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Masters Degrees (Numerical Modelling)

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This course is for you if you wish to enter knowledge-led industrial sectors or to embark upon doctoral interdisciplinary study. This interdisciplinary programme between Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, and Astronomy gives you access to a broad range of knowledge and application in industry and academia. Read more

Why is this course for you?

•This course is for you if you wish to enter knowledge-led industrial sectors or to embark upon doctoral interdisciplinary study.
•This interdisciplinary programme between Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, and Astronomy gives you access to a broad range of knowledge and application in industry and academia.

What will you gain as a student?

•practical skills in computation in a range of languages and professional software
•rigorous understanding of the theory of common numerical methods
•technical knowledge in numerical modelling
•exposure to a range of common areas of application

Core Modules

Scientific Computing
Practical Programming
Computational Methods for PDEs or Finite Element Methods

Optional Modules include:

Topics in Mathematical Biology
Particle Methods in Scientific Computing
Advanced Fluid Dynamics
Data Mining and Neural Networks
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Dynamics of Mechanical Systems
Applications in Theoretical Physics

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This course is one of the premier international applied petroleum geoscience courses. Since the inception of the course in 1985 its graduates have an unparalleled employment record in the petroleum industry both in the UK and worldwide. Read more

This course is one of the premier international applied petroleum geoscience courses. Since the inception of the course in 1985 its graduates have an unparalleled employment record in the petroleum industry both in the UK and worldwide. In addition our graduates are highly sought after for further PhD research in the petroleum geosciences.

● Recognised by NERC - 5 MSc studentships each year covering fees, fieldwork and maintenance.

● Recognised by Industry - Industry scholarships

● We offer highly focused teaching and training by internationally recognised academic experts as well as by visiting staff from the petroleum industry.

The course covers the applications of basin dynamics and evolution to hydrocarbon exploration and production. The course is modular in form providing intensive learning and training in geophysics, tectonics and structural geology, sequence stratigraphy and sedimentology, hydrocarbon systems, reservoir geology, remote sensing and applied geological fieldwork.

The MSc course provides ‘state of the art’ training in -

● 3D seismic interpretation and 3D visualization;

● Fault analysis and fault-sealing;

● Seismic sequence stratigraphy;

● Applied sedimentology;

● Well log analysis;

● Remote sensing analysis of satellite and radar imagery;

● Analysis of gravity and magnetic data;

● Numerical modelling of sedimentation and tectonics;

● Applied structural geology;

● Geological Fieldwork.

● Transferable skills learned during the course include

project planning, presentation techniques, report writing and compilation, team working skills, spreadsheet and statistical analyses, GIS methods as well as graphics and visualization techniques.

● The full time MSc course runs for 50 weeks. The first half comprises one and two week course modules as well as group projects and fieldwork. The second half of the MSc course consists of an individual research project usually carried out in conjunction with the petroleum industry or related institutions such as international geological surveys.

● Part time study over 24 months is also available

● Each year independent projects are arranged with new data sets from industry – some students work in the offices of the company whereas other may use our excellent in-house facilities. All independent projects are supervised by faculty members with additional industry supervision where appropriate.

Facilities include –

● Dedicated Modern Teaching Laboratories

● 14 Dual Screen Unix Seismic Workstations

● PC and Macintosh Workstations

● Internationally Recognised Structural Modelling Laboratories

● Advanced Sedimentological Laboratories

The MSc course also greatly benefits from dynamic interaction with internationally recognised research groups within the Geology Department including –

● Project EAGLE – Evolution of the African and Arabian rift system – Professor Cindy Ebinger

● Southeast Asia Research Group – Tectonic Evolution and Basin Development in SE Asia – Professor Robert Hall

● Numerical Modelling Research Group – Numerical Modelling of Tectonics and Sedimentation – Dr Dave Waltham

● Fault Dynamics Research Group – Dynamics of Fault Systems in Sedimentary Basins – Professor Ken McClay

The 2005 MSc graduates went on to employment with Shell, BP, Amerada Hess, Gaz de France, OMV (Austria), Star Energy, First Africa Oil, Badley Ashton, ECL, PGS, Robertsons, PGL, Aceca, and to PhD research at Royal Holloway and Barcelona.

Since 2001, 85% of our graduates have gone in to work in the oil industry, 10% into geological research and 5% into environmental/engineering jobs.

Accommodation is available on campus in en-suite study bedrooms grouped in flats of eight, each with a communal kitchen and dining space.

