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The MMedSci Oncology at Keele has been specifically designed to enable an introduction to a research programme whilst offering sustained clinical interaction throughout the course. Read more

Overview

The MMedSci Oncology at Keele has been specifically designed to enable an introduction to a research programme whilst offering sustained clinical interaction throughout the course. Keele University has a strong track record of clinically translational research, enabled by the close interaction of clinical interventionists with world leading academic researchers. This course benefits entirely from this bench-to-bedside ethos and will support like-minded students across this multidisciplinary environment. The course should serve as a platform to develop a medical research career.

As would be expected from such a clinically involved course, much of the teaching takes place at Keele University’s hospital campus located in the Royal Stoke University Hospital, University Hospital of North Midlands (UHNM) Trust. Keele University’s flagship research Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine (ISTM) is integrated with the hospital with the strategically aligned Guy Hilton Research Centre being located directly adjacent to the hospital. Being opened in 2006, this research centre offers patient treatment alongside state-of-the-art equipment and translational research. The centre has enabled research active clinical members to drive cutting-edge research and streamline the pipeline to patient benefit. The Oncology Department located in UHNM provides chemotherapy, radiotherapy, brachytherapy, clinical trials, and lymphoedema and haematology/oncology outpatients to a population of approximately 845,000. It is one of the top ten performing Trusts in the UK for delivering Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). This course offers the opportunity to interact closely with both clinical and research environments, with theoretical, practical and research-centric approaches underpinning the delivery of taught modules, clinical attachments and research projects.

Advances in the management of oncological patients are much needed in our rapidly aging community. New methods are continually being introduced allowing clinicians to better understand and react to patient care in an effort to maximise patient benefit and minimise in-patient time and treatment side effects. The MMedSci Oncology course offers the opportunity to harness the capabilities of cutting edge research to drive new concepts in a clinically transformative capacity.

The course has been awarded 50 CPD credits by the Royal College of Radiologists.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalscienceoncology/

Course Aims

MMedSci Oncology draws together the fundamental principles of current oncological patient management, clinical practice, stem cell and pathology techniques for clinical assessment of tissue and biological samples, with a focus on research-driven work closely related to ‘real world’ clinical practice. Further, transferable skills are delivered through intensive Clinical Audit, Health Informatics, and Leadership & Management modules. The course is open to third year medical students and above, qualified doctors and qualified health professionals with an interest in Oncology.

Course Content

The course is structured to sit within the framework of Keele University’s MMedSci route, with module timescales allowing, if necessary, to be taken full-time within the one year of entry. The structure has been specifically designed to maximise both clinical engagement, support from taught components and research experience. The course is split between non-optional core modules that students must take to progress on the MMedSci Oncology route, with at least 4 of the elective modules as listed below.

Non Optional Core Modules (60 credits + 60 credit dissertation)

- Independent Practice-based Study (30 credits)
- Management of the Oncological Patient (15 credits)
- Experimental Research Methods (15 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Choice of Four Optional Modules (60 credits)
(subject to availability)

- Clinical Audit (15 credits)
- Health Informatics (15 credits)
- Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Ethics and Law (15 credits)
- Statistics and Epidemiology (15 credits)
- Introduction to Medical Imaging (15 credits)
- Cell and Tissue Engineering (15 credits)
- Stem Cells: Types, Characteristics and Applications (15 credits)
- Molecular Techniques: Applications in Tissue Engineering (15 credits)

Teaching & Assessment

All content is delivered from leaders in representative fields, either from academic staff in the University, or from active clinical staff in the National Health Service. Course content will develop students’ fundamental knowledge of the diagnosis and management of oncological patients. An appreciation regarding patient informed consent and establishment/ delivery of clinical trials is also covered alongside Research Methods, accumulating to a 6 month research project. Students will attend clinical seminars, multidisciplinary and mortality meetings within the UHNM Oncology Department to sustain engagement of the clinical delivery of topics taught throughout the course.

Students will be immersed in the clinical environment focussed on oncological management, with an emphasis on research procedures and translation of cutting-edge research into the clinic.

Assessment will be carried out by attending clinics, lectures and meetings, presentation of a patient case report, and a written assignment linked to the research project.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Cancer is a subject which embraces an ever-widening range of disciplines. Read more

Overview

Cancer is a subject which embraces an ever-widening range of disciplines. The degree of Master of Science in Oncology is suitable both for scientists and other graduates who wish to learn more about the science as well as the practice of oncology, and for clinicians together with other health care professionals who require further training in the molecular aspects of oncology.

