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Masters Degrees (Nuclear Policy)

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Studying this postgraduate course, will enable students to evaluate the complex environmental, social and economic impacts of Nuclear Security projects, and to critically assess and respond to policy and regulation frameworks. Read more
Studying this postgraduate course, will enable students to evaluate the complex environmental, social and economic impacts of Nuclear Security projects, and to critically assess and respond to policy and regulation frameworks. You will develop a knowledge and awareness of the planning and regulations related to Nuclear Security projects. The nuclear industry will continue to provide a significant proportion of the UK's energy needs over the next ten years and this percentage will increase as new nuclear power stations come on stream at the end of this decade and beyond. As a result, the Postgraduate Certificate in Nuclear Security and Safeguards has been uniquely designed and is delivered from a UCLan campus, offering employees already working within the sector and assisting employer led provisions, a flexible programme to fit in around their work patterns. Access to those people from the general engineering sector is also being encouraged.

INDUSTRY LINKS

UCLan has developed strong relationships with nuclear employers which include Sellafield Ltd, National Nuclear Laboratory, BAE Systems at Barrow and Westinghouse Ltd.

FURTHER INFORMATION

A variety of assessments including laboratory and field visit reports, and project reports and presentations to test the ability and knowledge in specific nuclear security projects. The programme offers modular delivery and will include lectures, seminars and visits to nuclear sites. Four modules available are delivered by blended methodology; only three are required for the award, Upon completion the student will receive 60 credits.

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This masters degree course is for students with science-based backgrounds, such as undergraduate degrees in Geosciences, Chemistry, Physics and Engineering, who are interested in a career in the Nuclear industry. Read more
This masters degree course is for students with science-based backgrounds, such as undergraduate degrees in Geosciences, Chemistry, Physics and Engineering, who are interested in a career in the Nuclear industry.

The course covers a wide range of the skills required to work in the nuclear industry and is co-taught with the academic staff from the Schools of Physics and Chemistry.

The University of Birmingham has a long and established track record of research and education in the nuclear sector, including reactor technology, metallurgy and materials, decommissioning and waste management, dating back to the earliest days of the nuclear industry. The University runs one of the longest-standing Masters level courses in the nuclear sector (over 50 years), in the Physics and Technology of Nuclear Reactors (PTNR). The University has extensive links to the nuclear industry and regulators both within the UK and internationally, including National Nuclear Labs, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Idaho National Labs, NAGRA, British Energy, AMEC, Serco, HSE (NII), Atkins, Babcock Marine, Westinghouse, UKAEA, EDF, E.ON and RWE NPower.

About the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences

The School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences has a renowned history for international excellence in research and teaching.
Our postgraduate programmes are shaped by research that addresses global grand challenges across the fields of geography, planning, earth sciences, environmental science, occupational health and safety, and environmental and public health. With policy- and practice-focused teaching, all our programmes have high employability outcomes.
We offer excellent facilities for postgraduate study including extensive map and archive facilities, earth imaging laboratory, stable-isotope laboratory (SILLA), environmental library, fully digital drawing office, and state-of-the-art laboratories for environmental chemistry, sedimentology, ecology, groundwater and palaeobiology. Our diverse range of programmes will provide you with a thorough understanding of the discipline, high-quality training and skills development, and access to our expert staff and extensive facilities.
Our graduates go on to forge careers in areas that matter – from environmental consultancies and the hydrocarbon industries, to urban planning, policy roles in NGOs and government regulatory services – and make a real contribution to global challenges. Many graduates also go on to study for PhDs.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MPhil in Nuclear Energy, provided by the Department in collaboration with the Cambridge Nuclear Energy Centre, is a one year full-time nuclear technology and business masters for engineers, mathematicians and scientists who wish to make a difference to the problems of climate change and energy security by developing nuclear power generation. Read more
The MPhil in Nuclear Energy, provided by the Department in collaboration with the Cambridge Nuclear Energy Centre, is a one year full-time nuclear technology and business masters for engineers, mathematicians and scientists who wish to make a difference to the problems of climate change and energy security by developing nuclear power generation. The combination of nuclear technology with nuclear policy and business makes the course highly relevant to the challenges of 21st century energy needs, whether in the UK or in countries across the globe.