Subsistence Costs ~£9,000 pa (including Hall of Residence fees of c. £4,500 for a full year)

APPLICATIONS can be made on line at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Registry/Admissions/applyonline.html



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This is one of the premier international applied MSc courses with a focus on petroleum exploration and production. It is run in parallel with the Basin Evolution and Dynamics MSc in Petroleum Geocsience but with a greater emphasis on tectonics and structural geology. Read more
This is one of the premier international applied MSc courses with a focus on petroleum exploration and production. It is run in parallel with the Basin Evolution and Dynamics MSc in Petroleum Geocsience but with a greater emphasis on tectonics and structural geology. In addition to successful employment in the international petroleum industry graduates from this course are employed in the international mining industry as well as being highly sought after for further PhD research in the geosciences.

● Recognised by Industry - Industry scholarships

● We offer highly focused teaching and training by internationally recognised academic experts as well as by visiting staff from the petroleum and remote sensing industries.

The course covers the applications of tectonics and structural geology to hydrocarbon exploration and production as well as to applied structural geology research in different terranes. The course is modular in form providing intensive learning and training in tectonics, applied structural geology, seismic interpretation of structural styles, tectonostratigraphic analysis, section balancing and reconstruction, remote sensing, crustal fluids and hydrocarbon systems, reservoir geology, and applied geological fieldwork.

The MSc course provides ‘state of the art’ training in –
● Plate tectonics and terrane analysis;
● Applied structural analysis;
● 3D seismic interpretation and 3D visualization of structural styles;
● Fault analysis and fault-sealing;
● Tectonostratigraphic analysis;
● Scaled analogue modelling;
● Numerical modelling of structures;
● Remote sensing analysis of satellite and radar imagery;
● Analysis of gravity and magnetic data;
● Section balancing and reconstruction;
● Applied structural fieldwork.

● Transferable skills learned during the course include
project planning, presentation techniques, report writing and compilation, team working skills, spreadsheet and statistical analyses, GIS methods as well as graphics and visualization techniques.

● The full time MSc course runs for 50 weeks. The first half comprises one and two week course modules as well as group projects and fieldwork. The second half of the MSc course consists of an individual research project usually carried out in conjunction with the petroleum industry or related institutions such as international geological surveys.

● Part time study over 24 months is also available

● Each year independent projects are arranged with new data sets from industry – some students work in the offices of the company whereas other may use our excellent in-house facilities. All independent projects are supervised by faculty members with additional industry supervision where appropriate.

Facilities include –
● Dedicated Modern Teaching Laboratories
● Internationally Recognised Structural Modelling Laboratories
● 14 Dual Screen Unix Seismic Workstations
● PC and Macintosh Workstations
● Advanced Sedimentological Laboratories

The MSc course also greatly benefits from dynamic interaction with internationally recognised research groups within the Geology Department including –

● Project EAGLE – Evolution of the African and Arabian rift system – Professor Cindy Ebinger
● Southeast Asia Research Group – tectonic evolution and basin development in SE Asia – Professor Robert Hall
● Numerical Modelling Research Group – Numerical modelling of tectonics and sedimentation – Dr Dave Waltham
● Fault Dynamics Research Group – Dynamics of Fault Systems in Sedimentary Basins – Professor Ken McClay

Our Tectonics MSc graduates have gained employment with Shell, BP, ECL, PGS, Sipetrol, PGL, Codelco, and to PhD research in a range of universities including Trieste, Barcelona, and Ulster universities.
Since 2001, 85% of our Petroleum Geosciences MSc graduates have gone in to work in the oil industry, 10% into geological research and 5% into environmental/engineering jobs.

Accommodation is available on campus in en-suite study bedrooms grouped in flats of eight, each with a communal kitchen and dining space.

Subsistence Costs ~£9,000 pa (including Hall of Residence fees of c. £4,500 for a full year)

APPLICATIONS can be made on line at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/Registry/Admissions/applyonline.html

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computer Modelling in Engineering at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computer Modelling in Engineering at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This MRes in Computer Modelling in Engineering programme consists of two streams: students may choose to specialise in either structures or fluids. The taught modules provide a good grounding in computer modelling and in the finite element method, in particular.

Key Features of MRes in Computer Modelling in Engineering

Computer simulation is now an established discipline that has an important role to play in engineering, science and in newly emerging areas of interdisciplinary research.

Using mathematical modelling as the basis, computational methods provide procedures which, with the aid of the computer, allow complex problems to be solved. The techniques play an ever-increasing role in industry and there is further emphasis to apply the methodology to other important areas such as medicine and the life sciences.

