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Masters Degrees (Numerical Analysis)

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The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Read more
The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Expertise in the group encompasses a broad range of topics, including Continuum Mechanics, Analysis & Dynamical Systems, Industrial & Applied Mathematics, Inverse Problems, Mathematical Finance, and Numerical Analysis & Scientific Computing. The group has a strongly interdisciplinary research ethos, which it pursues in areas such as Mathematics in the Life Sciences, Uncertainty Quantification & Data Science, and within the Manchester Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics.

The Applied Mathematics group offers the MSc in Applied Mathematics as an entry point to graduate study. The MSc has two pathways, reflecting the existing strengths within the group in numerical analysis and in industrial mathematics. The MSc consists of five core modules (total 75 credits) covering the main areas of mathematical techniques, modelling and computing skills necessary to become a modern applied mathematician. Students then choose three options, chosen from specific pathways in numerical analysis and industrial modelling (total 45 credits). Finally, a dissertation (60 credits) is undertaken with supervision from a member of staff in the applied mathematics group with the possibility of co-supervision with an industrial sponsor.

Aims

The course aims to develop core skills in applied mathematics and allows students to specialise in industrial modelling or numerical analysis, in preparation for study towards a PhD or a career using mathematics within industry. An important element is the course regarding transferable skills which will link with academics and employers to deliver important skills for a successful transition to a research career or the industrial workplace.

Special features

The course features a transferable skills module, with guest lectures from industrial partners. Some dissertation projects and short internships will also be available with industry.

Teaching and learning

Students take eight taught modules and write a dissertation. The taught modules feature a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, coursework, and computing and modelling projects (both individually and in groups). The modules on Scientific Computing and Transferable Skills particularly involve significant project work. Modules are examined through both coursework and examinations.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment comprises course work, exams in January and May, followed by a dissertation carried out and written up between June and September. The dissertation counts for 60 credits of the 180 credits and is chosen from a range of available projects, including projects suggested by industrial partners.

Course unit details

CORE (75 credits)
1. Mathematical methods
2. Partial Differential Equations
3. Scientific Computing
4. Dynamical Systems
5. Transferrable skills for mathematicians

Industrial modelling pathway
1 Continuum mechanics
2. Stability theory
3. Conservation and transport laws

Numerical analysis pathway
1. Numerical linear algebra
2. Finite Elements
3. Optimization and variational calculus

Career opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a career in research (via entry into a PhD programme) or direct entry into industry. Possible subsequent PhD programmes would be those in mathematics, computer science, or one of the many science and engineering disciplines where applied mathematics is crucial. The programme develops many computational, analytical, and modelling skills, which are valued by a wide range of employers. Specialist skills in scientific computing are valued in the science, engineering, and financial sector.

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This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Read more

This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of problems, on the analytical and numerical techniques for a solution and the computation of useful results.

By the end of the course students should be able to formulate a well posed problem in mathematical terms from a possibly sketchy verbal description, carry out appropriate mathematical analysis, select or develop an appropriate numerical method, write a computer program which gives sensible answers to the problem, and present and interpret these results for a possible client. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for all these parts in the problem solving process, and on the fact that they frequently interact and cannot be carried out sequentially.

The course consists of both taught courses and a dissertation. To complete the course you must complete 13 units.

There are four core courses which you must complete (one unit each), which each usually consist of 24 lectures, classes and an examination. There is one course on mathematical methods and one on numerical analysis in both Michaelmas term and Hilary term. Each course is assessed by written examination in Week 0 of the following term.

Additionally, you must choose at least least one special topic in the area of modelling and one in computation (one unit each). There are around twenty special topics to choose from, spread over all three academic terms, each usually consisting for 12 to 16 lectures and a mini project, which culminates in a written report of around 20 pages. Topics covered include mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, perturbation methods, numerical solution of differential equations and scientific programming. 