The MPhil is part of the University of Cambridge's Strategic Energy Initiative in response to the prospect of a nuclear renaissance in the UK and around the world. The aim is to provide a masters-level degree course in Nuclear Energy which will combined nuclear science and technology topics with business, management and policy teaching. Students will be equipped with the skills and information essential to responsible leadership of the international global nuclear industry.

The course recognises that, though the prospects for nuclear energy are now better than they have been for twenty years, the nuclear sector is situated within in a wider market for energy technologies, and has no special right to be developed. The political, economic and social contexts for nuclear power are as important as the technical merits of the designs of reactors and systems. The course therefore has a multi-disciplinary emphasis, aiming to be true to the reality of policy-making and business decision-making.

This course is for students who have a good degree in Engineering or related science subject and who wish to gain the knowledge and skills to build a career in the nuclear and energy sectors. Secondary career paths might include nuclear proliferation prevention, radiological protection, nuclear governance, nuclear medicine and health physics. While the prime focus of the course is to equip students for roles in industry, there is a path towards research through preparation for a PhD programme. The modular open architecture of the course allows students to tailor the degree to suit their background, needs and preferences.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egegmpmne

Course detail

The course will equip its graduates with a wide range of skills and knowledge, enabling them to fully engage in the nuclear sector.

Graduates will have developed a knowledge and understanding of nuclear technology, policy, safety and allied business. They will have received a thorough technical grounding in nuclear power generation, beginning with fundamental concepts and extending to a range of specialist topics. They will also be equipped with an appreciation of the wider social, political and environmental contexts of electricity generation in the 21st century, with a firm grounding in considering issues such as climate change, energy policy and public acceptability.

The programme will cultivate intellectual skills allowing graduates to engage with the business, policy and technical issues that the development and deployment of nuclear energy poses. These include skills in the modelling, simulation and experimental evaluation of nuclear energy systems; critically evaluating and finding alternative solutions to technical problems; applying professional engineering judgment to balance technological, environmental, ethical, economic and public policy considerations; working within an organisation to manage change effectively and respond to changing demand; understanding business practice in the areas of technology management, transfer and exploitation.

The programme will also develop transferable skills enabling graduates to work and progress in teams within and across the nuclear sector, including the management of time and information, the preparation of formal reports in a variety of styles, the deployment of critical reasoning and independent thinking.

Finally, graduates will have research experience having planned, executed, and evaluated an original investigative piece of work through a major dissertation.

Format

The MPhil in Nuclear Energy is based in the Department of Engineering and is run in partnership with Cambridge Judge Business School and the Departments of Materials Science and Metallurgy, and Earth Sciences.

The programme consists of six compuslory courses in nuclear technology and business management, and four elective courses chosen from a broad range of technical and management courses. These elective courses enable the student to tailor the content of the programme to his career needs; they range from wholly management-oriented courses to technical courses in preparation for an engineering role or further research through a PhD. A long research project is required, with topics chosen from a list offered by members of staffed and Industry Club members, and linked to the principal areas of energy research in their respective departments and companies.

Students are also expected to attend field visits, a Distinguished Lecture Series and weekly seminars, and are able to benefit from research skills training offered by the Department.

Assessment

A large individual research project will be undertaken, which will be examined in two parts. The first part will include a report (of up to 4,000 words) and a five-minute oral presentation. The second part is assessed through the writing of a 15,000 word dissertation, including a fifteen minute oral presentation.

All students will be required to complete at least four items of coursework.

All students will take at least three written examinations, of 1.5 hours each.

Continuing

Students wishing to apply for continuation to the PhD would normally be expected to attain an overall mark of 70%.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

UK applicants are eligible to apply for scholarships of £7,000; these scholarships are funded by the MPhil's industrial partners.

To apply for a scholarship, eligible applicants must list the Nuclear Energy Scholarship in Section B(4) of the online GRADSAF form. People wishing to be considered for a scholarship must submit their application before the end of May 2016.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MA in Science and Security is designed to provide an integrated understanding of science and international politics. Developments in technology are central to all aspects of international conflict, and a multidisciplinary understanding of these developments is necessary to fully comprehend their policy implications. Read more
The MA in Science and Security is designed to provide an integrated understanding of science and international politics. Developments in technology are central to all aspects of international conflict, and a multidisciplinary understanding of these developments is necessary to fully comprehend their policy implications. Topics include nuclear weapons, arms control verification, cyber security, and terrorism.

