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The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing. This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Read more
The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing.

Who is it for?

This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. The unifying factor for all writers on the programme is their intention to deliver their research or story through a narrative structure.

Objectives

Our definition of narrative non-fiction includes biography, travel, history, life writing, true crime, sports and other forms of sustained and structured non-fiction storytelling. The Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA provides you with essential skills and a supportive and challenging environment in which to write a full-length work of narrative non-fiction. You will develop your research skills, experiment with different writing styles, reflect on your own and other writer’s work and learn the essentials of the publishing industry.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, all by published authors, across the two years is front-end loaded in terms 1 and 2 with workshops, with workshops, lectures and seminars held two days a week. Here you will extend your writing skills, your understanding of non-fiction genres and your awareness of creative possibilities. You will also analyse the work of leading writers and explore writing through a variety of exercises, encouraging you to experiment with new approaches.

All workshops are based around the students’ own writing assignments which work towards the completion, or opening chapters, of a book. We also closely analyse published works of non-fiction, taking apart books to examine their style, structure and research methods.

Throughout the two years there are readings and workshops with visiting authors. In terms 3, 4, 5 and 6 you work principally on your own book project with the support of one-to-one tutorials.

In term 6 (the final term) the lectures and guest sessions focus on the publishing industry which will provide you with the knowledge to be placed with a literary agent. During the final term you will have the opportunity to read from your work in progress, to contribute to anthology of writing and to submit a full draft of your book.

Modules

Term 1
-CWM 959 The Fundamentals of Non-fiction (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Term 2
-CWM957 The Process of Writing (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Terms 3,4,5 and 6
-CWM956 Complete Book

Career prospects

The MA creative writing non-fiction is proud of its track record in publishing with students from the programme winning publishing contracts every year.

Graduates include:
-Peter Moore, The Weather Experiment (Chatto and Windus),
-Anne Putnam, Navel Gazing (Faber and Faber)
-Bridge O’Donnell, Inspector Minahan Makes a Stand (Picador).

Graduates have also gone on to work for media outlets and used their transferrable skills in a variety of professions including teaching, political campaigning and in the charity sector.

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Humber’s Creative Writing – Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Poetry graduate certificate program is a distance studio program offering aspiring writers the exceptional opportunity to work at home. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Poetry graduate certificate program is a distance studio program offering aspiring writers the exceptional opportunity to work at home. There are no formal classes on site. Individual courses are offered in a non-traditional way with a distinguished faculty member critiquing your work of creative non-fiction, fiction, book of short stories or volume of poetry. The program is intended for students working on book-length projects. The program is customized to address the particular needs of your manuscript and may include assessments of your handling of plot, story, character, dialogue, pace and style, or may focus on the particular needs of the manuscript as determined by the writing advisor. Graduates have the satisfaction of completing a large body of work which may include all or parts of a novel, volume of short stories or a book of poetry. Students are also referred to writing competitions.

Humber is noted for its exceptional faculty including authors of world stature. This faculty list has included Edward Albee, Martin Amis, Peter Carey, Miriam Toews, David Mitchell, Nino Ricci, David Adams Richards, the late Timothy Findley, Paul Quarrington, the late Carol Shields and Alistair MacLeod. Forthcoming international authors include Samantha Harvey and Tim O’Brien.

A virtual café exists through Blackboard, Humber’s online learning system, to encourage writing students to interact and build a sense of community.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.
• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Canadians still love a good read. They spend 14 percent of their leisure time reading, half of which is spent reading books. The main goal of the program is to improve your writing and publication is a possibility for some. Graduates of this program may use their writing and editing skills in a wide variety of careers and professions in addition to writing books. Some of our graduates write for newspapers, magazines, television and other media. More than 300 Humber School for Writers alumni have published books of fiction or poetry and Dr. Vincent Lam, who won the 2006 Scotiabank Giller Prize for his literary debut Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures, is just one of our distinguished former students. Other alumni have also been on the bestseller lists in Canada: Suzanne Desrochers for Bride of New France, Cathy Marie Buchanan for The Painted Girls and Eva Stachniak for Empress of the Night.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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The MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction is for anyone seeking to develop their writing in the increasingly diverse and exciting genre of non-fiction. Read more
The MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction is for anyone seeking to develop their writing in the increasingly diverse and exciting genre of non-fiction.

UEA is the country's leading university for the teaching of Creative Writing. The course, which runs for one year (full-time) or two years (part-time), is taught by Kathryn Hughes, Ian Thomson and Helen Smith, all of whom have won major literary awards.

Teaching is by 3 hour seminar during which you may discuss a set text, present a paper on a recent work of non-fiction or workshop your own writing. You will take two modules in the first semester and two in the second (one each semester for part-timers). You will submit a 15,000 word dissertation at the end of the summer.

During the year you will meet agents and publishers, hear talks by distinguished non-fiction writers and write a piece to be published in the annual student anthology.

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This course is subject to validation. The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. Read more
This course is subject to validation.

