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This distance learning LLM is designed to provide you with specialist knowledge of key areas of law relevant to international business. Read more
This distance learning LLM is designed to provide you with specialist knowledge of key areas of law relevant to international business.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for those looking to develop a career in international business or law. Applicants to the course are likely to be recent graduates seeking to improve career prospects in international business and law or professionals working in international business, finance or international business law seeking to develop their expertise. As the emphasis of the programme is on the practical and problem solving aspects of the law, it will also help those who may not possess a legal background.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their advanced legal studies by enrolling on the PhD or MPhil programmes offered by The City Law School.

The nature of the LLM as a distance learning programme means there is no requirement to enter the UK, so you do not require a visa if you are an overseas student.

Objectives

The programme is designed with one aim in mind: flexibility. As the programme is delivered online, students have the freedom to study in their own working environment and at their individual pace. Technology-enhanced learning environments support the student experience and students also have access to City's extensive range of legal databases, including e-journals and e-books.

This flexible, part-time LLM is designed to provide you with specialist knowledge and help to broaden your existing knowledge of the legal rules which impact on international business. You will acquire legal and research skills to help enhance your career prospects as an international business professional or legal practitioner.

On successful completion of the LLM International Business Law by distance learning, you will have gained specialist knowledge in the key areas of law from an international business perspective and will have acquired transferable skills essential to understanding and succeeding in international business.

Academic facilities

The LLM International Business Law is delivered entirely online via distance learning via City's virtual learning environment Moodle. All resources used on the programme are available online via Moodle and the Library. You are welcome to connect with your module leaders via email or arrange appointments to speak on Skype or meet in person if you are in London.

As a distance learning student you have access to the facilities, including the libraries, dedicated law libraries and Student Centre at City. You are also welcome to attend public events/lectures and use the on-campus facilities if you are in London.

Scholarships

New students will be invited to apply for a scholarship which will be awarded at the start of the programme and applied to the cost of the first module. Decisions will be made on the basis of applicants' academic merit, financial need and 250-words statement.

Prizes

Progressing students (on progression from the first module, Foundations of Law in International Business, to the elective stage) will be eligible for excellence awards. Excellence awards will be applied to the cost of the second module. Decisions will be made on the basis of the students' top performance on the Foundations module.

Teaching and learning

The programme provides you with interactive learning opportunities, combining a range of learning technologies. Whilst it is in essence a self-directed study course, there is also an emphasis on interactive engagement, using learning activities such as discussion forums and chat rooms to help you extend your learning and work collaboratively with your colleagues.

Learning will be facilitated by:
-Virtual learning environment (VLE) as e-learning platform
-High quality module learning packs written by our experts and available online
-Online academic support and personal tutoring (e.g. via email or webchats)
-Interactive multimedia content
-Virtual classroom environment (e.g. via discussion boards or Adobe Connect)
-24-hour IT support
-Online access to our extensive library resource database.

Each module is facilitated by an e-tutor who will offer academic and technical support as required. To enrol on the programme, you are required to have easy access to a computer or laptop that has a minimum technical specification and good internet access. We will provide you with an email account and secure access to your virtual learning environment. You are expected to regularly submit work online and engage in online activities.

Assessment

On a weekly basis, you will receive feedback via the discussion board per each discussion thread. The Learning Packs will contain self-assessment questions, and tutors will provide formative feedback on your responses to these questions. Participation on taught modules is a pre-requisite for sitting the final assessment. Participation is mandatory and is therefore assessed as a pass/fail summative assessment. The activity requiring participation may vary from module to module, however, a standard will be maintained across all modules. For instance, if a module requires participation vis-à-vis posting messages/responses on a module discussion board and there are eight weekly opportunities to do so, you will be required to submit four posts (50%) for assessment. Each post must be sufficient in length (i.e. approximately 500 words). You are expected to participate in all online activities.

Summative assessment of the taught modules that comprise the degree will be by coursework only (3,500 words). It is considered that you will obtain the greatest academic benefit and satisfaction from researching a topic, reflecting on it and providing considered arguments in relation to it, as well as affording the opportunity to explore particular topics in greater depth. All coursework must be submitted via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Email submissions will not be accepted.

You will be offered a range of assessment titles in each subject. Additional titles may be added to reflect any developments in the subject occurring during the teaching of the module, enabling you to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary issues and to respond to the most up-to-date information available.

Modules

The distance learning LLM in International Business Law programme consists of taught modules of 150 credits (five modules at 30 credits each) and a compulsory Dissertation module of 30 credits.

In the first academic term, all students are required to take the Core module, Foundations of Law in International Business (30 credits). Upon successful completion of the Core module, you will select any further four taught modules from the range of available subjects. Students are free to take one or two modules each academic term.

All modules run over a period of 10 weeks (10 units). Each module requires approximately 300 hours of study and students will normally spend between 25 and 30 hours a week on each module, comprised mainly of self-directed and on-line hours. Typically, once all taught modules have been successfully completed, students proceed to the Dissertation (30 credits).

Elective modules - the elective modules will draw from a variety of sources of law, including laws from different systems of law (European Union Law, international law and the English common law) to make your learning experience more rewarding. The programme will take an internationalist and comparative legal approach wherever appropriate, an approach that is more enriching for professionals who work in a global environment. This distinguishes The City Law School distance learning LLM from most other LLMs offered by UK universities. The elective modules (30 credits each) currently offered on the LLM International Business Law include:
-Dispute resolution in international commerce
-E-commerce law
-International corporation law
-International investment law
-Law of international trade
-Legal aspects of international finance
-Privacy and data protection laws
-Regulation of information technology and intellectual property

Dissertation - the requirement to complete a 10,000-word Dissertation reflects the assumption, and the concerns of employers, that an LLM graduate should display a high standard of competence in research and a capacity for original thought. Dissertation supervision will be undertaken by internal members of staff and visiting lecturers ensuring that expert guidance is available to all. Where it is appropriate for a student to be supervised by a visiting lecturer, because of the subject area of the dissertation, the student should ensure that they have agreed in advance methods of communication including the mode and frequency of contact.

Career prospects

By the end of the programme, you will not only have gained specialist knowledge in key areas of law from an international business perspective but will have also acquired transferable skills essential to understanding, and succeeding in, the world of International Business Law. With this sound basis, you will be well placed for developing a career in international business or law.

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In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. Read more
In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. HR specialists help organisations achieve success by providing knowledge, expertise and insight into a wide range of HRM activities from talent resourcing and selection, performance management, learning and development, change management and employee engagement. HR can be an exciting, rewarding and challenging career that can take you anywhere in the world.

If you are seeking roles within HR, you may find that employers require a qualification that leads to membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). This programme is accredited by the CIPD and has been specifically designed to meet the needs of HR professionals wishing to further their career and progress into senior roles.

If you have some experience within the working environment and want to develop your HRM knowledge or have completed an HRM (or related) degree, find out more about the opportunities on offer through the PG Diploma in Human Resource Management.

CIPD Membership

The CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development) is the professional body for HR and people development which aims to champion better work and better working lives. As a HRM student you will become part of this professional body and on completion of the programme will be able to upgrade your status to a chartered member of the CIPD

All students are required to enrol as CIPD student members and to remain in membership throughout the duration of the programme.

