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Masters Degrees (Novel Writing)

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Since creating the UK's first full BA and London's first MA in Creative Writing, Middlesex University has continued to pioneer and evolve the ways in which we approach the discipline of Creative Writing. Read more
Since creating the UK's first full BA and London's first MA in Creative Writing, Middlesex University has continued to pioneer and evolve the ways in which we approach the discipline of Creative Writing. Now, in recognition of the personal and professional commitments of many aspiring novelists we have developed the UK's first Distance Education MA which focuses solely on Novel Writing, enabling you to research and write your book at your own pace from wherever you choose, anywhere in the world.


Why study MA Novel Writing at Middlesex?

At Middlesex we take a practical and contemporary approach to Novel Writing that ensures you are able to hone your writing skills and develop your book while also identifying gaps in the market and how to approach agents and publishers. Drawing on the expertise of a wide range of published novelists with extensive teaching experience, you will not only develop your work to a publishable standard but acquire valuable communication skills which will benefit a variety of professions.

Delivered online through our Virtual Learning Environment, our unique course encourages you to interact, question, share and participate with others on your course, ensuring you never feel as if you are studying in isolation. Whether you're working full time, unable to attend our London campus regularly, or based overseas this challenging and exciting MA will enable you to embark on your novel in your own time with expert guidance, world-class resources and valuable industry links to help you get published.

Course highlights

- Teaching staff who are all published novelists with industry experience, led by Dr David Rain - author of nine novels (eight published as Tom Arden), and Josie Barnard - BBC radio journalist, author of two novels and long-standing Creative Writing tutor at the Faber Academy, Goldsmiths and Middlesex University
- International industry links including involvement with the North London Literary Festival, providing valuable writing insights and publishing advice from some of the UK's leading writers and literary figures
- State-of-the-art distance learning tools and 24-hour web support through our innovative online platform, Mylearning, to ensure that you always have the help you need wherever you are
- Online support for each module with detailed guidance and instructions around required tasks, online discussion boards for posting queries, group discussion opportunities and audio lectures and slides so you never have to miss a workshop.

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Why study MA Novel Writing at Middlesex?. At Middlesex we take a practical and contemporary approach to Novel Writing that ensures you are able to hone your writing skills and develop your book while also identifying gaps in the market and how to approach agents and publishers. Read more
Why study MA Novel Writing at Middlesex?

At Middlesex we take a practical and contemporary approach to Novel Writing that ensures you are able to hone your writing skills and develop your book while also identifying gaps in the market and how to approach agents and publishers. Drawing on the expertise of a wide range of published novelists with extensive teaching experience, you will not only develop your work to a publishable standard but acquire valuable communication skills which will benefit a variety of professions.

Delivered online through our Virtual Learning Environment, our unique course encourages you to interact, question, share and participate with others on your course, ensuring you never feel as if you are studying in isolation. Whether you're working full time, unable to attend our London campus regularly, or based overseas this challenging and exciting MA will enable you to embark on your novel in your own time with expert guidance, world-class resources and valuable industry links to help you get published.

Course highlights

- Teaching staff who are all published novelists with industry experience, led by Dr David Rain - author of nine novels (eight published as Tom Arden), and Josie Barnard - BBC radio journalist, author of two novels and long-standing Creative Writing tutor at the Faber Academy, Goldsmiths and Middlesex University
- International industry links including involvement with the North London Literary Festival, providing valuable writing insights and publishing advice from some of the UK's leading writers and literary figures
- State-of-the-art distance learning tools and 24-hour web support through our innovative online platform, Mylearning, to ensure that you always have the help you need wherever you are
- Online support for each module with detailed guidance and instructions around required tasks, online discussion boards for posting queries, group discussion opportunities and audio lectures and slides so you never have to miss a workshop.

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​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. Read more

Course Overview

​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career, and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice and contemporary writing in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links. We have a focus on the contemporary that is underpinned with expertise in historical periods.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university's commitment to e-learning.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are co​re and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10 credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits. In a 10 credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20 credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30 credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60 credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (New and Experimental Writing, Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example).

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of creative writing or who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing. Read more

Course Overview

​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice as well as contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

The English Literature part of the degree analyses historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural practices of location and space. The Creative Writing modules are specifically designed to develop you as a writer of fiction.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature and Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English-and-Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.
Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.​

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of English literature and creative writing as well as those who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of English literature creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

​Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. Read more
This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. It is a practical course, taught by experienced lecturers who are all published children's writers and/or industry professionals.

The course is for writers for children of all ages, from the picture-book age through to young adult (YA). Prose fiction is likely to be the main area studied, but students will have the chance to look at writing in all forms, including poetry, picture book texts and narrative non-fiction for young people.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course supports you to create a significant body of writing, with practical plans for its place in the real world of publishing. It is based on the principle that most writers learn and benefit from working closely with their fellow writers, in a disciplined supportive setting, and with tutors who are practising and published writers in their field. Most of our students aim to complete a novel by the end of the MA.