The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. We believe that all writers need a core toolkit of skills, but we also understand that our students often want to specialise in an area of writing about which they’re passionate; that’s why we offer pathways in Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror, Commercial Fiction, Writing for Children and Creative Non-Fiction. Our courses are designed with busy lives in mind, and are taught through a combination of intensive weekends, high-quality distance learning and one-to-one tutorials, either in person or via Skype. We also offer a strong focus on developing professional practice in writers, looking at skills such as self-presentation, pitching and understanding the publishing industry.

Our Pathways

Commercial Fiction:
Students selecting this pathway will explore literary and more commercial forms of creative writing, fiction, poetry and non-fiction. This degree will appeal to students who wish to generally enrich their writing skills, or whose practice falls broadly into these areas.

Fantasy, Science-Fiction and Horror:
This pathway is aimed at students who wish to specialise in speculative fiction genres. You will develop a detailed understanding of the history and diversity of these literary forms, and work on techniques such as world-building, metaphor and narrative structure.

Creative Non-Fiction:
This pathway allows students to explore the creative aspects of non-fiction writing, including memoir, features journalism and travel/nature writing. Students will explore the creative tension between fact and fiction, and will develop practical skills in pitching and selling their work.

Writing for Children:
An ideal choice for those who want to develop a career in writing novels, picture books or children’s non-fiction, this pathway will develop the specific writing skills needed for writing for under-12s, and give students a practical understanding of issues such as the specific publishing environment for this practice, working with illustrators and interfacing with school curricula.

Steeped in literary history, Canterbury is an excellent setting for the next chapter of your Creative Writing story. Canterbury Christ Church University is a young, dynamic university, and the degree is run by a team of writers who have live experience of the publishing market. We pride ourselves in taking innovative approaches to the way our students learn, offering flexible options that help you to fit an MA into your life. We also have strong links to publishers, agents and literary festivals, and work hard to create opportunities for our students to develop their writing practice and career.

The MA Creative Writing includes core modules in The Craft of Writing, Professional Practice and Research Skills, which develop a toolkit for great writing across all genres. In all other modules, you will specialise in your chosen pathway of either Commercial Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Writing for Children or Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Horror. You will study in guided reading groups to develop a critical understanding (and warm appreciation) of your specialised area of writing, and will work intensively to develop your practice in termly residential weekends. Finally, every student submits a 15,000 word piece of extended writing, working closely with a prominent writer from their chosen area of specialism.

Who Is The Course For?

The programme is aimed at adults who are passionate about writing, and want to hone their craft while developing an understanding of the publishing market and how to access it. Unlike traditional MAs, we ensure that our teaching falls outside of office hours, which allows students to learn at times that suit them. It may appeal to recent graduates who wish to specialise further in their chosen writing practice, or to adult learners who have been writing independently for a while, and are now ready to take the next steps towards a writing career. We are proud to work with many mature students, and aim to continue to do so in the future.

Students completing this MA could go on to a Creative Writing PhD, or could undertake a teaching qualification to take their practice into a school, FE or HE setting.

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks. It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

You will be guided in the production of creative work in a range of genres and styles, and also in critical reflection on your own work and that of other writers. The course tutors and guest speakers are all established literary professionals.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-creative-writing

Who is the course designed for?

The MSt aims to facilitate students' creative practice, whether for their own personal creative development as writers or because their professional work impinges on these areas.

Examples could include teachers of English at secondary level for whom the teaching of creative writing is increasingly necessary for GCSE and A-level English Language and English Literature. It is also designed to be of professional value to those working in areas such as journalism, broadcasting, publishing and editing.

Aims of the programme

By the end of the course students should have:

- Developed their own writing and self-editing skills in a range of fiction and non-fiction genres
- Developed a solid and substantial understanding of the history (in terms of innovative developments) of fiction and non-fiction writing and of critical, analytical and narrative theory

Format

The MSt is structured around four modules, each of which includes a residential block at Madingley Hall that students must attend. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities, and followed by two writing assignments: one critical and one creative.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules to build a virtual community of practice.

Lectures, seminars and classes: 4 x 4-day residential sessions in Year 1; a 2-day residential session in Year 2.

Supervisions and tutorials: each student has their own tutor to whom they will have several one-to-one sessions during the first year. During the second year students have 5 x 1-hour sessions with their supervisor.

Year 1

The first year is characterised by variety. Students will engage and experiment with a wide variety of genres, building on existing strengths and exploring unfamiliar territories.

Module 1: Writing for readers: the art of poetry and the craft of criticism (17-20 October 2016)
This module will combine close critical reading of selected example of poetry and autobiographical prose with the writing of both by students.

Module 2: Writing for readers: imagined worlds - fiction, long and short (12-15 December 2016)
This module focuses on prose fiction, examining the relationship between memory, imagination and research and exploring the essential concerns of the fiction-writer, including plot and narrative, voice and character and the importance of place.

Module 3: Writing for performance: monologue and polyphonic scripts (13-16 February 2017)
This module explores various forms of writing for an audience, encompassing writing for radio, theatre, television, cinema and other forms of scripted public address and performance.

