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The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Read more
The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Our expert tutors will introduce you to the very latest academic debates, along with longstanding critical issues such as race, class and sexuality.

Why study English Studies at Dundee?

The MLitt English Studies is a taught one year full-time, or two years part-time, postgraduate degree, which can be tailored to your needs, allowing you to pursue any literary interest you can imagine, whether it’s Arthurian literature or American crime fiction, animal rights or post colonialism.

This degree will:
Provide training in literary and cultural research as a firm basis for proceeding to doctoral work
Provide a taught postgraduate programme to suit individual student research interests and research needs
Enable completion of a dissertation of 18,000 words: an independent piece of work based on primary texts and sources, on your own topic, under the direction of an expert in the field.

Unique to Dundee is the “Special Author” option module, which allows you to explore in depth the full range of your chosen author’s works, whether it might be the Harry Potter series, Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, or the poems of Geoffrey Hill. Other examples include: Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Robert Burns, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Orwell, Joseph Conrad, or Angela Carter.

What's so good about English Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
English Studies is part of the School of Humanities at Dundee, is a centre of research excellence, we have recognized strengths in book history, authorship studies and visual culture, and we lead the way in interdisciplinary scholarship. Our research culture thrives on probing the creative relationships between literature and film, poetry and theatre, word and image.

In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

We are also home to an annual Literary Festival which regularly attracts high profile writers to Dundee.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

What you will study

There is one core module: Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture which runs over two semesters, and you choose two optional modules, from the list available each year, plus the English Studies Dissertation.

Below is a typical list of modules, which varies from year to year, and is subject to demand and availability. You can also choose your optional modules from any grouping.

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
Exploring Old English Texts
Special Author: directed reading
Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
The Scottish Novel
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
British and Irish Poetry, 1680-1830
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
Literature & Society, 1750-1900
The Irish Novel
Special Author: directed reading
Modern and Contemporary Literature

The Scottish Novel
Constructing Identities: Self, Subject and Persona in Contemporary Poetry
Virginia Woolf
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
The Irish Novel
The Literature of Hollywood
Writing, Texts and Books
Joyce and the Cinema
Postwar American Fiction and Transatlantic Exchange
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
Gender, Ethnicity, Text: Contemporary Readings
Special Author: directed reading
For the current list, visit the Humanities website.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Humanities degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, recent graduate

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This interdisciplinary course is designed for well-qualified graduates who wish to extend their interest in medieval studies. Read more
This interdisciplinary course is designed for well-qualified graduates who wish to extend their interest in medieval studies. The flexible structure of the course allows students to construct their degree around their particular areas of interest, while acquiring both the technical expertise to investigate primary medieval documents and an insight into the complexities of medieval culture generally. Students will have the opportunity to be taught not only by Trinity staff but also by visiting lecturers from other internationally renowned institutions.

Students take four core courses:

Research Methodology;
Medieval Thought;
Medieval Culture and Society;
and a language chosen from: Elementary Classical Latin, Medieval Latin, Old English, Middle English, Italian, Medieval German, Medieval French, Old Irish.

Two options are also chosen. Currently the subject areas include:
Chaucer; Language and Genre; Varieties of Comedy in Dante and Boccaccio; 'Wild' Women in Medieval Literature; Old English Prose; Arthurian H; Courtly love song in Medieval Europe, Early Medieval Ireland; Text and Image; Old English Heroic Poetry; The Unruly Middle Ages; Medieval Philosophy.

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The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society. Read more

Introduction

The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society.
We investigate how language works, how people use it, what people use it for, where it came from and how it changes. The range of research expertise represented by the three dedicated members of staff teaching on the course are reflected in a comprehensive suite of modules that include cognitive, sociolinguistic, historical, evolutionary, and discourse analytical topics.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time: MLitt-12 months, PG Diploma-9 months, PG Certificate-3 months Part-time: MLitt-27 months, PG Diploma-21 months, PG Certificate-9 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Bethan Benwell | Dr Andrew Smith

