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The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours. We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. Read more
The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours.

Who is it for?

We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. All you need is a desire to write exciting words and spend two years working on a novel.

All our group teaching is conducted in the evening – so if you have a job or a family, you can still take this course. We actively seek to attract people who, with other life commitments, are still committed above all to writing great fiction.

David Young, Crime Thriller MA - "The chance to have a novel-length manuscript read and challenged by leading published crime writers is what attracted me to the MA course. The focus is on writing your own novel and giving you the tools to do that, rather than getting bogged down in literary criticism. I'd thoroughly recommend it."

Objectives

At the end of the Novels MA course, you will be very different; you will have written a novel.

This course is designed to provide a supportive and thought-provoking, yet challenging, environment for novelists to develop their skills, experiment with approaches to writing, learn about the industry and, most importantly, complete a polished novel ready to send to publishers and agents.

This MA allows you to focus on one of two areas: Literary Novels or Crime Thriller Novels. As a focused, high-intensity course, we only have a maximum cohort of 14 students each year for each genre, therefore you must apply and be awarded a place for Literary Novels or Crime Novels at the outset.

At the core of the Novels course is the experience of established writers. Everyone who teaches on this MA course is a working, published novelist. Their experience underpins all the teaching.

Teaching and learning

Workshops, seminars and lectures are 6pm to 9pm every Tuesday and Wednesday of the first two terms. Thereafter tutorials are fixed at mutually convenient times – we are happy to work around other life commitments.

Everyone who teaches on this course is a published and working novelist – we strongly believe that only published writers understand everything it takes to write a novel. The core of the teaching comes in one-to-one tutorials which are used to discuss a minimum of 10,000 words of your novel in progress. Thus, across the two-year programme we read and discuss more than 200,000 words of creative writing by each student.

In the first two terms, we aim to provide you with your toolbox for when you start the novel. This covers every way in which you might approach constructing and writing and polishing your novel: we look at the word, the sentence, the paragraph, the chapter and the entire plotting and structuring of a full-length novel. During these terms, we encourage you to experiment with your writing, to find skills and aptitudes you didn’t know you possessed. We also examine published novels, taking them apart like clockmakers, to see how the constituent parts make them tick. That said, there is no literary criticism on this course – we are not theorists, we are a craft-based course, teaching you the techniques and devices (and pitfalls) required when writing your first novel.

In addition to the tutors and lecturers, there are Q and A sessions with visiting guest authors in each term.

Modules

For this course you are required to write 2,000 words a week for 100 weeks. 2,000 in order to generate 1,000 polished, edited words. During the first two terms, the exercises require 1,000 words each week. For the remaining 80 weeks of the course, you need to write a novel and the average length is 80,000 words. This is a serious course for serious writers who want to work hard and write better.

In addition, during the first two terms there are two other modules requiring an analysis and an outline.

Term 1
-Fundamentals of fiction
-Storytelling (Part 1)
-Reading as a Writer

Term 2
-Experiments in style
-Storytelling (Part 2)

Term 3-6
-Complete your novel

Career prospects

The focus is for you to finish a novel and use City’s unparalleled industry links to help start our literary career as a published novelist.

At the end of this course, you will have the manuscript of your novel and we will do everything we can to assist you to find an agent to represent you who will then work to find a publisher for it.

Our recently published alumni include:
-Rod Reynolds
-Hannah Kohler
-Jem Lester
-David Young

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Our Masters in Comics and Graphic Novels is the only course of its kind in the UK, and Dundee is one of only a handful of institutions in the world offering the opportunity to study comics at postgraduate level. Read more
Our Masters in Comics and Graphic Novels is the only course of its kind in the UK, and Dundee is one of only a handful of institutions in the world offering the opportunity to study comics at postgraduate level. Our expert staff are involved in making comics, researching comics, organising major comics conferences, and co-editing peer-reviewed journals in this expanding field.

Aims of the Course

This course will provide you with an understanding of the comics medium and the comics industry, and their relation to different genres, national cultures, and various media. You will be encouraged to think critically about these ideas, and to appreciate the importance of relating critical close analysis of style and form to theory, context, politics and history.

You can also practice creating comics from script writing to thumbnails, pencils, inks, lettering, colouring and production methods.

These analytical and creative skills, combined with assessments that test presentational and communication skills and problem solving abilities, are essential in the workplace. The fact that the course is interdisciplinary in its approach (looking at writing and visual culture together) means that we foster creativity and ingenuity in developing critical approaches to the work.‌

How you will be taught

The MLitt is led by Dr Chris Murray with the MDes led by Phillip Vaughan.

A variety of teaching methods are used, including: small group teaching, one-to-one teaching, supervised study, seminars, tutorials, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, workshops, practical classes and demonstrations.

How you will be assessed

The assessment methods used in this course include weekly journals, presentations, research essays, dissertations and projects. Some of the option modules include assessment of creative work accompanied by reflective essays.

Dissertations and projects are supervised on a one-to-one basis to ensure continuity, and this will provide you with the opportunity to work on an area of comics study or creation of your own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

There are two teaching semesters, from September to December and from January to March. You'll study the core modules below, plus your choice of optional modules

From April onwards, you'll write your dissertation or produce your major project.

