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The ALGANT Master program provides a study and research track in pure mathematics, with a strong focus on algebra, geometry and number theory. … Read more

The ALGANT Master program provides a study and research track in pure mathematics, with a strong focus on algebra, geometry and number theory. This track may be completed throughout Europe and the world, thanks to a partnership between leading research universities. The ALGANT course introduces students to the latest developments within these subjects, and provides the best possible preparation for their forthcoming doctoral studies.

The ALGANT program consists mainly of advanced courses within the field of mathematics and of a research project or internship leading to a Master thesis. Courses are offered in: algebraic geometry, algebraic and geometric topology, algebraic and analytic number theory, coding theory, combinatorics, complex function theory, cryptology, elliptic curves, manifolds. Students are encouraged to participate actively in seminars.

The university partners offer compatible basic preparation in the first year (level 1), which then leads to a complementary offer for more specialized courses in the second year (level 2). 

Program structure

Year 1 (courses in French)

Semester 1

  • Modules and quadratic spaces (9 ECTS)
  • Group theory (6 ECTS)
  • Complex analysis (9 ECTS)
  • Functional analysis (6 ECTS)

Semester 2

  • Geometry (6 ECTS)
  • Number theory (6 ECTS)
  • Spectral theory and distributions (6 ECTS)
  • Probability and statistics (6 ECTS)
  • Cryptology (6 ECTS)
  • Algebra and formal computations (6 ECTS)

Year 2 (courses in English)

Semester 1

  • Number theory (9 ECTS)
  • Algorithmic number theory (6 ECTS)
  • Geometry (9 ECTS)
  • Elliptic curves (6 ECTS)
  • Algebraic geometry (9 ECTS)
  • Analytic number theory: advanced course 1 (6 ECTS)

Semester 2

  • Cohomology of groups: advanced course 2 (6 ECTS)
  • The key role of certain inequalities at the interface between complex geometry (6 ECTS)

Strengths of this Master program

  • Courses given by academic experts within the field of mathematics.
  • Individually tailored study tracks.
  • Top-quality scientific environment and facilities provided by leading global research institutes, e.g. Institut de Mathématiques de Bordeaux.
  • Supported by the International Master program of the Bordeaux Initiative of Excellence.

After this Master program?

Students who successfully complete the ALGANT program will be well equipped to pursue a career in research by preparing a Ph.D.

Graduates may also directly apply for positions as highly trained mathematicians, especially in the areas of cryptography, information security and numerical communications.



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Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. Read more
Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. This MSc course enables you to delve deeply into particular aspects of pure and applied mathematics, through a wide choice of modules in fascinating areas such as fractal geometry, coding theory and analytic theory. You’ll complete your MSc with a piece of independent study, exploring the history of modern geometry, advances in approximation theory, variational methods applied to eigenvalue problems, or algebraic graph theory and culminating in a dissertation on the topic of your choice.

Key features of the course

•Ideal for mathematically inclined scientists and engineers as well as mathematicians
•Extends your knowledge and refines your abilities to process information accurately, and critically analyse and communicate complex ideas
•Develops an enhanced skill set that will put you at an advantage in careers as diverse as mathematics, education, computer science, economics, engineering and finance.
•The most popular MSc in mathematics in the UK.
This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England. For more information, see Fees and funding

Course details

You can take a number of different routes towards your qualification - see the full module list for all options.

Modules

The modules in this qualification are categorised as entry, intermediate and dissertation. Check our website for start dates as some modules are not available for study every year.

Entry:

• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)

Intermediate:

• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)
• Applied complex variables (M828) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Analytic number theory II (M829) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Approximation theory (M832) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Advanced mathematical methods (M833) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Fractal geometry (M835) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Coding theory (M836) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Dissertation: Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

Module study order:

•You must normally pass at least one entry level module before studying an intermediate module.
•You must pass Analytic number theory I (M823) before studying Analytic number theory II (M829).
•You must normally pass four modules before studying the Dissertation in mathematics (M840).
•Some topics for the dissertation have prerequisite modules

Otherwise within each category modules may be studied in any order, and you may register for a module while studying a pre-requisite for that module (i.e. before you know whether you have passed the pre-requisite module or not).

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

150 credits from this list:

Optional modules

• Advanced mathematical methods (M833)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)
• Analytic number theory II (M829)
• Applied complex variables (M828)
• Approximation theory (M832)
• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Coding theory (M836)
• Fractal geometry (M835)
• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)

Plus

Compulsory module

Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

For this qualification, we do not allow you to count credit for study you have already done elsewhere.