Course objectives

Students will be expected to graduate with a knowledge of contemporary linguistic theories, including both generative and cognitive approaches to linguistic description, and the contexts in which these theories arose.
They will also acquire knowledge and understanding in specialist selected areas of study (e.g. Old and Middle English, historical, social and regional varieties of English, language and cognition, discourse analysis and evolutionary linguistics), including critical understanding of research in these areas.
They will be able to apply a variety of descriptive linguistic tools to language data and linguistic theories to selected specialist areas of study within English Language and Linguistics, according to their areas of interest.
They will learn to plan and manage a Research Project under supervision, undertaking independent research, including keeping track of relevant developments in the chosen field(s) and being able to set them in an appropriate context; they will be able to structure and communicate ideas effectively; gather, evaluate and organise information from multiple sources; and engage with other researchers by writing, debating, and delivering oral and written presentations.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

Postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are much sought-after by students across the world, providing a grounding in theories and methods essential for a range of research and teaching careers in disciplines including English Studies, Education, English as a Foreign Language and English for Specific Purposes.
Students with postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are prized for their excellent communication and problem-solving skills, and their ability to analyse and synthesise information rapidly and accurately. They are generally very adaptable and go on to a wide range of careers in all sectors of the economy, such as: private and public sector management and research, marketing and advertising, government administration, journalism, banking and finance, speech therapy.
Former graduates from the MLitt have gone on to, for instance, Linguistics Research (in the Healthcare sector) and further study in Speech Therapy (for which a Master's in Linguistics was a prerequisite).
In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law.

Employability

Your MLitt in English Language and Linguistics will provide you with important transferable skills which you will be able to make use of throughout your career. Our course will help you develop your oral and written communication skills so that you can engage in confident and informed debate with a range of audiences. You will be able to design, plan and manage your own independent research projects; you will develop your skills in collecting, analysing and interpreting information, and will be able to structure, contextualise and communicate your ideas and findings effectively.
You will play an active part in our regular Language Research Group meetings, which discuss articles on important and controversial linguistic topics. You will have the opportunity to introduce articles of your choice to the group and will develop important skills in leading and managing open-ended discussions.

- Skills you can develop through this course
An MLitt in English Language and Linguistics is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively.
Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also require students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently.
Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately, to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of a MLitt in English Language and Linguistics.

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Programme description. This intensive programme will enable you to delve deeper into the structure of the English language’s phonology, syntax and semantics and modern and historical development. Read more

Programme description

This intensive programme will enable you to delve deeper into the structure of the English language’s phonology, syntax and semantics and modern and historical development.

The MSc can function either as a stand-alone masters qualification or as a basis for further postgraduate study, typically at PhD level.

Joining an internationally acclaimed centre for research and teaching in the linguistic study of English, you will explore in depth a global language with a rich history and great social and geographical variation.

You will be taught by world-leading experts who will give you a detailed awareness of the ways in which English is used in Britain and around the world.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

The programme focuses initially on the structure of English, and also offers option courses on aspects of the history of English, on current varieties of the language and on a good number of approaches to the study of the language and English linguistics.

Compulsory courses:

  • Introduction to Language Research
  • Introduction to Phonology
  • Introduction to Syntax
  • History of the English Language

Optional courses:

  • Corpus Linguistics
  • Current Issues in Phonology: Current Issues in Syntax
  • Diachronic Linguistics
  • Dialects of English in Britain & Ireland
  • Early Germanic Dialects
  • English Grammar: a Cognitive Account
  • Global Englishes
  • Historical Phonology
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis
  • Introduction to Morphology
  • Introduction to Semantics
  • Introduction to Sociolinguistics
  • Middle English
  • Pragmatics
  • Pragmatics of Linguistic Communication
  • Reading Old English
  • Scots and Scottish English

You can also choose optional courses from a wide range of other areas of linguistic study. You may be able to take a course from other degree programmes in the School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences, and in some cases, from elsewhere in the University.

Career opportunities

The programme has been designed to help you progress your career as an English language specialist in academia. The analytical skills you develop and the research training you receive will be valuable in a wide range of careers.



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The . MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.  is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's . Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Read more

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS), and is currently run from the History Department. The programme is suitable for students whose undergraduate training is in Archaeology, Classics, History, Literature/Languages, Philosophy, Theology, or other related disciplines. The main aim of the programme is to prepare students for doctoral research in the study of the medieval and early modern past by offering outstanding interdisciplinary training to equip students with the skills they need for their future careers. It is taught by specialists who are members of IMEMS, primarily from the departments of ArchaeologyClassicsEnglishHistoryModern Languages and CulturesPhilosophy and Theology.