Subscription fee is payable direct to CIPD and excluded from the course fee. For more information on the fees please refer to the CIPD Website: http://www.cipd.co.uk/

Students will be encouraged to join, support and participate in local CIPD branch activities. These are the Northampton and Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire groups. Although you will, officially, be a member of only one CIPD group, you are welcome to attend any of the group meetings some of which will be delivered by Northants branch as part of the programme.

For more information on the local branch see the Northampton (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/midlands-area-partnership/northamptonshire/default.aspx) or Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/bedfordshire-milton-keynes/) websites.

Course content

The aim of this course is to develop you as an HR professional. You will be introduced to specialised knowledge and research evidence giving you an in depth understanding of successful people management in organisations. Perhaps more importantly, you will practice the tools and techniques of strategic and operational HRM giving you practical, insight-driven experience which will help further your career.

The modules on this course are designed to provide you with expert knowledge of distinct HR subject areas together with exposure to contemporary debates, policies and practices, keeping you at the forefront of developments in your field.

You will develop an understanding of HRM within a range of organisational contexts, and you will be equipped with the analytical and diagnostic skills required of HR professionals.

In addition to the modules making up this course you will attend a two day off-site residential at the end of the taught programme focusing specifically on skills development activities. Attendance at the residential is a course requirement and the cost is included in the course fees.

Methods of Learning

The learning and teaching style on this course is designed to enable you to take responsibility for your own learning and skills development within a caring environment facilitated by high quality academic support from tutors. You will be introduced to much of the core course content through activities that can be undertaken in your own time, off campus. These will usually be facilitated through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment – a web-based portal where you will be able to participate in learning activities, on-line discussions, reading and reflection. During on-campus sessions, the emphasis will be on participative and interactive activities designed to consolidate and develop your understanding through debate, discussion, role-play and participation in events such as guest speakers and a mock employment tribunal.

The course uses a carefully balanced combination of in-course assignments designed to enrich your learning which include business projects, reflective activities, group work presentation and examinations.

This course usually has a diverse student group and this diversity provides a rich basis for sharing of different experiences and thinking on organisational and people issues. Peer networking and action learning sets will be facilitated and encouraged to maximise the learning to be gained from different student experiences.

The course is only offered part-time. In Year 1 students will take two modules in Semester 1 and one module in Semester 2. In Year 2 students will take two modules in Semester 1 and two short modules in Semester 2.

Each module will require you to attend a three hour workshop per week. Class sessions would normally be on one day per week (pm).

To maximise chances of success on this course, we recommend students spend approximately 12 hours a week per module in self-directed study time to prepare for the sessions and complete assignments.

Schedule

Year One
Semester 1
HRM in Context – You will explore HRM in a business context to develop your understanding of the increasingly complex environments HR must work within both inside and external to organisations. This module allows learners to develop analysis skills to facilitate informed choices on which strategies may be most and least appropriate.

Investigating a Business Issue – You will diagnose and investigate a live business issue from a HR perspective, locate the issue within the body of contemporary knowledge, collect and analyse data, derive supportable conclusions and make practical and actionable recommendations for change and enhancement of current practice.

Semester 2
Leading Managing and Developing People – You will analyse key factors in leading, managing and developing people for organisational success. Every organisation is made up of individuals whose behaviour, individually or collectively will impact on its ability to succeed. Organisational performance can be enhanced and competitive advantage increased through the strategic management, leadership and development of people. This module enables you to gain an in-depth knowledge of HRM and HRD and to explore major themes from the growing literature and research in this subject area.

At the end of your first year of studies, once teaching is over, there will be a two-day skills development workshop that will explore the skills required to be an effective HR leader. This is a great chance to consolidate your learning from Year 1 in a relaxed and informal setting with your classmates and tutors. The workshop is an essential and required part of the course.

Year Two
Semester 1
Resourcing and Talent Management – You will evaluate strategies for resourcing and managing talent within the organisation. There is a focus on activities concerned with resourcing the organisation; the practical aspects of recruitment, selection, employee retention and dismissal, and also on the strategic aspects of planning an organisation’s long and short term human resource requirements. This requires analysis of external labour markets and considerations of flexibility, as well as consideration of how internal labour markets may be made more productive and effective.

Performance Management – You will investigate the management of employee performance within the organisation, exploring the evidence that people are a major source of competitive advantage and the challenge of how best to develop and manage people to maximize their performance. You will assess the major systems for enhancing the performance of employees at all levels and advise organisations on the most appropriate methods for managing performance.

Semester 2
Learning and Talent Development – You will develop a critical understanding of the role and influence of a range of contextual factors associated with the design, delivery and evaluation of learning and development in a variety of organisational contexts. You will also explore and evaluate the contribution of learning and talent development strategies and practices in meeting the aspirations, ambitions and objectives of the organization and the individual. This is a seven week module.

Employment Relations – You will develop and reflect upon your knowledge and understanding of Employment Relations from a number of different perspectives. The holistic significance of employment relations within an organisation is emphasised together with the importance of aligning HR policies with business strategy, change processes, employee voice and involvement practices. Good employee relations are important for an organisation’s success in the achievement of its business objectives and for gaining employee commitment to those objectives. Increasing legislation in this area has also brought pressure to develop appropriate managerial strategies to ensure employee commitment to organisational success. This is a seven week module.

At the end of teaching you will undertake a two day residential course that will explore how to put all the skills from the course into developing good HR practices.

Assessments

Assessment will be undertaken by a range of methods including written assignments, business reports, projects, reflective activities, group work, presentations and examinations.

Facilities and Special Features

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), Europe’s largest professional body supporting and developing those responsible for the management and development of people within organisations. The PG Diploma HRM reflects and incorporates CIPD knowledge and competence requirements. Completing the PG Diploma HRM will provide you with the underpinning knowledge required for Chartered CIPD membership. If you have the relevant experience you can then apply for full membership based on your workplace activities and behaviours through the CIPD.

On successful completion of the PG Diploma in HRM, students are eligible to continue their studies on the MA HRM (top-up).

Careers

The PG Diploma HRM opens the way for a career in HRM/HRD. The programme provides opportunities for individuals to develop enhanced, specialist, higher level knowledge, skills and leadership capabilities and equips students with enhanced career pathways in the HRM/HRD field within different organisational contexts.

Read less
In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. Read more
In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. HR specialists help organisations achieve success by providing knowledge, expertise and insight into a wide range of HRM activities from talent resourcing and selection, performance management, learning and development, change management and employee engagement. HR can be an exciting, rewarding and challenging career that can take you anywhere in the world.

If you are seeking roles within HR, you may find that employers require a qualification that leads to membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). This programme is accredited by the CIPD and has been specifically designed to meet the needs of HR professionals wishing to further their career and progress into senior roles.

If you have some experience within the working environment and want to develop your HRM knowledge or have completed an HRM (or related) degree, find out more about the opportunities on offer through the MA in Human Resource Management.

CIPD Membership

The CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development) is the professional body for HR and people development which aims to champion better work and better working lives. As a HRM student you will become part of this professional body and on completion of the programme will be able to upgrade your status to a chartered member of the CIPD.

All students are required to enrol as CIPD student members and to remain in membership throughout the duration of the programme.

Subscription fee is payable direct to CIPD and excluded from the course fee. For more information on the fees please refer to the CIPD Website: http://www.cipd.co.uk/

Students will be encouraged to join, support and participate in local CIPD branch activities. These are the Northampton and Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire groups. Although you will, officially, be a member of only one CIPD group, you are welcome to attend any of the group meetings some of which will be delivered by Northants branch as part of the programme.