Module 4: Writing life: creative non-fiction (15-18 May 2017)
This module explores the concept of creative non-fiction and examines examples drawn from a range of sub-genres. These are likely to include biography, memoir, travel-writing and writing about the environment. Sessions on study and research skills will prepare students for Year 2. Visiting speakers for this module will include those from the world of publishing.

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on a specialist genre. Students will work independently to explore further and develop their own literary and critical skills, resulting in an extended piece or portfolio of writing. They will work under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact.

Students will have five supervisions in the second year. The first will take place in October 2017, ideally at Madingley Hall, but Skype can also be used. The dates of this and the next three supervisions will be arranged between you and your supervisor (these can also be face-to-face or via Skype). The fifth and final supervision will usually take place at Madingley Hall at the time of the only residency in the second year, the Presentation and Discussion of Portfolios, on 16-17 April 2018.

Assessment

- Year 1 -

Following the first residency students will produce 750 words of poetry and a critical commentary of 3,000 words. Following the other three residencies students will produce 4,000 words of creative prose and a critical commentary of 3,000 words.

- Year 2 -

Students will produce a portfolio consisting of 15,000 words of creative prose (or 5,000 words of poetry) and a 3,000-word critical commentary.

- Feedback -

Students are given formal written feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course, including during tutorials and supervisions. Tutors produce a report for each student at the end of Year 1 and supervisors produce termly reports for each student during Year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Read more
This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. The programme, located in the School of Humanities and Cultural Industries, has become established as one of the leading courses of its kind.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.

The MA in Creative Writing is concerned with imaginative writing, which includes novels, short stories, poetry and non-fiction. The emphasis is upon encouragement, to help you to find and pursue a direction in your writing, and to understand the process of offering a manuscript for publication.

Because of the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who, every year, form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers. Frequent visits by other writers, literary agents, publishers, broadcasters and other professionals connected with writing ensure that students are given plentiful advice about how to place work and make decisions about their careers as writers.

The course is not for the writer whose only interest is in their own work, but rather for the writer who can benefit from working closely with fellow students and with tutors, many of whom are practising and published writers.

In recent years, several current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; Two were long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, three for the Orange Prize, one for the Costa Prize and one for the Guardian First Book Award. One received the Betty Trask Prize; another the Manchester Book Award; another a W.H. Smith New Talent Award. One reached the best-seller lists. Student poets have had their poetry accepted for publication in numerous literary journals, including Ambit, Magma, London Magazine, Poetry Wales, PN Review and The Reader, among others, and have been placed in such competitions as the Bridport, the Frogmore, Mslexia, and Writers Inc. Janklow and Nesbit Ltd, a leading literary agency, awards an annual prize for the best novel or novel in progress by a student on the course.

It is implicit in the course philosophy that critical reading aids the development of writers. Workshops, in which you look constructively at each other’s writing, and context modules, to study the ways in which writers meet certain challenges, are integral parts of the course.

MODULES

The full MA programme consists of two writing workshops, two context modules and the Manuscript (a double module):

Workshop One - You can either start with a general writing workshop in which you experiment with a range of forms, or a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Workshop Two - This is a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Context Modules - These modules examine genres and look at ways in which writers meet challenges from the public world. At least five of the following are offered each term:

• Writing and the Environmental Crisis
• Suspense Fiction
• Contemporary American Writing
• The Writer and Place
• Modernism and Postmodernism
• Writing and Gender
• The Short Story
• Writing and Politics
• Reviewing and Journalism
• Narrative Non-Fiction
• Genres of Television Drama
• The Love Story
• Writing for Young People

The Manuscript - For this module each student brings a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. You are assigned a specialist tutor.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Students take two three-hour seminars a week for the workshop and context modules. The Manuscript is completed between June and September. Students meet tutors regularly during this period. A residential writing weekend is an essential part of the course.

TUTORS

Tutors include prestigious, best selling and award winning writers, such as Gerard Woodward (novelist and poet); Tim Liardet (poet); Tessa Hadley (novelist); Andrew Miller (novelist); Carrie Etter (poet); Samantha Harvey (novelist); Steve May (radio dramatist, playwright and novelist); Richard Kerridge (nature writer); Paul Evans (nature writer); Lucy English (novelist and poet); Mimi Thebo (novelist); Jonathan Neale (novelist, dramatist and non-fiction writer); Tricia Wastvedt (novelist); Celia Brayfield (novelist); Jenni Mills (novelist); Neil Rollinson (poet). In addition you will have the opportunity to meet a wide range of writers, publishers and literary agents.

VISITING WRITERS

Readings and seminars conducted by writers are built into the programme. Visiting writers have included Moniza Alvi, John Burnside, Stevie Davies, Helen Dunmore, Roy Fisher, Peter Flannery, Nick Hornby, Michael Hulse, Emyr Humphreys, Kathleen Jamie, Mimi Khalvati, Toby Litt, Tony Lopez, Benjamin Markovits, Les A. Murray, Tim Pears, Ashley Pharoah, D.B.C. Pierre, Jem Poster, Philip Pullman, Fiona Sampson, Michael Schmidt, Matthew Sweeney and Fay Weldon. There will also be visits from publishers, literary agents and broadcasters. Every year there are opportunities to show work to agents and editors who visit.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment is by coursework only. Each writing workshop is assessed on the basis of a folder of creative writing and an early draft of part of the Manuscript. Each context module is assessed on the basis of an essay and a folder of creative responses. The Manuscript is 35,000–40,000 words (or the equivalent for poetry and scriptwriting).