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering, within which this course is run, has excellent computing facilities, including a state-of-the-art multi-processor super computer with virtual reality facilities and high-speed networking.

This Computer Modelling in Engineering course is suitable for those who are interested in gaining a solid understanding of computer modelling, specialising in either structures or fluids, and taking the skills gained through this course to develop their career in industry or research.

If you would like to qualify as a Chartered Engineer, this course is accredited with providing the additional educational components for the further learning needed to qualify as a Chartered Engineer, as set out by UK and European engineering professional institutions.

Modules

Modules on the Computer Modelling in Engineering programme typically include:

• Finite Element and Computational Analysis

• Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations

• Solid Mechanics

• Advanced Fluid Mechanics

• Dynamics and Transient Analysis

• Communication Skills for Research Engineers

• MRes Research Project

Accreditation

The MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

The MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

The MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Links with Industry

The Civil and Computational Engineering Centre has an extensive track record of industrial collaboration and contributes to many exciting projects, including the aerodynamics for the current World Land Speed Record car, Thrust SSC, and the future BLOODHOUND SSC, and the design of the double-decker super-jet Airbus A380.

Examples of recent collaborators and sponsoring agencies include: ABB, Audi, BAE Systems, British Gas, Cinpress, DERA, Dti, EADS, EPSRC, European Union, HEFCW, HSE, Hyder, Mobil, NASA, Quinshield, Rolls-Royce, South West Water, Sumitomo Shell, Unilever, US Army, WDA.

Student Quotes

“I was attracted to the MRes course at Swansea as the subject matter was just what I was looking for.

I previously worked as a Cardiovascular Research Assistant at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Melbourne. My employer, the Head of the Cardiology Department, encouraged me to develop skills in modelling as this has a lot of potential to help answer some current questions and controversies in the field. I was looking for a Master’s level course that could provide me with computational modelling skills that I could apply to blood flow problems, particularly those arising from congenital heart disease.

The College of Engineering at Swansea is certainly a good choice. In the computational modelling area, it is one of the leading centres in the world (they wrote the textbook, literally). A lot of people I knew in Swansea initially came to study for a couple of years, but then ended up never leaving. I can see how that could happen.”

Jonathan Mynard, MRes Computer Modelling in Engineering, then PhD at the University of Melbourne, currently post-doctoral fellow at the Biomedical Simulation Laboratory, University of Toronto, Canada

Careers

Employment in a wide range of industries, which require the skills developed during the Computer Modelling in Engineering course, from aerospace to the medical sector. Computational modelling techniques have developed in importance to provide solutions to complex problems and as a graduate of this course, you will be able to utilise your highly sought-after skills in industry or research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK

Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK

Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Swansea University has been at the forefront of international research in the area of computational engineering. Internationally renowned engineers at Swansea pioneered the development of numerical techniques, such as the finite element method, and associated computational procedures that have enabled the solution of many complex engineering problems. As a student on the Master's course in Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics, you will find the course utilises the expertise of academic staff to provide high-quality postgraduate training.

Key Features: Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics

Computer simulation is now an established discipline that has an important role to play in engineering, science and in newly emerging areas of interdisciplinary research.

Using mathematical modelling as the basis, computational methods provide procedures which, with the aid of the computer, allow complex problems to be solved. The techniques play an ever-increasing role in industry and there is further emphasis to apply the methodology to other important areas such as medicine and the life sciences.

This Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course provides a solid foundation in computer modelling and the finite element method in particular.

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering, within which this course is run, has excellent computing facilities, including a state-of-the-art multi-processor super computer with virtual reality facilities and high-speed networking.

Modules

Modules on the Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

Reservoir Modelling and Simulation

Solid Mechanics

Finite Element Computational Analysis

Advanced Fluid Mechanics

Computational Plasticity

Fluid-Structure Interaction

Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Dynamics and Transient Analysis

Computational Case Study

Communication Skills for Research Engineers

Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Accreditation

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) is composed of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE), the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), and the Institute of Highway Engineers (IHE).

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

The MSc Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics degree has been accredited by the JBM under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Hardware includes a 450 cpu Cluster, high-end graphics workstations and high-speed network links. Extensive software packages include both in-house developed and 'off-the-shelf' commercial.

Links with Industry

The Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering has an extensive track record of industrial collaboration and contributes to many exciting projects, including the aerodynamics for the current World Land Speed Record car, Thrust SSC, and the future BLOODHOUND SSC, and the design of the double-decker super-jet Airbus A380.