Key benefits

• A unique programme designed to develop students' abilities to understand and analyse the security implications of scientific and technological developments, utilising knowledge and tools of analysis from the hard sciences, political science, history, philosophy and the sociology.

• The Centre for Science and Security Studies, based in the Department of War Studies, provides a vibrant home for the MA. The Centre has a growing cadre of PhD students and researchers, and sponsors its own speaker series. Students on the MA are encouraged to apply for internships (on Centre research projects and/or with other relevant institutions in London, such as the Verification Research, Training and Information Centre (VERTIC) and IISS).

• With a typical 50-50 mix of students with a hard science versus social science/humanities background, the programme provides an excellent opportunity for students to learn from each other as well as from staff and visiting lecturers; in recent years students have institutionalised this by forming their own reading group.

• Students have access to visiting academics, serving officers, government ministers and other experts who give regular public lectures and seminars.

• The Department of War Studies is unique in the UK and one of very few university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon.

• The Department has an excellent reputation as a graduate training institution and is recognised by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a training institution for War Studies.

• The Department places great emphasis on recruiting leading experts who bring with them not only a wealth of knowledge and ideas but an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

• The unrivalled location in the heart of London beside the River Thames brings outstanding advantages. Students enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities.

• The department is close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/science-and-security-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

There is an increased need in today's world to understand the security implications of scientific and technological developments. While science and technology have always affected national and international security, current developments in the fields of space, nuclear and biological weapons, and long-range missiles as well as work in such emerging fields as biotechnology and information technology suggest that the impact of science on security is becoming more diverse as well as more central to policy planners. At the same time, individuals and sub-national groups have more access to new technologies than ever before.

Our programme is designed to provide you with an integrated understanding of science and politics. This involves developing an understanding of the science underlying key weapons systems and technologies, the main concepts and tools of international politics and security studies, and the process by which scientists and policymakers can interact productively in the policy process. The goal is to equip you to be able to analyse the impact of current and future scientific developments on security.

- Course purpose -

Our programme is designed to provide you with an integrated understanding of science and international politics to cope with the demands of the emerging security agenda.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules are assessed by a 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules are assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas, exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Whilst this is not a vocational programme, students on our MA programmes have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching, and the armed forces.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Energy is the largest and one of the most dynamic industry sectors. It raises many challenges both politically and technically, from traditional exploration and production of fossil fuels to more recent mining extraction methods (hydraulic fracturing or 'fracking'), renewables and environmental protection. Read more
Energy is the largest and one of the most dynamic industry sectors. It raises many challenges both politically and technically, from traditional exploration and production of fossil fuels to more recent mining extraction methods (hydraulic fracturing or 'fracking'), renewables and environmental protection. Queen Mary is only one of a few universities in the world to offer an LLM in Energy and Natural Resources Law and this programme builds upon well-established areas at Queen Mary, such as Commercial Law, Dispute Resolution, Environmental Law and Regulation.

All these constituent elements of Energy and Natural Resources law are approached through a comparative and international lens and prepare students to enter practice as regulators, lawyers in private practice of public sector lawyers. You will also benefit from the current research, consultancy work and events undertaken and held by the Energy and Natural Resources Law Institute (ENRLI) at Queen Mary.

Many of the modules will be co-taught by practitioners and leading industry figures so you will benefit from practical real life insights into the industry. You will also be able to attend a series of General Counsel lectures, giving you a chance to network with speakers from organisations such as Exxon, British Gas, Shell and EDF.

This programme will:

Examine the area from a comparative, international and inter-disciplinary perspective.
Focus on both regulatory and transactional matters but also issues of policy.
Give you access to leading experts in the field who provide an accurate and measured assessment of key pervasive and emerging issues.
Approach the energy and natural resources law academically, from policy and a problem-solving perspective.
Provide you with unique internship and networking opportunities within the industry.

Taught Modules

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Energy and Natural Resources Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM098 European Environmental Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM152 International Energy Transactions (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM153 International Arbitration and Energy (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM154 International Regulation and Governance of Energy (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM304 Mining and Natural Resources (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM379 Energy Law: Renewable and Nuclear (sem 2)
◦ QLLM380 Energy Economics: A Legal Perspective (sem 1)
◦ QLLM381 Energy Economics: Applied Analysis (sem 2)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The MSc Global Governance is designed to ensure that you develop an in-depth understanding of global governance and the increasingly intertwined nature of government, business and non-governmental organisations (NGO) activities. Read more
The MSc Global Governance is designed to ensure that you develop an in-depth understanding of global governance and the increasingly intertwined nature of government, business and non-governmental organisations (NGO) activities. The course focuses on debates relating to sustainable development.