The writing workshop is at the heart of the course. What you’ll do with tutors and your fellow writers in a workshop situation is learn to see your work through objective eyes and to think clearly about the different strategies you might adopt. You learn from each other’s mistakes and successes as well as your own. You will be urged to try things out, take risks and experiment, and reflect on and discuss the writing process. The context modules help you to see your own writing in the wider context of published children’s writing. The course encourages you to read widely and analytically.

MODULES

In the first trimester’s writing workshop you’ll explore a variety of forms of writing, gaining a sense of different age ranges and styles of writing and experimenting with your own writing. The context module is Writing for Young People: Forms, Ages and Stages and it is concerned with the writer’s relationship with their audience, and will help you understand some of the issues raised by writing for young people.

In the second trimester, you'll be asked to choose your area of writing and use the workshop’s feedback and encouragement to explore it in more depth. You will bring short excerpts from your work-in-progress for discussion and feedback in the group. You may continue to experiment with different ideas for other stories.The second trimester's Context Module is Contemporary Children's Publishing, which aims to give a realistic grasp of the choices open to new writers in the field.

In the third trimester, you'll continue to write your work-in-progress, developing a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. The manuscript may be a novel, picture book texts, or a collection of stories or poems.

For more information on module and course structure please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

TEACHING METHODS

Modules are normally taught via tutor-led writing workshops, with one three-hour session each week for the eleven weeks of each taught trimester, at the Corsham Court campus. We aim to keep the writing workshops small – usually no more than eight students – so that there is sufficient time, support and attention for each person’s work.

ASSESSMENT

The assessed coursework for each Writing Workshop is a folder of creative writing plus a short reflective commentary. The manuscript is 35,000-40,000 words, or the equivalent in poetry or picture book texts.

TUTORS

This course is taught by publishing writers and depending on timetables will include:

• Julia Green: her novels for young adults include Blue Moon, Baby Blue and Hunter’s Heart (Puffin), Breathing Underwater, Drawing with Light and Bringing the Summer (Bloomsbury)and her most recent novel for younger children is Tilly’s Moonlight Fox (Oxford University Press).
• Lucy Chrisopher: prize winning author of Stolen and The Killing Woods for YA readers, and Flyaway for younger teens ( Chicken House).
• Steve Voake: his novels include The Dreamwalker's Child, The Web of Fire, The Starlight Conspiracy, Blood Hunters, Fight Back and Dark Woods (Faber & Faber), plus his Daisy Dawson and Hooey Higgins series for younger readers (Walker Books).

For the full list of our fantastic staff and tutors please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Graduates have achieved publication deals with a range of different mainstream and smaller publishers, and many more students have secured literary agents. Other students have subsequently taught Creative Writing at university level. Some have combined their writing with subsequent careers in journalism, teaching, publishing, television etc.

ALLUMNI SUCCESS

More than 30 graduates of this MA have achieved publication deals since the course began in 2004, with more novels due to be published in 2016-2017. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children’s Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award in 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize. Elen Caldecott, Clare Furniss, Gill Lewis and Jim Carrington have been long-listed for the Carnegie award. Sally Nicholls was short-listed for the Guardian children’s book prize and won the Independent Booksellers’ award in 2015 for her novel An Island of Our Own. David Hofmeyr was short-listed for the Branford Boase award 2016 for his novel Stone Rider.

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Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start. Read more
Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start.

Why study Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

This degree gives you the opportunity to translate creative interests into a fully accredited postgraduate programme of study, with flexibility and individual needs built into its delivery. It has been created and is directed by Professor Kirsty Gunn, an award winning international author whose work has been translated and published in a number of territories all over the world.

Our programme is distinctive in its approach and teaching, and highly engaged in the world of contemporary publishing, offering students the opportunity to meet with writers and publishers from around the UK and beyond and to take part in our varied and exciting range of literary activities, from performing their own work to being "showcased" at our Literary Festival.

You will learn how to:
Create and develop your own writing practice through a series of creative and practical workshops
Present and talk about your own work with authority and confidence - in the context of literary studies and a knowledge of the creative marketplace.
Read others' writing with sensitivity, intelligence and critical awareness.
Build a significant folio of creative work and develop this into work of a standard that is ready for formal presentation.
Each module can be studied separately, or as part of a full degree or diploma that can be taken part time or full time.

We can guarantee that your writing during the course of your programme will be productive, intellectually stimulating and highly creative.

What's so good about Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

In addition to producing a range of finished work for assessment during the year, you will also learn about the details of publishing, finding agents, setting your work in a context and making the important connection between the scale and shape of your writing and your aspirations for it. You'll have the opportunity to undertake specialist master classes with top-name authors, and go on visits to sites of special interest for the creative student - in the past these have included the D'Arcy Thomson Museum and the Scottish Poetry Library.

Literary Dundee

With an annual Literary Festival, regular and varied literary salons, poetry workshops, readings from internationally renowned and local authors, and much more, the events organised under the umbrella of Literary Dundee complement the course perfectly.

