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Masters Degrees (Number Theory)

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Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. Read more
Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. This MSc course enables you to delve deeply into particular aspects of pure and applied mathematics, through a wide choice of modules in fascinating areas such as fractal geometry, coding theory and analytic theory. You’ll complete your MSc with a piece of independent study, exploring the history of modern geometry, advances in approximation theory, variational methods applied to eigenvalue problems, or algebraic graph theory and culminating in a dissertation on the topic of your choice.

Key features of the course

•Ideal for mathematically inclined scientists and engineers as well as mathematicians
•Extends your knowledge and refines your abilities to process information accurately, and critically analyse and communicate complex ideas
•Develops an enhanced skill set that will put you at an advantage in careers as diverse as mathematics, education, computer science, economics, engineering and finance.
•The most popular MSc in mathematics in the UK.
This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England. For more information, see Fees and funding

Course details

You can take a number of different routes towards your qualification - see the full module list for all options.

Modules

The modules in this qualification are categorised as entry, intermediate and dissertation. Check our website for start dates as some modules are not available for study every year.

Entry:

• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)

Intermediate:

• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)
• Applied complex variables (M828) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Analytic number theory II (M829) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Approximation theory (M832) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Advanced mathematical methods (M833) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Fractal geometry (M835) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Coding theory (M836) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Dissertation: Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

Module study order:

•You must normally pass at least one entry level module before studying an intermediate module.
•You must pass Analytic number theory I (M823) before studying Analytic number theory II (M829).
•You must normally pass four modules before studying the Dissertation in mathematics (M840).
•Some topics for the dissertation have prerequisite modules

Otherwise within each category modules may be studied in any order, and you may register for a module while studying a pre-requisite for that module (i.e. before you know whether you have passed the pre-requisite module or not).

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

150 credits from this list:

Optional modules

• Advanced mathematical methods (M833)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)
• Analytic number theory II (M829)
• Applied complex variables (M828)
• Approximation theory (M832)
• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Coding theory (M836)
• Fractal geometry (M835)
• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)

Plus

Compulsory module

Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

For this qualification, we do not allow you to count credit for study you have already done elsewhere.

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This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. Read more
This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. During the course critical awareness of problems in information transmission, data compression and cryptography is raised, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems are explored.

The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography and our academic staff include several leading researchers in these areas. Students on the programme have the opportunity to carry out their dissertation projects in cutting-edge research areas and to be supervised by experts.

The transferable skills gained during the MSc will open up a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsofcryptographyandcommunications(msc).aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and a knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course former students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses as well as complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Channels
In this unit, you will investigate the problems of data compression and information transmission in both noiseless and noisy environments.

Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Public Key Cryptography
This course introduces some of the mathematical ideas essential for an understanding of public key cryptography, such as discrete logarithms, lattices and elliptic curves. Several important public key cryptosystems are studied, such as RSA, Rabin, ElGamal Encryption, Schnorr signatures; and modern notions of security and attack models for public key cryptosystems are discussed.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a suitable mathematical foundation for undertaking research or professional employment in cryptography and/or communications

- the appropriate background in information theory and coding theory enabling them to understand and be able to apply the theory of communication through noisy channels

- the appropriate background in algebra and number theory to develop an understanding of modern public key cryptosystems

- a critical awareness of problems in information transmission and data compression, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems

- a critical awareness of problems in cryptography and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to provide solutions to these problems

- a range of transferable skills including familiarity with a computer algebra package, experience with independent research and managing the writing of a dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications. Read more
This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications.

You will explore the mathematical techniques that are commonly used to solve problems in the real world, in particular in communication theory and in physics. As part of the course you will carry out an independent research investigation under the supervision of a member of staff. Popular dissertation topics chosen by students include projects in the areas of communication theory, mathematical physics, and financial mathematics.

The transferable skills gained on this course will open you up to a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsforapplications.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications, preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography. The academics who teach on this course include several leading researchers in these areas.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses and complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed, as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- knowledge and understanding of: the principles of communication through noisy channels using coding theory; the principles of cryptography as a tool for securing data; and the role and limitations of mathematics in the solution of problems arising in the real world

- a high level of ability in subject-specific skills, such as algebra and number theory

- developed the capacity to synthesise information from a number of sources with critical awareness

- critically analysed the strengths and weaknesses of solutions to problems in applications of mathematics

- the ability to clearly formulate problems and express technical content and conclusions in written form

- personal skills of time management, self-motivation, flexibility and adaptability.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security Manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Joining the Department as a postgraduate is certainly a good move. The Department maintains strong research in both pure and applied mathematics, as well as the traditional core of a mathematics department. Read more
Joining the Department as a postgraduate is certainly a good move. The Department maintains strong research in both pure and applied mathematics, as well as the traditional core of a mathematics department. What makes our Department different is the equally strong research in fluid mechanics, scientific computation and statistics.