For more information on the local branch see the Northampton (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/midlands-area-partnership/northamptonshire/default.aspx) or Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/bedfordshire-milton-keynes/) websites.

Course content

The aim of this course is to develop you as an HR professional. You will be introduced to specialised knowledge and research evidence giving you an in depth understanding of successful people management in organisations. Perhaps more importantly, you will practice the tools and techniques of strategic and operational HRM giving you practical, insight-driven experience which will help further your career.

The modules on this course are designed to provide you with expert knowledge of distinct HR subject areas together with exposure to contemporary debates, policies and practices, keeping you at the forefront of developments in your field.

You will develop an understanding of HRM within a range of organisational contexts, and you will be equipped with the analytical and diagnostic skills required of HR professionals.

In addition to the modules making up this course you will attend a two day off-site residential at the end of the taught programme focusing specifically on skills development activities. Attendance at the residential is a course requirement and the cost is included in the course fees.

Semester 1

HRM in Context – You will explore HRM in a business context to develop your understanding of the increasingly complex environments HR must work within both inside and external to organisations. This module allows learners to develop analysis skills to facilitate informed choices on which strategies may be most and least appropriate.

Investigating a Business Issue – You will diagnose and investigate a live business issue from a HR perspective, locate the issue within the body of contemporary knowledge, collect and analyse data, derive supportable conclusions and make practical and actionable recommendations for change and enhancement of current practice.

Resourcing and Talent Management – You will evaluate strategies for resourcing and managing talent within the organisation. There is a focus on activities concerned with resourcing the organisation; the practical aspects of recruitment, selection, employee retention and dismissal, and also on the strategic aspects of planning an organisation’s long and short term human resource requirements. This requires analysis of external labour markets and considerations of flexibility, as well as consideration of how internal labour markets may be made more productive and effective.

Performance Management – You will investigate the management of employee performance within the organisation, exploring the evidence that people are a major source of competitive advantage and the challenge of how best to develop and manage people to maximize their performance. You will assess the major systems for enhancing the performance of employees at all levels and advise organisations on the most appropriate methods for managing performance.

Semester 2

Leading Managing and Developing People – You will analyse key factors in leading, managing and developing people for organisational success. Every organisation is made up of individuals whose behaviour, individually or collectively will impact on its ability to succeed. Organisational performance can be enhanced and competitive advantage increased through the strategic management, leadership and development of people. This module enables you to gain an in-depth knowledge of HRM and HRD and to explore major themes from the growing literature and research in this subject area.

Learning and Talent Development – You will develop a critical understanding of the role and influence of a range of contextual factors associated with the design, delivery and evaluation of learning and development in a variety of organisational contexts. You will also explore and evaluate the contribution of learning and talent development strategies and practices in meeting the aspirations, ambitions and objectives of the organization and the individual. This is a seven week module.

Employment Relations – You will develop and reflect upon your knowledge and understanding of Employment Relations from a number of different perspectives. The holistic significance of employment relations within an organisation is emphasised together with the importance of aligning HR policies with business strategy, change processes, employee voice and involvement practices. Good employee relations are important for an organisation’s success in the achievement of its business objectives and for gaining employee commitment to those objectives. Increasing legislation in this area has also brought pressure to develop appropriate managerial strategies to ensure employee commitment to organisational success. This is a seven week module.

Semester 3

Research Methods and Dissertation – In this semester you will work on completing a 16,000 word dissertation. You will undertake this as self-study and you will be allocated a supervisor who will guide and support you through this process. Meetings with your supervisor are not compulsory but are strongly recommended.

At the end of teaching you will undertake a two day residential course that will explore how to put all the skills from the course into developing good HR practices.

Course modules (16/17)

-HRM in Context
-Leading, Managing and Developing People
-Investigating a Business Issue
-Performance Management
-Dissertation and Research Methods
-Resourcing and Talent Management
-Learning and Talent Development
-Employment Relations

Methods of Learning

The learning and teaching style on this course is designed to enable you to take responsibility for your own learning and skills development within a caring environment facilitated by high quality academic support from tutors. You will be introduced to much of the core course content through activities that can be undertaken in your own time, off campus. These will usually be facilitated through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment – a web-based portal where you will be able to participate in learning activities, on-line discussions, reading and reflection. During on-campus sessions, the emphasis will be on participative and interactive activities designed to consolidate and develop your understanding through debate, discussion, role-play and participation in events such as guest speakers and a mock employment tribunal.

The course uses a carefully balanced combination of in-course assignments designed to enrich your learning which include business projects, reflective activities, group work presentation, examinations and a substantial research dissertation

This course usually has a diverse student group and this diversity provides a rich basis for sharing of different experiences and thinking on organisational and people issues. Peer networking and action learning sets will be facilitated and encouraged to maximise the learning to be gained from different student experiences.

Full-time students will take four modules in both Semester 1 and 2, part-time students will take two modules in both Semester 1 and 2.

Each module will require you to attend a three hour workshop per week.

For full-time students, taught sessions will normally be delivered over two days each week. For part-time students, it would normally be one day per week.

To maximise chances of success on this course, we recommend students spend approximately 12 hours a week per module in self-directed study time to prepare for the sessions and complete assignments.

Assessments

Assessment will be undertaken by a range of methods including written assignments, business reports, projects, reflective activities, group work, presentations and examinations.

The 16,000 word Dissertation is a major component of this course and allows students to demonstrate a range of knowledge, skills and insight in their chosen topic area.

Facilities and Special Features

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), Europe’s largest professional body supporting and developing those responsible for the management and development of people within organisations. The MA HRM reflects and incorporates CIPD knowledge and competence requirements. Completing the MA HRM will provide you with the underpinning knowledge required for Chartered CIPD membership. If you have the relevant experience you can then apply for full membership based on your workplace activities and behaviours through the CIPD.

Careers

The MA HRM opens the way for a career in HRM/HRD. The programme provides opportunities for individuals to develop enhanced, specialist, higher level knowledge, skills and leadership capabilities and equips students with enhanced career pathways in the HRM/HRD field within different organisational contexts.

Read less
This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. Read more

Overview

This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice. The emphasis is on stroke care, but also covers areas such as an understanding of Medical Education, Leadership for Health Professionals, Clinical Effectiveness and Research Methodology.

Each module consists of a mixture of different types of delivery, with some on line learning and face to face teaching, utilising a mixture of seminars, group work or short lectures.

There are a number of CORE modules and then a wide range of other generic modules that are optional. We have designed the award to be as flexible as possible, including enabling students to study some modules from other Keele awards.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalsciencestroke/

Course Content

Each module is given a credit rating within the national Masters framework. These may be transferable from or to other institutions where the learning outcomes are comparable.
Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Science: 60 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Science: 120 credits
Masters in Medical Science: 180 credits
(The Masters Degree must be completed within five years of registration, the Diploma within four years and the Certificate within three years. It will be possible to complete a Masters Degree in Medical Science in two years.)

