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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. Read more
The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. The MPhil comprises a Core Course and two taught modules of your choice. Assessment takes the form of three assessed essays of 5,000 words and a 15,000-word thesis. A background in literature, anthropology, modern languages, area studies, history or the social sciences is useful but not essential. Evidence of interest in or commitment to Latin America is expected. Students already at Cambridge applying to continue from the MPhil to the PhD should have attained, or be expecting to obtain, an overall mark of 73% with at least 75% in the thesis or the coursework.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hslamplas

Course detail

By the end of the course students will have:

- developed a critical view of the contribution made by the academic study of Latin America and of some of its specific disciplines to the humanities and the social sciences;
- become familiar with some of the main themes of contemporary debate;
- presented their own ideas in a public forum;
- developed intellectual and practical research skills;
- tested their ability to produce a piece of advanced scholarship in conformity with the research techniques, standards of argument and accepted style of presentation of an academic discipline.

Format

The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. The MPhil comprises a Core Course and two taught modules of your choice. Assessment takes the form of three assessed essays of 5,000 words and a 15,000-word thesis. A background in literature, anthropology, modern languages, area studies, history or the social sciences is useful but not essential. Evidence of interest in or commitment to Latin America is expected. Students already at Cambridge applying to continue from the MPhil to the PhD should have attained, or be expecting to obtain, an overall mark of 73% with at least 75% in the thesis or the coursework.

Not applicable, although you may wish to carry out some research / fieldwork towards your thesis in Latin America during the Easter vacation period, depending upon your research topic. Fieldwork is expensive, however, and although some funding sources are available to offer small travel grants, students should expect to incur some costs themselves.

Students will receive feedback via individual essay and thesis supervisions, with detailed feedback provided by examiners for all coursework.

Students should expect to receive formal termly progress reports from their Principal Supervisor on their thesis writing and research, with more regular feedback provided on an ongoing basis via email or in face-to-face meetings.

Assessment

Each candidate for the M.Phil is required to submit an original thesis on an approved topic. On application students are asked to submit a thesis proposal (500 words) and, subject to the success of an application, will be assigned a thesis supervisor as part of the admissions process. In some cases further study may lead to a change of topic and even to a consequential change of supervisor. The provisional title for the thesis must be agreed between candidate and supervisor by the end of Lent Term (mid-March). Theses submitted for the M.Phil in Latin American Studies must not exceed 15,000 words, including footnotes, tables, and any appendices but excluding the bibliography and must be written in English.

Students write one essay over the course of the first term and two essays during the second term. Each essay must be no more than 5,000 words long, including notes, but excluding bibliography, tables, and appendices, and a word-count must be provided at the end. The first essay will usually be related to a topic covered in the Core Course whilst the second and third essays will relate closely to topics explored in the two option modules.

An oral examination must take place if the thesis is in danger of failing or if the Examiners and External Examiner cannot agree on a recommendation. Moreover, an oral examination must be held in any case where a candidate who, because of a borderline or failing performance in the compulsory essay examinations, needs to achieve a high performance in the thesis examination in order to qualify for award of the M.Phil degree.

Continuing

Candidates who achieve an average of 73 (High Pass) on the MPhil course, with a 75 (Distinction) either in the thesis or across the three essays (averaged), may apply to be registered for the PhD. Students who wish to apply for provisional leave to continue to the PhD will be given full information on how to apply during Michaelmas Term (October-December).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please consult the Centre's website for detailed information on funding available to both prospective and current students (http://www.latin-american.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MA program at the University of Calgary supplies students with a strong foundation of theoretical and empirical knowledge. Students can also diversify their academic portfolio by choosing their own areas of specialization. Read more
The MA program at the University of Calgary supplies students with a strong foundation of theoretical and empirical knowledge. Students can also diversify their academic portfolio by choosing their own areas of specialization. Areas of specialization at our Department of Economics include, but are not limited to: international trade, environmental economics, industrial organization, and behavioral economics.

We offer two different M.A. programs: Course- Based and Thesis-Based.

Our Course-based MA program is a twelve month program consisting of both course work and a major research project. Approximately 20 students are admitted to this program every year. This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the public or private sector, or to pursue further studies in a PhD program. Recent graduates have taken positions at such institutions as Canadian Pacific, BMO Financial Group, and the Alberta Utilities Commission.

Our Thesis-based MA program is intended for MA students with a greater interest in independent research. In return for a slightly reduced course load, students are required to prepare and orally defend a formal thesis (original research). Students usually complete this program in 12 to 24 months and recent graduates have gone on to work in such institutions as Industry Canada and have earned placement in PhD programs ranging from UBC to Princeton University.

Our faculty continuously receive funding from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council as well as other agencies. Some members of our faculty also hold Tier I and II Canada Research Chairs. Because of this, we can offer our M.A. students ample opportunity to gain research experience at the University of Calgary. Given our large undergraduate base, M.A. students have a very high likelihood of consistently getting a full Teaching Assistantship position each semester.