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Do you want to develop your own original writing whilst engaging with the best contemporary work being published? You’ll refine your craft with guidance from the award-winning writers who teach on this workshop-based MA, as well as from visiting writers. Read more
Do you want to develop your own original writing whilst engaging with the best contemporary work being published? You’ll refine your craft with guidance from the award-winning writers who teach on this workshop-based MA, as well as from visiting writers. Make the most of an opportunity to produce a substantial written project in a nurturing, creative environment. The writing skills you’ll develop will help ensure that, upon graduating, your work is ready for submission to publishers and agents.

Key features

-Develop your confidence and writing skills in an environment supportive of creative work.
-Produce a substantial writing project which you can submit to publishers and agents.
-Benefit from the depth of experience and knowledge shared by our staff, including several award-winning writers, and visiting writers.
-Expand your own writing experience through submitting work to student publications such as Ink, and the University press published literary journal, Short Fiction.
-Increase your critical self-awareness on a programme designed to round you as a writer.
-Enrich your learning experience through workshop-based seminars that allow you to explore the diverse strands of creative writing, from stories to screenplays.

Course details

You’ll attend four workshop-based seminars, detailed below. Throughout the term you’ll submit your best work in an environment dedicated to writing success. Writing is complemented by the reading of established authors in order to give you that all-important sense of literary context. Experienced tutors lead small seminars exploring the nuances of craft and the compositional process. We believe that all kinds of writing can inform each other, and ensure you study fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and dramatic writing (for stage and screen), before settling down to write your dissertation in a singular mode. Your dissertation will comprise a collection of poems, a stage or screen-play, or 20,000 words of prose from a story collection, novel or creative non-fiction. The ultimate goal is to help you to take your private writings to the public sphere. Full-time students take two modules per term, while part-time students take one module per term.

Core modules
-CWMA705 Creative Writing Dissertation
-CWMA703 Dramatic Writing: Stage and Screen
-CWMA704 The Business of Writing: Before and After Dissertation
-CWMA701 Fiction: Stories and Novels
-CWMA702 Poetry and Creative Non-Fiction

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Taught by committed and active filmmakers, you’ll learn to produce a portfolio of short non-fiction films in a creative and stimulating environment. Read more
Taught by committed and active filmmakers, you’ll learn to produce a portfolio of short non-fiction films in a creative and stimulating environment.

You have the opportunity to pursue your own interests through your film practice and engage in a range of approaches from story-telling to more experimental forms. You will learn:
-To communicate imaginatively through the moving image about the topics that interest you most
-How to research and write original non-fiction film
-How to develop visual storytelling
-How to shoot and edit
-How to project manage, schedule, budget, distribute and fundraise

Uniquely, you also have the opportunity to develop your abilities not only in single-screen video but in other digital media forms.

How will I study?
Each term you work on practical documentary projects alongside conceptual and theoretical study. In the summer term, you undertake either a documentary project or a dissertation.

There are frequent discussions of your work-in-progress. Regular master classes and screenings are presented by industry professionals and successful alumni from the course.

Assessment is by:
-Practical video/media work
-Essay or video essay and
-Production documentation and critique

The final assessment is a major documentary project plus report or a dissertation.

Facilities
You’ll have 24-hour access to the School of Media, Film and Music’s broadcast-standard equipment including HD cameras and a range of post-production facilities.

Scholarships
Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty
Our researchers produce internationally recognised creative and critical practice through a range of media, including film, radio, photography and new and interactive forms.

Faculty projects have been broadcast on the BBC and Channel 4 and shown at many festivals, galleries and events including:
-Jeu de Paume (Paris)
-LLGFF London Southbank
-Brighton Festival
-Impressions Gallery
-Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art

They specialise within three interlocking themes:
-Cultural histories/cultural politics
-Resistant images
-Hybrid forms, media and genres

Careers
The MA prepares you for professional work in the media and related industries, as well as enabling you to make an informed contribution to non-fiction film.

The sessions by industry professionals and distinguished alumni including Gerry Rothwell, Kim Longinotto, Penny Woolcock, Peter Beard and Marc Isaacs allow you to make links with potential employers and give you insights and advice on working in the media professions.

The course also provides an in-depth study of contemporary documentary for those wishing to pursue a PhD in this area.

Our students have been successful in gaining highly competitive scholarships offered for doctoral study, both at Sussex and other UK universities.

Graduates have pursued careers in:
-Independent filmmaking
-Television production and research
-Marketing
-Communications
-Teaching and academic research

Employers include the BBC, ITN News, Al Jazeera, Century Films, Ricochet, Back2Back Productions, Brighton.tv, EDF Energy, BP, Vodafone and a variety of universities and research centres.