Core Modules :

Acute and Hyperacute Stroke (15 credits)
Acute stroke care is a rapidly changing field with new investigations and treatments emerging. This module will address acute stoke unit care, thrombolysis, advanced imaging (e.g. CT angiography, perfusion/diffusion imaging, MRI, transcranial Doppler) and interventional treatments (e.g. intra-arterial thrombolysis and thrombectomy) and integration of clinical practice with research. It aims to respond to the need for healthcare professionals who can rise to the challenge of rapid changes in stroke care. This module will provide technical updating and personal development for those involved in front line stroke services by using small group teaching, on-line exams and practice in audit to enhance service delivery.

Community Stroke: Prevention and Life after Stroke (15 credits)
The NHS of the future will need creative, imaginative healthcare professionals who can rise to the challenge of service redesign and improvement. This module, through a reflective portfolio of cases will enable students to develop as critical thinkers and use those skills to develop project proposals for changes to practice. Employers will see their staff develop the skills to research, argue for and develop projects that they can see will make a difference in the areas of stroke prevention and life after stroke. Students will learn the skills to turn their ideas into practice.

Stroke Service Development and Improvement (15 credits)
Mortality of stoke has significantly reduced over the last 10 years, and fewer patients remain dependent with changes in service delivery and improved care. This module further develops the ability of participants to become leaders and change managers in the field of stroke service provision. Building on the module Community Stroke: Prevention and Life After Stroke (which is a pre-requisite) those closest to the needs of patients will have the chance to implement their ideas for how services need to change. The key output of the module will be a result of a pilot developed, implemented and evaluated by the student.

Stroke Research (15 credits)
Research has led to great improvement in stroke care over the last decade. Through the infrastructure of stroke research networks more patients and staff are actively involved in the delivery of stroke research. This module has been designed to build on this experience of research and to enable participants to mover form delivering research to developing their own ideas into research projects. The development of an idea into a research protocol, user involvement, networking with professional bodies and other service providers, and becoming familiar with the grant application process will be covered. Students will meet experienced researchers, undertake private study and also receive feedback in small groups about their research ideas from peers and the module leader.

Optional Modules:

Concepts of Neurological Rehabilitation (15 credits)
Assistive Technologies in Neuromuscular Rehabilitation (15 credits)
Research Methods (15 credits)
Leadership and Management for Healthcare Professionals (15 credits)
Clinical Effectiveness (15 credits)
Contemporary Challenges in Healthcare Ethics and Law (15 credits)
Statistics and Epidemiology (15 credits)
Strategic Management of Patients with Long Term Conditions (15 credits).
The Interface between Primary and Secondary Care (15 credits)
Literature searching and synthesis (15 credits)

Dissertation:
The award of an MMedSci (Stroke) follows successful completion of the taught modules which make up the Diploma in Medical Science and submission of a further 60 credits worth of learning. This latter may be a research dissertation on a subject related to the individual’s specialty, in which case candidates will also be expected to have completed the Research Methods, Literature Searching and Synthesis, or the Statistics and Epidemiology modules depending on the type of research. A practice based project is another possibility, such as evaluation of changes implemented in a clinical setting, educational projects, or exploration of ethical dilemmas in policy and/or practice. It is expected to be a significant piece of work, and we encourage all students to consider aiming for publication of their findings. All candidates will be expected to have a local clinical supervisor for their project and educational supervision will continue to be provided by the award team. Previous experience has shown us that this is an extremely popular component of the Degree. Candidates have often published or presented their dissertation at Regional and National meetings.

Teaching & Assessment

Each module consists of a mixture of different types of delivery, with some on line learning and face to face teaching, utilising a mixture of seminars, group work or short lectures.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

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This programme challenges the assumptions behind the media and development industries and development studies, and offers new ways of thinking about the issues. Read more
This programme challenges the assumptions behind the media and development industries and development studies, and offers new ways of thinking about the issues. The approach balances critical theoretical analysis of the hegemony implied by the ideas and practices of development with the practical issues surrounding the use of contemporary media, including notably digital technologies.

It draws on media theory, practical knowledge and experience, alongside critical debates within and about development, to challenge assumptions about the role of media and development industries. Students combine critical theoretical analysis of the role of media in development with a focus on practical issues surrounding the use of media, including digital technologies.

The programme differs from other degrees in the field by placing the onus on the role of media to further the Development agenda, especially post the Second World War. Students benefit from the unique position of the Centre for Media Studies as a specialist institution for the study of media in the global south.

It is designed for those with an interest in global media and development, including media and development professionals seeking alternative ways of thinking about their roles. It provides an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/media-studies/ma-media-and-development/

Teaching & Learning

- Learning Outcomes

Knowledge:

1. How to assess data and evidence critically from texts, manuscripts, audio and video sources, both analog and digital, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, develop skills in critical judgements of complex source materials, locate materials in print and on line, use research resources (particularly research library catalogues and websites) and other relevant traditional and electronic sources.

2. Knowledge and understanding of the dynamics and debates about the role of media and Information Communication Technologies in the development process: to be able to critically examine the discourses of development, the roles of national and international organizations, NGOs, citizens in defining and producing development and the emergence of critical and alternative paradigms for sustainable societies; to be aware of the key theoretical issues surrounding the role of media and Information Communication Technologies in development processes; to be able to analytically disaggregate economic, political, social and cultural strands of development and the nature of mediated practices within each; develop awareness of emergent models of sustainable development in which contemporary media practices play a key role; analyze the role of the media in hegemonic representations of social change and development.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

1. To be critical and precise in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents and electronic sources can and cannot tell us. Such skills should improve and be refined throughout the programme.

2. Question theories and interpretations, however authoritative, and critically reassess evidence for themselves. Students will learn how to question and challenge the accepted tenets both of development and media as the means of transmission of messages. These skills should improve and be refined throughout the programme.

3. Critically interrogate situated empirical examples of specific media and Information Communication Technologies practices in development contexts in Asia, Africa, Middle East

Subject-based practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing

2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of conventional and electronic sources

3. Communicate orally to a group. Listen and discuss ideas introduced during seminars and classes.

4. Practise research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.

5. Have developed some new competencies in digital media production and dissemination

Transferable skills:

1. Write good essays and dissertations

2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing

3. Understand unconventional ideas

4. Study a variety of written and digital materials, in libraries, on line and research libraries of a kind they will not have used as undergraduates.

5. Present material orally to a group.

6. Have developed a range of on-line competencies

Employment

As well as academic expertise, MA Media in Development graduates from SOAS gain a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include; written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. This postgraduate degree provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This is a two year Part-Time Distance Learning PGCE Programme with a focus on the 3-7 year group. Read more
This is a two year Part-Time Distance Learning PGCE Programme with a focus on the 3-7 year group.

Northumbria University is a centre of excellence for initial teacher education, this innovative high quality distance learning Early Primary course has been specifically developed to provide a route for students wishing to achieve a PGCE in Early Primary Education with Qualified Teacher Status. It has been especially designed to facilitate students who prefer both a school based and distance based route into teaching and require a longer trajectory of study due to work and life commitments. Students complete the programme in two years.

In addition to this students are also given the opportunity to develop a subject specialism as part of their study.

This Early Primary (Blended) course is divided into two parts. Both Part 1 and Part 2 consist of: on line study with directed tasks to be completed in an experience school, module assignments and an assessed teaching placement. This is supported by two university weekends and occasional study days. ICT confidence and access to a personal computer with a broadband internet facility are essential requirements

The Early Primary course is designed to support students towards achieving the Standards for QTS.

All primary education programmes at Northumbria are category A (The highest possible category) from OFSTED.