Core Modules for MLitt

Critical Approaches to Comics and Graphic Novels
International Comics Cultures
Dissertation

Core Modules for MDes

Creating Comics
Comics Production
Major Project

Optional modules (shared between both courses):

Critical Approaches to Comics and Graphic Novels
International Comics Cultures
Creating Comics
Comics Production
Comics and Film
Science Fiction Comics
Autobiographix: Documentary and Autobiographical Comics

Employability

This course offers good employment opportunities for anyone interested in working in the field of comics, either critically or creatively. You will also meet many industry professionals during the course, and have the chance to make valuable connections.

Students taking this programme may also choose to pursue academic careers, work in the media, or in the creative industries or publishing. An understanding of comics cuts across publishing, computer games, the internet, television, and film.

You'll have networking opportunities throughout the course, you'll meet with industry professionals and there will be opportunities to attend and organise major comic conventions. There are also opportunities for internships.

Additionally, the high levels of analysis, problem-solving abilities and the presentational and communication skills that you will develop on this course are highly valued by employers.

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Taught by practitioners with extensive experience in children’s books, graphic novels and illustrated stories and utilising an impressive list of specialists from all areas of publishing, the course is divided into three terms (if studied full time). Read more
Taught by practitioners with extensive experience in children’s books, graphic novels and illustrated stories and utilising an impressive list of specialists from all areas of publishing, the course is divided into three terms (if studied full time).

Each module is designed to be flexible, allowing you to bring your own specific interests to the course work while developing and expanding your visual language and understanding of the requirements and demands of successfully seeing through the activity of writing, illustrating and preparing a text for publication. Additional time will be spent looking at the available avenues and opportunities for publishing, including co-editions, book fairs (a dominant and crucial factor in successful publishing), self-publishing and the international publishing market.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published.

Why Study Creative Writing: Writing and Publishing Fiction with us?

This distinctive course comprises four modules – Writing Short Fiction for Publication, Writing Novels for Publication, Getting Published, and The Writing Project – which are taught by a team of published writers, scholars, and editors. Their publications include: flash fiction; novels; prose-poetry and short-story anthologies and collections; articles and essays; interviews; student textbooks; and writers’ guides. Two of the teaching team edit Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine, which has published stories by students on the MA.

The Parkgate Road Campus library is well stocked with creative writing textbooks and houses the Flash Fiction Special Collection, the world’s largest archive of flash-related books and magazines.

What will I learn?

You will study and try your hand at writing flash fiction, short stories, novellas, and novels. Getting Published looks at the world of fiction publishing. For The Writing Project, you will be able to write a collection of flashes and/or short stories, a novella, or a novel.

How will I be taught?

Typically, Writing Short Fiction for Publication and Writing Novels for Publication are taught by nine weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops; and Getting Published is taught by five weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops. One-to-one tutorials are also available. For The Writing Project (the final module), you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

The total workload, including reading, preparation, seminars, workshops, tutorials, research, and writing, is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework, including essays, a journal, creative pieces, and a 16,000-word writing project. There are no formal exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. Read more
This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. It is a practical course, taught by experienced lecturers who are all published children's writers and/or industry professionals.

The course is for writers for children of all ages, from the picture-book age through to young adult (YA). Prose fiction is likely to be the main area studied, but students will have the chance to look at writing in all forms, including poetry, picture book texts and narrative non-fiction for young people.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course supports you to create a significant body of writing, with practical plans for its place in the real world of publishing. It is based on the principle that most writers learn and benefit from working closely with their fellow writers, in a disciplined supportive setting, and with tutors who are practising and published writers in their field. Most of our students aim to complete a novel by the end of the MA.

The writing workshop is at the heart of the course. What you’ll do with tutors and your fellow writers in a workshop situation is learn to see your work through objective eyes and to think clearly about the different strategies you might adopt. You learn from each other’s mistakes and successes as well as your own. You will be urged to try things out, take risks and experiment, and reflect on and discuss the writing process. The context modules help you to see your own writing in the wider context of published children’s writing. The course encourages you to read widely and analytically.

MODULES

In the first trimester’s writing workshop you’ll explore a variety of forms of writing, gaining a sense of different age ranges and styles of writing and experimenting with your own writing. The context module is Writing for Young People: Forms, Ages and Stages and it is concerned with the writer’s relationship with their audience, and will help you understand some of the issues raised by writing for young people.

In the second trimester, you'll be asked to choose your area of writing and use the workshop’s feedback and encouragement to explore it in more depth. You will bring short excerpts from your work-in-progress for discussion and feedback in the group. You may continue to experiment with different ideas for other stories.The second trimester's Context Module is Contemporary Children's Publishing, which aims to give a realistic grasp of the choices open to new writers in the field.

In the third trimester, you'll continue to write your work-in-progress, developing a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. The manuscript may be a novel, picture book texts, or a collection of stories or poems.

For more information on module and course structure please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

TEACHING METHODS

Modules are normally taught via tutor-led writing workshops, with one three-hour session each week for the eleven weeks of each taught trimester, at the Corsham Court campus. We aim to keep the writing workshops small – usually no more than eight students – so that there is sufficient time, support and attention for each person’s work.

ASSESSMENT

The assessed coursework for each Writing Workshop is a folder of creative writing plus a short reflective commentary. The manuscript is 35,000-40,000 words, or the equivalent in poetry or picture book texts.