Our students have access to a plethora of information pertinent to their research and learning through our libraries which includes textbooks, handbooks and journals in all the specializations that we offer. We are also home to a federal data centre that permits students to apply directly for their own research agendas.

We encourage our senior students to participate in a mentoring program for incoming students. If you are anxious about joining our Economics department, coming to the university, or living in Calgary in general, you can request a mentor to help you adjust to the University of Calgary lifestyle.

M.A. students have access to a number of recreational facilities including a fully equipped gym, swimming pool, and squash courts. Access to such facilities is included with tuition. Our department holds start of semester welcoming parties, Christmas parties and a variety of social events are carried out by our student graduate association.

MA Course-based

The standard course-based MA program is a twelve month combination of formal coursework and closely supervised structured research. Students complete two semesters of course work in the fall and winter terms and must complete no less than seven one semester graduate courses. In addition to the standard seven one semester graduate courses, students are required to enroll in a set of four research methods courses over the course of their twelve month program of study. These courses are conducted by active researchers in the economics department and are intended to provide structure and help for students through the process of conducting original research in economics. The program is capped by a formal research paper which is completed over the spring and summer semesters. Students are required to present their paper at the department’s annual “open conference” held in August.

MA Thesis-based

The Thesis based MA program is similar to the course based but replaces the closely supervised structured research with a less formal supervision arrangement. Instead of enrolling in the four research methods courses, thesis based students will be expected to find a single faculty member to supervise their research. The research paper requirement is also replaced by a formal thesis. The quality and originality of a formal thesis is required to be higher than that of the course based research paper. Additionally, thesis based students are required to undergo a formal oral thesis defense. Given the increased demands of a formal thesis, thesis based students are required to take six one semester graduate courses rather than the seven required for course based students.

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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more

The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

View the list of subjects offered for the Master of Science (MSc) and the Master of Applied Science (MAppSc).

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned.

A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.

A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.

A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.



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This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. Read more
This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. More than half of the curriculum is shared with the MPhils in Public Health and Epidemiology. The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care.

The course draws on local strengths in working with large databases, primary care-based clinical trials and a wide range of other appropriate methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and analyses. Throughout the course students are able to draw on the research expertise within the Institute of Public Health and wider expertise in the University.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvphmppcr

Course detail

The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care. Specifically, the course aims to:

1. Contribute to the commitment of the Cambridge University Hospital’s NHS Foundation Trust (CUHNHSFT), Cambridgeshire Primary Care Trust/ Clinical Commissioning Group and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to continuing professional development of NHS staff in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
2. Develop a cadre of primary care clinical research leaders who will pursue clinical Academic careers within academia, the NHS and industry;
3. Contribute to the commitment of the Health Education East of England to continuing professional development of GP Specialty Trainees in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
4. Expand critical and current knowledge of research methodologies through an academically vigorous education programme offered in a world-leading primary care clinical research environment;
5. Equip clinical researchers with knowledge about the complex issues associated with conducting sound translational research in general practice and community settings.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this programme successfully will have gained an understanding of the primary care research context, including the distinctive nature and contribution of primary care research, and the contribution of key underpinning methods. Specifically, graduates will possess a grounding in primary care-relevant epidemiological, psychological, sociological and health services research methods, statistical methods and data analyses including surveys, trials and evidence synthesis. Upon successful completion each student will be able to apply contemporary research tools to clinically relevant areas of investigation in primary care.

Successful completion of the MPhil will also equip students with the skills and knowledge defined by the Academy of Medical Sciences’ Supplementary Guidelines for the Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) for Specialty Registrars undertaking joint clinical and academic training programmes (September 2011).

Michaelmas Term

This term focuses on epidemiological and biostatistical principles and procedures. Teaching sessions during this term will be shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health course. The teaching in this term also includes training in basic data handling and analysis using the statistical package Stata.

The three modules are:

- Epidemiology
- Biostatistics
- Data handling and appraisal

During this term you will also complete an essay on the epidemiology of a chosen condition in a primary care population. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. You should also begin to research an appropriate topic for your MPhil thesis. You should discuss this proposal with you Course Supervisor to assess the suitability of the topic and the availability of relevant data.

There will also be an assessment based on the epidemiological component of the first term. This assessment is informal and does not count towards your degree. The assessment provides your Course Supervisor and Course Directors with a guide to your progress. A guideline answer sheet will be provided at the end of the assessment.

Lent Term

This term includes modular-based lectures and seminars in more advanced aspects of epidemiological research and public health which are shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health, and specific modules on Primary Care Research not shared with other MPhil students.

Modules shared with the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health:

- Health Policy
- Social Science
- Chronic disease epidemiology
- Genetic epidemiology and Public health genomics
- Health Promotion

Primary Care Research modules:

- Introduction to Primary Care Research
- Use of routine data in Primary Care
- Designing, delivering and analysing surveys in primary care
- Qualitative research

Please note some modules may move from term to term.