PGCE EYP Blended students gain an in depth knowledge and understanding of the Early Primary National Curriculum with particular focus on the 3-7 range, whilst obtaining a broad range of experiences. Students will be expected to demonstrate their ability to work independently as a self-motivated distance learner with support from their curriculum and professional tutors on line.

This is a route for designed for highly motivated people, from all walks of life. It enables them to have the opportunity to enter a hugely rewarding profession. In following this route you will receive an excellent introduction to the teaching profession.

Module Overview
Year One
TE6684 - Curriculum, Creativity & Challenge (NC, 30 Credits)
TE6685 - Primary Professional Practice (NC, 30 Credits)
TE7059 - Professionalism & Inclusive Practice (NC, 30 Credits)

Year Two
TE6685 - Primary Professional Practice (NC, 30 Credits)
TE7059 - Professionalism & Inclusive Practice (NC, 30 Credits)
TE7060 - Learning, Teaching & Assessment in the Core Curriculum (NC, 30 Credits)

Assessment

The content of the programme will reflect the curricula requirements of the Foundation Stage and National Curriculum for England. There will also be tasks and assignments that will relate to the extended life of a school, educational theory and a wider understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the teacher.

Our PGCE students experience great success in entering teaching straight away. Career opportunities include teaching in maintained and independent nursery, infant, junior, primary, first and middle schools, as well as in other areas of education, such as Children's Centres and other early years settings.

Please note: we do not accept deferred applications for this programme.

Accreditation

Our Initial Teacher Education courses are rated as Outstanding by Ofsted and in 2014 ranked us as 7th overall in the UK.

[[Placements ]]
When you want to get hands-on experience of teaching we can support you. All of our programmes offer the opportunity for experience in educational settings.

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The objective of the international Seminar on European Project Planning is to provide participants with the skills to plan European projects in the fields of education, training and culture. Read more

OBJECTIVES

The objective of the international Seminar on European Project Planning is to provide participants with the skills to plan European projects in the fields of education, training and culture.
The European Project Planning international Seminar focuses on the following topics:
- Funding opportunities in the field of education, training and culture managed by the European Commission
- Understanding a call for proposal in the framework of the current European programmes in the field of education, training and culture
- Development of effective project ideas
- Collection of relevant documents for the European project submission
- Identification of effective transnational project partnership for European projects
- The procedures for writing and submitting a European project

TARGET GROUPS

The European Project Planning international Seminar is addressed to officers, executives, directors, managers, lecturers, teachers, trainers, researchers and experts working in public bodies, universities, schools, training organizations, adult education institutions, research centres.

The European Project Planning international Seminar is addressed to individuals who wish to acquire the skills for successfully accessing and managing European funds in the field of culture, education and training.

The list of the previous participants is available at: http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPP_previous_edition_DB_partecipant.php

THE PROGRAMME

The programme of the international Seminar on European Project Planning is organized in 5 main modules:
- Module 1: European Funding Programmes
Review of the funding opportunities managed by the European Commission in the fields of education, training and culture.
- Module 2: Quality Project Planning
Analysis of the planning process, from the idea to the project.
- Module 3: Partnership Development
Introduction to the strategies to create and manage transnational partnerships for European Projects
- Module 4: Financial Planning
Presentation of the administrative and financial rules for the project budget development
- Module 5: Filling in the Application Form
Practical simulation of the necessary steps to fill in the project application
The total duration of the course programme is 50 hours. 25 hours of classroom based learning in Florence and 25 hours of e-learning integrated with virtual meetings.

The detailed programme is available at: http://europlan.pixel-online.org/files/EPP/2%201%20EPP%20Course%20Programme.pdf

THE COORDINATOR OF THE SEMINAR

The International Seminar on European Project Planning is organized and coordinated by Pixel, an education and training institution based in Florence (Italy) having as its main aim the provision of support to internationalization and European Cooperation. Pixel successfully coordinated and managed over 75 European projects. Some of the European programmes that funded the projects in which Pixel was and is involved are: Socrates ODL; Socrates Minerva, Socrates Grundtvig, Socrates Lingua, eLearning, Leonardo da Vinci, Lifelong Learning, Justice Programme, Safer Internet Programme. Many among the European projects coordinated by Pixel were given an “Excellent” rating and identified as “Best Practice” by the European Commission.
More information on the European projects carried out is available at: http://www.pixel-online.net/PRJ_european_projects_lista.php
Pixel also coordinated and managed over 30 projects funded by the European Social Fund.

ORGANIZATION

The European Project Planning international Seminar has a duration of 50 hours.

25 hours of classroom based learning held in Florence (Italy). The 25 hours course is organized in 5 days, Monday to Friday, 5 hours each day.
25 hours of e-learning integrated with 2 virtual meetings with the course tutor and the other course participants. A Forum is also available for virtual meetings among all participants.

The classroom course takes place at Pixel, in Florence, Italy.

METHODOLOGY

The approach used is highly practical, based on the expertise of the course trainers who have over 15 years of experience in planning and managing projects and initiatives funded by the European Commission, mainly in the sector of Education and Training.

A practical simulation is carried out for each topic in focus. The practical simulation is based on the use of the services, databases and documentation made available, on-line, by the European Union.
The objective of the practical activity is the simulation of the development and presentation of a European project.
At the end of the international Seminar, every work group will have produced a first draft of a European project including the application form, budget, transnational partnership etc.

FOLLOW UP

During the classroom course each participant is introduced to the e-learning course’s contents.

During the four weeks after the classroom course, 2 virtual meetings are organized between the course trainers and tutor and the course participants to further analyse and discuss the contents learnt at distance. An on line Forum is also available for all course participants to ask questions to the course trainers and share the answers with their colleagues.

TESTIMONIALS

Over 45 editions of the international Seminar have already taken place at Pixel, in Florence, since 2004.

The testimonials of the previous participants are available at: http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPP_testimonials.php

FURTHER INFORMATION

For further information please contact:

Pixel
Via Luigi Lanzi 12 - 50134 Firenze - Italy
Tel. +39-055-489700 - Fax. +39-055-4628873
e-mail:

Further information on the International Seminar on European Project Planning is available on line at:
http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPP_index.php

ENROLLMENT

The Registration Form can be downloaded at: http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPP_enrolment.php

Optional accommodation and subsistence packages are available.

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The objective of the international Seminar on European Project Management is to provide participants with the skills to enable them to effectively manage a European project. Read more
The objective of the international Seminar on European Project Management is to provide participants with the skills to enable them to effectively manage a European project.

OBJECTIVES

The objective of the international Seminar on European Project Management is to provide participants with the skills to plan European projects in the field of education, training and research.