You must also undertake at least one case study in modelling and one in scientific computing (one unit each), normally consisting of four weeks of group work, an oral presentation and a report delivered in Hilary term.

There is also a dissertation (four units) of around 50 pages, which does not necessarily need to represent original ideas. Since there is another MSc focussed on mathematical finance specifically, the MSc in Mathematical and Computational Finance, you are not permitted to undertake a dissertation in this field.

You will normally accumulate four units in core courses, three units in special topics, two units in case studies and four units in the dissertation. In addition, you will usually attend classes in mathematical modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills during Michaelmas term.

In the first term, students should expect their weekly schedule to consist of around seven hours of core course lectures and seven hours of modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills classes, then a further two hours of lectures for each special topic course followed. In addition there are about three hours of problem solving classes to go through core course exercises and students should expect to spend time working through the exercises then submitting them for marking prior to the class. There are slightly fewer contact hours in the second term, but students will spend more time working in groups on the case studies.

In the third term there are some special topic courses, including one week intensive computing courses, but the expectation is that students will spend most of the third term and long vacation working on their dissertations. During this time, students should expect to work hours that are equivalent to full-time working hours, although extra hours may occasionally be needed. Students are expected to write special topic and case study reports during the Christmas and Easter vacations, as well as revising for the core course written examinations.



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Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Read more

Introduction

Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Seafood products are provided by both aquaculture and capture fisheries and are one of the most highly traded food products globally. Including seafood in our daily diet provides an affordable source of macro and micronutrients required for optimal human health and development.
This course is designed to introduce the global issues affecting seafood production and trading, and will promote an understanding of the key factors affecting aquatic food production, post-harvest protocols, post-mortem metabolic events and microbial/chemical processes key for food safety and quality. Sensory assessment and shelf-life extension technologies will also be covered. The course will also examine other key issues in seafood trading such as traceability systems, certifications as well as the impact of governance and legislation on the global seafood sector.
This is the only aquatic food security MSc currently available in the UK. It will comprehensively follow the food chain from production through to consumer health and welfare.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Rachel Norman

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

This course shares some modules with the MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture and there is flexibility within the system to change the degree title depending on what advanced modules are taken. The course is divided into four taught modules, containing 18 subject areas or topics, and a single Research Project module.

Delivery and assessment

In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both supervisors and an external examiner.

Modes of study

The course is available on a block-release basis (by selecting individual or a series of modules) over a period not exceeding five academic years.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

This MSc brings a unique perspective to the expertise that already exists in Stirling on global seafood production. It is the only MSc in the UK that focusses on how seafood can contribute to global food security.
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries and this will provide students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector.
We also have links within Asia and Europe which will allow the opportunity to undertake the Research Project overseas.

Academic strengths

The Institute of Aquaculture has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and reducing the environmental impact of these activities. In addition, we have recently invested in new posts in Aquatic Food Security whose activities also include research into food safety and quality post harvest, aquatic animal nutrition, as well as developing mathematical models of production systems. We therefore have expertise that covers the whole production cycle from farm to fork.
The Institute of Aquaculture is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and is one of only a handful of institutions devoted to aquatic food security. The goal is to develop and promote aquatic food security building on the Institute staff expertise in sustainable aquatic animal production.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Demand for well qualified postgraduates to contribute to food production and the supply chain will continue to increase in line with demand to double food production over the coming decades. This course provides each student with the appropriate knowledge and practical experience important for a career in aquatic food security. The course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Employability
This course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry.

- Industry connections
We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries which provides students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector. We also have links within Asia and Europe which allows the opportunity to undertake the research project overseas.