TUTORS

This course is taught by publishing writers and depending on timetables will include:

• Julia Green: her novels for young adults include Blue Moon, Baby Blue and Hunter’s Heart (Puffin), Breathing Underwater, Drawing with Light and Bringing the Summer (Bloomsbury)and her most recent novel for younger children is Tilly’s Moonlight Fox (Oxford University Press).
• Lucy Chrisopher: prize winning author of Stolen and The Killing Woods for YA readers, and Flyaway for younger teens ( Chicken House).
• Steve Voake: his novels include The Dreamwalker's Child, The Web of Fire, The Starlight Conspiracy, Blood Hunters, Fight Back and Dark Woods (Faber & Faber), plus his Daisy Dawson and Hooey Higgins series for younger readers (Walker Books).

For the full list of our fantastic staff and tutors please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Graduates have achieved publication deals with a range of different mainstream and smaller publishers, and many more students have secured literary agents. Other students have subsequently taught Creative Writing at university level. Some have combined their writing with subsequent careers in journalism, teaching, publishing, television etc.

ALLUMNI SUCCESS

More than 30 graduates of this MA have achieved publication deals since the course began in 2004, with more novels due to be published in 2016-2017. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children’s Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award in 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize. Elen Caldecott, Clare Furniss, Gill Lewis and Jim Carrington have been long-listed for the Carnegie award. Sally Nicholls was short-listed for the Guardian children’s book prize and won the Independent Booksellers’ award in 2015 for her novel An Island of Our Own. David Hofmeyr was short-listed for the Branford Boase award 2016 for his novel Stone Rider.

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Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook. Read more
Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook.

Whether your interests lie in the world of the postcolonial or you have a fascination with women's writing, this challenging course will allow you to study recent volumes of poetry, research cultures and explore novels and films relating to current debates. You will use key theoretical models and concepts to gain a greater understanding of how we study literature and the motivations and historical events that have driven the authors you choose to read.

Taught by a team with an international reputation for their research in diverse areas, ranging from Caribbean culture, history and literature to cultural representations of the 2007-08 credit crunch across literature, stage and screen, this course will expose you to new ideas and encourage you to question them.

Check out our twitter feed @BeckettEnglish for up-to-date information on staff and student events, short courses and fun happenings around the school.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/englishcontemp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Course Benefits

You'll learn how to use a range of cutting-edge theoretical approaches to texts, while you will be able to draw upon the course team's research and teaching strengths in contemporary women's writing, postcolonialism and popular fiction.

You will acquire a well-informed, critical understanding of current developments, questions and critical issues in the field of contemporary literatures and develop the transferable skills needed to undertake independent research into contemporary literatures and associated criticism and theory.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
Is an interdisciplinary research methods module, taught with students on other Masters programmes. It prepares students for their dissertation, and equips them with research skills and strategies necessary if they intend to progress to PhD.

Doris Lessing: Narrating Nation & Identity
Explore a selection of the extensive body of work produced during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by the Nobel Prize-winning writer, Doris Lessing.

Contemporary Genre: (Re)Presenting the 21st Century
Examine contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovations and socio-cultural developments.

Haunting the Contemporary: the Ghost Story in 20th & 21st Century Fiction
Discover the contemporary field of haunted narratives and consider them in relation to a variety of theoretical approaches, primarily the work of Jacques Derrida.

Post-Structuralist Theory: Foucault & Derrida
Develop a deeper awareness and more sophisticated understanding of two theorists who have been of fundamental importance to debates in literary studies in the twentieth century: Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Neoliberal Fictions
You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Dissertation
Presents the opportunity for students to synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the course and to write a substantial piece of supervised research, in the guise of a 15,000-word masters dissertation.

With the exception of Researching Cultures and Dissertation, the modules offered each year will be rotated. Other modules include:

Poetry & Poetics
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

Contemporary Gothic
Examine the relevance of the Gothic today by studying contemporary Gothic texts. You will engage not only with novels but with Gothic-influenced US TV drama, South-East Asian vampire films, and Latin American horror.

India Shining: Secularism, Globalization, & Contemporary Indian Culture
Discover the diverse and challenging selection of literary and visual texts offered by modern postcolonial India and explore the different conceptual and political approaches taken by writers and film-makers.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration 1768-1996
Consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries described in a range of travel writing from 1768 through to 1996 and gain an understanding of how travel, tourism and exploration have evolved.

Translating Tricksters: Literatures of the Black Atlantic
Explore postcolonial writing in the form of short stories, novels and poetry, and unpick the ways writers use religion and folklore to define their identity and resist the legacy of western imperialism.

New Yorkshire Writing: Scholarly Practice & Research Methods
Develop the research and writing skills needed to conduct advanced research in your field as you study representations of Yorkshire and the region's position within Britain.

Other Victorians: The Neo-Victorian Contemporary Novel
You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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This three module course will develop your understanding of the new National Curriculum focus on reading for pleasure. Read more
This three module course will develop your understanding of the new National Curriculum focus on reading for pleasure.

You will focus on understanding how texts are constructed using a range of narrative models and how this aspect of your subject knowledge can be employed in the primary classroom to develop children's abilities to read a range of texts.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgcert-education-childrens-literature/

Why choose this course?