It is delivered by leading academics who are experts in their field, and boasts an international teaching team who are able to share their first hand experience of cross cultural negotiation, global partnerships and new security challenges.

On completion of this postgraduate governance course, you will be well equipped for senior roles in some of the top international organisations.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1647-msc-global-governance

What you will study

The MSc Global Governance is uniquely underpinned by the principles of the United Nations Global Compact and United Nations Principles in Responsible Management Education. The University of South Wales is a signatory of both the United Nations Global Compact and the Principles in Responsible Management Education.

You will study 180 credits in total. Modules include:

- International Human Rights Law
Study the historical development and procedural and institutional framework of human rights protection; gaining a critical awareness of both substantive and procedural aspects.

- Global Ethics
Consider current controversies in global ethics from migration, climate change to terrorism and war whilst studying this module whilst applying a range of specific concepts such as ‘human rights’ and ‘global justice’ in the process.

- Globalisation
Explore the concept of globalisation, its history and the causes of globalising process whilst addressing the different contexts in which globalisation applies such as governance, culture, economics and security.

- New Security Challenges
An introduction to the concepts and theories of security in international relations, examining security challenges such as cyberterrorism, nuclear non-proliferation and resource wars.

- Global Governance: Shared approaches to shared challenges
Gain an understanding of Global Governance and its institutions and processes set up to deal with issues that underpin the United Nations Global Compact relating to labour rights, human rights, environmental degradation and anti-corruption.

- Conducting Research
An introduction to the basics of how to conduct a small-scale research project and write a dissertation. This module will prepare you for working on your dissertation.

- Dissertation

You'll also study two of the following option modules:

- Planning for Disasters and Civil Contingencies
- Economies, Markets and Strategic Decision Making
- Global and Strategic Issues in Leadership and Management

Learning and teaching methods

We use a variety of teaching styles and assessment methods. The course is taught face to face and online through interactive workshops and simulations. You will also engage in supervised research. The course also benefits from strong links with international organisations, government and business and therefore, there will be optional study visits and special lectures at European institutions, the U.S. Embassy and private sector organisations.

If you choose to study full-time the course length is approximately 12 months.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

There is high demand for graduates with an in-depth understanding of the intertwined activities of states, businesses and nongovernmental organisations. Global governance has particular relevance to policy makers and following graduation, you will be well prepared to enter or progress further in careers in government, international organisations, the diplomatic service, nongovernmental organisations, policy work, and the voluntary sector.

- Industry endorsements
“Today’s students need to have a perspective on critical global issues. This MSc programme provides knowledge on issues like human rights, good workplace and environmental standards and governance which are based on key United Nations norms and conventions. It is an innovative programme which I have not seen in this form at many other higher education institutions. I would recommend this to students who intend to become future organizational and business leaders.”
Jonas Haertle, Head, Principles of Responsible Management Education Secretariat, United Nations Global Compact Office

“Governance is becoming an increasingly important topic throughout many aspects of the world we live in today. It’s not any longer just the preserve of the Corporate or Banking world, it applies equally to pan continental and global organisations and agreements. The trick is to show that governance can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of an organisation or programme and not just add a layer of bureaucracy or become ineffective because of compromise. The course content at the University of South Wales looks like a good mix of theory and practical applications that will be both interesting and fun to learn and will allow an individual to evaluate world and corporate events from a more informed standpoint."
Geoff Cousins, former Global Director of Jaguar Cars

Assessment methods

Formal examinations are not a feature of the course, each module will be typically assessed through coursework and presentations.

The supervised research project will take the form of a written report. Some modules will require you to develop podcasts as part of your assessments, which will become part of a collection of online educational resources. Full training and support will be given to ensure that you have appropriate levels of digital literacy to undertake all assessments.

Teaching

Programme Leader:
Our global governance Masters degree is led by Dr Bela Arora who has 15 years experience of lecturing in international relations. She has provided guest lectures for a wide range of organisations including the Joint Services Command and Staff College. She has also worked on consultancy projects relating to corporate social responsibility, businesses in zones of conflict and blood diamonds.

