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The MSc Social Policy and Development programme is aimed at those who have work experience in developing countries and wish to acquire professional skills in the expanding field of social policy and development. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Social Policy and Development programme is aimed at those who have work experience in developing countries and wish to acquire professional skills in the expanding field of social policy and development. The degree aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methodology of social policy and development, to allow deeper study in specialist development areas of particular interest to individual students and to strengthen analytical and organisational skills.

The first stream, Social Policy and Development, approaches social policy and development primarily from the perspective of government. The second stream, Social Policy and Development: Non-Governmental Organisations approaches the subject from the perspective of NGOs and wider civil society. Both streams share a common engagement with the core concepts and debates within social policy and development including the policy process, wellbeing, poverty and exclusion, global institutions and the aid system, sustainability and livelihoods, and rights and citizenship.

You will study in a comparative, international and multi-disciplinary environment, with staff who have expertise in Asia, Africa, Latin America and post-communist societies, and maintain research and advisory links with governments and key international development organisations.

Graduate destinations

Students who have graduated from this programme have gone one to work for:
Different UN agencies including UNDP, UNICEF and UNHCR
A variety of small and large NGOs including Oxfam, Médecins Sans Frontières, International Red Cross, One World Action
International or intergovernmental organisations such as the World Economic Forum, European Commission, World Bank
Consulting companies
Government ministries

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law. In studying the Human Rights and Humanitarian Law LLM you will tackle traditional subjects as well as new and emerging issues, such as the regulation of international society and the legal mechanisms of human rights during international and non-international armed conflicts. Your study will reflect the local, national and international nuances of this complex subject matter; and you will graduate with expertise highly sought-after in law firms, government departments, think-tanks, international institutions and non-governmental organisations alike.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who, as well as being active in research and publication, participate in national and international debate and policy-making in legal, criminological and other related fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/human-rights-humanitarian-law-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to humanitarian and human rights issues
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course detail

The LLM in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law provides a comprehensive overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. The course balances the academic with the urgently practical – for example, combining the necessarily comprehensive detail of human rights legislation in conflict with the harsh reality of the threat posed to human rights by the same conflict. Other modules will tackle significant issues such as the ‘victory’ of democracy on the international stage and the ideological change that has shifted it in the West from a system of government to 'the only route to ensure peace and prosperity’ in places like the Middle East.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within the specialism of your choice. This is your opportunity to select a project topic which has a direct bearing on your professional life. Previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found this opportunity to be invaluable in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, international organisations, humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of Human Rights and Humanitarian law. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data regarding Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in Democracy, Human Security and International Law will challenge you to critically examine these three key areas. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in Democracy, Human Security and International Law will challenge you to critically examine these three key areas. In addition, you will be required to work through the complex practical difficulties of applying the law within the economic and political contexts from which it has evolved. This balanced approach including both theory and practice will equip you to deal with the real-life negotiation that goes on in the authentic lawmaking and practice in your future career or further study.

This course will expose you to some of the most pressing legal issues of the day. You will examine some of the ideologies and subjects which have shaped the early twenty-first century – the impact of democracy and the issue of security in their international contexts. As you approach these challenging topics, you will benefit from the excellent instruction of our departmental staff, all of whom are experts in their chosen fields of study. They will provide the necessary guidance and support needed for you to identify and pursue your own specialist topic which may form the basis for your future career.

Upon graduation, you will possess a level of expertise that is highly sought-after in law firms, government departments, think-tanks, international institutions and non-governmental organisations alike. In addition, you will be well-equipped with a wide range of general skills – such as research, analysis, argument-construction and many more – which will make you a highly desirable candidate for almost any postgraduate employment position.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/democracy-human-security-international-law-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you want to develop a profound understanding of international law on critical subjects
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course detail

The LLM in Democracy, Human Security and International Law is your opportunity to engage with a broad range of subjects, such as the contribution made by governments and courts on international law; current initiatives relating to human security worldwide; and the impact of non-governmental organisations on international policy-making.

The course balances the theory with the urgently practical – for example, combining in-depth analysis of legal principles on an international level with the study of how such law affects a range of contrasting local situations. You will also come to appreciate the necessary differences and points of difficulty between national and international legislation where factors like nationalism, protectionism and self-interest conflict with international declarations and law.