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The student will perform a research project in veterinary medicine, veterinary science or a biological science, and during the course of the year will also prepare a literature review in the subject of their research project and present the project in talks and/or posters to a Departmental audience. Read more
The student will perform a research project in veterinary medicine, veterinary science or a biological science, and during the course of the year will also prepare a literature review in the subject of their research project and present the project in talks and/or posters to a Departmental audience. There are opportunities to present at external scientific meetings for many students. Students will be expected to take training courses in specialist areas as appropriate. Examination is entirely based on the dissertation presented at the end of the year.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvvtmpvet

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acting autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The student is assigned a primary supervisor who will help to appoint an advisor or sometimes a supervisory team. Students are closely supported in their activities by this group.

The number of contact hours is not set.

The student is expected to attend journal clubs and departmental seminars. Other classes are decided by student and supervisor and the number of hours is not set.

As for classes, the number of hours is not set.

The number of hours is not set, except that there is a minimum requirement for generic skills training.

Minimum of one journal club per fortnight.

Frequent informal feedback through supervisor, plus termly formal reporting.

Assessment

The MPhil in Veterinary Science is examined by dissertation and viva. The dissertation must be no longer than 20,000 words and must satisfy the examiners that the candidate can design and carry out an original investigation, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspective of the subject.

Usually one literature review in the first third of the year.

At least one presentation to the whole Department, plus a variety in small group sessions such as lab meetings.

You will be given informal feedback on your literature review.

Continuing

Continuation from MPhil to PhD is possible although it is not automatic. All cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor, full funding and resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and the Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

A number of places are funded through University Scholarships or other internally generated sources, but self funding applicants are also welcome.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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- Compulsory modules. Read more

MSc in Sustainable Development Energy

- Compulsory modules
Interrogating Sustainable Development – This module will introduce you to, or develop your knowledge across, areas such as the history and genesis of sustainable development, an understanding of earth systems science, the social and economic systems that shape humanity and impact on the environment, and an understanding of how these systems interact.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Sciences – This module will introduce you to various quantitative and statistical approaches used to analyse social processes and phenomena and how to apply these in sustainable development.

Master Class in Sustainable Development – This module will enable an in-depth study of a number of areas. These areas will be investigated via group work with the research being initiated by invited lecturers from the appropriate areas.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Sciences – This module will provide you with the necessary skills of dealing with qualitative data from interviews, participant observations, questionnaires and other sources.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Help others directly through development or aid work.

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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Programme description. As a multidimensional phenomenon, it is essential that pain is managed through planned multidisciplinary initiatives and inputs that aim to ease patient suffering and improve quality of life. Read more

Programme description

As a multidimensional phenomenon, it is essential that pain is managed through planned multidisciplinary initiatives and inputs that aim to ease patient suffering and improve quality of life. Through a solid, theoretical understanding of the biological, psychological and social concepts that drive, develop and maintain pain, students will explore the multifaceted nature of pain and its effects. Students will gain an advanced understanding of the specialist area of pain management and will develop the core skills and knowledge required of an advanced pain practitioner.

Each course of the programme is divided into a set of themed sections in which material is presented in a blend of short online lectures, practical case studies, directed readings, podcasts and webinars. This is supplemented by discussion boards that provide directed assessment tasks while input from expert guest lecturers and tutors offer students opportunity for collaborative critical discourse and debate of current issues.

This part-time, fully online programme attracts an international and multi-professional student cohort and offers a unique opportunity to have direct contact with others working in pain management across the world. Within this context, students will gain the knowledge, understanding and evaluative skills to provide advanced clinical care so as to improve outcomes for people living in pain.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

By studying at the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, students will join a rich tradition of education – one of the oldest institutions in the UK - but also one of the most progressive and dynamic.

The University of Edinburgh has a growing portfolio of established and highly regarded online distance learning postgraduate programmes, with thousands of students currently taking advantage of this mode of education. As a postgraduate student at the University of Edinburgh, you will become part of a supportive online community, able to take advantage of the University’s strong academic tradition, while studying together students and tutors from across the world.

Programme structure

The University of Edinburgh offers a number of outcome awards from its suite of pain management programmes. For those wishing to complete a short option, there are continuing professional development (CME/CPD) courses and for others, who may wish to pursue a longer programme option, there are University awards of Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Master of Science (MSc) – all delivered online using methods that are fully supported by the University’s award-winning online learning environments.

The key differences between the University awards are the number of credits needed to achieve each award:

  • Postgraduate Certificate: this is 60 successfully completed credits of study
  • Postgraduate Diploma: this is 120 successfully completed credits of study
  • Master of Science: this is 180 successfully completed credits of study

Postgraduate Certificate - Level 1 (60 credits)

The Postgraduate Certificate level courses allow students to gain a solid, theoretical understanding of the biological, psychological and social concepts that drive, develop and maintain pain.