She has a strong track record in learning and teaching innovation and always ensures a high quality student experience. She has had experience of teaching on executive programmes, and MBA modules, and is committed to providing professional delivery for students looking to enhance their careers. All members of the teaching team have been recognised for their teaching experience. Our expert practitioners have been acknowledged for their first hand experience of shaping policy and professional practice at an international level.

Work and Study Placements

Students on the MSc Global Governance will have the opportunity to apply for a competitively selected funded work experience placement in another EU country.

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The Master of International Security is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills relevant to understanding both traditional and emerging security challenges. Read more
The Master of International Security is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills relevant to understanding both traditional and emerging security challenges. It draws on a wide range of disciplinary fields including defence, international relations, strategic studies, political science, economics, environmental studies, law, business, public health, biology and demography.

The course provides a solid grounding in the foundational concepts and methods in the study of international security. You will also engage with a wide range of complex and frequently interconnected issues. They range from the causes and consequences of war between states to ethnic, religious and ideological conflicts, threats to human security and the stability of states from environmental degradation, infectious diseases, climate change, nuclear proliferation, and the activities of non‑state actors. You will have the opportunity to take classes from across the department’s offerings in international relations, public policy, and Australian politics.

The Master of International Security has a research-driven teaching approach. It adds a practical focus by encouraging you to apply theories to real-world situations and current policy debates. Our staff are actively engaged with the policy community and regularly undertake field research within the region and elsewhere internationally.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

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We live in an increasingly globalised world. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, failed states, global poverty and inequality, financial market instability, biodiversity losses, and climate change - are among the global challenges we face and which demand global cooperation if they are to be to adequately resolved. Read more
We live in an increasingly globalised world. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, failed states, global poverty and inequality, financial market instability, biodiversity losses, and climate change - are among the global challenges we face and which demand global cooperation if they are to be to adequately resolved.

The MSc Global Politics provides students with the tools to understand and critically assess these challenges and the forms of cooperation required to address them.

The programme's core modules concentrate on the institutional drivers of global politics and offer an incisive overview of the main theoretical and applied moral debates concerning the ethics of globalization. It is also possible to choose modules from other departments with approval of the School of Government and International Affairs, for example:
-Anthropology of Global Health (ANTH43615)
-Environmental Economics and Policy (ECON40615)
-Globalisation and Global Health Politics (HEAL3031)

Student Profile

"The close-knit nature of the Global Politics MSc has allowed me to closely engage both with our lecturers, and fellow students in the program. The course has inspired us to debate economic and moral issues pertaining to World politics long after classes are over and made me feel part of an intellectual community not simply enrolled in a degree." Sam George

Course Content

The MSc Global Politics thus aims to provide students with knowledge of the political, economic, cultural and moral debates about how and to what extent the effects of globalisation can be governed.

It will provide the means for students to develop the analytical and conceptual skills necessary to understand and discuss:
-The key international and transnational structures, organisations and institutions that have developed in the era following the Second World War
-The range of the academic debates in the area of global governance
-Policy developments and innovations in the fields of economics, security, and environment

The moral justification for different and sometimes competing regimes of global governance.
Students will also benefit from the wide range of academic resources within the School of Government and International Affairs, the Law School, the Department of Geography, and the School of Economics, Business and Finance, making the MSc Global Politics a truly unique interdisciplinary programme.

The programme consists of:
Core Modules:
-Theoretical Approaches to Global Governance
-Global Governance Institutions
-Theories of Global Justice
-Ethical Aspects of Global Governance
-Dissertation: 12,000 word research dissertation providing students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of one field of global politics

Optional Modules - A choice of up to four modules from the list of elective modules both within the School of Government and International Affairs and within other Schools and Departments at Durham University.

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into four core and four optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than 12,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies. Global Politics students also typically benefit from participation in Global Policy Institute events.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. Read more
Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. The programme considers how political communities with different values, cultures, histories, and security conceptions can build trust in a global system.

You will gain a multidisciplinary understanding of key global security challenges (e.g. climate change, nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, and intractable conflicts inside and across state borders) and cover debates in International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies.