The quality of research at the postgraduate level is reflected in the scholarly achievements of faculty members, many of whom are recognized as leading authorities in their fields. Research programs often involve collaboration with scholars at an international level, especially in the European, North American and Chinese universities. Renowned academics also take part in the Department's regular colloquia and seminars. The faculty comprises several groups: Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Probability and Statistics.

Mathematics permeates almost every discipline of science and technology. We believe our comprehensive approach enables inspiring interaction among different faculty members and helps generate new mathematical tools to meet the scientific and technological challenges facing our fast-changing world.

The MPhil program seeks to strengthen students' general background in mathematics and mathematical sciences, and to expose students to the environment and scope of mathematical research. Submission and successful defense of a thesis based on original research are required.

Research Foci

Algebra and Number Theory
The theory of Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations play an important role in many of the recent development in mathematics and in the interaction of mathematics with physics. Our research includes representation theory of reductive groups, Kac-Moody algebras, quantum groups, and conformal field theory. Number theory has a long and distinguished history, and the concepts and problems relating to the theory have been instrumental in the foundation of a large part of mathematics. Number theory has flourished in recent years, as made evident by the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. Our research specializes in automorphic forms.

Analysis and Differential Equations
The analysis of real and complex functions plays a fundamental role in mathematics. This is a classical yet still vibrant subject that has a wide range of applications. Differential equations are used to describe many scientific, engineering and economic problems. The theoretical and numerical study of such equations is crucial in understanding and solving problems. Our research areas include complex analysis, exponential asymptotics, functional analysis, nonlinear equations and dynamical systems, and integrable systems.

Geometry and Topology
Geometry and topology provide an essential language describing all kinds of structures in Nature. The subject has been vastly enriched by close interaction with other mathematical fields and with fields of science such as physics, astronomy and mechanics. The result has led to great advances in the subject, as highlighted by the proof of the Poincaré conjecture. Active research areas in the Department include algebraic geometry, differential geometry, low-dimensional topology, equivariant topology, combinatorial topology, and geometrical structures in mathematical physics.

Numerical Analysis
The focus is on the development of advance algorithms and efficient computational schemes. Current research areas include: parallel algorithms, heterogeneous network computing, graph theory, image processing, computational fluid dynamics, singular problems, adaptive grid method, rarefied flow simulations.

Applied Sciences
The applications of mathematics to interdisciplinary science areas include: material science, multiscale modeling, mutliphase flows, evolutionary genetics, environmental science, numerical weather prediction, ocean and coastal modeling, astrophysics and space science.

Probability and Statistics
Statistics, the science of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting data, is an essential tool in a wide variety of academic disciplines as well as for business, government, medicine and industry. Our research is conducted in four categories. Time Series and Dependent Data: inference from nonstationarity, nonlinearity, long-memory behavior, and continuous time models. Resampling Methodology: block bootstrap, bootstrap for censored data, and Edgeworth and saddle point approximations. Stochastic Processes and Stochastic Analysis: filtering, diffusion and Markov processes, and stochastic approximation and control. Survival Analysis: survival function and errors in variables for general linear models. Probability current research includes limit theory.

Financial Mathematics
This is one of the fastest growing research fields in applied mathematics. International banking and financial firms around the globe are hiring science PhDs who can use advanced analytical and numerical techniques to price financial derivatives and manage portfolio risks. The trend has been accelerating in recent years on numerous fronts, driven both by substantial theoretical advances as well as by a practical need in the industry to develop effective methods to price and hedge increasingly complex financial instruments. Current research areas include pricing models for exotic options, the development of pricing algorithms for complex financial derivatives, credit derivatives, risk management, stochastic analysis of interest rates and related models.

Facilities

The Department enjoys a range of up-to-date facilities and equipment for teaching and research purposes. It has two computer laboratories and a Math Support Center equipped with 100 desktop computers for undergraduate and postgraduate students. The Department also provides an electronic homework system and a storage cloud system to enhance teaching and learning.