"Studying for an MLitt gave me the time and opportunity to work on my debut novel which was published soon after I graduated. I found the teaching and supportive environment to be invaluable during that time and it has had a great impact on my confidence since."
Zoe Venditozzi - graduated MLitt 2012

Zoe's novel is Anywhere's Better Than Here, published by Sandstone Press Ltd

How you will be taught

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a fulltime basis.

This programme is varied in delivery and content, comprising four-hour writing workshops to seminars to individual tutorials, helping you to develop practical, intelligent and highly creative methods by which you can approach your writing.

What you will study

During the first two semesters (September to December and January to April), students take the following core modules:

Creating Writing*
Studying Writing
Each student also selects two optional modules (40 credits each) from a list available each year. The currently available modules are:

Publishing Writing
Performing Writing
Refining Writing
Writing, Texts & Books
Planning Writing
You will then (from May to September) go on to undertake a dissertation worth 60 credits. You develop the theme or idea for your dissertation over the year, with the help of tutors.

*Creating Writing may be taken on a stand-alone basis.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by creative folio (6,000 words) and accompanying essay (2,500 words), or two essays.
Assessment for the research-led modules is normally by essay (2,000-2,500 words or 2,500-3,000 words).
The dissertation or creative manuscript has a word limit of 15,000, and includes a reflective piece of writing (3,000 words).
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Our graduates go on to be involved in a range of exciting literary activities - that range from publication of creative work to participation in national festivals and reading events. Recent students' successes include a first novel coming out with Sandstone this year, a placement in Canongate Publishing, Writers' Awards from Creative Scotland and the Scottish Books Trust, and the performance of a play. Our ex-students tend to stay part of our literary and creative community at Dundee after they have finished their formal studies with us - for as much as we believe in involving participants as fully and creatively as we can while they are with us, so do we not like to see them go!

This alone, makes our programme distinctive and individual and the very opposite of a large, more anonymous school. As a result our students are highly proactive and fully creatively engaged in the publishing and cultural world after they receive their degree.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, graduate

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours. We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. Read more
The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours.

Who is it for?

We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. All you need is a desire to write exciting words and spend two years working on a novel.

All our group teaching is conducted in the evening – so if you have a job or a family, you can still take this course. We actively seek to attract people who, with other life commitments, are still committed above all to writing great fiction.

David Young, Crime Thriller MA - "The chance to have a novel-length manuscript read and challenged by leading published crime writers is what attracted me to the MA course. The focus is on writing your own novel and giving you the tools to do that, rather than getting bogged down in literary criticism. I'd thoroughly recommend it."

Objectives

At the end of the Novels MA course, you will be very different; you will have written a novel.

This course is designed to provide a supportive and thought-provoking, yet challenging, environment for novelists to develop their skills, experiment with approaches to writing, learn about the industry and, most importantly, complete a polished novel ready to send to publishers and agents.

This MA allows you to focus on one of two areas: Literary Novels or Crime Thriller Novels. As a focused, high-intensity course, we only have a maximum cohort of 14 students each year for each genre, therefore you must apply and be awarded a place for Literary Novels or Crime Novels at the outset.

At the core of the Novels course is the experience of established writers. Everyone who teaches on this MA course is a working, published novelist. Their experience underpins all the teaching.

Teaching and learning

Workshops, seminars and lectures are 6pm to 9pm every Tuesday and Wednesday of the first two terms. Thereafter tutorials are fixed at mutually convenient times – we are happy to work around other life commitments.

Everyone who teaches on this course is a published and working novelist – we strongly believe that only published writers understand everything it takes to write a novel. The core of the teaching comes in one-to-one tutorials which are used to discuss a minimum of 10,000 words of your novel in progress. Thus, across the two-year programme we read and discuss more than 200,000 words of creative writing by each student.

In the first two terms, we aim to provide you with your toolbox for when you start the novel. This covers every way in which you might approach constructing and writing and polishing your novel: we look at the word, the sentence, the paragraph, the chapter and the entire plotting and structuring of a full-length novel. During these terms, we encourage you to experiment with your writing, to find skills and aptitudes you didn’t know you possessed. We also examine published novels, taking them apart like clockmakers, to see how the constituent parts make them tick. That said, there is no literary criticism on this course – we are not theorists, we are a craft-based course, teaching you the techniques and devices (and pitfalls) required when writing your first novel.

In addition to the tutors and lecturers, there are Q and A sessions with visiting guest authors in each term.

Modules

For this course you are required to write 2,000 words a week for 100 weeks. 2,000 in order to generate 1,000 polished, edited words. During the first two terms, the exercises require 1,000 words each week. For the remaining 80 weeks of the course, you need to write a novel and the average length is 80,000 words. This is a serious course for serious writers who want to work hard and write better.

In addition, during the first two terms there are two other modules requiring an analysis and an outline.

Term 1
-Fundamentals of fiction
-Storytelling (Part 1)
-Reading as a Writer

Term 2
-Experiments in style
-Storytelling (Part 2)

Term 3-6
-Complete your novel

Career prospects

The focus is for you to finish a novel and use City’s unparalleled industry links to help start our literary career as a published novelist.