- There is a strong focus on applied classroom practice

- You will be taught by an experienced team of colleagues researching and teaching in the area of children's literature

- You will explore a variety of texts currently available, including classic texts, comics, novels in verse form, literature in translation and interactive texts.

This course in detail

The three modules are:

- Reading for pleasure in the primary classroom
(7 sessions in the Autumn term)

Grounded in reader response theory, the focus of this module is to enhance your skills as a teacher of reading in its broadest sense. With an excellent range of high quality texts at the module's heart, you will explore how to read picture books, novels, poetry and interactive texts across the primary ages. By the end of the module, you will have the tools to support children in being able to talk critically and comprehensively about texts and have the knowledge to build a community of successful, lifelong readers.

- Children's literature through the ages: from classic texts to interactive texts and their use in the classroom
(7 sessions in the Spring term)

The profile of children's books has undergone an unparalleled change compared to other fields of literature. From its early days of didactic and moralistic undertones pre-18th century, to the present day where stories are not just written for pleasure but actively encourage children to question the ideologies that surround them, this genre's journey has been fascinating and, arguably, the most diverse. This module will begin with studying some of the early classics and end with children's stories in today's multimedia world. Through a range of theoretical perspectives such as feminism, marxism and post-modernism, this module will explore a range of texts including: classics, novels in verse, literature in translation, apps, traditional tales and comics.

- Investigating practice
(3 workshops and tutorial support in the Summer term)

You will develop an inquiry related to your own practice which can then be assessed through either a report or a portfolio of work. This might include the development of pedagogical approaches or curriculum materials, or investigations into the achievement levels or the opportunities provided for particular groups of learners. It could also include the development of professional practice through shadowing others or engaging in collaborative work across organisations.

The inquiry will be supported by a personal tutor. Group seminars and workshops will provide guidance on the development of methodological tools for the inquiry and enable you to share the stages of project development with other members of the group. You will be allocated a personal tutor for this assignment who will signpost you to relevant academic theory and research and support material.

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly, the modules available may vary from those shown here.

Attendance pattern

This course takes place on Wednesday evenings 5.00pm - 8.00pm at the Harcourt Hill Campus.

How this course helps you develop

The PGCertificate aims to develop reflective practitioners at master's level.

Careers

Your learning on the course may lead to better prospects for career advancement and students frequently change role / direction as a result of developing new understandings and skills from their work on the course.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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The Master in International Screenwriting and Production is a graduate program that aims at creating professional scriptwriters, story editors and producers, providing them with a thorough understanding of the audiovisual industry and a strong knowledge of the storytelling techniques, which are the heart of every project of feature film and television series. Read more
The Master in International Screenwriting and Production is a graduate program that aims at creating professional scriptwriters, story editors and producers, providing them with a thorough understanding of the audiovisual industry and a strong knowledge of the storytelling techniques, which are the heart of every project of feature film and television series.

The MISP is a full-time intensive course, with a maximum enrollment of 42 students. The diploma, issued by Università Cattolica, is recognized as a first level Master’s degree by the Italian Government.

Learning objectives

The MISP will allow students to acquire the required knowledge to work in the entertainment industry, both as writers and/or professionals working in production or distribution companies, TV networks, talent agencies or as production assistants.

Students will receive a comprehensive and high level training which effectively combines the academic expertise of university professors with the professional know-how of high-ranking professionals with international profiles.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Graduates from the MISP are exposed to a wide range of career opportunities. Graduates have both the theoretical knowledge and the methodological tools suited to pursue professional and managerial careers as:

● Screenwriters or creative producers of television series and feature films;

● Authors of TV entertainment programs and documentaries, copywriters, creators of video games and web series, writers of comic books and novels and fiction editors in publishing companies;

● Story editors and script consultants;

● Supervisors of evaluation, acquisition and programming of TV shows;

● Professionals working in different areas of the television and film industry (physical production, distribution, acquisition, product placement, etc.)

Guest Lecturers

Here is a list of some Professors and Guest Lecturers:

● Eleonora Andreatta - Director TV series and TV dramas for Rai Fiction

● Luca Bernabei, CEO Lux vide, Rome

● Armando Fumagalli, Director of the Master, professor of Semiotics and History of Cinema, UCSC; script consultant for Lux vide

● Robin Lyons - Animation Writer and Producer – Calon (UK)

● Luca Manzi - Writer for novel, theatre and television, and co-founder of the Master Program

● Cristiana Nobili - Director, Original Live Action Production, Disney Europe, Middle East and Africa (London)

● Paolo Sigismondi, professor of Global Entertainment, Annenberg School of Communication, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

● John Truby - Screenwriter and script doctor for Disney, Universal, Sony Pictures, Fox, HBO, BBC

Curriculum

● Screenwriting theory (8 ECTS/ CFU)

● Script analysis and project evaluation (8 ECTS/ CFU)

● Writing techniques for audiovisual products (12 ECTS/ CFU)
- Screenwriting practice: treatments, scenes and dialogues, scripts, pitches.
- The writing of genres and adaptation.
- Writing for different formats: comic books, novels, documentaries, entertainment TV shows, advertising, the web, mobile media, and transmedia projects.
- Screenwriting and production of animation projects.