Through six core courses covering, assessment and measurement of pain, mechanisms of pain, and the pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of pain, students will explore pain's multifaceted and dynamic nature. In the final core course, students will examine selected conditions seen in clinical practice.

Postgraduate Diploma - Level 2 (60 credits)

(not all Level 2 courses will be offered every year) On successful completion of the Postgraduate Certificate courses, the 60 credits at Postgraduate Diploma level allow students to select courses that focus on areas of pain management that are congruent with students' career goals and clinical or personal interests.

Through a number of course options, including, but not limited to, courses in cancer pain, medical pain, acute pain, neuropathic pain and pain in ageing populations, students will gain an advanced understanding of key areas in pain management. At this level, students may opt to begin to take courses in the areas of either headache management or veterinary medicine to gain a named PGDip or MSc award.

Master of Science - Level 3 (60 credits)

On the successful completion of 120 credits, students are able to proceed to the Master of Science level of the programme. There are a number of options at this level:

  • Fully taught option – successfully complete 60 credits from the Level 2 courses, or,
  • Successfully complete a written dissertation (60 credits), or,
  • Successfully complete a project (60 credits)

Degree Awards with a Headache or Veterinary Designation?

We also offer Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Master of Science (MSc) awards in the focussed clinical areas of headache management and veterinary medicine.

Alongside the core pain programme content, students have the option to take a number of courses in specific clinical areas to gain the award of PGDip/MSc Clinical Management of Pain (Headache) or PGDip/MSc Clinical Management of Pain (Veterinary). To gain a named award (i.e. a Headache or Veterinary designation), students must complete at least one third of the credits of the award in the focussed area.

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD)

Postgraduate Professional Development is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course, without the time - or financial - commitment of a full Masters degree, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate. We offer short, focussed, academic credit-bearing courses that provide education on key subjects in pain management.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) scheme. These credits are recognised in their own right as postgraduate-level credit, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc at the University of Edinburgh or another academic institution.

Career opportunities

By combining academic excellence with the University of Edinburgh’s world-class reputation, graduates from our suite of programme are well placed to continue and advance their clinical careers within the NHS or other health services, pursue advanced academic study, or work in industry. Equally, graduates can expect to be academically confident and may choose to pursue academic careers in related fields.



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This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications. Read more
This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications.

You will explore the mathematical techniques that are commonly used to solve problems in the real world, in particular in communication theory and in physics. As part of the course you will carry out an independent research investigation under the supervision of a member of staff. Popular dissertation topics chosen by students include projects in the areas of communication theory, mathematical physics, and financial mathematics.

The transferable skills gained on this course will open you up to a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsforapplications.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications, preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography. The academics who teach on this course include several leading researchers in these areas.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses and complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed, as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- knowledge and understanding of: the principles of communication through noisy channels using coding theory; the principles of cryptography as a tool for securing data; and the role and limitations of mathematics in the solution of problems arising in the real world

- a high level of ability in subject-specific skills, such as algebra and number theory

- developed the capacity to synthesise information from a number of sources with critical awareness

- critically analysed the strengths and weaknesses of solutions to problems in applications of mathematics

- the ability to clearly formulate problems and express technical content and conclusions in written form

- personal skills of time management, self-motivation, flexibility and adaptability.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security Manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. Read more
On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. The programme is interdisciplinary thus building on the strengths in this area of the Sutherland School of Law and the School of Politics and International Relations. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international human rights law from asylum law and practice, the EU and fundamental rights to the law of privacy in Ireland.

The LLM in International Human rights differs from existing degrees in Ireland by having a distinct interdisciplinary nature flowing from the co-ordination between the School of Law and the School of politics and International relations (SpIre).

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Your studies

On this programme you will acquire a specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights in a single course.
Your core modules will include International Human Rights Law and the Politics of Human Rights. You will also choose from modules such as: International Security; Politics of Development; Discrimination Law; and, Media and Regulation. You will complete a supervised dissertation and will also have international exchange opportunities during the programme. On completion of your studies, you will:
- be able to understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and international relations in the study of human rights;
- be able to apply this knowledge and understanding to real and hypothetical situations;
- be able to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers;
- have identified doctrinal and practical trends in legal practise and their impact; and,
- have an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The programme qualifies you to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, legal-adviser, policymaker, advocate, researcher, or academic. Career opportunities exist in intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms, and Universities.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, there are core modules that must be taken in both Law and Politics. The core law modules are

- International Human Rights considers the theoretical underpinnings and development of contemporary international human rights law, critically examines the institutional architecture developed by the UN system and regional systems to implement human rights norms as well as national methods of implementation of human rights law.