Course aims

The course aims to:

- provide formal training for basic scientists and clinicians in the theoretical and practical aspects of the causes and treatment of cancer
- through the project and dissertation, familiarise you with the research environment, and enable you to develop the skills necessary to undertake independent research

The MSc Oncology draws on a unique blend of clinical and scientific expertise and experience, and benefits from strong ties that exist between the clinic and laboratory within the Division of Oncology.

Two thirds of the course are taught with the remaining third being a research component. Laboratory research is compulsory for full time students.

Key facts

- The course has been running since 1997, and continues to provide up-to-date knowledge and training to its students.
- The course partly fulfils the syllabus requirements for clinicians studying to sit Part 1 FRCR exams. The syllabus also meets the curriculum requirements for Higher Specialist Training in Medical Oncology set out by the Joint Committee on Higher Medical Training. CME Credits are also available.
- The latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) confirmed The University of Nottingham's position as a world class research-led institution. Over 60 per cent of the University's RAE scores identified research as being of a level of international excellence
- This achievement has helped put Nottingham in the world’s top 75 universities according to The Newsweek World University Rankings
- The research carried out within Oncology is recognised at an international level

Student Opinions

"Overall very interesting and provides a solid background into the development, causes and treatment of cancer. A good stepping stone into further research and provides a good knowledge of cancer and general biology. I personally feel far more confident going into a PhD having done the course."

"Very worthwhile to have more lecture material on cancer and lab/research experience before starting a PhD. I probably wouldn't have got the PhD of my dreams if it wasn't for this course."

"Overall, the MSc in Oncology has been extremely interesting, incorporating many aspects within the field, all of which were relevant to the course from a scientific and clinical point of view."

"Individual lecturers/modules have been fantastic. The staff are enthusiastic, approachable and encourage asking questions. The research project has been very useful in terms of learning techniques and getting the chance to manage your own piece of mini research. The personal tutor system is good for career advice and general support through the course."

"The course is well organised, teaching materials are well provided and useful. Students are taken care of and the hospital visits are excellent."

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Therapeutic radiographers play an important role for cancer patients as they are appropriately trained to plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment while ensuring each patient receives care and support and is treated as an individual. Read more
Therapeutic radiographers play an important role for cancer patients as they are appropriately trained to plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment while ensuring each patient receives care and support and is treated as an individual. This programme has been developed to accelerate graduates into the radiotherapy workforce with the essential technical, communication and caring skills that are required in the NHS or private radiotherapy departments.

Key benefits

This course is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and on successful completion, you can apply to register with them for the protected title of Therapeutic Radiographer.

This course is also accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers (SCoR).

Course detail

We are recognised nationally and internationally as one of the leading education and training centres for Radiotherapy and Oncology, and are proud to have produced the Society and College of Radiographers national student of the year in 2013 (BSc Radiotherapy and Oncology). A recent Radiotherapy MSc graduate also obtained the UWE Santander Master's Bursary for research or work experience. He used the money to gain experience at the Peter Mac RT department in SABR and HEARTSPARE (treatment techniques) in Australia.

Our teaching staff are known for their exceptional knowledge, clinical experience and student support, while our national student survey rank proves our continually high standards when it comes to learning experience and employability.

Our academic team's research-based approach to teaching led to them being chosen to host the inaugural VERT International Users Conference in 2010.

Year 1

In your first year you'll study a range of modules that allow you to build on your existing graduate skills. You will learn the fundamentals of radiotherapy and oncology linking with the relevant anatomy and associated physiology. You will also be introduced to applied physics relating to the radiation and technology in order to receive the underpinning knowledge required for the first clinical placement.

• Principles of Radiotherapy and Oncology (15 credit)
• Science and Technology in Radiotherapy (15 credits)
• Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice (15 credits including Practice Placement 1)
• Research methods in Radiotherapy (15 credits)
• Radiotherapy and Oncology theory and Practice (30 credits including Practice Placement 2)
• Dissertation (45 credits)

Year 2

In your second year, you'll build on the knowledge and skills you learned in Year 1 to explore more complex aspects of Radiotherapy and Oncology practice.

• Communication Skills in Cancer and Palliative Care (15 credits)
• Complex issues in radiotherapy and oncology (30 credits including Placement 3)

Placements

We have excellent industry links in the South West, with placements possible in nine different NHS hospitals from Cheltenham to Truro. You'll take part in three 14-week placements over the two years, where you'll learn on the job while carrying out primary research towards your final dissertation.