● The audiovisual industry (4 ECTS/ CFU)
- Industries and audiences.
- TV acquisition and programming and film distribution
- The physical production: pre-production, shooting, post-production, contracts and budgeting.

● Communication ethics (4 ECTS/ CFU)

Final project

Three months before the end of theoretical classes, the students will have to choose between one of the following careers: screenwriting or production. The students, who choose the screenwriting career, will have to write and deliver a final project from which the writing abilities developed during the program should emerge. Typically,the final project takes the form of a script for a feature film, which can either be an original idea or an adaptation.

The final project can be written in English, Italian, French or Spanish. The students, who choose the production career, will have the opportunity to undertake an internship within an established production or distribution company, a TV network, an advertising agency or on a film set.

Industry related

The MISP aims at providing its stu- dents with the adequate knowledge, wide-ranging skills and contacts to meet the requests of an increasingly global and varied audiovisual industry.

Alumni achievements

In previous years, alumni from MISP (which, until 2015, was taught in Italian: Master in Scrittura e produzione per la fiction e il cinema) have been working as writers and producers for top rating TV series and highly successful feature films, or as writers of best selling novels, published in many countries; many of them have been working in high-ranking audiovisual companies such as Cattleya, Disney, Endemol, Focus Features, Freman- tle, Lux Vide, Mediaset, RAI, SKY, among others. They work not only in Italy, but also in London, Los Angeles, Madrid, New York, Paris, etc.

Employment opportunities

The MISP aims at providing the students with a 360 degree education in the audiovisual field, so as to create pro- fessionals able to tackle both creative and organizational/managerial tasks and work in wide-ranging professional environments.

Scholarships

All scholarships are assigned on a merit basis and will be mostly given to students who apply by the priority deadline. Some scholarships may also target specific geographic regions.

Scholarship value: €4000

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This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Read more
This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Working with tutors and other writers on the course, you’ll develop your writing and build up a substantial body of work. Weekly workshops are taught by a strong team of published writers, and there are regular visits by literary agents, publishers, magazine editors and broadcasters, as well as other writers.

Due to the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers every year.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.

You’ll learn:

• To plan a manuscript (a novel, collection of short stories, collection of poems or book of literary non-fiction) and complete it, or a substantial part of it, brought to publishable quality or as near as possible.
• To understand literary form, style and genre, as relevant to your chosen form of writing
• To acquire a variety of relevant writing techniques, and research techniques to support writing, and adapt them to your particular creative project.
• To understand and respond creatively to questions arising from the subject-matter, themes, genres, traditions and other literary contexts with which your chosen manuscript is engaged.
• To receive and give precise and sensitive critical feedback in workshop groups and one-to-one tutorials.
• To respond creatively to feedback provided by tutors and other students, adapting that feedback to your particular vision of your book.
• To understand choices and opportunities relevant to your chosen manuscript, including questions of how to place your work, and the role of agents, publishers and editors.

MODULES

Each student will take two workshop modules, two context modules and a double module entitled 'The Manuscript':

In the first trimester ‘Professional Skills’ provides intensive group discussion and some plenary lectures. You’ll bring short pieces of writing to workshop groups consisting of a tutor and not more than seven other students. There are separate groups for prose and poetry. You’ll submit a manuscript proposal halfway through the module.

In trimester two, you’ll take a second workshop module in either prose or poetry.

Each context module explores connections between your creative writing and the wider world as represented by a theme or genre. Seminars are divided between considering set texts and workshopping your creative writing. You’ll take a context module in trimester one and another in trimester two.

In trimester three, ‘The Manuscript’ will be taught by means of one-to-one tutorials. This is the culmination of the course – the book, or substantial part of a book.

For more information on course structure and modules please go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-creative-writing/

TEACHING METHODS

You’ll be taught in group workshops and seminars, one-to-one tutorials, plenary lectures and a residential weekend.

TUTORS

The teaching team in 2015-16 included the novelists Ian Breckon, Nathan Filer, Maggie Gee, Tessa Hadley, Samantha Harvey, Philip Hensher, Beatrice Hitchman,Tricia Wastvedt, Fay Weldon and Gerard Woodward, the poets Tim Liardet, Lucy English, Neil Rollinson and Sean Borodale, the historical novelists Celia Brayfield and Kylie Fitzpatrick, the nature writer and memoirist Richard Kerridge, the nature writer Stephen Moss, the travel writer Joe Roberts and the literary memoirist Gavin Cologne-Brookes.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

You’ll be assessed entirely by coursework: mainly creative writing, plus two short essays, a manuscript proposal and a short commentary on the manuscript in progress.

For more information on assessment please see the course handbook: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/media/bathspaacuk/course-handbooks/course-handbooks/PG-Creative-Writing-Handbook-2016-17.pdf

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; been long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, Orange Prize, Costa Prize and the Guardian First Book Award; received the Betty Trask Prize, Manchester Book Award and a W.H. Smith New Talent Award, and reached the best-seller lists.

ALLUMNI SUCCESS

In recent years, several current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; Two were long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, three for the Orange Prize, one for the Costa Prize and one for the Guardian First Book Award. One received the Betty Trask Prize; another the Manchester Book Award; another a W.H. Smith New Talent Award. One reached the best-seller lists. Student poets have had their poetry accepted for publication in numerous literary journals, including Ambit, Magma, London Magazine, Poetry Wales, PN Review and The Reader, among others, and have been placed in such competitions as the Bridport, the Frogmore, Mslexia, and Writers Inc. Janklow and Nesbit Ltd, a leading literary agency, awards an annual prize for the best novel or novel in progress by a student on the course.