To assist computations that require a large amount of processing power in the research area of scientific computation, a High Performance Computing (HPC) laboratory equipped with more than 200 high-speed workstations and servers has been set up. With advanced parallel computing technologies, these powerful computers are capable of delivering 17.2 TFLOPS processing power to solve computationally intensive problems in our innovative research projects. Such equipment helps our faculty and postgraduate students to stay at the forefront of their fields. Research projects in areas such as astrophysics, computational fluid dynamics, financial mathematics, mathematical modeling and simulation in materials science, molecular simulation, numerical ocean modeling, numerical weather prediction and numerical methods for micromagnetics simulations all benefit from our powerful computing facilities.

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Choosing to take a Master of Science in Mathematics and Statistics at Acadia will deepen your mathematical knowledge, and develop your research and analytical skills. Read more
Choosing to take a Master of Science in Mathematics and Statistics at Acadia will deepen your mathematical knowledge, and develop your research and analytical skills. At the same time, you can earn your degree while gaining experience working and researching in industry.

Acadia's graduate program in mathematics and statistics offers you an exciting opportunity to earn your degree and tackle a significant research problem while also participating in our award-winning co-operative education option and gaining industry work experience. You will take courses that will broaden your knowledge and also prepare you to work on your chosen research project. Our co-operative education option allows you to gain eight months of industry experience work terms or internships. A special feature of the program is to be able to align your work experience and research project, allowing you to more deeply understand the importance and relevance of the research problem.

Be Inspired

In our program, you will benefit from the small school advantage – close contact with your supervisor and a program best-suited to your interests – while also being able to participate in a wide range of research that Acadia faculty conduct. In our department, you can pursue research into tidal energy in the Bay of Fundy, fractal images, games on graphs, statistical learning, big data, computer experiments, cryptography, number theory, scheduling theory, and statistical applications in agriculture, biology, and medicine.

Our department is associated with the Acadia Centre for Mathematical Modeling and Computation, ACENet and Compute Canada, which provide expertise and resources for applying computational resources towards solving problems in the mathematical sciences. The Statistical Consulting Centre creates opportunities to support local projects, and to consult on other research projects at the institution. Acadia's faculty engage in projects with local businesses, federal and provincial government agencies, the local tidal power and agricultural industries, and a variety of businesses nationally and internationally.

Research Interests

-Hugh Chipman: Tree models, variable selection, Bayesian methodology, data mining
-Nancy Clarke: Graph theory, combinatorics, design theory and game theory
-Eva Curry: Digital representations for vectors and connections to wavelet theory, iterated function systems, probability, and number theory
-Jeff Hooper: Algebraic number theory, cryptography
-Richard Karsten: Models of ocean circulation, climate modelling
-Wilson Lu: Survey sampling, replication methods, survey confidentiality, computer experiment design
-Franklin Mendivil: Image processing, stochastic optimization, fractal analysis
-Jianan Peng: Order restricted inference, multiple comparisons, nonparametric statistics
-Pritam Ranjan: Computer experiments, sequential designs, combinatorial designs
-Paul Stephenson: Machine scheduling, optimization algorithms
-Holger Teismann: PDE, control theory, non-linear optics
-Ying Zhang: Statistical computing, time series analysis, applied statistical modelling

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This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience.

You reflect on these areas of thinking in themselves and as they relate to particular literary texts, to post-enlightenment philosophy and to other relevant areas of culture and experience. It is for those interested in writing, reading, language, art, the self, literature and discovering more about the relations between literature and philosophy.

The MA in Critical Theory offers a choice of two core courses that survey a wide range of modern theoretical approaches, and a range of taught options covering postcolonial theory, theories of art, modern approaches to comparative literature, deconstruction and a chance to work in depth on a single key theoretical text and the writings it refers to.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/216/critical-theory

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; one core module (FR866: Literature and Theory) and three optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a theory-based dissertation between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH833 - Contemporary Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)

Assessment

The course is assessed by coursework for each module and by the dissertation which accounts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of modern literary and critical theory

- study the reading-practices, analytic tools and vocabularies of modern critical thought

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced theoretical study of literature

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach critical theory, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical awareness of the expressive and analytical resources of language

- offer scope for the study of critical theory within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by philosophy

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- examine this writing in the wider context of literature, culture and philosophy

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree, should you so wish.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Mathematics is a core scientific subject and an essential basis for a range of other sciences. Read more
Mathematics is a core scientific subject and an essential basis for a range of other sciences. This programme brings together the latest developments in a range of mathematical disciplines to provide you with a thorough grounding in the subject, together with a substantial project that can be used to develop a specialisation.