Students are incorporated into the vibrant research communities within departments, IMEMS, and the university. Durham has a large and extremely active postgraduate community, and IMEMS supports the Medieval and Early Modern Student Association (MEMSA), whose members organise regular seminars and conferences. IMEMS has more than fifty staff members from arts, humanities, social science and science departments across the University, all active researchers, and is one of the largest gatherings of scholars in this area in the world. IMEMS is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham CathedralDurham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of medieval and early modern studies at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant.

All students on the MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies take two core modules, Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past, and Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past (30 credits each); both of these run throughout Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms. Students also write a 15,000-word dissertation (60 credits), supervised by one of Durham's specialists, which allows them to focus on a specialist topic of their choice in the period AD 300-1700, which may be interdisciplinary or focused primarily on one of the individual disciplines which make up the programme. They also take two optional modules (30 credits each) which run either in Michaelmas or Epiphany or throughout both terms. These may be content, language or skills modules, and are drawn from the seven participating departments as well as Durham’s other centres and programmes. All elements of the programme have embedded within them a range of content, subject-specific skills, and key skills.

Core modules

The two team-taught core modules enable students to develop advanced skills in interpreting and usinga range of different kinds of source-material from the medieval and early modern periods, including textual, material and visual culture. They allow students to consider developments over the longue duree and enable a more rounded understanding of how a range of themes, ideas and institutions changed from the end of the classical world, through the Middle Ages and into the early modern era. These modules are intended to guide students whose backgrounds are in a range of disciplinary specialisms towards an understanding of how study of the medieval and early modern past can be nuanced and enhanced by approaches from multiple different disciplines used alongside each other. The modules also help students develop from a more tutor-led approach to independent learning, in order to support their work on their dissertations and their future careers. Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past takes one key item or body of material (e.g. a text, a site, an archive) as a lens through which to explore different disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to studying the period 300-1700. Students are assessed by a 5000-word essay on a topic of their choice connected with the themes of the module. Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past focuses on major themes, movements and institutions which can best be examined across the whole medieval and early modern period, and which can best be explained by close study of change and continuity over a long period of time. A number of these themes will invite interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary approaches, and thus will allow students to develop their skills in bringing together different kinds of material for study of the past. Students are assessed for this module by a) a 4000-word essay on a topic of their choice, connected with the themes of the module, and b) a 15-minute presentation.

Optional modules

Students choose two optional modules offered by the departments participating in the programme. These modules are taught by subject specialists and usually involve a series of seminars with an emphasis on close study of original material from the medieval and early modern periods, and provide a ‘step up’ from the level of final-year undergraduate study. The breadth of modules available means that students can develop their skills and research interests according to their own tailored programme and with the advice of their dissertation supervisor, ensuring the best possible preparation for the future. There are also some modules focusing on particular skills-training such as medieval or modern languages or auxiliary skills (e.g. Latin; Ancient Greek; Old Norse; Old English; Academic French; Academic German; Palaeography).

The range of optional modules in each year varies according to staff availability and departmental provision, but as a representative sample optional modules may include the following:

  • Anglo-Saxon Societies and Cultures: interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval England
  • Archaeology of the Book
  • Christian Northumbria, 600-750
  • Contact and Conflict: Texts and Cultures
  • Courts and Power in Early Modern Europe and the New World
  • Latin for Research
  • Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
  • Negotiating Life in the Early Modern World
  • Old English Language, Texts and Contexts
  • Old Norse
  • Palaeograpy: Scribes, Script and History from Antiquity to the Renaissance
  • Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages
  • Renaissance Humanism
  • Rewriting Empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History
  • Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
  • Work and Play in Early Modern Europe


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MA Chinese/English Translation & Interpreting. The MA in Chinese/English Translation and Interpreting is jointly taught by specialist staff in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, the Institute of Contemporary Chinese Studies, and the Centre for English Language Education. Read more
MA Chinese/English Translation & Interpreting

The MA in Chinese/English Translation and Interpreting is jointly taught by specialist staff in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, the Institute of Contemporary Chinese Studies, and the Centre for English Language Education. It is designed for native speakers of Chinese who have a high level of competence in English and wish to develop this further. The MA is also open to native speakers of English who have a high level of competence in Chinese. The course combines practical, technological and theoretical training in translation between English and Chinese along with training and practice in bi-lateral interpreting between the two languages. For native speakers of Chinese, modules in advanced English skills offer preparation for the Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE, equivalent to Council of Europe level C2), or alternatively the Cambridge Advanced Certificate of English (CAE, equivalent to level C1).