At the end of this course, you will have the manuscript of your novel and we will do everything we can to assist you to find an agent to represent you who will then work to find a publisher for it.

Our recently published alumni include:
-Rod Reynolds
-Hannah Kohler
-Jem Lester
-David Young

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The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer. Read more

Overview

The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer.

Working with published writers from within and outside the University, the Keele Writing MA offers participants an opportunity to improve their writing and to bring it up to publishable standard while learning more about the critical and intellectual context in which their work is situated.

Students on the Keele Writing MA also participate directly in the development and maintenance of the events, publications, workshops and short courses which constitute Keele’s vibrant writing culture – typically through opting to gain experience in one of the areas in which writers often establish a secondary income – reviewing, editing and teaching.

You can study full-time or part-time for this MA. It is also possible to take short courses in Creative Writing, delivered as part of our MA programme, as well as Certificate and Diploma-level courses in the subject.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/creativewriting/

Course Aims

- To provide opportunities for the practice and study of creative writing at an advanced, publishable level

- To provide a supportive and constructively critical environment in which students can work with published writers and their peers to improve their writing

- To provide students with the necessary skills to write at an advanced, publishable level

Course Content

The course is delivered as three stand-alone taught modules. In addition students complete a Portfolio of original work. Students will have the opportunity to take any single module as a short course or to combine two modules and be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or to complete four modules and receive a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits).

The contents of each module are summarised below.

The Writer as Critic, The Critic as Writer (30 Credits) is the core compulsory module, and looks at questions of influence, the critical process of reading other writers’ work and the cultural context in which a writer lives and works. Students will study contemporary examples of script, poetry and fiction.

Writing Fiction (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing short fiction and novels, with structured reading and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Writing Poetry (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing poetry, with structured reading, discussion and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Life Writing (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on forms of writing such as auto/biography and memoir.

The Writer in the Community (30 Credits) is a project-based module which offers students the opportunity to create and deliver a professional project of a type commonly undertaken by writers. Possible projects include: designing and delivering creative writing workshops; mentoring less experienced writers; steering a literary editing project; setting up and putting on a literary event; or creating a web-based literary resource.

The Portfolio (90 Credits) is the compulsory Dissertation-level module, taught through a series of individual supervisions. Students develop a portfolio of original writing to a professional standard through the production of either a complete piece of written work or a substantial part of a complete piece of written work, e.g: a collection of poetry; a collection of short stories; a short novel; or a substantial part of a longer novel.

Teaching & Assessment

The core 30-credit module (The Writer As Critic, The Critic As Writer) is assessed by written assignments and a presentation. The optional 30-credit modules (Writing Prose, Writing Poetry, Life Writing, The Writer in the Community) are assessed by a portfolio of work and a critical commentary that reflects on the contents of the portfolio. The 90-Credit dissertation-level Portfolio is assessed by a substantial portfolio of original writing and a commentary.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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MA Creative Writing at Brunel University London is designed for writers who want to express their creativity in a number of forms – novels, film scripts, poems, journalism – rather than specialise in only one. Read more

About the course

MA Creative Writing at Brunel University London is designed for writers who want to express their creativity in a number of forms – novels, film scripts, poems, journalism – rather than specialise in only one.

The Creative Writing master's course will appeal to writers who wish to try out a number of areas before deciding which they are best at or those who already know their strongest form, but feel the need to gain expertise in other fields to fund their speciality.

In addition, the course provides instruction on writing in the community, creative writing teaching and the organisation and funding of arts events.

We seek to create a supportive but constructively critical environment for circulating and evaluating students’ creative and journalistic work and to foster a broad span of creative and critical writing skills, including the ability to work independently on a long creative/critical project.

All applications should include a sample of writing.

Aims

This degree will give you instruction and practice in a broad range not only of writing forms, but also of strategies and techniques within those forms.

You will be introduced to the latest theories of creativity and up-to-date thinking on literary and journalistic genres.

We seek to create a supportive but constructively critical environment for circulating and evaluating students’ creative and journalistic work and to foster a broad span of creative and critical writing skills, including the ability to work independently on a long creative/critical project.

The Creative Writing master's programme will prepare you for:

A career as a creative or feature writer
Progression to doctorate-level creative writing or journalistic research
Employment in the creative industries or other areas of work where writing skills are a central requirement

Course Content

The MA consists of compulsory modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time route

Term 1

Elements of Writing: Fiction
Creativity

Term 2

Feature and Screenwriting
Writers at Work

Term 3/Summer Vacation (until the end of September)

Independent Writing Project

Part-time route

Term 1: Elements of Writing: Fiction
Term 2: Feature and Screenwriting
Term 4: Creativity
Term 5: Writers at Work
Term 6/Summer Holiday (until the end of September): Independent Writing Project

Modules

Creativity
Elements of Writing: Fiction
Feature and Screenwriting
Writers at Work

Special Features

MA Creating Writing students are taught by some of the most talented, original, exciting and experienced writers publishing in the industry today. Brunel’s creative writing staff have between them published over 80 books and have written for television, film and radio. The team includes writer and broadcaster Will Self and renowned performance poet, writer and broadcaster Benjamin Zephaniah.