Internationally leading research supports this programme, with particular research strengths including magnetic fields, interface of algebraic number theory and abstract algebra, climate system dynamics and display-structure on crystalline cohomology.
The programme prepares you for a career in numerous industries or for progression to a PhD for those interested in pursuing a research pathway.

Programme structure

The programme comprises three compulsory taught modules and 90 credits of option modules. The taught component of the programme is completed in June with the project extending over the summer period for submission in September.

Compulsory Modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research in Mathematical Sciences; Advanced Mathematics Project and Analysis and Computation for Finance

Optional Modules

Some examples of the optional modules are as follows;
Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics; Methods for Stochastics and Finance; Mathematical Theory of Option Pricing; Dynamical Systems and Chaos; Fluid Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans; Modelling the Weather and Climate; The Climate System; Algebraic Number Theory; Algebraic Curves; Waves, Instabilities and Turbulence; Magnetic Fields and Fluid Flows; Statistical Modelling in Space and Time and Mathematical Modelling in Biology and Medicine.

The modules we outline here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

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This intensive introduction to advanced pure and applied mathematics draws on our strengths in algebra, geometry, topology, number theory, fluid dynamics and solar physics. Read more

About the course

This intensive introduction to advanced pure and applied mathematics draws on our strengths in algebra, geometry, topology, number theory, fluid dynamics and solar physics. You’ll attend lectures but you’ll also get hands-on research experience, writing a dissertation supervised by an active researcher.

Your career

Our graduates go into finance, manufacturing and pharmaceuticals. They work for government agencies and research institutes with major organisations such as First Direct, GlaxoSmithKline, Marks and Spencer, the Government Statistical Service and Medical Research Council units. Our courses can also prepare you for PhD-level research.

About us

Our academics are in demand. They are members of international societies and organisations, and they speak at conferences around the world. They bring new ideas into the classroom so you can see how research is improving on existing approaches. Our solar scientists were the first to record musical sounds created by vibrations in the sun’s atmosphere.

Our Statistical Services Unit works with industry, commerce and the public sector. The services they provide include consultancy, training courses and computer software development.

Different ways to study

You can study full-time over a year or part-time over two to three years via online distance learning. The MSc Mathematics is only available as a full-time course.

Modules

Possible module choices include: Algebra; Analysis; Geometry; Algebraic Topology; Number Theory; Topics in Advanced Fluid Dynamics; Analytical Dynamics and Classical Field Theory; Mathematical Modelling of Natural Systems; Stochastic Processes and Finance; Waves and Magnetohydrodynamics.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and seminars. You’re assessed by exams, coursework and a dissertation.

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The MSc Pure Mathematics offers a modern research-oriented taught course, providing students with a broader and deeper understanding of several core areas of pure mathematics that are of strong current interest and with a solid foundation for a career in research in pure mathematics. Read more

Overview

The MSc Pure Mathematics offers a modern research-oriented taught course, providing students with a broader and deeper understanding of several core areas of pure mathematics that are of strong current interest and with a solid foundation for a career in research in pure mathematics. The programme covers a wide range of topics in algebra, analysis and number theory.

The course is informed by the research interests of the members of the Division of Pure Mathematics

Key facts:

- The School of Mathematical Sciences is one of the largest and strongest mathematics departments in the UK, with over 60 full-time academic staff

- In the latest independent Research Assessment Exercise, the school ranked eighth in the UK in terms of research power across the three subject areas within the School of Mathematical Sciences (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and operational research)

- The University of Nottingham is ranked in the top 1% of all universities worldwide.