This is a postgraduate qualification for prospective professional translators between English and Chinese and interpreters mediating between the languages. It is also suitable for Chinese teachers of English wishing to enhance their qualifications. In addition it provides a basis for those who might wish to go on to further academic study.

Additional Entry requirements

Candidates who are native speakers of English should hold an honours degree in Chinese Language and/or Chinese Studies, with a Chinese language component in every year of the degree, at 2:1 level or above or an international equivalent. Native speakers of English should also have at least a year of overseas work experience in a Chinese-speaking country. Passing advanced HSK is also essential.

Candidates whose first language is not English must achieve an overall score on the British Council IELTS test of at least 7 with no less than 6.5 in each element; or a TOEFL score of 600 with at least 5 in the Test of Written English (TWE); or TOEFL iBT score of 100, with no less than 21 in any element. Test results should be no more than two years old.

Course structure

The MA is structured around core modules in translation theory and practice, use of technological translating tools, training and practice in bi-lateral interpreting, and advanced English or Chinese skills, as appropriate to the native language of the student.

Optional modules allow the acquisition or extension of skills in a language other than English or Chinese, or development of existing expertise for technical translation purposes. These modules are taught across two semesters, running from the end of September to the following June. The remaining time is allocated to the preparation and submission of a targeted translation project with commentary, for submission in September. If appropriate arrangements can be made, the project may be a practical exercise undertaken during a placement with a local public body or charity.

The first semester modules can be taken separately as a Postgraduate Certificate in Chinese/English Translation and Interpreting. The first and second semester modules can be taken as a Diploma in Chinese/English Translation and Interpreting.

While providing generic training in the theory and practice of translating and interpreting, the course is dedicated to translation and interpreting between the specific languages and cultures of English and Chinese. It is therefore able to target specific theoretical, technical and practical issues relating to this particular cultural interface. Information about staff research interests and publications can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/modernlanguages

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The Department of English and Humanities offers committed, enthusiastic and dynamic research-based teaching, with a constantly evolving curriculum sensitive to developments in contemporary culture. Read more
The Department of English and Humanities offers committed, enthusiastic and dynamic research-based teaching, with a constantly evolving curriculum sensitive to developments in contemporary culture.

We actively foster the creation of a lively graduate intellectual community and our students' professional development. A large number of our recent PhD graduates have successfully obtained permanent academic posts in leading universities in Britain, the United States and other countries.

We welcome applications for research in all areas of English, cultural studies and related areas, including: Old English, Old Norse, medieval literature and culture, the Renaissance and early modern periods, the Enlightenment, Romantic and Victorian studies, the modern and contemporary periods, literary and cultural theory, gender studies, theatre studies, poetics and creative writing (including practice-based research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
With more than 100 students undertaking research for MPhil/PhDs, Birkbeck's Department of English and Humanities has a large and thriving postgraduate community - the largest body of graduate students in English studies in the University of London. Supervision is available in literature from Old Icelandic to contemporary writing, and we are also well regarded for our work on interdisciplinary research topics in cultural history and theory.
We place great emphasis on ensuring that graduate supervision is thorough, professionally conducted and leads to the successful completion of a thesis. We offer a dedicated research skills course at the start of the degree with the option of a paleography course for those working on early periods. As well as observing strict guidelines on supervision, a senior member of staff acts as director of graduate studies and co-ordinates the monitoring of our students' progress.
A termly graduate forum allows students formally to discuss issues of graduate provision and resources with staff.

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The Masters in English Literature. Early Modern Literature and Culture is a flexible, interdisciplinary programme taught by Glasgow’s internationally renowned team of experts. Read more

The Masters in English Literature: Early Modern Literature and Culture is a flexible, interdisciplinary programme taught by Glasgow’s internationally renowned team of experts. It offers students the practical, historical, and theoretical skills needed for advanced study in this area. The programme’s flexibility means that you can tailor your study according to your own research interests. Students are also able to draw on Glasgow’s exceptional holdings of medieval and early modern manuscript and printed materials.