Students’ documentary work from the School has been shown at several film festivals including:
-London Short Film Festival
-Cinecity
-Sheffield International Documentary Festival
-East London Film Festival

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Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. You will learn the essentials (story, structure, conflict and, most importantly, comic voice) and the business of getting in the door (pitching, dos and don’ts, how to handle rewrites and writing for producers). You will graduate with the satisfaction of knowing that your experience is truly a one-of-a-kind accomplishment.

Students work on a one-to-one basis with an award-winning, internationally acclaimed writer who critiques, supports and helps improve their writing. Program faculty have made millions laugh and have included Joe Flaherty (Second City Television (SCTV), Happy Gilmore, Freaks and Geeks) and David Flaherty (SCTV, Maniac Mansion).

Your experience will span 30 weeks. Correspondence is as close as your fingers are to your laptop. No classroom here – just you and your ideas. Our advisory committee provides regular review and input to our curriculum, ensuring our program is always on the cutting edge of industry developments.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.

• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Think you have a funny premise for a TV show? How about an idea that would make a great movie? If you’ve ever dreamt about writing a comedy, make it happen. And the beauty is, you can write comedy anywhere, any time your schedule allows.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth. Read more
Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth.

The emphasis of this postgraduate creative writing course is cross-cultural and cross-genre, pointing up the needs and challenges of the contemporary writer who produces his or her creative work in the context of a global writerly and critical community. The master's degree in creative writing offers a clustered learning format of five Residences, two Guided Retreats and one Placement over two years. The research Placement, a distinguishing feature of the course, offers between one and two weeks' hands-on experience of writing in the real world. Students may undertake their placement in a literary agency, a publishing house, the offices of a literary periodical, a theatre company, a screen production company, or other relevant organization. Placement organisations have included Macmillan, Initialise Films, Random House, the BBC, the Literary Review, AM Heath, Pegasus Theatre, the Poetry Society, and Carcanet.

The virtual open event for this programme is available to watch at http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/cwopenday. The open event features acting Course Director Jane Draycott and course administrator Rebecca Rue, who discuss the programme, its requirements and the student experience. Participants' questions were texted in and answered during the event. A FAQ of all the questions and their answers is available at the top of this section.

The MSt has a blog, a resource for Oxford events, calls for submission, competitions, news, interviews and more, which is available at http://blogs.conted.ox.ac.uk/mstcw/.

"The Oxford MSt enables you to fast-track your career in writing."
- Fortuna Burke

"… the freedom to explore and experiment… has been fundamental to my development as a writer."
- Clare Tetley

"The range and variety of the group … offers truly exciting opportunities for the kind of exchanges that really accelerate your development as a writer."
- Michael Schuller

"What does the course offer? Self-discipline, professionalism and confidence."
- Abigail Green-Dove

"My life has been so enriched and expanded. My writing evolves daily through the tools that you gave me. Not to mention the wonderful friendships formed throughout our two years together."
- Lindsay Moore

"The Masters in Oxford, while encouraging creativity, raised the bar on the quality of the finished work and gave me the discipline to be a professional."
- Bette Adriaanse

"I doubt there’s a more suitable MSt in the United Kingdom for work which challenges boundaries and takes risks."
- Jennifer Thorp

Students and alumni have won a wide range of prizes. These successes include winning the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize, the Writers’ Village International Short Fiction Award 2014, the Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, the Martin Starkie Prize, the International Jane Martin Poetry Prize, the Heritage Arts Radio play competition, the Cascade Pictures Writer’s Couch pitching competition, first prize in the Poetry Book Society Student Poetry Competition, the Miracle Poetry Competition, Best Photography Book Award from POYi (Pictures of the Year international), and the Yeovil Literary Prize for Poetry. Two alumni have won the Oxford University’s DL Chapman Memorial Prize, another was a finalist in the 2013 Writers at Work Fellowship Competition, and another won the London Fringe Festival’s Short Fiction Award. Alumni have been awarded a Toshiba Studentship, a Hawthornden Fellowship, and funded residencies at the Banff Centre, Canada, and at the Expansionists Project, Whitstable.

Students and alumni have had their work shortlisted across the genres for, among others, the Asham Award, the Bridport Prize, the Bridport Prize for Flash Fiction, the Fish Flash Fiction prize, the Yeoville Literary Prize, the Oxonian poetry prize, the Fish Short Story Prize 2013, the Big Issue in the North’s New Writing Award, the Oxonian review, and the Aesthetica Creative Writing Competition. A 2010 graduate was short-listed for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award 2011. Two alumni were longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, and one was shortlisted. An alumnus’ debut novel also made the longlist for the Not the Booker Prize.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-creative-writing

Destinations

Many of our graduate students have signed with agents, and each year a number go on to undertake doctoral study in creative writing or English Literature. Our graduates have obtained positions in publishing, media and the creative arts industries, as well as teaching positions in tertiary education.