Careers

Employment in a wide range of industries, which require the skills developed during the Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics course, from aerospace to the medical sector. Computational modelling techniques have developed in importance to provide solutions to complex problems and as a graduate of this course in Computer Modelling and Finite Elements in Engineering Mechanics, you will be able to utilise your highly sought-after skills in industry or research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.



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There is a growing need for qualified professionals with expertise in environmental modelling. The UCL Environmental Modelling MSc is a cross-disciplinary degree that provides rigorous technical and scientific training for the next generation of environmental modelling professionals. Read more
There is a growing need for qualified professionals with expertise in environmental modelling. The UCL Environmental Modelling MSc is a cross-disciplinary degree that provides rigorous technical and scientific training for the next generation of environmental modelling professionals.

Degree information

You will gain a well-rounded training in the role, implementation and application of models in environmental science. Core modules provide a critical perspective on model-based science, and introduce essential computational and numerical methods. The programme is contextualised with reference to the challenges of understanding both natural and human-induced changes to a variety of environmental systems.

Students take modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months, part-time two years) is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, full-time 12 weeks, part-time one year) is offered.

Core modules
-Models in Environmental Science
-Global Environmental Change
-Scientific Computing
-Analytical and Numerical Methods

Optional modules - options may include:
-Climate Modelling
-Coastal Change
-Environmental GIS
-Impacts of Climate Change on Hydro-Ecological Systems
-Lakes
-Ocean Circulation and Climate Change
-Surface Water Modelling
-Terrestrial Carbon: Monitoring and Modelling
-Other MSc modules offered across UCL may be taken at the discretion of the MSc convenor

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, culminating in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words and an oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and laboratory and computer-based practical classes. Assessment is through independent project work, practical-based and written coursework, written examinations and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme has been designed to provide an ideal foundation for PhD research, or for employment with environmental monitoring and protection agencies, industry and environmental consultancies. Graduates have gone on to careers as management consultants, business analysts and university researchers.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Fellow, University of Girona and studying PhD Sanitas, Universitat de Girona (University of Girona)
-Risk Analyst, Canopius

Employability
Modelling was identified as the highest priority UK skills gap in a government review of the environmental sector. This MSc programme exposes students to the full range of environmental modelling which places graduates in a strong position to find employment. We anticipate that graduates of this MSc are either employed in the private environmental consulting sector or undertake a PhD.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Environmental Modelling MSc is run by UCL Geography which enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching. Research groups contributing to the MSc include those concerned with environmental modelling and observation, past climates, and recent environmental change and biodiversity.

The programme draws on the unrivalled strengths of UCL in environment modelling. Our expertise encompasses state-of-the-art global climate models, regional ocean models, advanced hydrodynamic and hydrological simulations, palaeoclimate reconstruction over geological to recent historical timescales, earth observation-derived vegetation and carbon cycle modelling, and model-based assessment of climate change impacts on coastal, estuarine and freshwater systems.

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To reduce greenhouse gas emissions and aid sustainable development, there is an urgent need to support our electricity generating capacity through the development of low carbon technologies, particularly those generated from renewable sources. Read more
To reduce greenhouse gas emissions and aid sustainable development, there is an urgent need to support our electricity generating capacity through the development of low carbon technologies, particularly those generated from renewable sources. The ocean represents a vast and largely untapped energy resource, that could be exploited as a form of low carbon electricity generation, and there is much European and global commercial and R&D activity in this energy sector. The UK is the world leader in the development of wave and tidal stream technologies, and if marine energy deploys globally, the UK is uniquely positioned to capture a substantial market share, with the potential to contribute as much as £4.3 bn to UK GDP up to 2050. The aim of this MSc programme is to equip students with the skills necessary to identify and quantify the potential of specific locations for marine renewable energy generation installations, with an emphasis on the resource (waves and tides), time series analysis, numerical modelling, and the challenges faced when placing arrays of devices in the marine environment.

This 12 month taught postgraduate course introduces students with a first degree in the physical, mathematical or other numerate sciences to the subject of Marine Renewable Energy. As well as providing an overview of marine renewable energy, the course enables students to research in detail those aspects of the subject in which they are particularly interested. The course places particular emphasis on assessing the wave & tidal energy resource, and geophysical nature of sites, providing students with the necessary skills for marine renewable energy resource and site characterisation from a theoretical, technical, and practical perspective.

Course Structure and Modules
The first two semesters of the course are taught, introducing the student to the physics of the ocean, and the ways in which we can make use of the ocean to generate electricity, whilst minimising environmental impacts. Modules cover both oceanographic theory and its application, as well as practical oceanography. The latter includes an introduction to state-of-the-art instrumentation and numerical modelling, as well as practical experience working on the University's state-of-the-art research vessel, the 35 metre RV Prince Madog. The course also includes a module on geophysical surveying, teaching the techniques used to survey sites suitable for deploying wave and tidal energy arrays. Student achievement in the course is evaluated by a combination of continuous assessment and module examinations.