Modules

Advanced Linear Analysis

Algebraic Geometry

Algebraic Number Theory

Combinatorial Group Theory

Complex Analysis

Further Topics in Analysis

Further Topics in Rings and Modules

Pure Mathematics Dissertation

English language requirements for international students

IELTS: 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any element)

Further information



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To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows. Stage 1. 60 credits from List A. List A. optional modules. Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824). Read more

Modules

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

Stage 1

60 credits from List A:

List A: optional modules

• Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824)
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Environmental monitoring and protection (T868)
• Finite element analysis: basic principles and applications (T804)
• Institutional development (TU872)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)
• Managing for sustainability (T867)
• Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)
• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Multilayer switching - CCNP 3 (T826)
• Network security (T828)
• Optimising networks - CCNP 4 (T827)
• Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889)
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)
• Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)

Plus 30 credits from List B:

List B: optional modules

• Advanced mathematical methods (M833)
• Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)
• Analytic number theory II (M829)
• Applied complex variables (M828)
• Approximation theory (M832)
• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Coding theory (M836)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Data management (M816)
• Developing research skills in science (S825)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Digital forensics (M812)
• Environmental monitoring and protection (T868)
• Finite element analysis: basic principles and applications (T804)
• Fractal geometry (M835)
• Information security (M811)
• Institutional development (TU872)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)
• Managing for sustainability (T867)
• Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)
• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Multilayer switching - CCNP 3 (T826)
• Network security (T828)
• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)
• Optimising networks - CCNP 4 (T827)
• Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889)
• Project management (M815)
• Researching mathematics learning (ME825)*
• Software development (M813)
• Software engineering (M814)
• Space science (S818) NEW1
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)
• Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)

* 60-credit module of which only 30 credits count towards this qualification

Plus 30 credits from:

Compulsory module

Team engineering (T885)

Stage 2

60 credits from:

Compulsory module

Research project (T802)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

Credit transfer is not permitted for the MSc except for any awarded as part of the Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering.
For further advice and guidance, please email us.

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In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. Read more
In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.
The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, Complexity Theory, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.
Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Mathematics or Computer Science
In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor's in mathematics or computer science that have a strong mathematical background and theoretical interests. We will select students based on their motivation and their background. Mathematical maturity is essential and basic knowledge of logic and discrete mathematics is expected.

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

There is a serious shortage of well-trained information specialists. Often students are offered a job before they have actually finished their study. About 20% of our graduates choose to go on to do a PhD but most find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers in the private sector or within government.

Our approach to this field

In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.

The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, General Topology, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.

Our research in this field

Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

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The Master’s programme in Mathematics in Leiden focuses on analysis, probability and statistics, number theory and (arithmetic) geometry. Read more
The Master’s programme in Mathematics in Leiden focuses on analysis, probability and statistics, number theory and (arithmetic) geometry.

For any student who wants to specialise in one of these areas, Leiden is an excellent possibility. All researchers in the present group have intensive contacts with colleagues from outside Leiden, within the Netherlands, but also abroad.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/mathematics/en/introduction

Course detail

If you are considering pursuing a Master of Science in Mathematics, Leiden is a very good choice. You will be hosted in one of the leading research groups in mathematics in the Netherlands. Another strong point is our personal approach. Our programmes will be tailor-made according to your wishes, depending on your individual background and your personal aims. It will be our interest to offer you a significant deepening of your knowledge, and to broaden your enthusiasm for mathematics.

Specialisations

- Algebra, Geometry and Number Theory
- Applied Mathematics
- Mathematics and Education
- Mathematics and Science Communication and Society
- Mathematics and Science-Based Business

Courses are taught at a high level, and each of the master’s tracks ends with an individual research project combined with a master thesis.

Careers

Students who have obtained a Master of Science degree in Mathematics possess a thorough theoretical basis, know how to work in a multinational environment, and are able to operate well on the international market.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. Read more
The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. The department emphasizes both pure and applied mathematics. Research in the department covers algebra, number theory, combinatorics, differential equations, functional analysis, abstract harmonic analysis, mathematical physics, stochastic analysis, biomathematics and topology.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Ring Theory and Module Theory, especially Krull dimension, torsion theories, and localization

• Algebraic Theory of Lattices, especially their dimensions (Krull, Goldie, Gabriel, etc.) with applications to Grothendieck categories and module categories equipped with torsion theories

• Field Theory, especially Galois Theory, Cogalois Theory, and Galois cohomology

• Algebraic Number Theory, especially rings of algebraic integers

• Iwasawa Theory of Galois representations and their deformations Euler and Kolyvagin systems, Equivariant Tamagawa Number
Conjecture

• Combinatorial design theory, in particular metamorphosis of designs, perfect hexagon triple systems

• Graph theory, in particular number of cycles in 2-factorizations of complete graphs

• Coding theory, especially relation of designs to codes

• Random graphs, in particular, random proximity catch graphs and digraphs

• Partial Differential Equations

• Nonlinear Problems of Mathematical Physics

• Dissipative Dynamical Systems

• Scattering of classical and quantum waves

• Wavelet analysis

• Molecular dynamics

• Banach algebras, especially the structure of the second Arens duals of Banach algebras