Beyond the required core modules, you will enjoy a degree of freedom in directing your own study path through the choice of option modules. You will also be able to further explore your chosen specialism through researching and writing your Master's dissertation. Our previous LLM students have reported that this can help direct future study and career pathways and provides an invaluable opportunity to establish a successful career.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who participate in national and international debates and policy-making in legal, criminological and other related fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought – all traits which are prized by postgraduate employers everywhere.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional appraised of the latest legal developments in three incredibly broad and marketable fields: democracy, security and international law. In addition, this course will help you to master general skills which are required in almost every postgraduate work situation. Through your studies, you will have honed your skills in planning, analysis and presentation and you will be able to tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence. This balance of expertise and a rare breadth of competencies will make you a highly desirable candidate for careers in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assimilate, interpret and apply a wealth of legal knowledge. In doing so, you will refine your own work methodologies, improving your personal skills in research, analysis, discourse and argument-construction. You will also be confronted with the task of improving your interpersonal skills in team work and group activities including debates and presentations.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict is designed to give you a comprehensive understanding of human rights law with a particular focus on armed conflict and criminology. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict is designed to give you a comprehensive understanding of human rights law with a particular focus on armed conflict and criminology. Upon completion of the LLM International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict, you will be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of basic law and criminological theory, as well as the ability to apply your learning to practical problems and authentic case studies. This pairing of theory and application will give you an impressive degree of expertise in this critical area of international law.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will benefit from being taught by staff who are active in research, in national and international debate and in policy-making in legal and criminological fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought.

Your mastery of this most urgent subject – criminology in international and non-international armed conflicts – will make you a highly sought-after asset to law firms, government departments, think-tanks, international institutions and non-governmental organisations alike.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/international-law-criminology-armed-conflict-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance for human life and security
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to conflict and criminality in conflict
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Overview

The LLM in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict provides a thorough overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. The course builds upon this exhaustive academic foundation with the exploration of real case studies that underline the importance of this area of work – for example, it analyses the necessarily comprehensive human rights legislation and its violations in potentially harrowing detail in order to define the criminal activity ahead of prosecution. The teaching of this subject reflects the important truth that this area of law is rooted in the reality of life and death. Every study will take into account the humanitarian, economic and political perspectives.

This course will equip you with the skills and research practices required to assimilate, evaluate and critically appraise large sections of legal knowledge. You will have the opportunity to prove your newly-acquired expertise in writing your Master's dissertation. This is also your opportunity to select particular specialism – a major topic or issue in the field of international law and criminology of armed conflict. This project topic may have a direct influence on your career trajectory; previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have often reported that their dissertation was a significant asset in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, international organisations, humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of international law and the criminology of armed conflict. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information regarding criminology and armed conflict. You will refine your professional practices by engagement with challenging exercises and case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any legal or unrelated professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Aberystwyth LLM in Rights, Gender and International Law offers you the opportunity to undertake critical study of two important fields – international law and human rights law – through the lens of gender. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM in Rights, Gender and International Law offers you the opportunity to undertake critical study of two important fields – international law and human rights law – through the lens of gender. In this LLM you will study the legal history of these fascinating areas alongside the latest developments in this constantly-developing legal area. Your study will include topics such as equality legislation, implementation and regulation at the international level, as well as the place of gender within wider human rights law.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who participate in national and international debate and policy-making in legal, criminological and other related fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought. You will graduate with expertise highly sought-after in law firms, government departments, think-tanks, international institutions and non-governmental organisations alike.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/rights-gender-international-law-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law which impacts significant populations within the developed and developing worlds
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to humanitarian and human rights issues
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course detail

The LLM in Rights, Gender and International Law provides a comprehensive overview of international law regarding human rights and gender issues, and how these critically important legal subjects impact in the world today. This course balances the theory with the urgently practical – for example, the detatched, academic knowledge of law may be taught through examining difficult case studies which are anything but clear-cut. By doing so, students are challenged to engage with the subject and face the dilemmas of authentic legal practice in the real world.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within the specialism of your choice. In your dissertation you will prove that you have become an expert in rights and gender law at an international level. The study may even come to have a direct bearing on your future professional life – previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found the opportunity presented by their dissertation to be an invaluable help in directing the path of a successful career. Staff from the Department of Law and Criminology will be on hand to advise, encourage and guide you towards the most suitable topics.

Upon graduation, you will be fully equipped with the knowledge and skills to develop a career in the field of human rights and humanitarian law and policy. You will also have honed your general academic skills which will stand you in good stead for entry into any position in the postgraduate jobs market.