Format

Based on our health-focused Glenside campus, this course begins in January and involves classroom-based modules and clinical placements where you gain your clinical competence and undertake research. It's an excellent mix of study and professional experience. The focus is on using your graduate skills to be an independent learner and manage your workload effectively.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods throughout the programme, including written assignments, exams, presentations, interactive online assessment, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and continuous practice assessment in a clinical environment.

The course is assessed according to the University Academic Regulations and Procedures, and we expect full attendance at all times. You must take your professional practice placements in order, and you'll need to pass each placement before being allowed to start the next. There is always at least one external examiner.

Careers / Further study

Students graduating from this course are highly employable, and there are lots of career opportunities and areas for role extension in therapeutic radiography, including planning and dosimetry. Once qualified you will be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professionals Council.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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In the first year, a student should take a minimum of 12 credits of courses. These courses will include the core courses (Oncology 502, 510) and electives. Read more
In the first year, a student should take a minimum of 12 credits of courses. These courses will include the core courses (Oncology 502, 510) and electives. Please note that credit for Oncology 510 will only be given at the end of the student's program of study so cannot be counted as part of the minimum 12 credits required in the first year. The elective courses are decided by the supervisor and the student, based on the student's needs and thesis topic. The elective courses must be approved by the student's Supervisory Committee. Typically, all electives should be courses at the 500 level or above; however, having up to 6 credits of electives at the 300 or 400 level is permissible. As specified in the Faculty of Graduate Studies calendar entry, the minimum requirements are 30 credits of courses numbered 300 or above, including at least 24 credits of courses numbered 500 to 699. These 24 credits include 12 credits of course work, plus a 12 credit thesis (Oncology 549). It is the responsibility of the supervisor and the Supervisory Committee to ensure that the student takes the required number of credits in appropriate courses. The supervisor and committee should also be prepared to assist the student in gaining admission to elective courses that may be blocked to students outside of specific departments.

The Supervisory Committee needs to be formed and the first meeting held within 3 months of starting the program. The names of the Committee and the date of the first meeting along with the Progress Report needs to be sent to the Director and Administrator of the program. The Committee consists of the student's research supervisor plus two other faculty members with appropriate expertise. The composition of the Supervisory Committee must be approved by the Program Director. Please fill out this form and send to Rebecca within three months of starting your program.

Program Overview

The Interdisciplinary Oncology Program offers advanced study and research in a variety of fields relating to oncology. The focus on interdisciplinarity is accomplished through a breadth of coverage in the following disciplines: molecular and cellular biology, genetics, biophysics, bioinformatics, pharmaceutical sciences, radiological sciences, immunology, socio-behavioural studies, and epidemiology. The goal of the Program is to provide graduate students from diverse backgrounds with an education in a number of disciplines relating to oncology, and to provide opportunities for intensive training in specialized aspects of oncology through thesis/dissertation research.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Interdisciplinary Oncology
- Subject: Health and Medicine
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Medicine

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If you are a non-radiotherapy graduate who would like to become a registered therapeutic radiographer, this postgraduate course in radiotherapy and oncology will prepare you to become one. Read more
If you are a non-radiotherapy graduate who would like to become a registered therapeutic radiographer, this postgraduate course in radiotherapy and oncology will prepare you to become one. By graduating from this course, you are allowed to register for this role through the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

By qualifying in this area you are able to respond to the increasing demand for therapeutic radiographers in the health service. Medical, technological and professional advances in radiotherapy mean the role of the therapeutic radiographer is ever changing.

Your on-campus training is based at the £13 million purpose-built Robert Winston Building. Here you use the state-of-the-art virtual environment for radiotherapy training (VERT). It creates a life-size 3D replica of a clinical environment. We also have 20 networked eclipse planning computers and 10 image review licences with specialist staff on hand to teach you radiotherapy planning and image matching. We are one of the only universities outside of the USA that can offer these facilities.

You get real insights into all aspects of radiography with our professionally approved teaching programme. You learn from a lecturing team who are all qualified radiographers involved in research at a national level.

In addition to this expertise, we invite guest lecturers to teach that are leaders in their field. You also meet and hear from ex-patients who share their experiences of treatment.

As part of the course, you gain important clinical experience in one of our nine participating hospitals. This gives you the knowledge, skills and confidence to undertake and develop your professional role.