During the second semester, the students begin to focus on specific aspects of the subject, initially through a dedicated module on marine renewable energy, and subsequently through an extensive literature review followed by a research project. The research project, which forms a major component of the course, is selected in close consultation with the students such that it is of direct relevance to their intended future work. The School of Ocean Sciences has extensive links with the marine renewable energy sector, and many of the projects will be in collaboration with industry. For overseas students, well founded projects based on investigations being undertaken in a home institute are encouraged.

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Biofluid Mechanics applies engineering, mathematical and physical principles of fluids to solve complex and multifaceted problems, primarily in biology and medicine, but also in aerospace and robotics. Read more

Why this course?

Biofluid Mechanics applies engineering, mathematical and physical principles of fluids to solve complex and multifaceted problems, primarily in biology and medicine, but also in aerospace and robotics.

This newly-launched MSc course is the first one-year taught course in the world dedicated to Biofluid Mechanics. It covers a wide range of multidisciplinary training on the kinematics and dynamics of fluids related to biological systems, medical science, cardiovascular devices, numerical modelling and computational fluid dynamics.

The one-year full-time programme offers you a unique opportunity to lead the next generation of highly-skilled postgraduates that will form a new model worldwide for academia – with world-class research knowledge, industry – with highly-competitive skills in both biomedical engineering and fluid dynamics, and for society – with better training to work with clinicians.

This course is taught by the Department of Biomedical Engineering, with input from other departments across the Faculty of Engineering and the wider University. You'll be supported throughout the course by a strong team of academics with global connections. You'll benefit from a unique training and an innovative teaching and learning environment.

You'll study

In Semesters 1 and 2, you'll take compulsory classes and a choice of optional classes. 
The remaining months are dedicated to project work, submitted as dissertation (Diploma students) or as a research thesis (MSc students).

Compulsory Classes

Biofluid Mechanics
Industrial Software
Medical Science for Engineering
Research Methodology
Professional Studies in Biomedical Engineering

Optional Classes

Haemodynamics for Engineers
Numerical Modelling in Biomedical Engineeirng
Cardiovascular Devices
The Medical Device Regulatory Process
Entrepreneurship and Commercialisation in Biomedical Engineering
Introduction to Biomechanics
Finite Element Methods for Boundary Value Problems and Approximation
Mathematical Biology and Marine Population Modelling
Design Management
Risk Management

Masters Research Project

The project provides MSc students with the opportunity to experience the challenges and rewards of independent study in a topic of their own choice; the project may involve an extended literature review, experimental and/or computational work.

Postgraduate Diploma Dissertation

The dissertation is likely to take the form of an extended literature review. Your project work will have been supported by a compulsory research methods module and specialist knowledge classes throughout the year designed to assist with technical aspects of methodology and analysis.

Industrial Partnerships

We have established strong partnerships with industrial companies that have offered their support through the provision of software licenses and/or teaching material.

Fees & funding

How much will my course cost?

All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise.

Scotland/EU

2017/18 - £5,500
Rest of UK

2017/18 - £9,000
International

2017/18 - £19,100
How can I fund my course?

Scholarship search

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students

Scottish and non-UK EU postgraduate students starting in 2017 can apply for support from the Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS). The support is in the form of a tuition fee loan and for eligible students a living cost loan. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from England

Students ordinarily resident in England can apply for Postgraduate support from Student Finance England. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. Find out more about the support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Wales

Postgraduate students starting in 2017 who are ordinarily resident in Wales can apply for support from Student Finance Wales. The support is a loan of up to £10,280 which can be used for both tuition fees and living costs. We are waiting on further information being released about this support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Students coming from Northern Ireland

Postgraduate students starting in 2017 who are ordinarily resident in Northern Ireland can apply for support from Student Finance NI. The support is a tuition fee loan of up to £5,500. We are waiting on further information being released about this support and how to apply.

Don’t forget to check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

International students

We have a large range of scholarships available to help you fund your studies. Check our scholarship search for more help with fees and funding.

Please note

The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Find out more about fees.

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Biofluid mechanics applies engineering, mathematical and physical principles of fluids to solve complex and multifaceted problems primarily in biology and medicine, but also in aerospace and robotics. Read more

Research opportunities

Biofluid mechanics applies engineering, mathematical and physical principles of fluids to solve complex and multifaceted problems primarily in biology and medicine, but also in aerospace and robotics.