This course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in international, humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business, law and a range of governmental and non-governmental organisations.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with expertise in these fascinating areas of human rights, gender and international law. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal knowledge. You will also be required to refine your professional practices by engaging with multiple complex case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and how to build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead in legal and more general workplaces.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within timeframes and to specific deadlines.Whether you pursue a legal career, further research or unrelated employment, these skills will enable you to progress to a significantly higher level.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. Read more
This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. If you wish to pursue a career with government, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises, this course is for you.

Rapidly urbanising world

Ours is a rapidly urbanising world: by 2010 over half the world's population lived in cities. Urbanization is fastest in the developing world, where both primary and secondary cities are rapidly expanding. It is predicted that by 2020 more Africans will live in urban than in rural areas, and in China, by 2023. Except in countries emerging from war, urbanisation is closely linked to economic growth, although urban poverty levels continue to rise.

This rapid growth, particularly in the light of its links to the flight from rural poverty and the development of a massive informal sector, has posed immense challenges to all urban systems. In many Asian, Latin American and African cities 30-70% of the population lives in slums and more than 90% of new jobs are in the informal sector. In transition countries, already highly urbanised, the changing political and economic framework has led to widespread poverty. Everywhere, urban roads, utilities, education and health services, and governance processes are heavily strained. While cities experience high levels of investment, it is often uneven.

This context is now widely recognized among all major actors, with policy and programmes targeting the urban sector now a growth area. The challenge for development professionals, whether working in donor agencies, NGOs, governments or private practice, is to understand the broad economic and political context of urbanization, develop analyses of complex urban trends, opportunities and problems, and be able to draw on a range of appropriate interventions. People seeking work or progression in development practice will be moving into a growth area if they can demonstrate familiarity with urban issues and policies in developing countries.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/msc-development-and-urbanisation

Modules

You'll explore urban issues, strongly linked to analyses of broader development issues, which will prepare them for roles in development agencies, NGOs, urban management or community work. It provides a thorough grounding in the broad agendas of poverty reduction and its global context. At the same time it provides a thorough understanding of rapidly changing urban settings and enables students to acquire practical development planning skills for an urban setting. An emphasis on research as well as practical skills allows students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

- Economies in transition
The module analyses and assesses the main development strategies implemented by developing countries in recent years, focusing on case studies from Africa, Latin America and Asia, outlining their key achievements and problem areas. This analysis then forms the basis for examining the possibilities for and outcomes of different types of industrialisation in the coming years, within a global context. The module combines detailed case study examples from particular types of industrialising economy, including examples from the rural, services, and raw material extractive sectors.

- Human development in a globalising world
This module focuses initially on the roles and inter-relations between corporations, governments, international agencies, multilateral institutions, corporations and non-governmental organisations in the global economy. It then goes on to examine these inter-relations in relation to the shifting power relations in the global economy. It aims in particular to examine the relations between growth, capacities for improving human capital, infrastructure development, livelihoods improvement and poverty reduction. The conclusions of the module feed into the case studies analysed in the Semester Two Economies in Transition module.

- Forced migration and development
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Urban challenges
The module addresses a wide range of topical and interlinked issues relevant to the evolution, tensions, economies, societies, cultures and demographies of developing-country cities; and the evolving frameworks for aid, governance, planning and management of their economic, social and physical space. It will draw on expertise of colleagues in practice and advocacy to explicate the links between theory and practice; and on seminars and special events to deepen understanding of the links between urban, and broader development contexts.

- Urban project
In this module students will develop a project in a developing-country city. In Part One of the project, students work in groups to develop a project background portfolio. In Part Two individual students propose a development plan for part of the project site which will focus on livelihoods, public space, housing, infrastructure, or Community development. Projects will be presented in class, but also uploaded on a website.

- Research methods
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies in the Development field, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

Employability

Students on our MSc Development and Urbanisation course will benefit from the renewed international interest in the urban sphere. Previous graduates have entered careers with a wide range of employers, working for international organisations, such as, the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation.

Many take up important posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations or non-governmental development organisations in the UK, such as Christian Aid and Oxfam, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

For students interested in further academic development or mid-career progression, successful completion of the MSc provides eligibility for our large and lively Mphil programme.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

- Dissertation and voluntary work placement
Part of the dissertation may be replaced with a voluntary work placement in one of our partner organisations. Through the use of case studies you will analyse a comprehensive range of development issues, such as: markets, trade and the global economy; the role of international institutions and agencies; human development; poverty and poverty reduction; social provision in developing countries; rural development and urbanisation; environmental policies and sustainable development; empowerment and participation; migration.