- Law of the ECHR offers a critical examination of key aspects of the operation and substantive law of the ECHR focussing on its incorporation into domestic law and an in-depth analysis and evaluation of the Court's jurisprudence for a number of substantive rights.

- Other Law modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Comparative Constitutional Law discusses a number of constitutional issues from a comparative perspective including the influence of the ECHR and its jurisprudence on constitutional structures and systems.

- Media Regulation discusses the regulatory environment in which the media operates, and encourages a critical analysis of the implications which the current system has for media freedom, journalistic ethics and practices, democracy and governance

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme will equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and capacity to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as practising lawyers, legal-advisers, policy-makers, advocates, researchers or academics. Career opportunities in the field of human rights can arise in a variety of different contexts. These include, but are not limited to, intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms and Universities.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/apply,80081,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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The construction industry is notorious for its high incidence of conflict and the resulting disputes are a drain on the industry's profitability and reputation. Read more

Introduction

The construction industry is notorious for its high incidence of conflict and the resulting disputes are a drain on the industry's profitability and reputation. PGDips International Construction Law course provides you with the skills necessary to identify and address legal issues related to construction projects as well as tackling disputes should they arise. It seeks to extend and develop your understanding of the law relating to the core aspects of international construction practice, dispute settlement, procurement and sustainability.

The PGDips International Construction Law course aims to provide opportunities for you to gain an understanding of global issues affecting construction law and practice and to gain knowledge, understanding and the requisite skills in preparation for employment in international construction legal practice and commercial organisations both in the UK and abroad.

This is a unique distance learning course aimed at a high level which will allow you to develop specialist knowledge in particular areas of construction law relevant to your employer or your business. Although the course involves the academic study of construction law, it also features a very important practical dimension as evidenced by case studies in a number of the module.

A number of high profile construction law practitioners input to the course. It is therefore suitable for practising lawyers in the built environment generally. The course will also be suitable for construction industry professionals, and for those who are responsible for representing the interests of the various stakeholders in the industry.

For up to date list of modules and course delivery please visit our website.

Learning and Teaching

The course uses a variety of learning tools including recorded lectures and real time online lectures together with supportive reading and tutorial sessions. It involves both extensive independent research and discussion in the context of workshops designed to encourage the development of critical analytical and reflective skills.

Study facilities

We have invested in online and offline computer-based resources to support modules, and especially those offered by distance learning. You will also have access to a vast number of journals and databases that are available to read online through UWE Bristol library.

As the largest university in the UK for degrees related to the built environment, UWE Bristol's success stems from the importance we place upon student contact through seminars and formal lectures delivered by leading academics. To replicate that experience for distance learning students, we have created an archive of over 100 hours of lectures specifically for construction degree courses and accessible to you through our virtual learning platform. Find out more: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/whyuwe/fantasticfacilities

Open Events

We hold a number of University-wide open evenings as well as a number of subject specific events throughout the year for anyone considering postgraduate and professional study. Visit http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/whatson/opendays/postgraduateopendays.aspx

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This programme is aimed at students interested in making a change to society, environment and economy with a background in politics, sociology, environmental sciences, biology, mathematics or economics. Read more

MSc in Sustainable Development

This programme is aimed at students interested in making a change to society, environment and economy with a background in politics, sociology, environmental sciences, biology, mathematics or economics.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

The University is working with a range of key stakeholders to promote sustainable development across the higher education sector. As an active member of the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) the University shares learning across the higher education and further education sector.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

Sustainable development is now widely regarded as the most promising framework within which these challenges can be addressed, moving humanity towards the creation of a more just and environmentally sustainable ‘global village’.

There is no single description of what sustainable development means, but one commonly used definition can be found in the 1987 Brundtland Report: “Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Help others directly through development or aid work.

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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This programme is aimed at those looking to pursue further research in sustainable development or develop their research skills within an employment context. Read more

MRes in Sustainable Development

This programme is aimed at those looking to pursue further research in sustainable development or develop their research skills within an employment context.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

St Andrews is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English speaking world, founded in 1413. As well as celebrating its long history, the University of St Andrews embraces its responsibilities for the future, by placing sustainable development at the heart of its operations along four integrated fronts: governance, teaching, research and sustainable estates management. The idea is to integrate sustainability into day-to-day thinking and decision-making processes of the University. New buildings and major refurbishments of existing buildings are being designed to meet strict environmental standards. The £1.7m SALIX energy fund is helping us to achieve this. The dedicated Estates Environment Team of professionals works closely with Schools and Units to raise awareness and understanding of operational sustainability issues.