Clinical placements may be taken in:
-St James' Hospital, Leeds.
-Royal Derby Hospital.
-James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough.
-Leicester Royal Infirmary.
-Lincoln County Hospital.
-The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle.
-Nottingham City Hospital.
-Castle Hill Hospital, Hull.
-Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield.

To begin with, your studies focus on the theoretical knowledge you need for your clinical experience. We encourage you to question and analyse, not simply accept the theory wholesale. You also learn to look at the complete picture from the view of the: patient; healthcare team; associated scientific principles.

You gradually learn to apply theory to practice and tailor treatment to each patient by accurately targeting high dose radiation beams and sparing surrounding normal tissues.

Your studies enable you to develop and adapt your clinical expertise through reflective practice. You learn to analyse and evaluate your experience as you gain and develop new skills and competencies and to look for areas that need changing.

The course is designed in response to recent government initiatives to: modernise healthcare education; increase recruitment into the health service; improve cancer care services.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/pgdip-radiotherapy-and-oncology-in-practice

Radiotherapy open days

Find out more about a radiotherapy career by attending an open day at a radiotherapy department.
-Leicester Royal Infirmary – Thursday 26 November.
-Leeds Radiotherapy Department – Friday 9 and Saturday 10 October.

CPD online

CPD Online, part of our CPD Anywhere™ framework, is being offered free to new graduates of this course for 12 months, as part of our commitment to support your lifelong learning.

CPD Online is an online learning environment which provides information to help your transition into the workplace. It can enhance your employability and provide opportunities to take part in and evidence continuing professional development to help meet professional body and statutory requirements.

For further information, visit the CPD Anywhere™ website at: http://www.shu.ac.uk/faculties/hwb/cpd/anywhere

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the College of Radiographers. This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Graduates are eligible to apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and apply to become members of the Society and College of Radiographers. You must be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in order to practise as a therapeutic radiographer in the UK.

Course structure

Full time – 2 years. Starts September.

Year One modules
-Fundamentals of radiotherapy and oncology
-Radiotherapy and oncology principles 1
-Principles of physics and technology
-Application of radiotherapy and oncology practice
-Competence for practice

Year Two modules
-Radiotherapy and oncology principles 2 and 3
-Imaging, planning treatment and delivery
-Application of radiotherapy and oncology practice 2
-Competence for practice 2

Assessment: individual assignments; personal and professional development portfolio; clinical assessment and appraisal; case studies; formatively assessed learning packages; placement reports; viva.

Other admission requirements

*GCSE maths and English equivalent
-Equivalency test from: http://www.equivalencytesting.co.uk

*GCSE science equivalents
-OCR science level 2
-Science units gained on a level 3 BTEC or OCR National Diploma or Extended Diploma Qualification
-Science credits gained on Access to Higher Education Diplomas (at least 12 credits gained at level 2 or 6 credits gained at level 3)
-Science equivalency test from: http://www.equivalencytesting.co.uk

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This part time, online course covers all aspects of delivering care to patients, including treatment modalities, biological, psychosocial and ethical perspectives. Read more
This part time, online course covers all aspects of delivering care to patients, including treatment modalities, biological, psychosocial and ethical perspectives. Developed and delivered with well-established cancer institutes and oncological and palliative care expertise, you will experience a comprehensive and intellectually stimulating experience wherever you are in the world.

The Oncology for the Pharmaceutical Industry course is designed specifically for professionals working in the pharmaceutical industry or those working in the health and palliative care profession. The course offers an insight into the evolution of drugs used for the treatment of cancer and related illnesses. You will focus on drug research and cutting down costs to find effective medicines to treat cancer.

You will develop detailed knowledge about the interrelationship between oncology and clinical cancer service provision. The course is suitable for those who wish to pursue a career in oncology pharmaceuticals, with a thorough understanding of oncology.

Through the course you will develop clinical leadership, clinical excellence and the ability to cultivate interdisciplinary collaboration in the delivery of evidence based oncology. This includes sharing mutually valuable information to help develop clinical practice. You will be introduced to the basis of research in oncology, preparing you for further research within the field.

We have designed this course in collaboration with the Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR) and it is delivered in association with the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC).

Our students include:
-Doctors
-Nurses
-Pharmacists
-Physiotherapists
-Occupational therapists
-Radiographers
-Senior House Officers and Registrars training for part one of the Fellow of the Royal College of Radiologists (FRCR) examination or in medical oncology

Staff

Newcastle and the North East of England have a tremendous amount of oncological expertise and all our teaching staff are healthcare professionals actively involved in research. This knowledge base provides a comprehensive, intellectually stimulating, and extremely useful educational experience to all students involved in it.