The broad range of forms, techniques and strategies taught on the MA Creative Writing gives you the opportunity to experiment and discover which suits you best. If you are already specialising in a particular area of writing, it will underpin your expertise by equipping you with a varied knowledge of other methods.

Teaching

The course offers various forms of teaching and learning methods such as:

3-hour lectures, combining presentation and practice
workshops
seminars
presentations
project supervision
tutorials
independent learning and practice.

Assessment

Students of the master's course will need to gain 180 credits to complete the Creative Writing MA degree; you will therefore take all the four modules of Strand A (120 credits) and the project of Strand B (60 credits). Full-time Creative Writing students will take two taught modules in Term 1 and two in Term 2. Part-time students will generally take the morning module in Terms 1 and 2 of the first year, and the afternoon module in Terms 1 and 2 of Year 2, although, if circumstances require, this pattern can be reversed.

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published. Read more

Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA is a stimulating and rewarding course designed to help you develop the craft of excellent writing, enable you to produce original fiction, and equip you with the knowledge to get it published.

The next intake for this course is October 2018.

Why Study Creative Writing: Writing and Publishing Fiction with us?

This distinctive course comprises four modules – Writing Short Fiction for Publication, Writing Novels for Publication, Getting Published, and The Writing Project – which are taught by a team of published writers, scholars, and editors. Their publications include: flash fiction; novels; prose-poetry and short-story anthologies and collections; articles and essays; interviews; student textbooks; and writers’ guides. Two of the teaching team edit Flash: The International Short-Short Story Magazine, which has published stories by students on the MA.

The Parkgate Road Campus library is well stocked with creative writing textbooks and houses the Flash Fiction Special Collection, the world’s largest archive of flash-related books and magazines.

What will I learn?

You will study and try your hand at writing flash fiction, short stories, novellas, and novels. Getting Published looks at the world of fiction publishing. For The Writing Project, you will be able to write a collection of flashes and/or short stories, a novella, or a novel.

How will I be taught?

Typically, Writing Short Fiction for Publication and Writing Novels for Publication are taught by nine weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops; and Getting Published is taught by five weekly two-hour seminars and two-hour workshops. One-to-one tutorials are also available. For The Writing Project (the final module), you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

The total workload, including reading, preparation, seminars, workshops, tutorials, research, and writing, is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework, including essays, a journal, creative pieces, and a 16,000-word writing project. There are no formal exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



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As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. Read more
As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. In addition to this, there are regular visits by other writers. The final taught module includes a session given by agents and editors. Staff are also willing to advise on professional issues of placing work.

The MA in Creative Writing is designed to give students a structure within which they can develop both their writing and imaginative critical skills, experimenting with the wide range of possibilities available to the contemporary writer. It is possible to write prose fiction (the novel or short story), poetry and drama. We are interested in literary fiction in all its forms.
Our MA Creative writing students 'read as writers', explore their reading in group discussions and engage in writing exercises designed to enlarge and stimulate their practice.
In the intensive MA workshops, students share work, learn to write to deadlines, learn how to redraft, polish, edit imaginatively and find the creative thread which, when followed, reveals how their own writing will achieve its optimum level.
All written assignments are accompanied by the writing of a commentary on the process; the commentary speeds and makes explicit a writer's discoveries, and so aids future practice.
Recent guest readers include: Simon Brett, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Vicki Feaver, Ed Hogan, Susanna Jones, Adam Marek, Bernard O'Donoghue, Michele Roberts, Jo Shapcott, Robert Shearman, Matthew Sweeney and Nick Warburton.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00


Many of our writers go on to publish and win prizes. For instance, Isabel Ashdown's novel Glasshopper, written during the MA, was hailed as one of the five best debut novels of 2009 in The Observer. MA graduate Wendy French won the £5000 2010 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. These are just two recent examples of the success of our graduates.

The annual Publishing Panel of six specialists has regularly welcomed literary agents from agencies such as David Godwin Associates, Rogers, Coleridge and White, United Artists, Greene & Heaton, Janklow and Nesbitt, RAFT and Lucy Luck Associates. Agents join literary editors for a discussion of the publishing world today and how to approach an agent or editor. We have welcomed literary editors from Penguin/Hamish Hamilton, Chatto&Windus, Myriad Editions, Simon & Schuster, Pighog Press, the Frogmore Papers and producers from BBC Radio.

Student Successes

Jane Rusbridge’s first novel, The Devil’s Music, was published by Bloomsbury in the summer of 2009. It is described as ‘a beautifully told story of family secrets and betrayal, involving knots, Harry Houdini and the shifting landscape of memory.’ The novel was started as part of her MA dissertation project. Jane's second novel, Rook, was published in 2012 and was a Guardian Readers' Book of the Year. Jane has won or been placed in several national and international short story competitions, including the WritersInc ‘Writer of the Year’ award (2005), the Ilkley literature Festival competition (2005), the Bluechrome Short Story competition (2005), the Bridport (2003, 2005) and the Fish Prize (2006). Jane's website can be found at http://janerusbridge.co.uk/

All these stories were written while studying on the MA. MA assignment poems have featured in The Interpreter's House, Red Hot Fiesta, New Beginnings, First Time, and the Surrey Poetry Competition anthology. Jane’s story ‘Sputnik’ was published in Mslexia (2006) and ‘The Devil’s Music’ – a chapter from the novel – was published by Route (2006).

