of salaries, clinical psychologists within the NHS typically have a starting salary of around £30,000, progressing up to more than £80,000 for higher level posts. Salaries in private hospitals and private practice will vary.

Equally, the course prepares you for employment in a broad range of sectors. Expertise in research methodology is highly valued in management, advertising, marketing, Human Resources, the police force, the prison service, social care, health services and teaching.

In addition, a Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Through the MA in Creative Arts Practice you will develop your creative identity and engage with digital culture. You will also join a vibrant community of professional artists, designers, musicians and performers. Read more

Course Overview

Through the MA in Creative Arts Practice you will develop your creative identity and engage with digital culture. You will also join a vibrant community of professional artists, designers, musicians and performers. We all work together to develop and diversify our work.

This course is based in Culture Lab, our home for creative digital practice. We are a research community at the forefront of thinking about how creative practice can generate new kinds of knowledge.

You will learn to work flexibly with open source and emerging technologies and create innovative work. In addition, research methods from experimental design will strengthen your practice. You will also engage with theories of digital art, culture and technology.

You will choose your course of study, including: live electronic performance; digital art practice; film making; creative writing; experimental music; creative enterprise.

We're in the heart of the city centre campus. Newcastle has a vibrant art scene, so is a great place to study digital creative arts.

The Newcastle University Institute for Creative Arts Practice aggregates the creative critical mass within a world-class research-intensive University. We'll encourage you to collaborate and create work that has a global significance. We offer a supportive environment where collaborative and interdisciplinary creative projects can thrive.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-arts-practice-ma/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-arts-practice-ma/#howtoapply

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USA. Our teaching is invigorated by work from several interdisciplinary research groups, like the Sheffield Centre for International Drylands Research, the Urban and Regional Policy Research Institute and the Sheffield Institute for International Development. Read more

About the course

USA. Our teaching is invigorated by work from several interdisciplinary research groups, like the Sheffield Centre for International Drylands Research, the Urban and Regional Policy Research Institute and the Sheffield Institute for International Development.

How we teach

Our staff are active researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. That research informs our masters courses. As well as the usual lectures and seminars, there are practicals, lab classes, field trips and research projects.

Facilities and equipment

A new £1m Sediment-Solute Systems lab enables geochemical analysis of aqueous and solid phases, especially in the context of biogeochemistry. We have equipment for chromatography, UV spectrometry and flow injection/auto analysis.

Our sample preparation facilities enable digestion, pre-concentration by evaporation under vacuum, and tangential flow filtration. There are alpha and gamma counters, a laser particle sizer and a luminescence dating lab. Field equipment includes automatic water samplers, weather stations, data loggers and environmental process characterisation sensors.

We have high-quality petrological microscopes for examining geological samples. We have labs for spectrometry and for palaeontological preparation, and you’ll also have access to specialist facilities in other departments at the University.

Laptops, camcorders, tape recorders and transcribers are available for your fieldwork. Our postgraduate computer labs have networked workstations for GIS research and climate modelling, ARC/INFO, ERDAS software and specialist software for remote sensing. GIS facilities are also provided by the £5m Informatics Collaboratory for the Social Sciences.

Our new postgraduate media GIS suite has facilities for Skype, video conferencing, web design, video editing and creative media.

Fieldwork

Most of our courses involve fieldwork. The MPH, MSc and MA International Development take students on a 10-day field trip where they put their research skills into practice. Recent classes visited the West Pokot region of Kenya, urban and rural areas of Nepal, the suburbs of Cairo and India.

Core modules

Quantitative Analysis 1; Applications of GIS; Open Source GIS and Spatial Data Analysis; Research Proposal for Applied GIS; Advanced GIS Methods; The Professional GIS Project.

Examples of optional modules

Quantitative Analysis 2; Urban and Regional Inequalities;Transport Planning; Issues in Housing; Regional Governance.

Teaching and assessment

There are seminars, lectures, workshops and reading groups. You’ll be assessed on your coursework assignments and a dissertation.

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