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The Creative Writing MA course offers you the chance to follow one of three pathways, all distinct but all containing common elements. Read more
The Creative Writing MA course offers you the chance to follow one of three pathways, all distinct but all containing common elements: Fiction Writing; Poetry Writing; and Poetic Practice.

The first two of these options are designed to encourage you to develop and reflect on your work as a creative writer, in the context of contemporary and well-established literatures. Whether you choose the Fiction or the Poetry strand, you will be expected to make the most of your existing experience, but also to discover ways of going beyond the merely personal, and writing with an engaged sense of society. At the same time as you learn to stretch your imagination, you will also be encouraged to develop your technical and analytic skills, and in the process to sharpen you self-criticism. The pathway in Poetry focuses on innovative forms of expressions across many media, including sound, film installation and architecture.

All three Creative Writing pathways are taught in Bedford Square, in the heart of London’s Bloomsbury, in a building which is adjacent to the facilities of the University of London. The Fiction and Poetry pathways have now been running for nearly a decade, and have achieved an extremely high reputation. Many of our graduates have gone on to publish collections of poems, novels and short stories, and also to win awards. In 2012 alone, four of our graduates published their first novels, and one of our poets her first full collection.

It is unfortunately not possible to switch from one pathway to another in mid-course, or to mix and match. However, the MA may be studied full-time or part-time.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/english/coursefinder/macreativewriting.aspx

Why choose this course?

- Distinguished writers, including Giles Foden, Susanna Jones, Ben Markovits and Jo Shapcott, contribute to teaching on this course.

- You will benefit from small workshops in poetry and fiction writing of no more than ten people.

- Since launching in 2004 the course has produced many successfully published authors including Tahmima Anam, Adam O'Riordan, Sam Riviere and Kate Williams.

- You will make important contacts through guest lectures by leading figures in the industry.

- All teaching is done in central London, at premises in Bedford Square and Gower Street.

Department research and industry highlights

In the most recent RAE (2008), 90% of the work submitted by the department was judged to be of international standard with 30% assessed as world-leading (4*), 35% as internationally excellent (3*) and 25% as internationally recognised (2*). The department’s performance, in terms of 4* and 3* results, was ranked 11th equal. Overall, the department was ranked one of the top three English departments in London.

We have particular strengths in the following research areas:
- Medieval Studies
- Shakespeare and the Renaissance
- 17th and 18th Century Literature and Culture
- 19th Century Literature
- 20th Century Literature and Theory
- Postcolonialism
- Creative Writing and Practice-based Research.

Course content and structure

In the Autumn and Spring terms, you will meet for a three-hour workshop and a one-and-a-half-hour critical class each week.

Core course units:
- Fiction or Poetry
This is a weekly three-hour workshop,in either fiction or poetry writing, in which your work is discussed, and critical skills are developed. You will be involved in the regular production of new work for this unit.

- Practical Work Project
You will undertake a major writing project (under supervision) and produce a critical and/or theoretical piece of writing reflecting on your work.

- Supplementary Discourses: Core Course
This is a weekly seminar in the Autumn Term. It involves critical and theoretical reading designed to supply you with appropriate critical and theoretical discourse for discussing your own work and others.

- Reading as a Writer
This is a weekly seminar in the Spring Term. You will read a selection of contemporary fiction and poetry from the perspective of a writer.

- Dissertation
You are required to produce a major critical and/or theoretical dissertation relating to your literary interests and your Practical Work Project, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- developed the ability to experiment in their writing and discover new things
- become more ambitious and perceptive about their own work
- broadened their appreciation of traditional and contemporary work, and extended their powers of communication
- a greater knowledge of shaping their work for publication.

Assessment

At the beginning of the Spring term fiction writers will submit a 5,000-word piece of work and poets a portfolio of 12 pages. In addition, they will submit a 3,000-4,000 word essay arising from their work in Supplementary Discourses. They will be given feedback and then, at the beginning of the Summer term, resubmit improved versions together with a second piece of creative work, and a second essay in relation to Reading as a Writer. Part-time students hand their work in at the end of the relevant term instead of the beginning.

At the end of the course fiction students will submit a 15,000 word piece of work and poets a portfolio of 24 pages. In addition, students will write a dissertation of 10-12,000 words, relating to their creative work and to their wider literary interests, to be submitted with the portfolio. Part-time students will make these final submissions at the end of their second year.

Employability & career opportunities

A number of our Creative Writing students have become published authors or found work in publishing and allied professions. In addition, the Department has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs; recently they have secured positions at the Universities of Edinburgh, Sussex and Leeds, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland.

The course also prepares graduates for successful careers in a variety of other fields, such as publishing, teaching, writing and journalism, administration and marketing.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Our challenging, practice-based course offers you a unique approach to the practice of writing, emphasising innovation and experimentation in your work. Read more
Our challenging, practice-based course offers you a unique approach to the practice of writing, emphasising innovation and experimentation in your work.