On the Third Day by Kate Betts won Channel 4’s ‘The Play’s The Thing’ script-writing competition in 2006. The play was performed in The New Ambassadors Theatre, London. Michael Billington, renowned theatre critic for The Guardian, wrote, ‘Betts reveals a bold theatrical sense’ and ‘a gift for wry humour’ while Charles Spencer of The Telegraph praised the ‘emotional candour and generosity’ of the script. Kate featured each week in the major Channel 4 serial documentary, The Play’s The Thing.

Bethan Roberts' fourth novel, Mother Island (Chatto and Windus), was winner of Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Award in 2015. Bethan's first novel, The Pools, which evolved from her MA dissertation, was published by Serpent's Tail in the summer of 2007.

While on the MA, Bethan was selected for the prestigious Arvon/Jerwood mentoring scheme for writers under 35. Entry was highly competitive, with only 9 creative writers chosen from MA courses throughout the country. As part of the scheme, Bethan completed her novel under the guidance of an experienced novelist. Bethan has also published short stories, all written for the MA, including 'Family Portrait' (MsLexia, 16, 2003). She won The Olive Cook Award (Society of Awards) for another short story in 2006. Bethan's website can be found at http://bethanrobertswriter.co.uk/

Gabrielle Kimm wrote her first novel, My Last Duchess (Sphere 2010) on the MA in Creative Writing. Since then Sphere have gone on to publish The Courtesan’s Lover (2012) and The Girl with the Painted Face (2013). Gabrielle's website can be found at http://gabriellekimm.co.uk/

Indicative modules
The MA comprises four taught modules and a creative dissertation:

The Writing Studio enables writers to experiment in any genre prose, poetry or drama, while exploring key features of those genres. This first module also serves as induction to the MA and to the distinctive methods of the 'Chichester workshop'.

Metaphor and the Imagination encourages innovation and experimentation, pushing writers beyond their usual boundaries.

Sources and Transformations engages writers with the essential writerly skills of transforming both outer research and inner biographical concerns into fiction.

Launching the Manuscript encourages autonomy, sustaining the longer project, learning about the publishing industry and includes guest readers and the publishing panel.
The Manuscript (a creative dissertation of 20,000) allows writers to develop a longer piece of work through one to one tutorials with a tutor as a consultant reader.

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We designed the Creative Writing. The Novel MA quite simply to teach everything we think a new novelist ought to know. It combines a focus on the skills of writing full-length fiction with a clear-eyed exploration of the publishing process and related creative fields. Read more

About the course

We designed the Creative Writing: The Novel MA quite simply to teach everything we think a new novelist ought to know.

It combines a focus on the skills of writing full-length fiction with a clear-eyed exploration of the publishing process and related creative fields.

The programme is designed around the core activity of producing a major prose fiction project, which can be a novel fragment with synopsis, a novella or a collection of short stories, of publishable quality and produced in a marketable form.

This MA has attracted considerable interest among publishers and literary agents, many of whom participate actively in the programme.

All applications should include a sample of writing.

Aims

The Internship Programme offers a unique opportunity in a Creative Writing Master's programme for you not only to understand the role that the creative industries play in shaping a writing career but actually to participate in these fields.

Course Content

You will take four taught modules including at least one industry-oriented module and then you will be able to work one to one with a tutor to prepare your dissertation of between 20,000 and 40,000 words.

The MA consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory Modules:

Elements of Fiction
Planning a Novel
Paths to Publication

Optional Modules:

Writers at Work
Features and Screenwriting

Dissertation
You will be able to work one-to-one with your dissertation tutor to write a novel extract of up to 40,000 words and a related a critical commentary.

Special Features

You will be taught by leading writers.

The course is career oriented and focused on current professional practice.

Our West London campus allows maximum contact with the arts in the capital.

The Curtis Brown Prize, worth £1,500, is awarded annually to a student from the MA programme in Creative Writing: The Novel. The winner is chosen by senior agents at Curtis Brown, the leading literary and talent agency, from amongst those students who achieve an A or A* grade for their dissertation. Curtis Brown may also, at their discretion, make an offer of representation to the winner.

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Why study at Roehampton. Develop professional-standard writing skills, and learn to formulate and address advanced research questions. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Develop professional-standard writing skills, and learn to formulate and address advanced research questions.
  • Suited to students that have a clear idea of what they want to work on, and with some experience of writing in their chosen form.
  • The Department is ranked in the top three in London and top 20 in the UK for English and Creative Writing (Guardian University Guide 2016).
  • Roehampton is ranked the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This MA Creative Writing (specialist pathway) provides an intensive opportunity for you to focus on a single writing form: Fiction, Fiction for Young Readers or Poetry.