The course is led by Dr Charles Kelly, Deputy Degree Programme Director and Consultant Clinical Oncologist.

Delivery

The course is taught online, so you can choose to study anytime and anywhere. This flexibility means that you can fit your studies around your other commitments, plus learning online will develop your online literacy as a transferable skill.

You will be given an account on Blackboard, our managed learning environment, and an email address. Blackboard is accessible across a variety of operating systems and browsers, check that your equipment is compatible. Our materials and supporting reading are accessible across a variety of devices including desktop computers, tablets and mobile phones.

Online delivery is structured in weekly topics, guiding your learning via tutorials, videos, discussions and formative exercises. The courses are full of interactive exercises and activities, including immediate feedback from automatically scored activities and practices. You can discuss the course, ask questions and get help with problems through the course discussion groups or through emailing your module leader. The networking opportunities of this course give you a multi-disciplinary awareness to your studies.

Your first task will be to complete a short induction module before studying between 10 and 30 credits per semester. You will be assessed in a variety of ways including:
-Multiple choice question exams
-Essays
-Presentations
-Case studies

Each 10 credit module is the equivalent to 100 hours of notional study time, which includes:
-Studying the course materials
-Online networking with fellow students
-Directed reading
-Research
-Interactive and collaborative activities
-Preparing assessments

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Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Approximately 300,000 people develop the disease each year in the UK. Read more
Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Approximately 300,000 people develop the disease each year in the UK.

Understanding the basis of tumourigenesis and developing new therapies are high priority areas for investment, especially since the economic burden of cancer is increasing. The field of oncology encompasses a wide variety of biological and physical sciences.

The MRes in Oncology draws on the wide range of expertise in research and treatment within the Manchester Cancer Research Centre, the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Manchester Institute and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust.

This comprises a unique grouping of basic, translational and clinical scientists of national and international renown.

This concentration of expertise offers high quality teaching on clinical and research aspects of cancer care from practising cancer clinicians and researchers, as well as access to an exceptional wide range of research projects.

Projects can be offered in basic cancer biology, translational areas, and in clinical cancer care and imaging.

This programme has both taught and research components and is suitable for those with little or no previous research experience.

Aims

Our MRes course aims to provide postgraduate level training that will equip you with the specialist knowledge and research skills to pursue a research career in the fields of medical and clinical oncology.

You will gain an understanding of the scientific basis of cancer and its treatments, as well as the skills needed to evaluate the potential efficacy of new treatments.

You will also be able to:
-Gain hands-on research experience
-Work with world-renowned experts
-Use state-of-the-art research equipment
-Publish your work and attend national and international conferences
-Be taught by speakers at the forefront of national and international cancer research
-Undertake laboratory or clinical-based research projects at the Christie Hospital site, the largest cancer centre in Europe with some of the UK's leading cancer researchers
-Enhance your research skills and gain confidence in your research abilities

Special features

This is one of only a handful of MRes Oncology courses that are available in the UK.

As such, it is expected that there will be a high demand for places on this course.

Unlike many other oncology courses, ours has both clinical and research elements, making it suitable for both medical undergraduates and graduates, as well as biomedical science graduates.

Teaching and learning

Our MRes is structured around a 2:1 split between laboratory/clinical-based research projects and taught elements.

Laboratory and clinical research experience is gained through two research placements, one lasting approximately ten weeks (October to December) and the second lasting approximately 25 weeks (January to August).

You may choose to carry out one project for both placements, which most students do, or separate projects for each placement.
Most research placements are based at the Christie site, either within the hospital or the CRUK Manchester Institute. Projects are also available on the Central Manchester University Hospitals site. A list of available projects will be provided to offer holders.

Coursework and assessment

Students are assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and a dissertation.

Read less
This part time, online course covers all aspects of delivering care to patients, including treatment modalities, biological, psychosocial and ethical perspectives. Read more
This part time, online course covers all aspects of delivering care to patients, including treatment modalities, biological, psychosocial and ethical perspectives. Developed and delivered with well-established cancer institutes and oncological and palliative care expertise, you will experience a comprehensive and intellectually stimulating experience wherever you are in the world.

This course is designed to provide those working in oncology and related professional roles with detailed knowledge about the interrelationship between oncology and clinical cancer service provision.

Through the course you will develop clinical leadership, clinical excellence and the ability to cultivate interdisciplinary collaboration in the delivery of evidence based oncology. This includes sharing mutually valuable information to help develop clinical practice. You will be introduced to the basis of research in oncology, preparing you for further research within the field.