Our new MRes course covers a wide range of multidisciplinary training on the kinematics and dynamics of fluids related to biological systems, medical science, cardiovascular devices, numerical modelling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), focusing on research. The MRes differs from an MSc in that you'll have the opportunity to perform multidisciplinary research for a longer time, preparing you for a research career and equipping you with world-class research knowledge.

The course is taught by the Department of Biomedical Engineering, with input from other departments across the faculty and the University.

During the course, you'll be supported by a strong team of academics with worldwide connections and you'll be offered a unique training and innovative teaching and learning environment.

Course director: Dr Asimina Kazakidi

Lecturer in Biofluid Mechanics

Course co-director: Professor Dimitris Drikakis

Executive Dean of Engineering and Professor of Engineering Science

What you'll study

This one-year programme consists of compulsory and optional classes in the first two semesters. Each class has timetabled contact hours, delivered predominantly in lectures, laboratories and tutorials.

The MRes research project will be chosen and started in semester one with guidance from a supervisor. Throughout the year you'll be working on your project.

Compulsory classes

Professional Studies in Biomedical Engineering
Research Methodology
MRes project

Elective classes

Biofluid Mechanics
Industrial Software
Medical Science for Engineering
Haemodynamics for Engineers
Numerical Modelling in Biomedical Engineering
Cardiovascular Devices
The Medical Device Regulatory Process
Entrepreneurship & Commercialisation in Biomedical Engineering
Introduction to Biomechanics
Finite Element Methods for Boundary Value Problems and Approximation
Mathematical Biology & Marine Population Modelling
Design Management
Risk Management

Guest lectures

During the course, academics and industrial speakers will be invited as part of the training. You'll also benefit from departmental seminars and knowledge exchange events.

Fees & funding

Fees

All fees quoted are per academic year unless otherwise stated.

Here are our fees for 2017/18:

Scotland/ EU

£4,195
Rest of UK

£4,195
International students

£19,100
Funding

If you can't find what you're looking for, try our scholarship search instead.

The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year.

Support & development

Careers

The new MRes course aims to train students in the Biofluid Mechanics field, targeting primarily the academic research market, but also the Medical Devices and Simulation/Analysis software industries and other related and new emerging markets.

Our postgraduates will benefit from acquiring world-class training and competitive skills in both biomedical and fluid dynamics disciplines that will make them highly employable at the following markets and related sectors/companies:

academic research
medical device market
simulation & analysis software market
biosimulation market
NHS & the healthcare/medical simulation market
life science research tools & reagents market
We've identified the current key vendors in each of the above markets and aim to create links with the relevant industry and monitor the changing market and employability trends, in order to adjust teaching modules and approaches and to enhance employability of our graduates.

Industrial partnerships

We've already established strong partnerships with industrial companies that have offered their support through the provision of software licenses and/or teaching material.

Student support

From financial advice to our IT facilities, we have loads of different support for all students here at our University. Get all the information you need at Strathlife.

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This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Read more

This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of problems, on the analytical and numerical techniques for a solution and the computation of useful results.

By the end of the course students should be able to formulate a well posed problem in mathematical terms from a possibly sketchy verbal description, carry out appropriate mathematical analysis, select or develop an appropriate numerical method, write a computer program which gives sensible answers to the problem, and present and interpret these results for a possible client. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for all these parts in the problem solving process, and on the fact that they frequently interact and cannot be carried out sequentially.

The course consists of both taught courses and a dissertation. To complete the course you must complete 13 units.

There are four core courses which you must complete (one unit each), which each usually consist of 24 lectures, classes and an examination. There is one course on mathematical methods and one on numerical analysis in both Michaelmas term and Hilary term. Each course is assessed by written examination in Week 0 of the following term.

Additionally, you must choose at least least one special topic in the area of modelling and one in computation (one unit each). There are around twenty special topics to choose from, spread over all three academic terms, each usually consisting for 12 to 16 lectures and a mini project, which culminates in a written report of around 20 pages. Topics covered include mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, perturbation methods, numerical solution of differential equations and scientific programming. 

You must also undertake at least one case study in modelling and one in scientific computing (one unit each), normally consisting of four weeks of group work, an oral presentation and a report delivered in Hilary term.

There is also a dissertation (four units) of around 50 pages, which does not necessarily need to represent original ideas. Since there is another MSc focussed on mathematical finance specifically, the MSc in Mathematical and Computational Finance, you are not permitted to undertake a dissertation in this field.