Why this programme

  • This Masters is taught by an internationally renowned team of experts in medieval and early modern studies.
  • Students are able to draw on the superb medieval and early modern holdings in the University Library Special Collections and the Hunterian.
  • The major research libraries in Glasgow and Edinburgh are easily accessible and you will be part of a vibrant community of academics and students working in the field.
  • You will be part of MEMNET (the Medieval and Early Modern Network) at Glasgow and have the opportunity to hear distinguished guest speakers and to participate in events and conferences.
  • The programme offers the option of studying languages, which may include medieval Latin, Old English, Old Icelandic, Old Irish and Old French as well as a range of modern languages.
  • You can tailor the programme to your own interests and requirements, while gaining an excellent grounding in the technical skills required for advanced study in this field.

Programme Structure

In this programme you will undertake three core courses and three optional courses. You will also undertake a 15,000 word dissertation.

Semester one:

  • Medieval and Early Modern 1: From Medieval to Early Modern
  • Research Methods
  • One optional course 

Semester two:

  • Medieval and Early Modern 2
  • Two optional courses

Optional courses

  • Gender and Religion in Medieval English Literature
  • Alternative Continuities: Scottish Literature, 1425-1625
  • Early Modern Mythmaking
  • Seventeenth-Century Women Writers
  • Humour, Opposition, and Literature in Early Modern England
  • Introduction to English Medieval Manuscripts
  • Medieval Palaeography
  • Early Modern Palaeography
  • Independent study option (in consultation with Course Convener and member of staff) 

With the permission of the course convenor, there is also the opportunity to take one of the optional courses available from the other pathways in English Literature and from across the College of Arts.

Summer

The two semesters of coursework are followed by one term of supervised work towards a dissertation of up to 15,000 words which you will submit at the beginning of September. The topic normally arises out of the work of the previous two semesters, but the choice is very much open to the student’s own initiative. Your supervisor helps you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology.

Part-time students

Part-time students take all three core courses plus one optional course in their first year of study, and two optional 20 credit courses and the dissertation in their second year.

Career Prospects

glasgow.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/medievalandearlymodernenglishliteratureandculture/#/careerprospects



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The MLitt in Medieval English is an intensive one-year taught programme of study covering the mediaeval literature of England and Scotland from the Anglo-Saxon period to the early Renaissance. Read more

The MLitt in Medieval English is an intensive one-year taught programme of study covering the mediaeval literature of England and Scotland from the Anglo-Saxon period to the early Renaissance.

Highlights

  • The programme develops the various intellectual and practical skills necessary for research in the field of medieval literature.
  • Students will extend and deepen their knowledge of English and Scottish literature from the earliest Old English writings through to the close of the Middle Ages.
  • In addition to being a member of the School’s own Medieval and Renaissance Research Group, you will also become a member of the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies
  • Expert palaeography classes and access to unique manuscript materials are provided by the University’s Special Collections.

Teaching format

Over two semesters, students will take taught modules that are conducted as seminars with some didactic classes and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment is conducted through coursework essays, assessed exercises and the final dissertation. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary. Class sizes typically range from three to ten students.

During the course of the year, but with particular focus during the last four months, students will research and write a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choosing.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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Studying English Literature at postgraduate level opens up a whole host of vibrant and intellectually stimulating avenues to explore. Read more

Studying English Literature at postgraduate level opens up a whole host of vibrant and intellectually stimulating avenues to explore.

At this level, English literary texts from the medieval period to present day are studied in and alongside their many different contexts – historical, social, political and/or material – and approached from a multitude of theoretical and methodological perspectives, enabling you to develop new and highly skilled ways of reading and interpreting a wide variety of cultural documents.

Our innovative programme draws on the wide-ranging research expertise of our staff in order to develop your critical and analytical skills in the field of literary and cultural studies. The programme allows you to take a general route, choosing core and optional from a variety of literary periods, or take one of a number of pathways, each focusing on a different historical period from the medieval through to the contemporary.

Please note: We offer additional opportunities to specialise in medieval literature via the MA Medieval Studiesand MRes Medieval Literature.

Course details

This programme will provide a solid grounding in the key intellectual debates within the scholarship surrounding a range of period and context specialisms, introduce you to the latest research in the field, and support your development of the skills required for writing a dissertation.

It includes a mixture of core and optional modules taken across the autumn and spring semesters.

Alongside the programme you will also have the chance to participate in a bespoke MA conference and become part of the department’s thriving academic research community.

Core modules 

Your core modules will either be from the same pathway, if you are specialising in a literary period, or can be chosen from different pathways if you are taking a general route through the degree.