On our MA Creative Writing, you deepen your knowledge of literary tradition, exploring different modes and genres in order to develop your own creative and expressive written skills. You expand your use of creative writing techniques and improve your critical judgement of your own work.

Our course encourages you to develop your writing by stepping outside your comfort zone and discovering the different approaches to verbal art that are possible today. This will invigorate your own practice, whether you are writing psychogeography, plays, novels, stories or something else. You will choose from a variety of modules, covering topics such as:
-Development of a novel plan, from research and concept-development, to plotting, character, and structure
-Experimental language play of the Oulipo group across the short story, autobiography, cartoons, cookery and theatre
-Relating magic to writing and creativity, both in theory and in practice
-Psychogeography, writing about walking, place, landscape, history and the psychic environment
-Poetic practice across experimental writing in poetry from the performative to the visual

To help you hone your craft, we also host two Royal Literary Fund Fellows, professional writers on-hand to help you develop your writing on a one-to-one basis, and regularly host talks and readings by visiting writers.

Essex has nurtured a long tradition of distinguished authors whose work has shaped literature as we know it today, from past giants such as the American poets Robert Lowell and Ted Berrigan, to contemporary writers such as mythographer and novelist Dame Marina Warner, and Booker Prize winner Ben Okri.

We are ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015, and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our teaching staff are experienced and established writers who have a breadth of experience across literary genres, from novels, prose and plays, to poetry and song.

Our creative writing teaching team has a breadth of experience in the literatures of different cultures and different forms. Our current teaching staff include poet and short story writer Philip Terry, lyric writer and essayist Adrian May, novelist and camper Matthew de Abaitua, poet and performance-writer Holly Pester, poet, fisherman and memoirist Chris McCully, and award-winning playwrights Elizabeth Kuti and Jonathan Lichtenstein.

Our Centre for Creative Writing is part of a unique literary conservatoire that offers students the skills, support and confidence to respond artistically and critically to the study of writing with the guidance of experts.

Specialist facilities

-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Hear writers talk about their craft and learn from leading literature specialists at regular talks and readings
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting skills at our Lakeside Theatre Writers workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

Many of our students have gone on to successfully publish their work, notable recent alumni including:
-Ida Løkås, who won a literary prize in Norway for The Beauty That Flows Past, securing a book deal
-Alexia Casale, whose novel Bone Dragon was published by Faber & Faber and subsequently featured on both the Young Adult Books of the Year 2013 list for The Financial Times, and The Independent’s Books of the year 2013: Children
-Elaine Ewert, recent graduate from our MA Wild Writing, placed second in the New Welsh Writing Awards 2015
-Patricia Borlenghi, the founder of Patrician Press, which has published works by a number of our alumni
-Petra Mcqueen, who has written for The Guardian and runs creative writing courses

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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The MA in English offers an exciting and challenging course of graduate study covering a range of periods and genres from the Renaissance to the Contemporary. Read more
The MA in English offers an exciting and challenging course of graduate study covering a range of periods and genres from the Renaissance to the Contemporary.

The course enables you to develop subject expertise at an advanced level, and carry out independent research projects in your own areas of interest.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/english/

Why choose this course?

- A curriculum that allows you to study either a broad range of literary texts, or specialise in pathways in 19th century culture, or modern and contemporary writing.

- You have the opportunity to study with internationally-renowned scholars who regularly publish in their field.

- You have access to a state-of-the-art learning environment, and use of Oxford's world-famous Bodleian Library.

- You have access to the Man Booker Prize archive, based here at Oxford Brookes.

- Oxford is a vibrant student city that has much on offer, including the Ashmolean, Pitt Rivers Museum, and Modern Art Oxford.

- Our Centre for Modern and Contemporary Poetry is home to a thriving poetry community.

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Classes are held in the evenings, with sessions running from 6.30pm to 9.00pm.

Part-time students attend the University one evening per week and should be able to devote an additional 12-15 hours per week to private study.

Full-time students attend classes on two evenings per week and spend 30 hours per week in private study.

Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes houses the Booker Prize Archive and has research and teaching strengths in fiction, drama, and poetry.

Our virtual learning portals provide core materials relating to learning and assessment online. These include lecture schedules, module guides, supporting materials, guidelines and criteria for coursework along with notes on essay writing and report presentation.

How this course helps you develop

The MA English offers you the opportunity to develop your literary critical skills to a high level, but it also fosters your professional and personal growth through improving:
- critical thinking skills
- verbal and literary presentation skills
- interpersonal and empathy skills
- research skills
- digital literacy skills.

Careers

Our alumni go on to a wide range of careers in different sectors, including teaching, publishing, NGO/charity work and the creative industries.

Recently, Jenny Mayhew, English PhD student, had her first novel published, A Wolf in Hindelheim. A significant number of successful MA students continue into further research and academic careers, at Brookes and other institutions.

The MA course offers an excellent grounding in further study in English no matter what you decide to do afterwards, and provides the research experience and training you need to pursue a successful PhD project.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

We are home to the Oxford Brookes Poetry Centre, which creates a space for discussion and research, as well as promoting connections between poets, academics, and readers of poetry in the local community. It also sponsors readings by poets, such as Simon Armitage, and a regular seminar series.

The department also has particular strengths in 20th century fiction, modernist culture, gender studies, Romanticism and the environment, Renaissance writing including drama and performance history, 19th century fiction, Irish and American writing and culture, and post-colonial writing.