You will normally accumulate four units in core courses, three units in special topics, two units in case studies and four units in the dissertation. In addition, you will usually attend classes in mathematical modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills during Michaelmas term.

In the first term, students should expect their weekly schedule to consist of around seven hours of core course lectures and seven hours of modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills classes, then a further two hours of lectures for each special topic course followed. In addition there are about three hours of problem solving classes to go through core course exercises and students should expect to spend time working through the exercises then submitting them for marking prior to the class. There are slightly fewer contact hours in the second term, but students will spend more time working in groups on the case studies.

In the third term there are some special topic courses, including one week intensive computing courses, but the expectation is that students will spend most of the third term and long vacation working on their dissertations. During this time, students should expect to work hours that are equivalent to full-time working hours, although extra hours may occasionally be needed. Students are expected to write special topic and case study reports during the Christmas and Easter vacations, as well as revising for the core course written examinations.



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This programme develops mathematical modelling skills and provides mathematical techniques required by industry. The period October to June is devoted to lectures, tutorials and practical sessions comprising the core modules. Read more
This programme develops mathematical modelling skills and provides mathematical techniques required by industry.

The period October to June is devoted to lectures, tutorials and practical sessions comprising the core modules.

This is followed by a period of about 14 weeks devoted to an individual project either in an industrial or engineering company or at the University.

Core study areas include mathematical modelling, regular and chaotic dynamics, programming and numerical methods, advanced reliability, availability and maintainability, elements of partial differential equations, static and dynamic optimisation and fluid mechanics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mathematics/industrial-maths-modelling/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
Semester 1
- Mathematical Modelling I
- Regular and Chaotic Dynamics
- Programming and Numerical Methods
- Advanced Reliability, Availability and Maintainability

Semester 2
- Mathematical Modelling II
- Elements of Partial Differential Equations
- Static and Dynamic Optimisation
- Fluid Mechanics

Assessment

A combination of written examinations, reports, individual and group projects, and verbal presentations.

Careers and further Study

Graduate employment over a wide range of industries encompassing aerospace, automotive electronics, and computer interests as well as software houses, insurance companies, and research establishments and institutions.

Scholarships and sponsorships

A limited number of scholarships are available for this programme as well as the loyalty bonus scheme which reduces fees for Loughborough graduates.

Why choose mathematics at Loughborough?

Mathematics at Loughborough has a long history of innovation in teaching, and we have a firm research base with strengths in both pure and applied mathematics as well as mathematics education.

The Department comprises more than 34 academic staff, whose work is complemented and underpinned by senior visiting academics, research associates and a large support team.

The programmes on offer reflect our acknowledged strengths in pure and applied research in mathematics, and in some cases represent established collaborative training ventures with industrial partners.

- Mathematics Education Centre (MEC)
The Mathematics Education Centre (MEC) at Loughborough University is an internationally renowned centre of research, teaching, learning and support. It is a key player in many high-profile national initiatives.
With a growing number of academic staff and research students, the MEC provides a vibrant, supportive community with a wealth of experience upon which to draw.
We encourage inquiries from students who are interested in engaging in research into aspects of learning and teaching mathematics at Masters, PhD and Post Doc levels. Career prospects With 100% of our graduates in employment and/or further study six months after graduating, career prospects are excellent. Graduates go on to work with companies such as BAE Systems, Citigroup, Experian, GE Aviation, Mercedes Benz, Nuclear Labs USA and PwC.

- Career prospects
With 100% of our graduates in employment and/or further study six months after graduating, career prospects are excellent. Graduates
go on to work with companies such as BAE Systems, Citigroup, Experian, GE Aviation, Mercedes Benz, Nuclear Labs USA and PwC.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mathematics/industrial-maths-modelling/

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he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. Read more
he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. This discipline encompasses a wide range of life science areas, including ecology (e.g. population dynamics), epidemiology (e.g. spread of diseases), medicine (e.g. modelling cancer growth and treatment) and developmental biology.

This programme aims to equip students with the necessary technical skills to develop, analyse and interpret models applied to biological systems. Course work is supported by an extended and supervised project in life science modelling.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Dynamical Systems;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine.

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Stochastic Simulation;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Biologically Inspired Computation;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Modelling Invasive Tumour Growth;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Wiring of Nervous System;
Vegetation Patterning in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

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The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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This MSc programme offers very relevant modules in highly sought-after engineering and scientific subjects. Read more
This MSc programme offers very relevant modules in highly sought-after engineering and scientific subjects. Computational modelling has become an essential part of industrial product development; the manufacturing sector in particular has been experiencing a significant uptake of computational engineering technologies to increase its competitiveness in the global market. This programme is designed for engineering and science graduates, providing a wide exploration of these new and advanced technologies. Problem based learning facilities the application of the modelling techniques.