  • Medieval pathway: Meeting Medieval Manuscripts; Understanding Medieval Literature
  • Reformation to Reform pathway: Writing Revolutions 1: Politics, Publics, and Professionalism in Literary Culture, 1580-1700 and Writing Revolutions 2: Politics, Publics and Professionalism in Literary Culture, 1700-1832
  • The Long Nineteenth Century pathway: Approaches to Nineteenth-Century Studies; Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century
  • Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literature: Modernism; Contemporary Literature.

All pathways also include a compulsory ‘Research Skills’ module. For full descriptions, see 'modules' below.

Optional modules

You will choose optional modules from a range covering a variety of authors and themes from the medieval period to the 21st century. If you are following a pathway through the MA, one of your options can be taken from outside your literary period. If you are following a more general route through the degree you can pick optional modules from any literary period.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by written assignment although some also require a presentation.

Over the course of the year you will also complete a supervised 15,000-word dissertation, with support from a supervisor. In order to complete your dissertation you will undertake independent research which may be based on (but will certainly extend) work undertaken for previous modules in the programme. There should be some element of originality to the research and staff will support your research in this regard; work should also aim towards making some contribution toward the field of study.

Please note: this programme outline relates to 2017/18 and is subject to change in future years.

Learning and teaching

You will be supported by literature staff in the department who research, publish, and teach across the full chronological range of English Literature from Old English to the present day, helping you to explore your specific interests.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: English Literature

Birmingham's English Literature postgraduates develop a range of skills including presentation, communication and analytical skills, as well as the ability to work independently, think critically and develop opinions.

Over the past three years, over 94% of English Literature postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Many of our graduates go on to further study or academia, while others use their transferable skills in a wide variety of occupations including copywriting, PR, marketing, publishing and teaching.



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The MA in Medieval Literature (one year full-time or two years part-time) allows students to explore one of the most interesting areas of English studies. Read more
The MA in Medieval Literature (one year full-time or two years part-time) allows students to explore one of the most interesting areas of English studies. Students participate in seminars and symposia, experience the challenges of Middle English, Old English or medieval Latin (amongst others), and engage with staff and visiting experts in some of the pressing methodological and critical debates of the day. The course is also designed to introduce students to the possibilities of doctoral study in the area. Funding is available to the best students from various sources, including AHRC, DEL and the School of English at Queen’s.

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As well as making a substantial contribution to the interdisciplinary MA in Medieval Studies offered by the Centre for Medieval Studies, the English Medieval School offers an MA in Medieval Literatures. Read more
As well as making a substantial contribution to the interdisciplinary MA in Medieval Studies offered by the Centre for Medieval Studies, the English Medieval School offers an MA in Medieval Literatures.

The MA in Medieval Literatures is a one-year programme that combines the study of Old and Middle English, and approaches medieval English literature as part of a dynamic, multilingual literary culture in which English interacted with Latin, Old Norse, and French. The MA caters both for those students who wish primarily to study the literature of medieval England, and also those who wish to explore other medieval European literatures as well. The MA thus takes full advantage of staff expertise in Latin, Old English, Middle English, Old Norse, Old French (including Anglo-Norman), while another area of special focus is Palaeography.

The course teaches a range of linguistic and technical skills which are essential for further medieval research.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

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This Master's degree in history considers the culture and society of the medieval period, which is usually understood as stretching from the transformation of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Read more
This Master's degree in history considers the culture and society of the medieval period, which is usually understood as stretching from the transformation of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. The programme will introduce you to a variety of topics within this broad span of time, including religion and heresy, philosophy and political thought, gender, the expansion of urban communities, power and kingship, and the dynamics of historical change. You will develop your ability to critically assess and analyse historical evidence and we will look at the archaeological record, documentary evidence, including parliamentary petitions, guild records and manorial court rolls, and literary sources by authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland, among others. While the focus is on Britain, you will also study the British medieval experience comparatively alongside that of mainland Europe, in particular France and Italy.

After the core module, you can choose option modules that will further extend your exploration of the period and engage your passion for particular topics. The dissertation allows you to pursue independent research in an area of personal interest under the expert supervision of one of our research-active academics. If you are interested in how societies develop over time, this course will give you a stimulating and complex perspective on this fascinating period.

Key teaching staff on this programme

Course director: Dr Caroline Goodson

Staff involved in teaching the MA include:

Dr Rebecca Darley
Professor Vanessa Harding
Professor John Henderson
Professor Matthew Innes.