We have designed this course in collaboration with the Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR) and it is delivered in association with the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC).

Our students include:
-Doctors
-Nurses
-Pharmacists
-Physiotherapists
-Cccupational therapists
-Radiographers

Senior House Officers and Registrars training for part one of the Fellow of the Royal College of Radiologists (FRCR) examination or in medical oncology.

Staff

Newcastle and the North East of England have a tremendous amount of oncological expertise and all our teaching staff are healthcare professionals actively involved in research. This knowledge base provides a comprehensive, intellectually stimulating, and extremely useful educational experience to all students involved in it.

Read less
If you are a therapeutic radiographer or another healthcare professional working within radiotherapy and oncology, this course offers you the opportunity to progress in your specialism. Read more
If you are a therapeutic radiographer or another healthcare professional working within radiotherapy and oncology, this course offers you the opportunity to progress in your specialism. The modules cover a wide range of topics relevant to this area of clinical practice, allowing you to tailor the course to your own career development needs.

Some of the modules you can take are radiotherapy specific, while others take a wider perspective and look at the interdisciplinary nature of approaches in oncology. All modules are designed to support your continuing professional development and the development of skills needed to plan and evidence this.

Opportunities for both independent study and work-based learning are included as part of the course structure. Both allow you to negotiate learning objectives that can be centred on your own area of interest within the workplace.

You may also be eligible to apply for accreditation of work-based projects and prior certificated learning, which will count towards your final award. Please contact us for more information.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mscpgdippgcert-radiotherapy-and-oncology

Study individual modules

You can study individual modules from this course and gain academic credit towards a qualification. Visit our continuing professional development website for more information: http://www4.shu.ac.uk/faculties/hwb/cpd/modules/

Professional recognition

The course is accredited by the College of Radiographers.

Course structure

Distance learning - 3 years. Starts September and January.

Course structure
The Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits. The Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits. The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

Postgraduate Certificate core modules
-Fundamentals of radiotherapy and oncology practice (15 credits)
-Professional practice portfolio (15 credits)
-Plus a further 30 credits from the optional module list below.

Postgraduate Diploma core modules
-Research methods for practice (15 credits)
-Personalised study module or work based learning for service development modules (15 credits)
-Plus a further 30 credits from the optional module list below.

Masters
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modules
-Technical advances in radiotherapy (15 credits)
-Informed consent in healthcare practice (15 credits)
-Image guided radiotherapy (15 credits)
-Brachytherapy: principles in practice (15 credits)
-Evidencing your CPD (15 credits)
-Prostate cancer (15 credits)
-Breast cancer radiotherapy (15 credits)
-Loss, grief and bereavement (15 credits)
-Advanced planning (30 credits)
-Fundamentals of radiotherapy planning (30 credits)
-Advancing practice in prostate cancer care (30 credits)
-Advanced communication and information in supportive care (30 credits)
-Psychology of cancer care (30 credits)
-Expert practice (30 credits)
-End of life decision making (30 credits)
-Head and neck cancer (15 credits)
-Collaborative working in supportive and palliative care (15 credits)
-Complexities of symptom management (15 credits)

Assessment
We use various assessment methods, supporting the development of both your academic and professional skills.Short online activities are used to promote engagement with the distance learning materials, provide support for the final assignment and facilitate online discussion with fellow peers on the module. Other methods of assessment include: essays; business cases or journal article; project and research work; poster and PowerPoint presentation; case studies; service improvement proposal and plans; critical evaluations; profiles of evidence; planning portfolio.

Other admission requirements

You must also have: access to and the ability to use IT software such as Word and PowerPoint; access to a computer with reliable internet access; confidence in accessing and using web-based materials. We determine you suitability for the course and your ability to complete it through your application, references and CV. You may also have an advisory interview with the course leader or nominated tutor to: ascertain your needs and aspirations; decide on a course of study; give you guidance to prepare for any claims for credit through our accreditation of prior certificated learning (APCL) or accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL) procedures.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Carolyn Staton. Translational oncology is the process by which laboratory research informs the development of new treatments for cancer. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Carolyn Staton

Translational oncology is the process by which laboratory research informs the development of new treatments for cancer. It’s a rapidly advancing field with massive therapeutic and commercial potential.