This programme is designed for ambitious, committed writers who are developing their independent writing practice. Taught by published, working writers including acclaimed poets, novelists, journalists and screenwriters, this programme provides you with the opportunity to focus on your passion, whether that’s Fiction, Poetry or Fiction for Young Readers.

Every module on this course has a strong focus on the writing industry, which means that it will prepare you for working in this competitive sector or for further academic study. Topics include the specifics of manuscript preparation; editing and redrafting; getting published and performance opportunities. Our strong links with the writing industry give you the chance to attend events and seminars with agents, editors and publishers from across the field of writing. These provide opportunities to network and get your work in front of the people who matter in the literary world. 

The department has thriving partnerships with Wimbledon Bookfest, Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, and local schools, giving you the chance to volunteer or undertake paid work experience during your time at Roehampton. Our in-house publishing imprint, Fincham Press, means you could see your work published or be involved in publishing other people’s work. 

You’ll be part of a department that combines tradition and innovation, excellent teaching and world-class research - 80% of our research publications are ranked as “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” for their impact. Plus, we are home to the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature, which is regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in the UK. We also house the Roehampton Poetry Centre, which places the department at the forefront of the UK poetry scene.

Content

Fiction pathway

This pathway is ideal for people who are committed to producing fiction of the highest professional calibre. You will examine two primary forms: the short story and the novel to produce a portfolio of fiction. The emphasis is on craft, technique and practical guidance, and you will engage with a variety of storytelling tools and models. You will learn how to make your writing practice more effective, how to break bad habits and how to professionally assess your work in progress. 

Fiction for Young Readers pathway

On the Fiction for Young Readers pathway, you will focus on the practice and theory of writing fiction for children. You will read a wide range of theoretical texts exploring definitions and concepts of children’s literature concerning picture-books, fiction for young readers (6-12 years old) and texts for Young Adults (YAs), enabling you to contextualise your own creative practice. 

Poetry pathway

On the Poetry pathway, you will explore the contemporary context of poetry and poetics, with a special focus on writing formally innovative work. You will have the opportunity to engage with topics including poetry as process; the materiality of language; literary affiliations and schools of poetry; intertextuality and found text; the contemporary long poem; non-narrative poetry.

The compulsory module, Creative Contexts, introduces you to theoretical and research-based issues faced by creative writers, investigates “critical” writing as a form in its own right, and provides guidance on study skills.

Your seminars, workshops and tutorials will be complemented by guest lectures from industry specialists and off-site visits. Recent guest lectures have been given by Hellie Ogden at Literary Agency Janklow and Nesbitt, and trips have been organised to Tate Modern, the London Bookfair and Apiary Studios. Each pathway will prepare you for writing your extended portfolio and self-critical analysis, which you will undertake during the final section of the programme year.

Career options

Students go on to employment as professional writers or in media-related occupations such as journalists, archivists, librarians, editors, copywriters and arts managers. Additionally, the programme provides essential preparation for advanced academic study of Creative Writing at PhD level or for teaching Creative Writing.

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Our Creative Writing. First Novel Master's degree works with a very small cohort. This means you'll receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to many other Creative Writing postgraduate courses. Read more
Our Creative Writing: First Novel Master's degree works with a very small cohort. This means you'll receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to many other Creative Writing postgraduate courses.

Here, you will be personally guided through the journey of your first draft, rather than being another student at the back of a large class. No short stories, no poetry, no screenplay, just your novel.

Your novel deserves a tutor that understands all - not just some of its parts - and you deserve a tutor who will coach not just the first draft of your novel, but also the development of your creative process.

Why St Mary's?

Our tutors are practising writers, and have between them written best-selling novels and won major literary awards. Drawing on our connections with the industry you'll also have seminars with some of the most sought-after agents and publishers in London.

When you have finished the degree, you can choose to continue workshopping and drafting with the dedicated cohorts we establish every year. We are passionate about our craft and about your craft too. That's why our first PhD student in Creative Writing struck a major two-book deal with Canongate and sales in multiple foreign territories.

Current students are receiving visits from high profile industry experts from the publishing world throughout this semester. These include visits, Q&As and masterclasses from Conville and Walsh, Canongate, Bookouture, Janklow and Nesbit, Little Brown, Corsair and Atom and Picador, and pitching opportunities to top agents and publishers: Hellie Ogden, Jo Unwin, Francesca Main, James Gurbutt, Natalie Butlin, Jessie Botterill, Sophie Lambert

We want to hear about your novel – the one you know you have to write. Pick up the phone or email the Programme Director: or call 020 8240 4380.

Course Content

A full list of modules is available on our website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/creative-writing-first-novel

Assessment

Each module produces a creative element of your draft which will be assessed. In the seminar modules, you will also be assessed by presentation to the group.

One-to-one tutorial feedback and support is essential for the writer aiming to complete a productive draft in just one year.