Other medievalists at Birkbeck include:

Dr Alison Finlay, a lecturer in English, specialising in Old Icelandic sagas and heroic poetry, and Old English.

Professor Anthony Bale, a Reader in English who works on late medieval texts and culture.
Dr Isabel Davis, a lecturer in English who works on late medieval texts and culture.
Dr Zoe Opacic, a lecturer in art history, who works on late medieval art and architecture.
Dr Robert Maniura, a lecturer in art history who works on late medieval art and architecture.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Birkbeck has research and teaching strengths in the medieval period and you will be taught by academics with expertise across history, English literature, cultural studies and interdisciplinary combinations.
This programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and writing a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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Our taught MA pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. Read more

Our taught MA pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the fields of Medieval and Renaissance studies. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from Old Norse to Renaissance Tragedy, from medieval manuscripts to critical theory. The Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies pathway includes the possibility of taking interdisciplinary modules involving other departments including History and Archaeology. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programme offers up-to-date training in research methods and skills. You will choose three modules, at least two of which are from within the pathway, and you will write a dissertation on a subject related to Medieval and/or Renaissance studies.

An MA in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take this named pathway, you will be expected to select at least two modules from those available within the pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to it. Your third optional module may, if you wish, be chosen from the full list of MA modules on offer in the Department. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules

  • Research Methods and Resources
  • Dissertation

Optional Modules

Typical modules might include:

  • Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
  • Old Norse
  • Old English Language, Texts and Contexts
  • The Anglo-Saxon World
  • Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
  • Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
  • Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Renaissance Tragedy
  • Renaissance Humanism
  • John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
  • Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation.

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more then six of the above will run in any one year.

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to indicate your choice of modules as well as to provide a personal statement.

Course Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study.

Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond. 



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Your programme of study. You have come to the right place in every respect to learn about Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Read more

Your programme of study

You have come to the right place in every respect to learn about Medieval and Early Modern Studies. The campus and university were initiated in 1495 so there are plenty of architectural wonders and history to interest you whilst you study in 'Old Aberdeen.'  The architecture is truly stunning and totally unexpected as you enter the university from the centre of Aberdeen. As you would expect in a university of this age and rich heritage there are also special collections hosting a variety of cultural artefacts. If you haven't visited University of Aberdeen it is well worth a tour to understand just how much history you get whilst you study. There are obvious connections from the university with many of the periods of medieval and early modern eras you study. 

This is an interdisciplinary programme which allows you to connect our contemporary world with the past. You can study a great range of areas in terms of courses that make up your programme and you have the ability to really understand ancient kingdoms and civilisations from the past. You may want to study further after this programme or you may be able to advise within heritage tourism, museums and tourist sites. You may also like to get involved in writing and publishing or a wide range of other careers. Aberdeen provides you with a great teaching experience in an even greater setting which is medieval in origin.

The courses reflect research interests drawn from various disciplines including History, Church History and Divinity, Celtic, English, French, History of Art, Law, Philosophy and Scottish and Irish Studies and is supported by highly specialised teaching and research staff. The MLitt provides ample opportunity to use the large depository of late medieval and early modern materials in the University's Special Collection, which has new state of the art rooms in the new Library.

Courses listed for the programme

Introduction

You must acquire 180 credits (105 credits from courses, 75 dissertation)

Optional Potential areas for study:

  • The Enlightenment in Comparison: Scotland, Ireland and Central Europe 
  • The Scottish Wars of Independence
  • The Three Kingdoms of The Seventeenth Century
  • Crime and Society in Early Modern England and Scotland
  • Back in the Viking Homelands
  • Jacobites: War, Exile and Politics of Succession in Britain
  • Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Manuscript Studies
  • Introduction to Old English Language
  • Controversy and Drama: Marlowe to Revenge Tragedy
  • Art and Society in Eighteenth-Century England
  • Seventeenth-Century Netherlandish Art
  • Medieval Manuscripts: Illustration of Medieval Thought
  • Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
  • Scottish Legal history, 14th - 18th century

Optional Courses

  • Special Subject
  • Engaging with Historiography
  • Old Norse1: Language, Literature and Culture
  • Palaeography
  • Latin 1

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You develop a strong understanding of culture and history within the UK and Scotland joining a lively research environment
  • You are taught by experts in their specialist areas of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, if you specialise in renaissance and early modern periods you can attend seminars from the Centre of Early Modern Studies

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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