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The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Read more
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Covering topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques, it produces graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well-equipped to proceed to doctoral research or directly into employment in industry, the professions, and the public service. It also provides training for the academic researchers and teachers of the future, encouraging the pursuit of research in computational methods for science and technology disciplines, thus being an important gateway for entering PhD programmes containing a substantial component of computational modelling.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpscm

Course detail

The MPhil in Scientific Computing has a research and a taught element. The research element is a project on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. The taught element comprises of core lecture courses on topics of scientific computing and elective lecture courses relevant to the science or technology topic of the project. Most of the projects are expected to make use of the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

The students will attend lecture courses during Michaelmas Term (some courses may be during Lent Term) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for continuation to a PhD programme or employment, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners who are working with the participating Departments and may be sponsoring the research project.

There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively.

Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments on the core courses 25%; written examinations on the elective courses 25%.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project.

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core lectures are on topics of high performance scientific computing numerical analysis and advanced numerical methods and techniques. They are organized by the Centre for Scientific Computing and are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their dissertation and for their general education in scientific computing.

In particular, their objective is to introduce students to the simulation science pipeline of problem identification, modelling, simulation and evaluation - all from the perspective of employing high-performance computing. Numerical discretisation of mathematical models will be a priority, with a specific emphasis on understanding the trade-offs (in terms of modelling time, pre-processing time, computational time, and post-processing time) that must be made when solving realistic science and engineering problems. Understanding and working with computational methods and parallel computing will be a high priority. To help the students understand the material, the lecturers will furnish the courses with practical coursework assignments.

The lectures on topics of numerical analysis and HPC are complemented with hands-on practicals using Linux-based laptops provided by the course (students may bring their own), as well as on the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

Appropriate elective lecture courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor. While every effort is made within the Departments to arrange the timetable in a coherent fashion, it is inevitable that some combinations of courses will be ruled out by their schedule, particularly if the choices span more than one department.

Continuing

For continuation to a PhD programme in Scientific Computing, students are required to gain a Distinction (overall grade equal or greater than 75%).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Applied Mathematical Sciences offers a clear and relevant gateway into a successful career in business, education or scientific research. Read more
Applied Mathematical Sciences offers a clear and relevant gateway into a successful career in business, education or scientific research. The programme arms students with the essential knowledge required by all professional mathematicians working across many disciplines. You will learn to communicate their ideas effectively to peers and others, as well as the importance of research, planning and self-motivation.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

:

Modelling and Tools;
Optimization;
Dynamical Systems;
Applied Mathematics (recommended);
Applied Linear Algebra (recommended).

Optional Courses

:

Mathematical Ecology;
Functional Analysis;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Pure Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Stochastic Simulation;
Software Engineering Foundations;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry.

Typical project subjects

:

Pattern Formation of Whole Ecosystems;
Climate Change Impact;
Modelling Invasive Tumour Growth;
Simulation of Granular Flow and Growing Sandpiles;
Finite Element Discretisation of ODEs and PDEs;
Domain Decomposition;
Mathematical Modelling of Crime;
The Geometry of Point Particles;
Can we Trust Eigenvalues on a Computer?

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he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. Read more
he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. This discipline encompasses a wide range of life science areas, including ecology (e.g. population dynamics), epidemiology (e.g. spread of diseases), medicine (e.g. modelling cancer growth and treatment) and developmental biology.

This programme aims to equip students with the necessary technical skills to develop, analyse and interpret models applied to biological systems. Course work is supported by an extended and supervised project in life science modelling.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Dynamical Systems;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine.

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Stochastic Simulation;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Biologically Inspired Computation;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Modelling Invasive Tumour Growth;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Wiring of Nervous System;
Vegetation Patterning in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

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Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. Read more
Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. This programme aims to provide an understanding of climate change causes, impacts, mitigation and adaptation measures from a life science perspective in conjunction with developing a wide variety of mathematical modelling skills that can be used to investigate the impacts of climate change.

The programme closely follows the structure of our Applied Mathematical Sciences MSc. Two of the mandatory courses will specifically focus on understanding the issues related to climate change and are taught by the School of Life Sciences.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures;
Dynamical Systems (recommended);
Stochastic Simulation (recommended)

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Applied Linear Algebra;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Bayesian Inference.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Climate Change Impact;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Vegetation Patterns in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

The final part of the MSc is an extended project in mathematical modelling the impacts of climate change on environmental systems, giving the opportunity to investigate a topic in some depth guided by leading research academics.