Our MSc(Res) is taught by leading research scientists and clinicians. The course offers training in the theory and practice of translational oncology and provides you with transferable skills for your future career. It includes a six-month research project for which you’ll work as part of a team within the oncology research community at Sheffield.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cancer; Cancer Epidemiology; Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment; Tumour Microenvironment; Cancer Technologies and Clinical Research; Literature Review; Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by lectures, seminars, class discussions/workshops, interactive tutorials, practical demonstrations, student-led group work and patient encounters.

Alongside the taught modules students attend the Sheffield Cancer Research seminars which include question and answer sessions with the experts, and a series of professional skills development tutorials.

Assessment is by a combination of written seen exams, oral and poster presentations, case studies and written assignments. The research project is assessed by an oral presentation and a written dissertation.

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course will allow individuals to retrain in the area of radiotherapy and oncology. It is not suitable for people already holding a qualification in therapeutic radiography. Read more
This course will allow individuals to retrain in the area of radiotherapy and oncology. It is not suitable for people already holding a qualification in therapeutic radiography.

Students normally complete a PgDip in two years. Some choose to return to progress to an MSc on a part-time basis.

Radiography is a caring profession that calls for technological expertise. Therapeutic radiographers use radiation to give radiotherapy treatment to patients with cancer. If you are considering this career move, it is essential that you have good interpersonal skills as radiographers have to interact with other healthcare professionals as well as with patients and their families, many of whom may need considerable reassurance.

This course will focus on the professional elements required of a therapeutic radiographer. The aim of the course is to further develop the analytical, theoretical and practical skills of an honours graduate so that they can demonstrate the necessary attributes required for a registered therapeutic radiographer. This will enable employment within the UK.

Teaching, learning and assessment

This course uses a wide range of learning and teaching methods, based on a problem-based learning approach with students working independently and collaboratively. The teaching and learning strategies are designed to enable independent progress within a supportive framework.

Clinical work-based learning will be undertaken, on a rotational basis, within regional cancer centres in hospitals in Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Inverness, and your personal performance will be assessed. These placements will take place over May to September. In general, you will be assessed by a variety of methods including case studies, essays and presentations. Normally there are fewer than 15 students on this course, this ensures individuals receive excellent support and guidance.
Joint teaching with other courses is utilised within this course. This allows individuals to benefit from a shared teaching and learning approach where discussion and experiences between students can occur.

Teaching hours and attendance

.
All academic modules will be studied on campus where you will be required to attend classes and carry out independent work. The number of classes on campus along with required independent study will depend on size of the module. Both work based learning modules will be undertaken whilst on clinical placement in any of the five cancer centres in Scotland. In Year One clinical placement runs for 16 weeks May-Aug. In Year Two placement lasts for 20 weeks, May-Sept.

Links with industry/professional bodies

You can become a member of the College of Radiographers as a student and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) on graduation. The course leads to eligibility to register as a therapeutic radiographer with the HCPC.

Modules

15 credits: Preparing for Practice as an Allied Health Professional/ Radiotherapy Science/ Research Methods for Health Professionals

30 credits: Introduction to Cancer and its Management/ Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice One/ Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice 2

10 credits: Introduction to the Human Body / Science and Technology

50 credits: Work-Based learning 1/ Work-Based Learning 2

If progressing to MSc, you will also complete a research project (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates are eligible to apply for registration with the HCPC and to work as therapeutic radiographers with the NHS in the UK. Currently, graduates from QMU have a 100% employment record.

Many graduates have worked abroad. However, although HCPC is recognised in many overseas countries, you may have to apply to the registration body of the country in which you wish to work.

Quick Facts

- A starting salary of £21,176 with excellent opportunity for career progression up to consultant level.
- A professional career in which you are eligible to register within just two years.
- A caring profession that calls for technological expertise in the rapid developing area of cancer treatment.

Read less
Despite the fact that we have improved methods of detection and have developed many novel therapies, cancer is still a major killer worldwide. Read more
Despite the fact that we have improved methods of detection and have developed many novel therapies, cancer is still a major killer worldwide. This course aims to inform and equip the practitioner with the necessary skills to function in a modern biomedical/clinical environment specialising in caring for the cancer patient, and will be relevant to researchers, day-to-day NHS hospital practice and general practice.

Why Study Oncology with us?

You will receive training in the skills required in the reading and interpretation of the literature and translating that into evidence-based practice. The course culminates in the Research Dissertation, which will be assessed through your production of two publishable scientific articles.

The content of the course is mapped to The Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board Speciality Training Curriculum for Medical Oncology.

If biomedical or clinical research is your interest, successful completion of the MSc will allow you to directly register onto PhD study and join our team of researchers at the Institute of Medicine.