Topics and issues examined include:

The Security Dilemma.
Face-to-face diplomacy.
Peace building, alliances and institutions
Emotions in crises and conflicts
The psychology of radicalization, terrorism, and political violence
Identities of religion, gender, and nationalism
Game theory: the Prisoner’s Dilemma.
The risks of nuclear war during the Cold War.
US-Iran nuclear relations.
The possibilities for avoiding a new Cold War with China.

Our students explore cutting edge scholarship through three core modules: Fear, Cooperation and Trust in World Politics, Global Cooperation in Practice, and our exclusive training programme on Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation. In addition, our new module Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation examines the psychological determinants of political choices and behaviours. Our programme allows for a truly interdisciplinary training in understanding and tackling the challenges of complex international tensions.

Our MSc degree has one more distinctive feature: it is offered by the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS), a world-leading interdisciplinary research centre, in partnership with the Department of Political Science and International Studies. The ICCS has strong connections to high level practitioner networks, which offer summer internship opportunities. Our MSc students can also become members of the four ICCS Research Working Groups: Trust; Political Settlements; International Political Psychology; Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems.

Who is the programme for?

Our MSc degree is designed for students interested in international relations, political psychology and security studies. Our students share a common goal: to advance their academic training, establish a policy-related career, work in government, international organizations and NGOs, or serve as mediators, negotiators and diplomats to address intractable conflicts at all levels of world politics.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Examines the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime and the way in which proliferation influences other issues in international relations. Read more
Examines the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime and the way in which proliferation influences other issues in international relations. This programme utilises knowledge and tools of analysis from history, political science, the hard sciences, philosophy and sociology.

Key benefits

- Drawing on the strengths of the Department of War Studies, this programme is multidisciplinary, utilising knowledge and tools of analysis from history, political science, the hard sciences, philosophy and sociology.

- Through guest speakers and when possible, field trips, the programme also draws on the broad range of expertise available in government and the NGO community.

- The Centre for Science and Security Studies, located within the Department of War Studies, provides a vibrant home for the MA, with its own speaker series and a growing cadre of PhD students and researchers. When possible, the Centre also offers internships on current research projects; students are also encouraged to apply for internships at other London-based institutions working in the field, such as the Verification Research, Training and Information Centre (VERTIC) and IISS.

- The Department has an excellent reputation as a graduate training institution and is recognised by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a training institution for War Studies.

- The Department places great emphasis on recruiting leading experts who bring with them not only a wealth of knowledge and ideas but an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/non-proliferation-and-international-security-ma-.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The development and spread of weapons technology has been and continues to be of central importance in international relations, with today’s growing concerns about the spread of chemical, biological and nuclear (CBN) weapons and their means of delivery to both state and non-state actors. Our MA programme enables you to examine the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime, and the way in which proliferation influences other key issues in international relations, including the causes of war and peace, military doctrine and strategy, and the rise (and possible decline) of the state as the central actor in international relations. Our programme is composed of a core module plus a choice of optional modules and a dissertation, and provides an ideal base for further academic or policy research or any career involving critical analysis.

Our MA programme is designed as a one-year full-time or two year part-time taught programme which offers you the opportunity to engage critically with ideas in international relations and social and political thought concerned with the study of conflict and peace, and their application to empirical case-study material. The compulsory module applies these ideas to the issue of proliferation. The various options available will allow you to broaden your programme of study by taking other contemporary or historical options offered by the department, or to focus on proliferation by taking specialised options that are being developed.

- Course purpose -

Our programme is for graduates and professionals with an interest in understanding the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime, and the way in which proliferation influences other key issues in international relations.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas, exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Whilst this is not a vocational programme, students on MA programmes in the department have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching, and the armed forces.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Discover the real-world career opportunities in the energy sector with this MSc in Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics. Read more
Discover the real-world career opportunities in the energy sector with this MSc in Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics.

Who is it for?

Wherever you are, energy has an implication. This course is for students who want to engage with different types of settings to research and establish the energy, environmental and technological implications that exist within them. Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics students will care for the environment as a sustainable system and ultimately have a desire to improve conditions for the wider population.

Students come from a range of backgrounds including engineering, finance and economics – and from within the energy industry itself.

Objectives

This Masters degree has been designed to give you a wide perspective when it comes to analysing and forecasting the future for energy, environmental technology and economics. We engage with the industry so you gain a real-world understanding of the problems that exist, and we consider our own ethical responsibilities in relation to energy use.