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Accurate and efficient scientific computations lie at the heart of most cross-discipline collaborations. It is key that such computations are performed in a stable, efficient manner and that the numerics converge to the true solutions, dynamics of the physics, chemistry or biology in the problem. Read more
Accurate and efficient scientific computations lie at the heart of most cross-discipline collaborations. It is key that such computations are performed in a stable, efficient manner and that the numerics converge to the true solutions, dynamics of the physics, chemistry or biology in the problem.

The programme closely follows the structure of our Applied Mathematical Sciences MSc and will equip you with the skill to perform efficient accurate computer simulations in a wide variety of applied mathematics, physics, chemical and industrial problems.

The MSc, has at its core, fundamental courses in pure mathematics and students will be able to take options from both pure and applied mathematics.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Functional Analysis;
Partial Differential Equations;
Pure Mathematics (recommended).

Optional Courses

Mathematical Ecology;
Optimization;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Dynamical Systems;
Stochastic Simulation;
Applied Linear Algebra;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Bayesian Inference and Computational Methods;
Geometry.

Typical project subjects

Domain Decomposition;
Mathematical Modelling of Crime;
The Geometry of Point Particles;
Can we Trust Eigenvalues on a Computer?;
Braess Paradox;
The Ising Model: Exact and Numerical Results;
Banach Alegbras.

The final part of the MSc is an extended project in computational mathematics, giving the opportunity to investigate a topic in some depth guided by leading research academics from our 5-rated mathematics and statistics groups.

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Accurate and efficient scientific computations lie at the heart of most cross-discipline collaborations. It is key that such computations are performed in a stable, efficient manner and that the numerics converge to the true solutions, dynamics of the physics, chemistry or biology in the problem. Read more
Accurate and efficient scientific computations lie at the heart of most cross-discipline collaborations. It is key that such computations are performed in a stable, efficient manner and that the numerics converge to the true solutions, dynamics of the physics, chemistry or biology in the problem.

The programme closely follows the structure of our Applied Mathematical Sciences MSc and will equip you with the skill to perform efficient accurate computer simulations in a wide variety of applied mathematics, physics, chemical and industrial problems.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Stochastic Simulation;
Applied Linear Algebra;
Numerical Analysis;

Optional Courses

Dynamical Systems;
Optimization;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Functional Analysis;
Software Engineering Foundations;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine;
Biologically Inspired Computation;
Advanced Software Engineering;
Geometry;
Bayesian Inference;

Typical project subjects

Simulation of Granular Flow and Growing Sandpiles;
Finite Element Discretisation of ODEs and PDEs;
Domain Decomposition;
Computational Spectral Theory;
Mathematical Modelling of Crime;
Mathematical Modelling of Micro-electron Mechanical Systems.
Can we Trust Eigenvalues on a Computer?

The final part of the MSc is an extended project in computational mathematics, giving the opportunity to investigate a topic in some depth guided by leading research academics from our 5-rated mathematics and statistics groups.

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The first intake for this course will be September 2015. The focus of this course is using mathematics to solve real world problems, such as in finance, energy, engineering or scientific research. Read more
The first intake for this course will be September 2015.

The focus of this course is using mathematics to solve real world problems, such as in finance, energy, engineering or scientific research. The combination of the applied nature of the mathematics that is taught, with the masters level of this course, makes this qualification highly attractive to employers.

Why study Applied Mathematics at Dundee?

Many of the topics taught are directly linked to the research that we do, so you will be learning at the cutting edge of applied mathematics.

We are a relatively small division and operate with an excellent staff/student ratio. One advantage of this is that we can get to know each student personally, and so can offer a friendly and supportive learning experience. Staff are ready and willing to help at all levels, and in addition, our Student-Staff Committee meets regularly to discuss matters of importance to our students.