What will I learn?

We will discuss mechanistic models of tumour formation and how knowledge of the cell biology can inform the treatment of a cancer. Blood-borne hormones and cytokines can be used as biomarkers of cancer and we will examine the problems associated with some of these measurements. You will evaluate new developments in research into oncology, and carry out a research project.

Seminars and tutorials will be held with various healthcare professionals and clinical researchers. You will also attend cancer clinics in one of our partner hospital trusts.

How will I be taught?

Our course consists of taught modules and a Research Dissertation.

We deliver taught modules as three-day intensive courses to facilitate attendance from students in employment. Weekly support sessions and journal club supplement learning – all held in our modern facilities in Bache Hall.
The total number of contact hours for the whole course are 360 hours, out of a total study time of 1,800 hours.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed via clinical reviews, laboratory reports, posters, oral presentations, or data manipulation exercises.

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This programme aims to provide you with a clear understanding of the scientific basis underlying the principles and practice of clinical oncology and the development, evaluation and implementation of new treatments. Read more
This programme aims to provide you with a clear understanding of the scientific basis underlying the principles and practice of clinical oncology and the development, evaluation and implementation of new treatments.

This will be underpinned by a thorough knowledge of cancer biology and pathology, drug development and research methodologies.

This knowledge will provide you with a good grounding in oncology within a clinical setting which will enhance prospects for those wanting to pursue a clinical academic career.

Compulsory Modules

• Ablative Therapies
• Cancer Biology
• Cancer Pharmacology
• Cancer Prevention & Screening
• Drug Development
• Genomic Approaches to Human Diseases
• Imaging
• Paediatric & Adolescent Oncology
• Pathology of Cancer
• Research Methods
• Site Specific Tumour Treatment

Elective Modules

• Biological Therapies
• Molecular Targeted Therapies and Immunotherapy for Blood Cancer

Core Module for MSc

• Dissertation

Barts Cancer Institute is a Cancer Research UK Centre of Excellence and one of the leading cancer institutes in the country.
Based in the heart of London, all our programmes are taught by experts in the field.

To find out more about BCI visit http://www.bci.qmul.ac.uk/study-with-us

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For health care professionals from diverse backgrounds who wish to expand their knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects of oncology, including. Read more
For health care professionals from diverse backgrounds who wish to expand their knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects of oncology, including:

medical and clinical oncology SpRs
nurses
pharmacists
radiographers
vets
clinical trial co-ordinators
dieticians

A full-time programme is also available.

This programme aims to give you a scientific understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of cancer, its epidemiology and pathology, and to place this in a clinical context. You will then address how this knowledge effects therapeutic approaches and disease management.

It aims to allow you to understand the research process by drawing on examples within the department and its associated clinical trials unit. A key part of this Masters programme is the planning, execution and reporting of a piece of independent study leading to submission of a dissertation.

At all levels we aim to encourage interactive rather than didactic learning and lecturing. Therefore, in addition to assembling and learning facts you will also to consider some of the philosophical challenges which underlie the treatment of cancer.

The programme is studied part time over 2 years and includes a taught element plus a work place based dissertation. This is made up of 4 residential taught modules per year (8 in total). Taught modules consist of one or two 5 day blocks Monday to Friday approximately 9am - 5.30pm. The total taught element consists of 45-55 days of attendance over the whole programme depending on your choice of optional modules.

You can opt for a Postgraduate Diploma on completion of the core modules and 40 credits of optional modules, or an MSc on successful completion of the taught programme and an independently researched dissertation.

About the College of Medical and Dental Sciences

The College of Medical and Dental Sciences is a major international centre for research and education, make huge strides in finding solutions to major health problems including ageing, cancer, cardiovascular, dental, endocrine, inflammatory diseases, infection (including antibiotic resistance), rare diseases and trauma.
We tackle global healthcare problems through excellence in basic and clinical science, and improve human health by delivering tangible real-life benefits in the fight against acute and chronic disease.
Situated in the largest healthcare region in the country, with access to one of the largest and most diverse populations in Europe, we are positioned to address major global issues and diseases affecting today’s society through our eight specialist research institutes.
With over 1,000 academic staff and around £60 million of new research funding per year, the College of Medical and Dental Sciences is dedicated to performing world-leading research.
We care about our research and teaching and are committed to developing outstanding scientists and healthcare professionals of the future. We offer our postgraduate community a unique learning experience taught by academics who lead the way in research in their field.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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