The MSt has enjoyed a very strong application field since its inception, attracting record interest in recent years from a global constituency of writers. The course`s emphasis on critical analysis as well as on writerly and creative excellence attracts students of commensurately strong academic potential as well as of significant creative promise. This combination of academic rigour and creativity is a central distinctive feature of the course. The resulting emphasis on exploration and the development of an individual writerly voice serve to attract particularly talented students from around the world as well as a strongly diverse group of UK students of varied backgrounds and ethnicity.

Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Please consult http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/.

Who should apply?

We are looking for writers with a proven record of commitment to their craft. You should be a keen reader, and bring an open-minded, questioning approach to both reading and writing. You will not necessarily have yet achieved publication, but you will have written regularly and read widely over a sustained period. You will be keen to dedicate time and energy and staying-power to harnessing your talent, enlarging your skills, and aiming your writerly production at consistently professional standards. It is likely you will have a first degree, or equivalent, although in some cases other evidence of suitability may be acceptable.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA we normally seek is 3.6 out of 4.0. We do not seek a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT score. Although a GRE or GMAT score is not a formal requirement, if one is available it should be supplied.

The high number of contact hours are concentrated into Residences and Retreats. Students should be at a stage in their writing where, with appropriate guidance, they can undertake agreed assignments, projects and essays between meetings. There is a dedicated Course Website for provision of up-to-date information; contact and exchange between students; and contact between students and tutors. The course, however, is not a ‘distance-learning’ course, and tutors, while being happy to help with questions or problems, do not offer regular weekly ‘office hours’.

The M.St is unlikely to be suitable for those who are just starting out on their writerly and critical development.

If you have any doubts about whether the M.St is right for your stage of development, please consult the website for information on our Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/dipcw

What does the course cover?

The first year concentrates equally on prose (fiction and narrative non-fiction), poetry and drama. There is a significant critical reading and analysis component, which is linked to the writerly considerations explored in each of the three genres. Students are expected to engage fully with all three genres, in a spirit of exploration and with the aim of discovering what impact and relevance unaccustomed genres have for the development of their individual writerly voice. This necessarily involves undertaking assignments and exercises in areas that are new to students, and do not relate directly to any work they may have in progress. Students may be able to continue with their own longer term pieces-in-progress but the concentration of year 1 teaching is on producing new work, and the exercises and assignments, which should take priority, reflect this emphasis.

The second year offers specialisation in a single genre, again accompanied by a significant critical element focused around issues of interest to the individual student and related to the genre of choice.

Your specialisation choices are as follows:

- The novel
- Short fiction
- Radio drama
- TV drama
- Screenwriting
- Stage drama
- Poetry
- Narrative non-fiction

In year 2, the specialisation in the genre of students’ choice provides an opportunity for significant concentration on either new work, or, subject to consultation with supervisor, on existing work-in-progress.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively. Read more
On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively.

Whether it's fiction, non-fiction, marketing copy, magazine features or screenplays, you'll learn how to tailor your work to competitive and fast-moving markets, developing a high-quality portfolio along with the confidence and professionalism you need to forge a successful career.

The course is taught entirely by practising writers and editors, and you'll also benefit from Falmouth's outstanding connections across the writing and publishing sector, with opportunities to learn from many leading writers and publishing industry insiders. Through a wide range of projects, live briefs and assignments, you'll discover your strengths as a writer, explore media and audience, and learn how to develop and pitch your ideas – all setting you up to excel as a professional writer.

The MA has a strong reputation for giving talented writers the skills needed to build a viable career. That's because we recognise that only by working to exacting, real-world standards can you rise to the tough demands of life as a writer.

You'll be immersed in the world of writing from the outset, learning how to create compelling narratives and voices before going on to apply these techniques to the specialist areas of your choice. You'll gain in-depth understanding of the content industry, and of how to raise your own professional profile within it. You'll be part of a lively and supportive community of fellow writers.

On graduation you'll be primed to tackle the writing industry head on – with a portfolio and accomplished working style ready to impress potential employers and meet any writing challenge.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/professionalwriting

Building professional experience

From day one, you'll be supported in shaping your work for publication. Many students succeed in placing work in both local and national publications while still on the course.

During the second half of the MA, you'll be encouraged to identify and undertake writing-related work experience that can feed into your industry-focused research project.

In previous years, students have secured placements with many leading publishers, media organisations, copywriting agencies, magazines and newspapers, often leading to ongoing work after graduation.

How the course is taught

The MA is structured around a mix of seminars, lectures, real-world briefs and practical workshops, along with your own self-managed work. You'll work individually and in teams, collaborating with other media professionals and developing your own projects and business ideas. Critiquing will form a valuable part of your learning experience.

As successful practising writers themselves, your tutors will expect you to take a disciplined and professional approach to your work.

Course outline

The full-time MA course runs over 45 weeks. If you're interested in developing an MA project related to your job, this may well be possible.

Enhanced learning opportunities

We are delighted to host the Writers in Residence programme. Matt Haig is Writer in Residence in 2015 whilst Lionel Shriver joined us in 2014 and Owen Sheers, poet and playwright, was here in 2013. Philip Marsden, novelist and non fiction writer launched the scheme in 2012.