In formal assessment, each module will produce a mixture of creative submission to deadline, workshop engagement, critical reflection and seminar presentation. The weight of marking always rests with creative submission and the aim is to complete a draft of a novel through continuous assessment.

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As writers now have the ability to produce their own work they need increasingly to know how publishing works. This degree enables aspiring writers to combine business acumen with creative endeavour, equipping them to work within the publishing industry while fostering their writing skills. Read more
As writers now have the ability to produce their own work they need increasingly to know how publishing works. This degree enables aspiring writers to combine business acumen with creative endeavour, equipping them to work within the publishing industry while fostering their writing skills.

Who is it for?

This course will appeal to both experienced and new writers who wish to gain the knowledge and skills relevant to professional practice in commercial settings which produce creative content for print and across digital formats. You will also be introduced to the rapidly developing world of self-publishing. A digital publishing element will teach you how social media and web publishing is now vital to finding and sustaining your own community of readers.

The target market for the programme is young graduates who are seeking to exploit the potential of a humanities degree through modules that focus on their creative writing and on publishing. It is ideal for anyone interested in getting hands-on practice experience and an insider’s perspective on the publishing industry while developing their creative practice.

Objectives

If you have experience of writing or working in publishing (or a related field), and would like to develop your skills further, this course is designed for you. If you are interested in learning how you, as a writer, can engage with the publishing industry and even work within it, this course will develop the skills you need. Creative Writing and Publishing MA enables you to aspire to a professional role that will match your interests and draw upon all of your talents. We welcome writers of all genres with recent graduates developing projects in fantasy, romance, science fiction and young adult fiction.

Placements

An optional professional placement module in terms 2 and 3 runs between January and June, for a period of at least 24 days. This provides students with practical experience of working within a publishing environment, enhancing their classroom learning.

While on placement, you will meet the hosts' standard arrangements for work placement interns and will carry out tasks or projects as agreed with your placement host.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mix of formal lectures, writing workshops, individual tutorials, group project work, seminar contributions, study visits, work attachments, project work and independent learning and research. Visiting speakers, including guest authors, regularly support your learning and module projects. You are encouraged, through a variety of strategies, to reflect on professional practice and professional frameworks during all of your applied work.

You will acquire attitudes and values through your interactions with lecturers, many of whom are professional writers or practicing publishers, and through a critical, reflective approach to your writing practice and to working in publishing. Leading writers act as guest tutors and mentors while senior members of the publishing industry regularly visit and often sponsor projects. Publishing and writing masterclasses also enable you to debate current issues within your field. Moodle is also embedded as a learning tool within the programme, offering you opportunities to interact with your fellow students and other programme academic staff outside of the classroom or workshop.

Your intellectual and cognitive skills will be developed through the programme’s range of learning modes, which include lectures, seminars, tutorials, coursework, the option of an assessed work placement drafts of major writing projects and short assignments and in your final project.

Your subject specific and transferable skills are developed in the modules through lectures, seminars, tutorials, coursework, an optional assessed work placement and in your major project.

Assessment

For the Creative Writing Workshop module and the Storytelling module, you will be assessed through an individual assessment, which may include a portfolio of creative writing, a substantial piece of redrafted creative writing with an accompanying self-reflective essay or a critical academic essay or a researched book proposal.

In your other modules, you will be assessed by a range of methods including analytical essays; assessed group and individual projects; presentations with supporting research; and reflective reports on your own portfolios of writing or professional experience.

Modules

The MA CWP runs over one academic year for full-time students who undertake two core creative writing modules over terms 1 and 2, alongside core publishing modules in term 1 and electives in term 2. In the final term students must complete their Major Project. Part-time students undertake the core creative writing modules in their first year of study, undertaking the publishing modules and electives and major project in the second year.

Term 1
-Creative Writing workshop
-Lecture Series on Storytelling.
-Creating and Managing Intellectual Property
-Digitisation and Publishing

Term 2
-International Publishing Case Studies
-Professional Placement
-Design for Interactive Media
-Developing Creative Content
-Digital Cultures
-Libraries and Publishing in an Information Society

Term 3 - Throughout the three terms, you will be invited to attend masterclasses in creative writing, professional development sessions, and group and one-to-one tutorials, as you work towards your Major Project.

Part-time route - Part-time students take the creative writing core modules in their first year of study and in their second year undertake the publishing core modules and electives and the Major Project.

Career prospects

We are delighted that graduate Carlie Sorosiak’s (MA CWP 2015) young adult novel, If Birds Fly Back will be published by HarperTeen in the US, Macmillan in the UK, Penguin Random House in Spain, and Arena Verlag in Germany in 2017.

Holly Domney (MA CWP 2016) won the George Orwell Dystopian Fiction Prize and is currently working in the publishing industry.

At City, you will benefit from our reputation for placing graduate students with agents and with major publishers. Creative writers get exposure to agents, editors and others within both traditional and electronic publishing. For budding publishers, you have the option of a work placement within the industry. We have for many years supported the career prospects of our publishing graduates via supportive links with an industry advisory board as well as alumni.

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