Subject guide and modules

The range of modules reflects the nature of engineering modelling and the uses it is put to in engineering and commercial practice.
Core modules:
-Computational Fluid Dynamics and Applications (ME4501)
-Practical Numerical Methods (ME4510)
-CAD Principles and Materials Selection (ME4505)
-Advanced Computer Aided Design (ADVCAD) (ME4518)
-Major Project (PD4000)
-Research Project (PD4001)
-Renewable Energy (ME4504)
-Sustainable Design (PD4005)

Elective Modules:
-Solid Mechanics and Finite Element Analysis (ME3070)
-Strategic Finance (EM4001)
-Project Management (EM4003)
-New Product Development (EM4006)
-Innovation Business Development (PD4008)
-Finite Element Analysis: Theory and Application (ME4502)

Learning, teaching & assessment

The modules in this programme are delivered with lectures and lab-based tutorials giving a good balance between scientific methodologies and hands-on practice.

There is a heavy emphasis on the use of computational engineering methods and this is reflected in the way the programme is delivered and assessed.

Modules are assessed through either course work or exams. The major project is assessed by dissertation; examples of past major projects include development of CFD code, aero and structural dynamics of vehicles and aircraft, and analysis of development of industrial machines.

Personal development

Along with the range of technical skills, the Programme aims to develop self reliance, project management, IT communications and research skills.

You will develop and deliver a major dissertation and the necessary project management processes. You will also make several individual presentations and get chance to hone your interview techniques.

Career prospects

Career prospects for graduates are excellent. The programme puts practical engineering modelling, research and project management skills in to the hands of graduate. This helps career progression in industries where computer-based technology is required including manufacturing, R&D, science, IT, design and academia.

Recent graduates have been employed in a range of jobs including:
-Product development with a manufacturer of domestic heating products
-Computer aided design with a manufacturer of military/surveillance equipment

Professional accreditation

The MSc Mechanical Engineering (Modelling) is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) for the purpose of meeting the educational requirements of Chartered Engineer (CEng).

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There is a growing need by industry for staff trained in computational molecular sciences. Read more
There is a growing need by industry for staff trained in computational molecular sciences. This new multidisciplinary MSc will teach simulation tools used in a wide range of applications, including catalysis and energy materials, nanotechnology and drug design, and will provide skills transferable to other fields, thereby broadening employment prospects.

Degree information

Students will gain detailed knowledge and skills in molecular modelling, focusing on the state-of-the art simulation techniques employed to research the molecular level properties that determine the macroscopic behaviour of matter. They will also gain key research skills and will learn the basic concepts in business and entrepreneurship as applied to high-tech industries.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three optional module (45 credits) and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules - students take the two modules listed below (45 credits) and submit a research dissertation (90 credits).
-Simulation Methods in Materials Chemistry
-The Scientific Literature

Optional modules - students take 45 credits drawn from the following:
-Mastering Entrepreneurship
-Numerical Methods in Chemistry
-Researcher Professional Development
-Transferable Skills for Scientists
-Choice of one postgraduate lecture module at UCL

Dissertation/report
All students undertake a computational research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation of approximately 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and laboratory classes. Assessment is through unseen examination, coursework, individual and group projects, poster creation, presentation and the research project.

Careers

There are increasing career opportunities in the field of molecular modelling in sectors including sustainable energy, catalysis, nanotechnology, biomedical materials and pharmaceuticals. This MSc will train students in the skills necessary for future employment in the industrial and public sector communities, together with specific training in career development and transferable skills.

The majority of students on the programme have moved on to PhD study.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Chemistry, University College London (UCL)

Employability
The training provided by this program will enable the student to enter into a wide range of fields. Students may continue in academia to complete a PhD or pursue teaching as a profession. Students with the skills obtained during this study are highly sought after by the industrial sector, including IT, sustainable energy, catalysis, nanotechnology, biomedical materials and pharmaceuticals. Students are very likely to be welcome in the financial sector.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Chemistry has a world-leading position in molecular modelling research.

Molecular modelling techniques are having increasing impact in the industrial sector, as evidenced by the partnership between UCL's Industrial Doctorate Centre in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science and a range of national and international industrial sponsors.

This multidisciplinary programme offers a wide range of options, thereby enabling each student to tailor the programme to their own needs and interests.

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