Students have the opportunity to attend the London Book Fair and Port Eliot Festival.

The course is delivered across three study blocks:

- Study Blocks 1 & 2

You'll start by developing your core writing skills across a range of formats, then choose two specialist options from a selection that includes Fiction, Non-fiction, Scriptwriting, and Business & Editorial Writing – building a portfolio that showcases your abilities.

To help guide your choice of specialism, you'll take a module that looks at how writers work in different areas of the content industry. You'll also learn how to use the web and social media to build a profile as a writer.

After completing your specialist options, you'll take a module in research skills. As part of this, you'll carry out industry-focused research and develop a proposal for a longer creative project – your MA project.

- Study Block 3

In the final part of the course, you'll work independently on this project, supported by a specialist tutor. To accompany your project, you'll write a contextual essay focusing on an aspect of your writing practice.

Facilities

- Our library offers access to a wide range of online resources
- Our Media Centre has industry-standard audio/video recording and editing equipment
- Course-specific Virtual Learning Environment

Assessment

- Formal assessment and feedback at the end of each module
- Final assessment is largely based on your extended creative project, which is accompanied by a contextual essay

Careers

Our graduates have forged careers across the publishing and content industry. Potential careers include:

- Full-time author
- Entertainment blogger
- App content creator
- Freelance journalist
- Website editor
- Business writer
- Script editor
- Press officer
- Playwright

Interview and selection process

When you apply, we will ask you to send us a sample of your work along with your application. This could be an unpublished (or published) short story, screenplay, report, journalistic feature, novel extract or anything else that demonstrates your aptitude for writing. If the course team feels you have potential, we'll invite you to interview. We value meeting you in person but Skype interviews can be arranged if this isn't possible.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Creative Writing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Creative Writing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Creative Writing is a unique programme that offers integrated training in the writing of literary and media text. The MA in Creative Writing is taught by prize-winning writers of fiction, poetry and drama who provide core training and individual pathways in the major genres of contemporary literary and media writing. Modules on the Creative Writing programme are taught through workshop sessions, group work and one-to-one mentoring between students and a tutor. Courses include the writing of prose fiction, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative nonfiction. Writers and representatives from the arts world and the publishing industry are invited to address the MA Creative Writing group about creative work and publishing. We have strong links with Swansea’s Dylan Thomas Centre, which offers a lively programme of events throughout the year.

Key Features of the MA in Creative Writing

- The MA in Creative Writing is taught by experienced writers and offers a wide range of writing genres including fiction, short story, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.
- Drama writing is a particular strength, including the relatively new and unexplored field of Dramaturgy.
- Regular play readings and students' dramatic writing is often performed by professional actors in the Rough Diamonds mini-festival in the summer.
- Creative Writers have a close relationship with National Theatre Wales and also open-mic poetry events at local venues such as the Dylan Thomas Centre and Howl.
- There is scope for work experience with local publishers.
- The writing programme has an online journal, The Swansea Review, and students write for The Siren, a student-run online journal, and The Waterfront student newspaper.
- Creative Writing students have free membership of Literature Wales, the national literature promotion agency.
- Students are involved in the annual Writers’ Day at the Dylan Thomas Centre, where they meet editors, agents, publishers and writers to discuss the ins and outs of publication and the craft of writing.
- Students are part of a vibrant community of writers and artists – Swansea, the birthplace of Dylan Thomas, having a fair claim to being Wales’s city of culture.
- The programme has connection with and experience of the unique literary culture of Wales, home to possibly the oldest (but still vibrant) bardic tradition in Europe.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Creative Writing typically include:

• Writing Fiction
• Writing Poetry
• Genre: Writing for Stage
• Creative Non-Fiction and Travel Writing
• Nature Writing
• Screenwriting
• Writing Radio Drama
• The Art of Short Story
• Writing the Self
• International Dramaturgy

Who should Apply?

Students or Professionals interested in Creative and Professional Writing. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD.

MA in Creative Writing Aims

- To offer students the chance to belong to a warmly supportive community of writers, passionate about their art.
- To give students the opportunity to discuss literary matters with agents, editors and publishers.
- To provide active participation in Swansea’s burgeoning literary scene and have students’ dramatic writing performed by professional actors at the Dylan Thomas Literature Centre.
- To offer research seminars presented by eminent creative writers and academics.
- To develop study and research skills in Creative Writing research and practice methodologies.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Creative Writing graduates. MA degree holders enter careers in professional and creative writing, publishing, education, global marketing and advertising, media, business, heritage and tourism, and performing arts. Some graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Student Quote

"Since graduating with an MA with Distinction in Creative Writing from Swansea University, I have published three collections of poetry, founded Grievous Jones Press, and begun lecturing in Creative Writing. In the near future I will finish my PhD in Creative Writing and have books forthcoming with Blackheath Books and Seren Books. The training, experience, and rigour of the Swansea MA in Creative Writing was invaluable for launching my career as a writer and publisher. Without the inspiration, guidance, and critique of the excellent faculty and peers, my own writing would not have grown and my flame for creation might have faltered."