Through a specialist theoretical module you'll also acquire a thorough grounding in urban development issues and their links to a broad development agenda; and this will be followed by a project module which will enable you to apply the theory and understand the necessary skills to plan, execute and monitor an urban development project. The course also develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy design and implementation.

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Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. Read more
Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. 75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded the quality rating of 3* out of 4* for 'environment' - quality that is defined as conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability (Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014).

The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. It provides a thorough grounding in the development field, and its emphasis on research enables students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

The MSc Development Studies is led by Professor John Taylor: an internationally renowned expert in social development and poverty reduction. Professor Taylor has undertaken research for the UK's Department of International Development, the World Bank, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNICEF, national and international NGOs.

See the current research projects tied to the International Development, Emergencies and Refugee Studies (IDEARS) Research Group:
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/research/research-interests/sites/international-development-emergencies-refugee-studies-group

Through the use of case studies you'll analyse a range of issues, crucial for Development policy and practice, such as:
- Globalisation: markets, trade and the global economy;
- Trade and Aid: the role of international institutions and agencies;
- Strategies for Industrialisation: economic growth and human development;
- Social Development: livelihoods, poverty and poverty reduction;
- Developing the Rural Sector: Agrarian Policies, migration and urbanisation;
- Environmental policies and sustainable development;
- Political empowerment, participation, and human rights.

The MSc develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy and project design and implementation. A research dissertation forms a central part of your work on the course.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/development-studies-msc

Modules

- Contemporary issues in development
The module aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed introduction to the contemporary challenges facing developing countries in the coming years. Topics vary from one year to the next, but currently the focus is on issues of poverty and poverty reduction; aid and its effectiveness; debt and debt servicing; governance and transparency; the environmental impact of development; patterns of inequality; the impact of urbanisation; and more generally, on changing economic relations within the world economy following the 2008-9 global crisis and subsequent events. The module also assesses the main developing strategies followed by selected middle and low-income countries, with detailed case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It also examines these topics from a gender perspective.

- Human development in a globalised world
This module focuses initially on the roles and inter-relations between corporations, governments, international agencies, multilateral institutions, corporations and non-governmental organisations in the global economy. It then goes on to examine these inter-relations in relation to the shifting power relations in the global economy. It aims in particular to examine the relations between growth, capacities for improving human capital, infrastructure development, livelihoods improvement and poverty reduction. The conclusions of the module feed into the case studies analysed in the Semester Two Economies in Transition module.

- Research methods for development
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

- Economies in transition: strategies for industrialisation
The Module Analyses and assesses the main development strategies implemented by developing countries in recent years, focusing on case studies from Africa, Latin America and Asia, outlining their key achievements and problem areas. This analysis then forms the basis for examining the possibilities for and outcomes of different types of industrialisation in the coming years, within a global context. The module combines detailed case study examples from particular types of industrialising economy, including examples from the rural, services, and raw material extractive sectors.

- Forced migration and resettlement
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Human rights in the developing world

- Research dissertation (triple module)

The MSc also offers a series of workshops in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, providing these essential skills for student's Development careers

Employability

A humanities masters has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations gave regular presentations to MSc students.

Research in the Development field

Recent and current research by staff includes projects funded by the World Health Organisation, the World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the UK Department for International Development, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

In recent years, staff members have conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia. Staff teaching on the MSc regularly publish books and articles both on development issues, and on the countries in which they have expertise.

Teaching and learning

- Study hours
Class contact time is typically 12 hours per week on the full-time mode of the MSc, and six hours on the part-time mode plus individual tutorial and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days a week, afternoons and evenings typically two evenings a week.

All staff members teaching on the course have considerable experience of working and conducting research in developing countries. They have all published work on Development issues and are well known in their respective fields.

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This programme offers a thorough academic analysis of one of the most salient and pressing issues in the contemporary world. the place of individual human rights in a system of international relations in which states’ rights have traditionally been paramount. Read more
This programme offers a thorough academic analysis of one of the most salient and pressing issues in the contemporary world: the place of individual human rights in a system of international relations in which states’ rights have traditionally been paramount.