The European Project Management international Seminar focuses on the following topics:
• Management of contractual procedures with the European Commission
• Organization and planning of the project work
• Management of the project partnership
• Monitoring the project development and evaluating its outcomes
• Creation and delivery project reports
• Management of financial and administrative issues of the project

TARGET GROUPS

The European Project Management international Seminar is addressed to officers, executives, directors, managers, lecturers, teachers, trainers, researchers and experts working in public bodies, universities, schools, training organizations, adult education institutions, research. The European Project Management international Seminar is addressed to individuals who wish to acquire the skills for successfully accessing and managing European funds in the field of education, culture and research. The European Project Management international Seminar aims at providing participants with the skills to enable them to:
• Manage contractual procedures with the European Commission and national agencies.
• Organize and plan the project work for a successful implementation of the project activities and for achieving the expected project’s results.
• Organize and manage the project partnership, monitor its work, prevent and address conflicts.
• Monitor the project development, assess and evaluate the quality of its outcomes, deal with possible risks.
• Create and deliver project reports both for internal and external purposes.
• Organize and manage the financial and administrative issues of the project, as well as check the eligibility of costs.
The list of the previous participants is available at: http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPM_previous_edition_DB_partecipant.php

THE PROGRAMME

The programme of the international Seminar on European Project Management is organized in 5 modules:
• Module 1: Introduction to Project Management
Introduction to the planning of a European project and how the planning phase influences the management of a funded project
• Module 2: Project Management Strategies and Contractual Issues
Presentation on how to plan the project activities and analysis of the typologies of contracts to be set up for project management.
• Module 3: Partnership Management
Introduction to the strategies to organize the project partners work and to successfully manage the partnership
• Module 4: Evaluation and Dissemination
Introduction to the planning and carrying out of an effective evaluation, dissemination and sustainability strategy
• Module 5: Project Reporting and Administrative Issues
Presentation of the reporting activities and methodologies and of the administrative and financial rules for the project financial and administrative management
The detailed programme can be downloaded at: http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPM_course_programme.php

THE COORDINATOR OF THE SEMINAR

The International Seminar on European Project Management is organized and coordinated by Pixel, an education and training institution based in Florence (Italy) having as its main aim the provision of support to internationalization and European Cooperation. Pixel successfully coordinated and managed over 75 European projects. Some of the European programmes that funded the projects in which Pixel was and is involved are: Socrates ODL; Socrates Minerva, Socrates Grundtvig, Socrates Lingua, eLearning, Leonardo da Vinci, Lifelong Learning, Justice Programme, Safer Internet Programme. Many among the European projects coordinated by Pixel were given an “Excellent” rating and identified as “Best Practice” by the European Commission.
More information on the European projects carried out is available at: http://www.pixel-online.net/PRJ_european_projects_lista.php
Pixel also coordinated and managed over 30 projects funded by the European Social Fund.

ORGANIZATION

The European Project Management international Seminar has a duration of 50 hours.

25 hours of classroom based learning held in Florence (Italy). The 25 hours course is organized in 5 days, Monday to Friday, 5 hours each day.
25 hours of e-learning integrated with 2 virtual meetings with the course tutor and the other course participants. A Forum is also available for virtual meetings among all participants.

The classroom course takes place at Pixel, in Florence, Italy.

METHODOLOGY

The approach used is highly practical, based on the expertise of the course trainers who have over 15 years of experience in planning and managing projects and initiatives funded by the European Commission, mainly in the sector of Education and Training.

A practical simulation is carried out for each topic in focus. The practical simulation is based on the use of the services, databases and documentation made available, on-line, by the European Union.
The objective of the practical activity is the simulation of the development and presentation of a European project.
At the end of the international Seminar, every work group will have produced a first draft of a European project including the application form, budget, transnational partnership etc.

FOLLOW UP

During the classroom course each participant is introduced to the e-learning course’s contents.

During the four weeks after the classroom course, 2 virtual meetings are organized between the course trainers and tutor and the course participants to further analyse and discuss the contents learnt at distance. An on line Forum is also available for all course participants to ask questions to the course trainers and share the answers with their colleagues.

TESTIMONIALS

Over 10 editions of the international Seminar have already taken place at Pixel, in Florence, since 2005.

The testimonials of the previous participants are available at: http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPM_testimonials.php

FURTHER INFORMATION

For further information please contact:

Pixel
Via Luigi Lanzi 12 - 50134 Firenze - Italy
Tel. +39-055-489700 - Fax. +39-055-4628873
e-mail:

Further information on the International Seminar on European Project Management is available on line at:
http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPM_intro.php

ENROLLMENT

The Registration Form can be downloaded at http://europlan.pixel-online.org/EPM_enrolment.php

Optional accommodation and subsistence packages are available.

Read less
People are increasingly encouraged to undertake sport and exercise as part of a healthier lifestyle. Although this has a number of global health benefits, a related caveat is an increased risk of injury. Read more
People are increasingly encouraged to undertake sport and exercise as part of a healthier lifestyle. Although this has a number of global health benefits, a related caveat is an increased risk of injury. Currently, sporting injuries commonly present to the health professional; these injuries present a unique challenge in terms of their aetiology, management and potential for recurrence.

Sport and Exercise medicine is now recognised as a specialist area and there are growing numbers of physicians and allied health professionals seeking to work in this diverse and exciting area. The School of Sport, Faculty of Life and Health Sciences, is now offering an MSc in Sport and Exercise Medicine. The teaching faculty comprises a balance of respected academics and clinical specialists in relevant fields of Sports Medicine, Physical Activity and Sports Biomechanics.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/201617/sport-and-exercise-medicine-9097

Course detail

- Description -

This Master's programme has been developed in collaboration with various professional bodies. In particular, consultation with members of: the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine, the International Federation of Sports Physiotherapists, the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine and the British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine has informed our learning outcomes, module content and delivery. We have ensured that these are mapped directly to masters’ competencies as defined by the International Federation of Sports Physiotherapists.

- Purpose -

The course is tailored towards clinical professionals working as medical doctors, or other health professionals including physiotherapy and podiatry. It will provide the knowledge, critical awareness and transferable skills for physicians and allied health professionals aspiring to engage in the field of Sports Medicine. The primary focus will be to develop practitioners who understand the importance of evidence based and specialist reflective practice, who will enhance the health care of people who are involved in sport and exercise within the UK and Ireland and beyond.

- Teaching and Assessment -

Teaching and Learning Methods include: lectures, case studies, tutorials, seminars, on line material; videos; access to graphical and anatomical models; problem based cases and scenarios, workshops, on line and face to face discussion groups, analysis of clinical data; practical exercises, demonstrations, literature searching and observation.

The learning outcomes of the course will be assessed through a combination of essay, examination, case studies, reflective practice, group and individual presentations and extended research project. These assessment methods will measure students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject as well as their intellectual and transferable skills.

Career options

All students enrolling on this course will already possess a relevant professional qualification (eg. medical doctor, physiotherapist, podiatry). It is anticipated that most students on this programme will be employed or will be seeking employment within the National Health Service, Social, voluntary sectors, or in independent practice. The programme therefore has significant clinical and vocational relevance. The specialist knowledge and postgraduate level skills gained will enhance students’ opportunities to progress in their careers.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why study at Ulster?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We are an international university with more than 2,000 international students from over 80 countries and Alumni from 121 countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/learnyourway

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Read more
Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in:
-Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data.
-Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.
-Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge.
-Reporting results in a clear and logical manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The six study lines are as follows:
Aerosol Physics
Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the most recent theoretical concepts, measurement techniques and computational methods applied in aerosol research.

Geophysics of the Hydrosphere
Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes.

Meteorology
Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example. As a graduate of the meteorology line, you will be an expert in atmospheric phenomena who can produce valuable new information and share your knowledge.

Biogeochemical Cycles
Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Remote Sensing
Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry. As a graduate of the remote sensing line you will have broad expertise in the operational principles of remote sensing instruments as well as methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Atmospheric Chemistry and Analysis
Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods. As a graduate of this line you will have understanding of the chemical processes of the atmosphere and the latest environmental analytical methods, so you will have vital skills for environmental research.