The University is working with a range of key stakeholders to promote sustainable development across the higher education sector. As an active member of the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) the University shares learning across the higher education and further education sector.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world. Read more
Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world.

The programme can be tailored to specific regional interests through option courses in West Europe and North America, East Europe, Africa, India, and the Middle East. The degree will provide you with a firm academic foundation in the study of comparative politics and a base of knowledge for careers in fields such as policymaking, development, and NGOs.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpolitics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

- the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

- offers an advanced grounding in international public policy while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- taught by academics, current and retired public policy practitioners

- our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alsiter Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willets MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include, Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: institutions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave, 2012) and James Sloam, 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Professor Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global. Professor Rumford and Professor Halperin edit the Routledge Series in Global and Transnational Politics and host the Global Studies Association and a BISA Working Group of Global and Transnational Politics in the Centre.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Prof Andrew Chadwick, Prof Ben O’Loughlin and Dr Cristian Vicarri. Recent publications include Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin and Laura Roselle, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). As well as hosting a large number of PhD students working in new political communication, Chadwick edited the Oxford University Press Series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal, Media, War and Conflict.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- The Politics of Democracy You will be provided with a sound understanding of contemporary thinking about democracy and political participation through the analysis of liberal democracy and its political institutions. The unit will draw upon a variety of contemporary and historical sources with particular reference to the political systems of Britain and the USA.

- Comparative Political Executives This unit explores the political executives of established democratic systems, focusing on institutions – presidents, prime ministers, cabinets and so on – and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the executives in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- European Union Politics and Policy This course provides students with an insight into the development and governance of the European Union as a political system. Particular attention is placed on the functions of the EU’s executive, legislative and judicial institutions as well as on a number of key policy areas in which the European Union’s sovereignty has developed in recent years. The course provides students with a solid theoretical background in understanding both the institutional politics and public policy of the EU.

- Political Parties
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse, and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS.
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Politics in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- Internet and New Media Politics Drawing predominantly upon specialist academic journal literatures, this unit focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements.

- Elections and Voting Behaviour

- Social Media and Politics

- Public Opinion and political participation

- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice

- Advanced Quantitative Methods

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to public policy, democracy, politics, international relations and governance

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of public policy, politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The master’s programme Mathematics focuses on analysis and number theory. From applied to fundamental research, and from algebra to data science, our master’s programme spans these fields entirely. Read more

The master’s programme Mathematics focuses on analysis and number theory. From applied to fundamental research, and from algebra to data science, our master’s programme spans these fields entirely.

What does this master’s programme entail?

The two-year master's programme Mathematics has two components: an analysis-oriented component with topics such as dynamical systems, differential equations, probability theory and stochastics, percolation and mathematics in the life sciences, and an algebra/geometry-oriented component with topics such as algebraic number theory, algebraic geometry, algebraic topology and cryptology. The goal of each programme is to train the student as an independent researcher, and to develop the necessary skills and proficiency to advance your career.

Read more about our Mathematics programme.

Why study Mathematics at Leiden University?

  • Your study programme can be fine-tuned to your own mathematical interests, both pure and applied.
  • You will be educated by renowned researchers like Spinoza prize winner Aad van der Vaart and Hendrik Lenstra and receive a top level education in Mathematics.
  • The institute has an extensive international network which allows you to broaden your horizon and provide you with ample opportunities to join interdisciplinary seminars and pursue interdisciplinary research projects.

Find more reasons to choose Mathematics at Leiden University.

Mathematics: the right master’s programme for you?

The master’s programme in Mathematics in Leiden focuses on analysis, probability and statistics, number theory and (arithmetic) geometry. If you are looking for an opportunity to specialize in one of these areas, Leiden is an excellent possibility. Students who have obtained a Master of Science degree in Mathematics possess a thorough theoretical basis, know how to work in a multinational environment, and are able to operate well on the international market.

Read more about the entry requirements for Mathematics.

Specialisations



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This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice. Read more
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice.

The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.
It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context.

Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context.

The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level
-You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner.

Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs.

Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

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This programme is designed to prepare nurses and a range of health and social care professionals for new and challenging roles in advancing and shifting the professional boundaries in critical care. Read more
This programme is designed to prepare nurses and a range of health and social care professionals for new and challenging roles in advancing and shifting the professional boundaries in critical care.

The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context.
Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context.

The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020.

This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs.

Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice. Read more
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice. The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context. Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context. The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012.

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs.

Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less

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