Why this programme

-If you plan a career with non-governmental organisations, in related domestic, European and other global institutions, or in higher education, or want to learn more about human rights and international politics, this programme is designed for you.
-You will have the opportunity to participate in a 5-day study trip to Geneva to visit the UN and non-governmental human rights organisations.
-The degree is genuinely interdisciplinary in content and structure, and is designed to ensure that you will encounter both legal and political perspectives, unlike most other human rights programmes which are exclusively focused on law. You can choose to focus on one domain more than the other.
-The programme draws on recognised expertise in international institutions, security, gender, political philosophy, theories of rights, and ethics and normative theory, as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.
-You will benefit from access to a number of organisations within and beyond the University, including the Glasgow Human Rights Network; The Glasgow Refugee, Asylum & Migration Network; The Glasgow Centre for International Development; and the annual International Human Rights Documentary Film Festival.
-If you wish to combine the study of this subject with additional advanced training in research methods, you should consider the closely-related MRes in Human Rights & International Politics.

Programme structure

You will take 4 core and 2 optional courses. Courses will be delivered via lectures and seminars. Some courses contain an exam. You will also submit a dissertation at the end of the programme.

Core courses
-Critical perspectives on human rights (Politics)
-Fundamentals of international law (Law)
-Human rights and global politics (Politics)
-Qualitative research methods OR Social science statistics

Optional courses (two chosen, one from politics and one from law)
Politics
-Challenges in international politics
-China's international politics
-Chinese politics and society
-Comparative European politics
-Ethics in global politics
-EU in international politics and development
-Foreign policy of the United States
-Freedom of expression
-Globalisation and European integration
-Institutions and policies of the European Union
-International relations theory
-International security and global politics
-Internet and civil society
-Media and democracy
-Political institutions, crisis and communication
-Political legitimacy: contemporary perspectives
-Politics of gender in development.

Law
-British constitutionalism c1600-1800
-Freedom, security and justice in the European Union
-Globalisation, constitutionalism and human rights
-Law and democracy
-United Nations law

Note: Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences and the School of Law.

Dissertation
The dissertation, written during the final phase of the programme, is your opportunity to explore your own specialist interest in human rights and international politics and to demonstrate the research and writing skills you have developed during the programme.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in higher education, government/foreign ministry, intergovernmental organisations, non-governmental organisations and think tanks.

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Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies. Read more
Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies.

The International Studies (Environment) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies. In particular it applies these to contemporary debates on global environmental issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-environment/

Why choose this course?

- A dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as global environmental governance, the rise of environmental social movements and whether we can achieve development whilst still maintaining the quality of our natural environment. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- You will have the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library, as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A high level of student support during your time with us. Each student is allocated an academic adviser and student support co-ordinators are also available to help you with any issues you might encounter.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in the fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
- Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

Professional advice

Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

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The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of key developments in the fields of health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. Read more
The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of key developments in the fields of health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. It examines the political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of contemporary trends in medicine, the biosciences and health, in changing social and regulatory contexts, and at national and international levels.

Key benefits

- Taught within a world-leading Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, by internationally recognised experts who have trained across a range of disciplines – from sociology, anthropology, geography, gerontology, socio-legal studies and political science to psychology, bioethics, philosophy, biology and medicine.

- Covers a broad range of substantive topics and offers a wide selection of specialist options addressing key social and ethical concerns related to, for example, psychiatry and mental health; ageing; war and trauma; pharmaceuticals, genomics, and biotechnology and clinical research; pandemics and biosecurity; and the political economy of health.

- Offers advanced training in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods, as well as critical policy research methods, allowing students to acquire the skills needed to undertake cutting-edge, social scientific analyses of diverse health-related issues.

- Provides opportunities to join a thriving research community, to participate with active researchers in a range of extra-curricular events such as reading groups and roundtable discussions, and to attend a rich programme of seminars and lectures by world renowned visiting speakers.

- Equips students with a set of skills and understandings necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.

- Provides internship opportunities and career support to enhance students’ employability

- Taught in the heart of London, at the Strand Campus on the banks of the Thames, with access to policy-makers, private sector organizations, government agencies and other research and academic institutions relevant to health, and to London’s key cultural activities.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medicine-health-and-public-policy-msc-pg-dip-pg-cert.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of developments in health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. It is designed for graduates who wish to develop specialist understanding of the complex interconnections between (1) changing social, economic and political contexts, (2) advances in the biosciences and technological innovation, and (3) the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities. Drawing on concepts, theories and methods from the social sciences and from philosophy and ethics, students are encouraged to combine rigorous theoretical analysis with concrete, problem-based and policy-relevant research addressing key issues and controversies relevant to recent developments in health and medicine.