Some recent research highlights include:
- Dr Eric White was recently awarded a Vacation Visiting Fellowship at the Rothermere American Institute (RAI) in the University of Oxford. The focus of his research programme at the RAI was The Transatlantic Avant-Garde: Little Magazines and Localist Modernism, 1912-1932, which culminated in the production of his first monograph. Transatlantic Avant-Gardes: Little Magazines and Localist Modernism was published by Edinburgh University Press in 2013. Eric also focused on ways to develop American and transatlantic modernist studies across institutions in Oxford.

- Dr James Hawes, Reader in Creative Writing, is the author of six novels with Jonathan Cape including a Sunday Times bestseller and two novels adapted to the screen starring Joseph Fiennes and Michael Sheen respectively. He is currently working closely with the king of UK adaptation, Andrew Davies, on a screen version of Speak for England. His latest publication entitled Englanders and Huns: How Five Decades of Enmity led to the First World War' came out in 2014.

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Hone your writing and expand your opportunities for publication. Our workshops will help you to develop your self-editing and refine your work using feedback from your peers and tutors. Read more
Hone your writing and expand your opportunities for publication. Our workshops will help you to develop your self-editing and refine your work using feedback from your peers and tutors. Get advice from our team of specialist lecturers, study classic and contemporary authors, and learn about the modern publishing industry.

Overview

If you’re a practising writer, this course will allow you to develop your craft in a supportive literary environment.

You’ll get the chance to work on your existing projects or try out something completely new, working across a range of styles and genres. Your first modules will focus on novels and short stories, while Special Topic and dissertation projects can range from drama and screenwriting to graphic novels and performance poetry*.

You’ll share your work with, and get invaluable feedback from, our experienced teaching team as well as your fellow students, giving you a unique perspective on how your work is read by different audiences.

All your writing will be supported by a close study of the most distinguished writers and works in each form. You’ll learn to reflect critically on other people’s writing, and through this discover new ways to understand and improve your own.

If you want to get published, you can get advice from our team of specialists, led by Laura Dietz, Una McCormack and Colette Paul, as well as our current Royal Literary Fund Fellows. We’ll introduce you to the writing industry through talks, masterclasses and networking opportunities with agents, publishers and established fiction writers. Our past tutors and speakers have included writers like Rebecca Stott, Toby Litt, Shelley Weiner, Martyn Waites, Julia Bell, Chris Beckett, Graham Joyce and Esther Freud.

You can choose to study this course in Cambridge (full- or part-time) or Chelmsford (part-time only).

Careers

This course will prepare you for a career as a creative writer or in related areas such as publishing and the media, but will also give you critical and analytical skills valued by many employers.

For an idea of how past students have moved from MA study to careers as published authors, read more about Kaddy Benyon, Penny Hancock and Kate Swindlehurst.

Modules

Core modules:
Patterns of Story: Fiction and its Forms
Master's Project in Creative Writing

Optional modules:
Workshop: the Short Story
Workshop: the Novel
Special Topic in Creative Writing/English Literature

Or change one of the above options to:
Renaissance Drama and Cultures of Performance
Re-reading Modernism, Practising Postmodernism
Creativity and Content in Publishing
The Long 19th Century: Controversies and Cities
The Business of Publishing
Independent Learning Module

Assessment

On each core module, you’ll show your progress through one or more pieces of writing. For the Patterns of Fiction module, this will be a single critical essay including samples of your own writing. For the other three modules you’ll submit one creative portfolio of up to 4,500 words, plus a critical reflection on your work and writing process.

You can also take several optional modules from our MA Publishing or MA English Literature courses.

The major project at the end of the course will allow you to present up to 15,000 words of your chosen writing project, including a critical commentary.

Cultural activities and events

In addition to our Creative Writing and Publishing events series, the department organises many extra-curricular activities, like the annual three-day trip to Stratford-upon-Avon, poetry and writing evenings, and research symposia and conferences.

You’ll also be able to join the Anglia Ruskin Literary Society, which arranges trips to local plays and poetry readings, organises workshops, and hosts guest speakers and performance evenings.

As a founding member, we also host events for CAMPUS, Cambridge’s only publishing society.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature is the first of its kind in the world. It draws on world-level expertise to explore the various types of narrative produced in ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt.

Key Features

This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. It is taught by a team of scholars associated with the KYKNOS research centre, whose research in this field is internationally recognised.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature offers excellent preparation for students who intend to undertake further research in this exciting and rapidly developing area of Classical literature. Students will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Greek and/or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient Narrative Literature can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin language
• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Greek and Roman Magic :Exploring the Sources
• Reading Academic German
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Word, Metaphor, Allegory: effective models of reality

Student Quote

"I studied at Swansea University for my Undergraduate degree and fell in love with the city, the university campus and the lecturers and supporting staff at the university. Deciding to do my MA in Ancient Narrative Literature here was therefore partly influenced by this. However, Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University was an attractive choice mostly because of the quality of the lecturers here. Both Professor John Morgan who is already a highly esteemed scholar within the area of the Ancient Greek novels and Dr Ian Repath who is a rising star in the same subject area make Swansea University the ideal place to study Ancient Narrative Literature at MA level."

Ida Meland

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