David Oprava, Creative Writing, MA

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Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Read more
Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Our staff have received national and international recognition for their work. You will work with them to prepare creative work for submission and publication.

Our courses provide a unique opportunity to develop and hone your creative writing skills. We teach creative writing in four strands:
-Prose writing
-Poetry
-Scriptwriting, with a unique emphasis on writing for radio
-Creative non-fiction, with a unique emphasis on memoir writing, essay writing and biography

The courses will introduce you to a wide range of subjects and areas in which writers are working professionally. You will build your awareness and broaden your knowledge of writing opportunities. You will also consider ways of matching your skills to jobs.

You will explore the many ways in which writing is produced, distributed and promoted to audiences. Our guest speakers are practitioners and/or associated with the world of publishing and performance. Working with them, you will explore the roles and importance of:
-Agents
-Editors
-Reviewers
-Social media
-New technology in contemporary publishing

The Newcastle Centre for Literary Arts (NCLA) offers you the opportunity to get involved in our writing community. Our readings and events feature poets, playwrights and novelists. Past speakers include:
-Kazuo Ishiguro
-Val McDermid
-Seamus Heaney

Delivery

At the centre of courses are writing workshops. We offer workshops in:
-Prose
-Poetry
-Scriptwriting
-Creative non-fiction

All our classes take place in the early evening.

You will develop your creative writing through our taught sessions and individual consultations. Our small seminar groups and one to one supervision gives you close contact with your tutors, who are all writing practitioners.

Those who complete the PGCert can choose to transfer to the second year of our part time MA.

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Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers. Read more
Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers.

If you want to make a career in writing, this course is for you. You already have talent and ideas, we’ll add the expertise you need to approach your chosen market with confidence, originality and skill. No ambitions are out of bounds: we love commercial genre fiction and literary experiments equally.

We aim to ensure our graduates are equipped to succeed - and to change the culture they choose to enter.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA-Creative-Writing-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

We take an innovative approach to the training and support of aspiring writers, driven by intellectual ambition and practical industry experience. There are four strands to the programme:

• developing narrative technique
• practising vocational skills (including abridgement, adaptation and collaborative creation)
• experimental, theoretical and personal development work
• regular one-to-one editorial mentoring

Uniquely, the course offers a dynamic range of cross-disciplinary options. Writing for graphic fiction, screenwriting, interactive media and creative non-fiction are all offered as specialisms, while our pioneering module in genre fiction covers crime, horror, fantasy and science fiction with YA options in each.

We host an exciting programme of lectures and master classes from award-winning authors and high-profile industry experts. In addition, an internationally recognised author joins us for 12 months as Writer in Residence, to develop new work alongside students, share experience and offer one-to-one consultations.

Our approach to full-length narrative development trains you to deploy a range of unique and dynamic pre-writing techniques invented by our programme. This energetic combination of conceptual development and critical self-reflection will transform you into a technically adept, purposeful writer ready to make your mark.

The course is taught by industry professionals Sam Kelly, a former literary agent and David Bishop, a successful working writer and former editor. In addition to campus facilities, our students have access to the Writers’ Room, a private workspace with Wi-Fi, available evenings and weekends. It houses an exclusive library of 2,000 hand-picked books, DVDs and graphic novels and is the venue for reading groups and social events.

The MA is piloting a Teaching Internship Scheme, offering selected graduates the opportunity to develop their teaching practice with the course for a further year.

Modules

• Creating Narrative – Writer’s Toolkit
• Innovation and Authorship
• Creative and Editorial Development
• Writing Practice – First Person Narrative
• Writing Graphic Fiction
• Writing Genre Fiction
• Creative Non-Fiction
• Interactive Media
• Major Project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Among our graduates’ achievements are:

• book deals
• representation by literary agents
• international and national competition wins
• publication in magazines and anthologies
• Edinburgh International Book Festival appearances
• paid editing and writing commissions
• performances and teaching
• working for national literary organisations

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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With a full programme of workshops and critical study, this MA provides a forum for you to work on your own writing in different genres while being supported by published practitioners. Read more
With a full programme of workshops and critical study, this MA provides a forum for you to work on your own writing in different genres while being supported by published practitioners. The Writers' Workshop will encourage you to develop your writing 'voice' through engagement with fellow students across a range of genre (in fiction or creative non-fiction), while the Special Study module enables you to specialise in one genre, such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama or screen writing.

This MA aims to give you the knowledge and confidence to enter the cultural debate and to begin to identify outlets for your own writing.

What will you study?

You will have the opportunity to develop your creative writing skills in general, or specialise in a chosen genre. You will also study literary criticism and theory and will look at the professional elements of writing, such as copy-editing and how to get your work published.
Assessment

Portfolios of exercises, edited and revised creative writing with evidence of extensive drafting, essays, presentations, research projects, substantial piece of creative writing of publishable standard.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Creative Dissertation
-Special Study: Workshops in Popular Genre Writing
-Structure and Style
-Ten Critical Challenges for Creative Writers
-Writers' Workshop

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