We also offer students the chance to choose a selection of modules from other subject areas such as economics and finance.

Specialist software:
We have a wide selection of mathematical software packages such as MATLAB, Maple and COMSOL, which are used throughout the course.

Weekly seminar programme:
We have a weekly seminar programme in the mathematics division, which features talks in the areas of research strength in the division, Mathematical Biology, Applied Analysis, Magnetohydrodynamics and Numerical Analysis & Scientific Computing.

How you will be taught

You will learn by traditional methods such as lectures, tutorials, and workshops as well as via computer assisted learning. We teach the use of professional mathematical software packages in order to allow you to explore mathematics far beyond the limits of traditional teaching.

Individual reading and study takes a particularly important role in the Summer project. For the project, you will be guided to prepare your research project plan and to develop skills and competence in research including project management, critical thinking and problem solving, project reporting and presentation.

What you will study

This one year course involves taking four taught modules in semester 1 (September-December), followed by a further 4 taught modules in semester 2 (January-May), and undertaking a project over the Summer (May-August).

A typical selection of taught modules would be eight of the following:

Dynamical Systems
Computational Modelling
Statistics & Stochastic Models
Inverse Problems
Mathematical Oncology
Mathematical Ecology & Epidemiology
Mathematical Physiology
Fluid Dynamics
Optimization in Finance and Energy
Personal Transferable Skills
We also offer the option of relacing one or two mathematics modules with modules from subjects such as Global Risk Analysis, Energy Economics, Quantitative Methods and Econometrics for Finance.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is via a mix of open book continual assessment and closed book examinations, with a substantial project completed over the Summer.

Careers

Mathematics is central to the sciences, and to the development of a prosperous, modern society. The demand for people with mathematical qualifications is considerable, and a degree in mathematics is a highly marketable asset.

Mathematics graduates are consistently amongst those attracting the highest graduate salaries and can choose from an ever widening range of careers in research, industry, science, engineering, commerce, finance and education.

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Our MPhil/PhD degree in Mathematics and Statistics aims to train you to conduct research of a high academic standard and to make original contributions to the subject. Read more
Our MPhil/PhD degree in Mathematics and Statistics aims to train you to conduct research of a high academic standard and to make original contributions to the subject.

The programme involves coursework (where suitable) and research training, but its major component is the preparation of a substantial research thesis. The thesis should demonstrate a sound understanding of the main issues in the area and add to existing knowledge.

Research interests in mathematics and statistics include: mathematical finance, in particular the analysis of risk and numerical computation; mathematical physics and partial differential equations; approximation theory and numerical analysis; probability and stochastic processes, pure and applied; applied statistics and multivariate analysis; covariance modelling for repeated measures and longitudinal data; medical statistics; combinatorics, algebra and designs.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

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Understand the main aspects of quantitative finance – including general finance theory, finance models and programming for graduates with a science, engineering and mathematics background. Read more
Understand the main aspects of quantitative finance – including general finance theory, finance models and programming for graduates with a science, engineering and mathematics background.

Our course has been developed drawing on expertise from industry professionals. You cover topics such as:
-Interest-rate theory
-Arbitrage theory
-GARCH models
-Corporate finance
-The Black-Scholes model and numerical analysis
-Programming in C and Java
-The use of mathematical computing software

How will I study?

You’ll study core modules and options in the autumn and spring terms. In the summer term, you undertake work on your MSc dissertation.

You’ll be assessed by a combination of unseen examinations and dissertation/projects.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

You’ll be taught by faculty from both the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Business and Management.

Careers

Our graduates have found jobs in banking (investment funds and hedge funds) and financial software companies.

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In this. MRes Mathematical Sciences. course, you will gain deep knowledge of a chosen topic in mathematics or statistics and develop your research skills in project planning, reviewing literature, group discussions, research presentations and writing publications. Read more

In this MRes Mathematical Sciences course, you will gain deep knowledge of a chosen topic in mathematics or statistics and develop your research skills in project planning, reviewing literature, group discussions, research presentations and writing publications.