Students will have the opportunity to study a wide range of topics, which may include: inequalities in health and access to healthcare; the dynamics and policy implications of ageing societies; the securitization of public health; the impact of war and conflict on health and well-being; transnational trends in medical research, pharmaceutical regulation and health technology assessment; ethical issues in clinical research; the implications of recent scientific advances in genomics, molecular biology and neuroscience for ideas of personhood and identity, and for the organisation and funding of healthcare; patient advocacy, health movements and citizen participation in health policy making; the commodification of the body; the role of psychiatry in the cultural construction of normality and abnormality; and the marketization and privatization of medical care.

- Course purpose -

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations, and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research within socio-ethical studies of health, medicine and public policy, and provides a firm grounding in the knowledge, analytical techniques and research methods used within advanced social research. In doing so, it equips students with a set of skills and understandings that are necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.

- Course format and assessment -

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, seminars and workshopsthat place an emphasis on group dialogue, presentations and debate. Assessment includes a mix of examinations, written work and oral presentations.

Career prospects

Students may go on to pursue careers in academia, in the fields of policymaking, research, and regulation in the public and private sectors, in government agencies, think-tanks and in national and international NGOs. We collaborate closely with the Careers & Employability Office at King's College London to enhance the employability of our students, and we organise targeted careers sessions with guest-speakers from relevant fields.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the changing nature of security in a global era. Read more
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the changing nature of security in a global era. The International Studies (Security) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies, and in particular applies these to contemporary debates on 'human security', culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-security/

Why choose this course?

- A dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- It covers issues such as changes in the nature of war, military culture, and security itself, both as a practice and academic discipline. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of this course is covered in the fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in Climate Change and Human Rights challenges you to seriously engage with an emerging and fascinating area of law – climate change law. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in Climate Change and Human Rights challenges you to seriously engage with an emerging and fascinating area of law – climate change law. You will examine the latest developments in how climate change and accompanying legislation is impacting human rights issues and law. By grasping the opportunity this course presents, you will involve yourself in arguably one of the most forward-looking areas of law in relation to the established core area of human rights.

Climate change presents one of the most pressing legal issues of today which impact the health, security and freedoms of billions of people around the world. This broad subject includes a foundation in human rights law, as well as an interrogation of environmental law and the emerging field of climate changes law. The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in climate change law in relation to human rights advocacy, business, international law firms and a range of government and non-governmental organisations.

Every course at Aberystwyth offers a programme of study that will push you to extend your expertise whilst broadening your general employability. You will emerge from this LLM degree with both cutting-edge subject expertise and a proven record in academic research, analysis, reporting, argument-construction and critical thinking. These combined traits will make you a highly attractive prospect for a range of potential employers.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/climate-change-human-rights-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to receive an advanced exposition of climate change and human rights law
- If you wish to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course detail

The LLM in Climate Change and Human Rights provides a comprehensive overview of human rights law and how it works in relation to the environment and the urgent topic of climate change. The course balances theory with the urgently practical – for example, combining the necessarily comprehensive detail of human rights legislation with the complex reality of situations of weather change and its impact on the local human population. Subjects of study include climate change law, contemporary issues in food law and policy, human rights law in relation to climate change law and policy, among others.

In addition to specialist subject knowledge, you will cultivate skills useful in a range of employment contexts. You will develop your abilities in critical analysis, team work and presentation. You will be able to identify assumptions, evaluate evidence, detect false logic and reasoning and identify suggestive trends in data – all traits which are prized by employers in every industry.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who possess both expertise and experience of law in this fascinating area. Under their personal tutelage, you will enjoy a degree of freedom in directing your own study path through the choice of option modules. In addition, you will explore the subject-specialism of your choice by researching and writing your Master's dissertation. This is your opportunity to select a project topic which has a direct bearing on your professional life and our previous LLM students have found this to be an invaluable opportunity towards establishing a successful career.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the contentious and urgent field of climate change. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies:

Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data regarding climate change and its relationship with human rights, and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any specifically legal or more general professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in Human Rights and Development is your opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the law in relation to development, rights, governance and justice issues. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in Human Rights and Development is your opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the law in relation to development, rights, governance and justice issues. You will tackle both the letter of the law and its many applications in a wider range of humanitarian and development case studies, whilst also developing your broader skills in legal analysis and research. This balanced approach will equip you to deal with the authentic negotiation that goes on the law itself and the challenges of applying it to real life.