• Abstract Harmonic Analysis, especially the Fourier and Fourier-Stieltjes algebras associated to a locally compact group

• Geometry of Banach spaces, especially vector measures, spaces of vector valued continuous functions, fixed point theory, isomorphic properties of Banach spaces

• Differential geometric, topologic, and algebraic methods used in quantum mechanics

• Geometric phases and dynamical invariants

• Supersymmetry and its generalizations

• Pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics

• Quantum cosmology

• Numerical Linear Algebra

• Numerical Optimization

• Perturbation Theory of Eigenvalues

• Eigenvalue Optimization

• Mathematical finance

• Stochastic optimal control and dynamic programming

• Stochastic flows and random velocity fields

• Lyapunov exponents of flows

• Unicast and multicast data traffic in telecommunications

• Probabilistic Inference

• Inference on Random Graphs (with emphasis on modeling email and internet traffic and clustering analysis)

• Graph Theory (probabilistic investigation of graphs emerging from computational geometry)

• Statistics (analysis of spatial data and spatial point patterns with applications in epidemiology and ecology and statistical methods for medical data and image analysis)

• Classification and Pattern Recognition (with applications in mine field and face detection)

• Arithmetical Algebraic Geometry, Arakelov geometry, Mixed Tate motives

• p-adic methods in arithmetical algebraic geometry, Ramification theory of arithmetic varieties

• Topology of low-dimensional manifolds, in particular Lefschetz fibrations, symplectic and contact structures, Stein fillings

• Symplectic topology and geometry, Seiberg-Witten theory, Floer homology

• Foliation and Lamination Theory, Minimal Surfaces, and Hyperbolic Geometry

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The MSc in Contemporary Political Theory offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political theory, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
The MSc in Contemporary Political Theory offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political theory, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. The department’s theory group has research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdippoliticaltheory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in international relations while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- Our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has recently hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), and David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills).
Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Dr Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global.
The Centre recently won £54,000 from NORFACE, a partnership of European Research Councils including the ESRC, for a pan-European research network on globalisation and the transformation of Europe's borders, and £20,000 from the joint AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme for a research network on the normative foundations of public policy in a multi-faith society.
Dr Yasmin Khan’s recent book The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan (Yale University Press) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Book Prize of 2007.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Dr Ben O'Loughlin and Akil N. Awan, together with colleague Andrew Hoskins at the University of Warwick, were awarded £300,000 from the ESRC for a study of terrorist networks on the internet.
Unit Co-Director Professor Andrew Chadwick is one of the founding members of the US National Science Foundation's International Working Group on Online Consultation and Public Policymaking, a three year project focusing on how political interaction on the internet can contribute to better government policy. It is funded through part of an overall grant of $1m to the State University of New York at Albany, from the NSF Digital Government Programme. Andrew Chadwick’s recent book Internet Politics (Oxford University Press) was awarded one of the American Sociological Association Best Book Prizes in 2007.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Core course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses and a course in research design.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to politics and international relations

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the discipline

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Our political philosophers have research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/mapoliticalphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the programme allows you to specialise in political philosophy while addressing questions from both analytic and European perspectives

- the course brings together staff and students working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- the course offers a wide range of options both within political philosophy and outside of it

- the programme has close connections to the Department of Politics and International Relations which hosts a vibrant international community of postgraduate students working on a wide range of issues in politics, political theory, and international relations.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining at the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood.

Programme structure

Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two Courses from Among: Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit); Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ Unit); and Political Concepts (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit)
You will be given an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in contemporary Anglo-American political theory, enabling you to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Attention will be paid to some of the main paradigms through which such debate is structured (e.g. individualism v. community, and democracy v. justice), as well as the practical implications of more abstract ideas.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- Political Concepts (½ unit)
The course aims to give an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in applied political theory, enabling students to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Seminars will be based on short pieces of key reading thus fostering skills of interpretive analysis and focussing discussion.

Dissertation on Political Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)

Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)

Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)

The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)

The Frankfurt School (½ unit)

The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)

Human Rights (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)

Legacices of Wittgenstein (½ unit)

Neo-Platonism (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)

Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of approaches in contemporary political philosophy from Anglo-American and Continental traditions

- detailed understanding of philosophers and texts in key traditions in political thought

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of political philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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