Imagine a Grade 1-listed building such as the Guildhall in London. As an energy consultant your task is to analyse the site to make it more efficient. But there is a caveat: you cannot make any structural changes to the walls or the windows. The MSc Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics course gives you the tools to examine and address these kinds of challenges.

The MSc Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics course is not about learning academic theories. Instead we focus on the breadth of the subject in the real world. By engaging with practising businesses and trade associations we identify a range of perspectives, and look at the influence of a myriad of other forces at play, from regulation and government funding, to behavioural psychology and emerging technologies. Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Does this new form of technology operate as it should?
-How does the UK relate to other European countries when it comes to energy efficiency?
-How does organisational psychology affect energy use within a company?
-How do you decide which energy contract to choose?
-What is the impact of a consumer society on personal energy use?

Placements

There is no formal requirement to do an industry-based placement as part of the programme. However, some students arrange to undertake their dissertation research within a company or within their part of the world. A recent student investigated the future of coal-fired generation in Turkey, and another student is combining a work placement at The World Energy Council with their dissertation.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised into modules comprising four consecutive day courses taken at a rate of one a month or so. This format makes the programme accessible for students who want to study part time while working.

Full-time students are also welcome. Whether you choose to take the course as a part-time or full-time student, we will offer a great deal of support when it comes to helping you prepare for the modules and project work. You will be expected to devote a significant part of your non-taught hours to project work as well as private study.

Our course is led by an exceptional group of experts in energy, supply, demand management and policies. As an example, one of our module leaders leads the UK contribution to writing international energy management standards and informing policy through the European Sector Forum for Energy Management. This forum looks at methodologies across the continent. There is also input to global standards development through the International Standards Organisation (ISO). At City we bring on board people with well-established academic careers as well as leaders from the energy industry. The programme has strong links with industry and commerce and involves many visiting lecturers who hold senior positions in their fields.

The Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics MSc gives you the opportunity to consider the role of International Energy Management Standards. You will explore the opportunities these standards provide for global service users and providers in relation to reducing energy costs and the environmental impact of energy use.

You will discover the range of current European and International Standards, explore why they are needed and how they are developed, and examine the benefits they deliver through case studies.

The UK has had a leading role in developing these standards in terms of both their writing and implementation. For example the Energy Audit standard, which forms part of the EU Energy Efficiency Directive, Article 8, mandates audits for private sector, non-SME organisations. In the UK this has been implemented as the Energy Savings Opportunities Scheme (ESOS).

Modules

Each course module is taught over four consecutive days of teaching with one module each month. Alongside the teaching you will have coursework to complete for each module. The modules run from October to April, and in the remaining time, you will concentrate on your dissertation, which forms a significant part of the programme.

The dissertation gives you the opportunity to create your own questions and to decide on your own area of interest. It should be a detailed investigation into a subject on energy supply and/or demand, with your own analysis and conclusions outlining the way forward. You may see the focus of your dissertation as a future career path, but whatever your area of study, these final few months of the degree should embody your vision of the future.

You will take four core modules and have six elective modules from which you can choose four topics from diverse subjects relating to energy supply and demand. These include energy in industry and the built environment, renewables, energy markets from the purchaser’s perspective and water supply and management. The latter has close parallels, and directly engages, with energy. You start the course with an introduction to energy and environmental issues and energy policies and economic dimensions in the first term, but you do not need to follow the course in any particular order from this point onwards.

If you are interested in sustainability, you have the option of taking up to two elective modules from the MSc in Environmental Strategy offered by the University of Surrey.

Completing eight modules and four examinations and four modular assessments will lead to a Postgraduate Diploma. Completing four core and four elective modules and a dissertation will lead to a Masters degree. If you are interested in this course may also be interested in the MSc Renewable Energy and Power Systems Management.

Core modules
-Introduction to energy and environmental issues (15 credits)
-Energy policies and economic dimensions (15 credits)
-The energy market from the purchaser's perspective (15 credits)
-Corporate energy management (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Energy, consumer goods and the home (15 credits)
-Transport energy and emissions (15 credits)
-Energy in industry and the built environment (15 credits)
-Renewable energy and sustainability (15 credits)
-Risk management (15 credits)
-Water supply and management (15 credits)

Career prospects

The story of energy is now part of public debate and climate change drives the international agenda. In the UK, there are additional energy supply issues, through the decline of existing nuclear capacity, growing imports of fossil fuels and challenging medium-term targets for renewables and low carbon supply.