Programme Structure

The basic degree in the Programme is the Master of Science (MSc). The scope of the degree is 120 credits (ECTS). As a prerequisite you will need to have a relevant Bachelor’s degree. The possible major subjects are Physics, Meteorology, Geophysics, Chemistry, and Forest Ecology. The programme is designed to be completed in two years. Studies in ATM-MP consist of various courses and project work: lecture courses, seminars, laboratory work and intensive courses.

Your first year of studies will consist mainly of lecture courses. During the second year, you must also participate in the seminar course and give a presentation yourself. There is also a project course, which may contain laboratory work, data analysis, or theoretical or model studies. You will have to prepare a short, written report of the project. There are also several summer and winter schools as well as field courses for students in the Programme. Many of the courses take place at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. The intensive courses typically last 5–12 days and include a concise daily programme with lectures, exercises and group work.

Career Prospects

There is a global need for experts with multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and environmental issues. Governmental environmental agencies need people who are able to interpret new scientific results as a basis for future legislation. Industry, transportation and businesses need to be able to adapt to new regulations.

As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. Graduates of the Programme have found employment in Meteorological Institutes and Environmental Administration in Finland and other countries, companies manufacturing instrumentation for atmospheric and environmental measurements and analysis, and consultancy companies. The Master's degree in ATM-MP also gives you a good background if you intend to proceed to doctoral level studies.

Internationalization

The Programme offers an international study environment with more than 30% of the students and teaching staff coming from abroad.

The ATM-MP is part of a Nordic Nordplus network in Atmosphere-Biosphere Studies, which gives you good opportunities to take courses currently in fourteen Nordic and Baltic universities. There are also several Erasmus agreements with European universities. The PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX) project provides you with opportunities to carry out part of your studies especially in China and Russia.

Research Focus

All the units teaching in the Programme belong to the National Centre of Excellence (FCoE) in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM), which is a multidisciplinary team of the Departments of Physics, Forest Sciences and Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Eastern Finland (Kuopio) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

The main objective of FCoE ATM is to quantify the feedbacks between the atmosphere and biosphere in a changing climate. The main focus of the research is on investigating the following topics:
1. Understanding the climatic feedbacks and forcing mechanisms related to aerosols, clouds, precipitation and biogeochemical cycles.
2. Developing, refining and utilising the newest measurement and modelling techniques, from quantum chemistry to observations and models of global earth systems.
3. Creating a comprehensive understanding of the role of atmospheric clusters and aerosol particles in regional and global biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and their linkages to atmospheric chemistry.
4. Integrating the results in the context of understanding regional and global Earth systems.

In addition to the research focus of FCoE, current research in hydrospheric geophysics at Helsinki University has an emphasis on cryology, with a focus on the effect of aerosols on Indian glaciers, the impact of climate change on the Arctic environment, the dynamics of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard, and the winter season in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

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International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject. Read more
International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject.

On the LLM International Trade Law you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. You will gain specialist legal knowledge within a practical context, whilst developing expertise in these areas and enhancing your research skills.

With maximum flexibility in mind, this distance learning course allows you to work towards your LLM in stages. To access the LLM you will have previously completed the awards of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma.

Students are required to pass three modules: Legal Research, International Sale Contracts, and Carriage of Goods. There are no examinations for each module. Instead, students research and write a 3,000 word essay on a topic selected by the module tutor. They graduate with the PgCert International Trade Law and may, if they wish, continue on to study for the PgDip International Trade Law the next academic year.

Learn From The Best

Study on the LLM International Trade Law and you will learn from inspirational academics that have a real passion for their subject. The course is accredited by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales, and is shaped by internationally excellent research to ensure the course is up-to-date and relevant.

Lecturers on this course have research expertise and practice-based experience in the areas of international business transactions; international commercial litigation; international commercial arbitration, international public procurement regulation; comparative corporate and financial law, and EU law; knowledge that you can draw on for your LLM project.

The course is delivered by Northumbria Law School, three times winners of the prestigious “Best Law School” accolade, awarded by the Attorney General’s Student Pro Bono Awards.

Teaching And Assessment

On this innovative distance learning LLM International Trade Law course you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. There is an emphasis on reflective practice and applying what you have learnt to your own organisation.

You will learn through a combination of online lectures and seminars and eLearning technology, able to tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Modules are assessed through coursework and for the award of LLM, you will complete a 15,000-17,000-word project, based on an area related to your own practice or intended practice.

Module Overview
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7036 - Carriage of Goods (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7051 - International Sale Contracts (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

The eLearning Portal provides students with written materials that are the equivalent to ten (10) one-hour lecture periods and five (5) two-hour workshop periods on the FT LLM International Trade Law. Written lecture materials tend to focus on the delivery of a particular legal topic and written workshop materials tend to focus on the actual application of topics in practical situations which business persons or lawyers would encounter. The DL PgCert/PgDip/LLM International Trade Law is practically oriented.

There is an on-line surgery at the beginning of each module with the module tutor, and an optional Study Day is held on campus on a Saturday near the beginning of each module. The Study Day is recorded using Panopto so that students who are unable to attend in person can view and listen to the day’s learning activities. There is no difference in the substantive content of each module between the DL PgCert/PgDip International Trade Law and the FT LLM International Trade Law.

Research-Rich Learning

Research rich learning (RRL) is embedded through the programme. Law School research focuses on the areas of Law and Society, Legal Education and Professional Skills, and the Centre for Evidence and Criminal Justice Studies. These internationally recognised groups act as a focus for research activity across the Law School, and their work feeds into the courses to ensure taught course content is informed by research developments in the sector.

The LLM culminates in the project module in which you will undertake a piece of independent legal research, informed by current practice and advanced scholarship and research, including a critical awareness and evaluation of current issues and developments in the field.

Give Your Career An Edge

The LLM is designed to enhance your career prospects in the international trade law arena. You will be encouraged to reflect upon your own practice, applying legal skills to the common problems you are experiencing or are likely to experience in practice, examine policies and undertake independent legal research to update your knowledge. You will have the opportunity to produce a project in your chosen field undertaking research and personal development in an area of particular relevance to your work.

The course is accredited for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales.

Your Future

The LLM International Trade Law course has been designed to meet the needs of practitioners in business and industry and law firms engaged in the area of international trade law.

You will graduate fully equipped with expert legal knowledge, greater awareness of legal commercial issues, and the ability to critically evaluate legal issues in the context of international trade law. You will be able to further develop your intellectual curiosity, to recognise uncertainty in the law, to produce and present reasoned arguments and to offer creative solutions to complex legal and ethical problems. You will develop your critical, analysis, research and the professional and reflective skills necessary for practice in this exciting field.

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This innovative new course has been designed in response to the General Medical Councils (GMC 2012) policies around the selection, recognition and approval of clinical and educational supervisors in postgraduate medical education settings. Read more
This innovative new course has been designed in response to the General Medical Councils (GMC 2012) policies around the selection, recognition and approval of clinical and educational supervisors in postgraduate medical education settings. It is mapped to relevant GMC Academy of Medical Educator (AoME) and Committee of Postgraduate Dental Deans and Directors (COPDEND) standards for clinical and educational supervisors. (It is anticipated that the course gain AoME recognition.)