You will study some of the most pressing legal issues of the day which impact the health, security and freedoms of billions of people around the world. Subjects will include human rights law, democracy and international law, and environmental law in relation to human rights. The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of government and non-governmental organisations.

Every course at Aberystwyth offers a programme of study that will push you to extend your expertise whilst broadening your general employability. You will emerge from this LLM degree with both cutting-edge subject expertise and a proven record in academic research, analysis, reporting, argument-construction and critical thinking. These combined traits will make you a highly attractive prospect for a range of potential employers.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/human-rights-development-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to gain a comprehensive introduction to and advanced exposition of human rights and development law
- If you wish to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course detail

The LLM in Human Rights and Development provides a comprehensive overview of human rights law and how it works in the field of development. The course balances the theory with the urgently practical – for example, combining the necessarily comprehensive detail of human rights legislation with the complex reality of situations of extreme poverty or oppression. You will also examine the increasingly important link between environmental law and its impact on human rights – how and when the laws align or come into conflict over the protection of these two important issues.

Beyond the critical subject matter found in the core modules, you will enjoy a degree of freedom in directing your own study path through the choice of option modules. In addition, you will explore the subject-specialism of your choice by researching and writing your Master's dissertation. This is your opportunity to select a project topic which has a direct bearing on your professional life and our previous LLM students have found this to be an invaluable opportunity to establish a successful career.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who participate in the national and international debates and policy-making in legal, criminological and other related fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought. You will also benefit from their subject-specific expertise that is borne of dynamic hands-on research.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of Human Rights and Development. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data regarding Human Rights and Development, and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in Environmental and Human Rights Law is your opportunity to engage with two of the most dominant current global concerns – the environment and human rights. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in Environmental and Human Rights Law is your opportunity to engage with two of the most dominant current global concerns – the environment and human rights. You will engage with these both as distinct subjects and as two interrelated and often competing areas of law. You will also master the law-making process, preparing for legislative action and anticipating the realities of law in application. You will study domestic, European and international examples of each study topic and you will learn to balance the competing demands of societal perception, market freedom and individual and group protection. This Distance Learning programme will enable you to continue in full- or part-time employment whilst enhancing your career prospects and managing other commitments. Your study materials are prepared and kept current by members of the Law and Criminology Department, with the assistance of lawyers from other academic institutions and private practice in the United Kingdom. Under their tutelage, you will strengthen your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in argument formation and your capacity for independent thought.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/environmental-human-rights-law-masters/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of coursework essays (120 credits). Each student will complete then a master’s dissertation (60 credits) which deals with an area of chosen study.

Overview

The LLM in Environmental and Human Rights Law provides a unique and highly-stimulating way into two fascinating subject areas: the environment and human rights. On this new and exciting course, you will engage with the key issues in environmental law and policy at regional, national and international levels. You will get to grips with the practical realities of environmental pollution and degradation, as well as engaging with the complex implications of how environmental law conflicts with individual or group enjoyment of human rights. You will even have the opportunity to study some of the emerging law and policy in this area.

The dissertation (13000-15000 words) provides you with an excellent opportunity to study an aspect of the law in your chosen area of study which is of particular interest to you. Students often, but not exclusively, select project topics which have a direct bearing on their professional lives. The standard of the work produced is very high indeed and several of our students have graduated with distinction.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, environmental agencies, international organisations, environmental and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations. As a distance-learning course, it will suit those already actively pursuing their careers or managing other commitments.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Employability

This degree will suit you:
- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance.
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to environmental and human rights issues.
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures.
- If distance learning is your preferred option for study.

- Employability:
Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest developments in Human Rights and Environmental law. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data regarding environmental and human rights law, and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any professional workplace.

- Self motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/environmental-human-rights-law-masters/#how-to-apply

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The taught postgraduate masters programme in International Studies provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies and international relations, including the application of these to real world issues. Read more
The taught postgraduate masters programme in International Studies provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies and international relations, including the application of these to real world issues. The MA and PGDip awards also provide training in social scientific methods.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with ever stronger links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- A flexible and exciting range of postgraduate courses as well as interdisciplinary opportunities provided through collaboration with our colleagues in Business and Law.

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed throughout the different pathways, including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

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