Our priority is to make you employable in a range of sectors in which effective energy supply and demand side management has become an important consideration.

You will graduate with economic and market-based skills relevant to complying with relevant legislation and technical and engineering skills related to energy generation and management.

With strong industry links and working level experience from our exceptional team of expert lecturers, as well as the diverse modules on offer, you will be equipped to become a leader and entrepreneur in your chosen area of specialisation within the realm of energy management, supply or policy making.

Our graduates have gone on to hold high-ranking positions as energy consultants, data analysts and directors of corporate sustainability working within organisations including:
-AK Home Energy
-Enelco Environmental Technology
-Energy Institute
-Equinoxe Services Ltd
-Log Tech Consultancy
-Ofgem
-Peckham Power
-RWE NPower Renewables
-SCFG

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The MA North Korean Studies provides the only dedicated master’s degree in this subject area outside South Korea. Read more

Programme Overview

The MA North Korean Studies provides the only dedicated master’s degree in this subject area outside South Korea. Uniquely, this one year course embeds the learning and teaching in a graduate introduction to social science philosophies and methods, provides training in the Korean language geared to the language level of the student (beginners, intermediate, or advanced) and, at the same time, introduces a wide range of materials on the society, economy, politics and International relations of North Korea. The course director, Professor Hazel Smith, is a world-leading scholar whose publications provide global benchmark studies on North Korea. The MA is taught by staff situated in UCLan’s International Institute of Korean Studies, which works within a globally established network of influential academics, diplomats, journalists and public policy officials who work on North Korea.

The course will provide you with the comparative advantage in journalism, diplomacy, international organisations, NGOs, and global business of gaining knowledge and expertise, not just on North Korea, but in the international relations of East Asia, which is the motor force of the world economy yet also contains some of the globe’s pressing security problems; the most important to all of the global powers of which is North Korea’s nuclear programme. Students graduating from this master’s course will have developed knowledge, analytical skills and language skills (Korean at beginners, intermediate or advanced level) that will equip them to work in a number of employment sectors dealing with international affairs. The strong support from policy makers in the UK (FCO and parliament) will also bring networks to our students that will facilitate employability prospects.

Modules

Inter-Korean relations: Theory and Practice
Research Methods
North Korea: History, Politics and International Relations
North Korea: Economy and Society
Korean Language 1
Korean Language 2
Dissertation

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Climate change is a universal problem with far reaching consequences for all governments, industry, societies and individuals. Read more
Climate change is a universal problem with far reaching consequences for all governments, industry, societies and individuals. The LLM in Environmental Law examines all the political and legal issues concerning environmental protection, climate change policies, natural resources law, with an overarching emphasis on the impact of gas and oil.

The LLM in Environmental Law is an interdisciplinary programme, encompassing legal, political and human rights issues of environmental protection, whilst drawing on expertise from colleagues in other Queen Mary departments, including geography, human rights and physics.

Your fellow students will come from the UK and more than 80 other countries, each able to draw on prior academic and in many cases professional experiences from different jurisdictions to enrich discussion and debate in class.

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Environmental Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM098 European Environmental Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM379 Energy Law: Renewable and Nuclear (sem 2)
◦ QLLM380 Energy Economics: A Legal Perspective (sem 1)
◦ QLLM381 Energy Economics: Applied Analysis (sem 2)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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This programme gives a broad assessment of contemporary international relations. It integrates theoretical approaches with the study of many cases and issues. Read more
This programme gives a broad assessment of contemporary international relations. It integrates theoretical approaches with the study of many cases and issues. It also explores the ways in which the line between the domestic and international is blurred by trade, financial, environmental, strategic, ideological, cultural and ethical issues.

The programme promotes a close-knit student community with easy access to members of staff who all give a high priority to teaching and supervision while maintaining high-quality, high-volume research.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-International Political Economy
-International Security
-Theories of International Relations

Optional units - You will choose three optional units from a selection offered by the School for Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS). Below is an example of topics that may be offered. Options vary each year but may include:
-Conflict, Security and Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Masculinities and IR
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Research Methods
-Military and militarisation
-Discourse Analysis
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Nuclear insecurity
-Theories of Violence
-Understanding Popular Culture in/and World Politics

A list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/2017/ssl/msc-international-relations/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

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