The course has a blended learning approach, with interactive on-line learning being supported by four study days over the course of two semesters (typically running from October to June). Assessment strategies have a practical focus but are also designed to foster an informed, critical stance to key issue in Postgraduate Medical and Dental Education.

The first unit focuses on the skill sets of clinical supervisors. You will explore ways to create safe clinical learning environments and the development of your own approaches to clinical teaching. Concepts of reflective practice and communities of practice are critically examined with reference to the ways in which learning is supported in clinical environments. The second unit focuses on educational supervision and leadership. You will examine the changing landscapes of postgraduate training and how you support the development of trainees and trainers. You will analyse current approaches to assessment and appraisal and how they can be maximised to support trainee development and progression. You will also develop a differentiated approach to training, including a focus on managing poor performance.

This postgraduate certificate is being developed as a recognised entry route into our long-standing and popular MA in Medical Education.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/clinical-and-educational-supervision

Why choose this course?

This innovative new distance-learning course has been designed in response to the General Medical Councils (GMC 2012) policies around the selection, recognition and approval of clinical and educational supervisors in postgraduate medical education settings.

The first unit focuses on the skill sets of clinical supervisors. You will explore ways to create safe clinical learning environments and explore ways to develop approaches to clinical teaching in a range of clinical settings. Concepts of reflective practice and communities of practice are critically examined with reference to the ways in which learning is supported in clinical environments.

The second unit focuses on educational supervision. You will examine the changing landscapes of postgraduate training and how you support the development of trainees and trainers. You will analyse current approaches to assessment and appraisal and how they can be maximised to support trainee development and progression. You will also develop a differentiated approach to training, including a focus on managing poor performance.

Modules

• Educational Supervision In Postgraduate Medical And Dental Education (MEC016-6) Compulsory
• Supporting Learning In Clinical Environments (MEC015-6) Compulsory

Assessment

The assessment strategy for this course combines formative and summative elements. Assessment is an integral part of your learning experience and we provide a range of opportunities for you to develop your assessment ideas with your allocated tutor(s). We have designed the assessment strategy to allow you to experience a range of approaches to assessment and make links between your experiences as learners on this course and those of your trainees. For example, you will keep a journal where you record your reflections on course learning experiences, with these being the basis of two reflective narratives submitted for summative assessment. Each of the assessments has been designed to allow you to make strong connections between your learning on the course and your practice as a medical educator. Each unit has three assessment points, linked to the end of blocks of themed learning. The table below summarises the assessment methods used on each unit.

You will be provided with a detailed assessment brief for each task and will have access to a named tutor who can provide guidance and support. Some tasks include opportunities to rehearse assessment activities. You will be provided with written feedback on all summative assessments with guidance on how to improve your performance on similar tasks in future.

Career

This course prepares you for roles as named clinical supervisor and named educational supervisor in line with professional standards and expectations. It also prepares you for educational leadership roles within your own professional context.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Management (International Management) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Management (International Management) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

We offer a MSc in Management (International Management) for students from any background who would like to work in business or management. The Management (International Management) programme has been specifically designed with a clear focus on management in an interconnected global community. This programme in Management (International Management) covers core management concepts such as international marketing, operations management, global strategy, finance and international human resource management. To help you get the best from your studies, the programme also includes an academic skills module that covers issues such as research methods, presentation skills, group dynamics and employability support.

MSc Management Pathways

- Generalist MSc Management - for you to create your own mix of specialist modules
- Marketing - focused on the challenges of global marketing activities
- Finance – for students interested in financial aspects of management
- Human Resource Management – focused on the challenges of leadership and managing a global work force
- Entrepreneurship – for students interested in the dynamics of starting their own business
- Operations and Supply Management – focused on the management of global operations and supply networks
- International Management – considers contemporary management practice in a global setting
- International Standards – focused on the role of internationals standards (such as ISO) in quality improvement
- Business Analytics – to equip students to work in the era of ‘big data’
- E-Business - investigates the challenges and opportunities of global information systems networks and e-commerce

Key Features of the Management (International Management) Programme

- All modules on the Management (International Management) programme are taught by our world-class faculty who have a breadth of industrial and academic knowledge
- Swansea is joint 1st in Wales for international ranked research (REF 2014)
- 93% of Swansea students in employment six months after graduating
- High contact time – our modules come with a lecture (in class sizes capped at approximately 150 students) and seminar/tutorial (in class sizes capped at 30) every single week
- Fully refurbished facilities – we have invested half a million pounds in a recent refurbishment to our student facilities
- Scholarships available for outstanding students
- Swansea is 1st in Wales for world-leading impact - 60% at 4-star level (REF 2014)

The MSc Management (International Management) is designed for students who wish to focus specifically on the opportunities and challenges of business in an interconnected global marketplace. Students will undertake modules in global business and international management before undertaking a specialist management consulting style project on international business.

Modules

Modules on the Management (International Management) programme may include:

Managing Financial Resources
Human Resource Management
Marketing Management
Operations Management
Strategy
Global Business Environment: International Political Relations
International Management

Careers and Employability

We have an excellent track record of placing our graduates including those from the Management programme with major multinational companies and our graduate employment rate is 92%.

From the moment you arrive at the School of Management as a student on the Management programme we will work with you to help you build your skills and experience to enhance your career prospects. During your time with us you’ll have the chance to:

- Undertake a work placement or internship through the Swansea Paid Internship Network (SPIN) or ‘Week of Work’ initiative
- Work and network with employers from a range of national and multi-national companies through our visiting speaker programme
- In conjunction with the International Development Office, undertake an Internship in India, with a company such as GE, Thomson Reuters, 3M, Private Equity or Kanvic Consulting
- Boost your skills and meet employers during our biannual Employability Week
- Complete the Swansea Employability Award
- Participate in one of our student challenges and competitions, such as the Branding Challenge, and CIM student competition ‘The Pitch’

School of Management

The School of Management at Swansea University is building on long-established foundations as one of the UK's top providers of Management, Accounting & Finance and Economic education.

The School of Management's vision is to make a difference to society and the economy locally and globally through excellence in research-led teaching that has resulted in the School being ranked 17th in the UK for research impact* and 26th in the UK for research excellence, all working towards continuing our trend of becoming one of the top business schools in Wales and the UK.

Environment:

The School of Management comprises over 150 staff and more than 2000 students studying at the new £450million Bay Campus, with the School of Management building itself providing truly world-class facilities with an impressive communal Atrium, new teaching rooms, meeting room and IT equipment.

School of Management, alongside the Great Hall, also proudly offers high quality conferencing and event capacity all within half a mile of the M4 corridor, that has already attracted several high profile and key events during the short time that the Bay Campus has been open.

Ambition:

Through its enterprise and innovation activities of business engagement the School plans to focus on three global challenges: Health & Wellbeing, Digital Society and Sustainable Economies. The School of Management's aim is to deliver world-class education through collaboration, innovation and fresh thinking, and we pride ourselves on the outstanding student experience on offer here at the School of Management ensuring a rich learning environment, while also developing our staff in line with Swansea University's wider ambition to anchor and underpin everything we do with a core set of values.

Opportunity:

School of Management aspires to be known globally as a centre for educational excellence, working in partnership with other Swansea University departments and organisations to create joint programmes that reflect the skillsets required by an evolving workplace.

*THE Research Excellence Framework 2014: Institutions ranked by subject

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