You can choose to work with experts from a range of areas including quantum cryptography, graph theory, statistical analysis, bioinformatics and mathematical modelling.

You will take three taught modules each providing you with the underpinning theory to support your research work.

Modules:

  • Computational Statistics and Data Analysis
  • Applied Statistics
  • Statistical Modelling
  • Mathematical Recipes
  • Topics in Mathematical Biology
  • Linear Systems
  • Topics in Applied Mathematics#
  • Numerical Analysis and Dynamical Systems
  • Topics in Pure Mathematics
  • Coding Theory and Cryptography
  • Research Methods
  • Research Project

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The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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The objective of this programme of study is to prepare professionals able to deal with complex systems using sophisticated mathematical tools, yet with an engineering attitude. Read more

Mission and goals

The objective of this programme of study is to prepare professionals able to deal with complex systems using sophisticated mathematical tools, yet with an engineering attitude. It harmonises a solid scientific background with a command of advanced methodologies and technologies. The programme is characterised by a continuous synergy between Applied Mathematics and Engineering disciplines- The students may choose among three specialisations:
- Computational Science and Engineering
- Applied Statistics
- Quantitative Finance

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

Career opportunities

The professional opportunities offered by this course are rather ample and varied: engineering consultancy companies that deal with complex computational problems; manufacturing or civil engineering companies where analyses based on the use of advanced mathematical tools are needed; banks, insurance companies and financial institutions making use of quantitative finance for risk analysis or forecast; companies that require statistical interpretation and the processing of complex data, or the simulation of different scenarios; public and private research institutes and laboratories.

Eligible students

Students holding a Bachelor degree in Mathematical Engineering, or in a related area with a solid background in the core disciplines of the programme, i.e. Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Applied Physics or other Engineering disciplines are eligible for application. In particular, eligible students' past studies must include courses in different areas of Engineering (among Informatics, Economics & Business Organization, Electrotechnics, Automation, Electronics, Applied Physics, Civil Engineering) for at least 25% of the overall courses, as well as courses in different areas of Mathematics (Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Geometry, Probability, Statistics, Numerical Analysis, Optimization) for at least 33% of the overall courses.
The following tracks are available:
1. Computational Science and Engineering
2. Applied Statistics
3. Quantitative Finance

Eligible students must clearly specify the track they are applying for in their motivation letter.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Mathematical_Engineering.pdf
The Master of Science in Mathematical Engineering (MSME) aims to form an innovative and flexible professional profile, endowed with a wide spectrum of basic scientific notions and engineering principles, together with a deep knowledge of modern pure and applied mathematical techniques. MSME is characterized by a continuous synergy between Mathematics and Engineering methods, oriented to the modelling, analysis and solution of complex planning, control and management problems, and provides the students with the possibility to face problems from various scientific, financial and/or technological areas. The MSME graduates can find employment in Engineering companies specialized in handling complex computational problems, requiring a multidisciplinary knowledge; in companies manufacturing industrial goods for which design analysis based on the use of advanced mathematical procedures are required; in service societies, banks, insurance companies, finance or consultant agencies for the statistical interpretation and the simulation of complex situations related to the analysis of large number of data (e.g. management and optimization of services, data mining, information retrieval) or for handling financial products and risk management; in public and private institutions. The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

Three main tracks available:
1. Computational Science for Engineering
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; numerical and theoretical analysis for partial differential equations; fluid mechanics; computational fluid dynamics advanced programming techniques for scientific computing;

2. Statistics
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; stochastic dynamical models; applied statistics, model identification and data analysis; Bayesian statistics

3. Mathematical Finance
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; stochastic differential equations; mathematical finance; financial engineering; model identification and data analysis.

In the motivation letter the student must clearly specify the track he/she is applying for.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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