During this term you will also complete a second essay which should take the form of a protocol for your thesis research. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. Before starting your protocol, the title of your thesis should be agreed with you Course and Thesis Supervisor. Both you Course and Thesis Supervisor should sign the thesis title form confirming the title. All students must have a designated Thesis Supervisor (in some cases this individual may also be the Course Supervisor).

Easter Term

This term includes a small number of modular-based lectures and seminars again shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Publich Health.

- Clinical Trials
- Health Economics
- Ethics and Law

The remainder of the term is dedicated to revision for the written examinations in June and thesis work. The term ends on the last business day of July 2016 with the hand-in of the thesis. If you leave the UK, you must be prepared to travel back to Cambridge for an oral examination, if required.

Assessment

A thesis not exceeding 20,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding tables, appendices, and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine.

Two essays, each not exceeding 3,000 words in length, on subjects approved by the Degree Committee

Two written papers, each of which may cover all the areas of study prescribed in the syllabus.

The course components are completed by the end of July. However, to complete the course, students will be required to attend a viva in person on a date (to be announced) in late August or early September.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Department of Geoscience provides excellent opportunities for research in most areas of geology, geophysics, and hydrology. The varied research interests of the faculty provide opportunities for a wide range of graduate research topics as well as collaborative projects with faculty who have different specialties. Read more
The Department of Geoscience provides excellent opportunities for research in most areas of geology, geophysics, and hydrology. The varied research interests of the faculty provide opportunities for a wide range of graduate research topics as well as collaborative projects with faculty who have different specialties.

The MSc thesis based program allows a maximum of 4 years to completion but it is encouraged that students finish in 2 years.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Course-based

Degree requirements:
-Nine half course equivalents including GLGY or GOPH 701
-GLGY OR GOPH 701 project course, submitted after all other course requirements are fulfilled
-Minimum GPA: 3.0 (base used: 4.0 point)
-Residence requirement: Yes
-Foreign language(s): No
-Computer language: No
-Comprehensive exam: No

Geoscience offers non-thesis Master's degrees in both Geology and Geophysics. The course-based M.Sc. program provides B.Sc. graduates with advanced academic training. If the student has an employer, the course-based M.Sc. program can be done in collaboration with an industrial partner and industrial capstone project. The program is suitable for both full-time and part-time mature students who may already be in the workforce with relevant work-experience, but wish to obtain an advanced degree without taking a leave of absence. The department provides no funding for course-based M.Sc. students and for admission a faculty member must agree to supervise the student's program.

Master's (MSc) Thesis-based

Degree requirements:
-Two full-course equivalents
-Number of hours: 12 hours per week per 12-week semester
-Minimum GPA: 3.0 (base used: 4.0 point)
-Residence requirement: Yes
-Foreign language(s): No
-Computer language: No
-Comprehensive exam: No
-Other requirements: Thesis proposal

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The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. Read more

Overview

The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a 60,000 word thesis.

The DCrim builds on the established and very successful UG and PGT provision in Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School to provide a specialist route for professionals and managers working in the field of criminal justice, or in related fields, who wish to embark on doctoral study located within their own professional discipline and practice. Indeed, this programme focuses on practitioners and professionals in criminal justice (e.g. policing, courts, probation, prison work, alternative sanctions, community sanctions, service providers in the sphere of drugs and addiction, and so on) or related fields of work and practice (e.g. local authority and third sector service providers in the sphere of crime prevention, security, community building and offender rehabilitation; private providers in the above or related spheres; non-governmental action in a variety of spheres such as environmental action, human rights policy and activism, and so on). This list is not exhaustive. Practitioners and professionals working in fields and organisations as diverse as (e.g.) Amnesty International and (e.g.) the Police all share a common sphere of work which is structured around problems and issues of deviance from legal norms.

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/sspp/postgraduatetaught/criminology/professionaldocorate/

Course Aims

- Promote an understanding of research evidence and methodologies relevant to professional practitioners.

- Develop a critical awareness of the policy context in which professional practice takes place.

- Enable participants to undertake a research study of relevance to their professional activities.

Course Content

Module 1 (30 credits) Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher (EDU-40106)
Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

Module 2 (30 credits) Critical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice
Assignment: Theoretical perspectives essay

Module 3 (30 credits) Research methods and evaluation (EDU-40103)
Assignment: A general research methods critique

Module 4 (30 credits) The pilot study (EDU-40105)
Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

Module 5 (60 credits) Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal (EDU-40107)
This is a summative assignment comprising a written research proposal and an oral presentation

Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis
This will be up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis

Teaching & Assessment

The programme is assessed by four formative assignments, one summative assignment and a Research Thesis.

Additional Costs

Additional costs for textbooks, inter-library loans, photocopying, printing, and potential overdue library fines.

No other additional costs for this postgraduate programme are anticipated.

Award Pathway Option

Upon successful completion of the taught part of the DCrim programme and a 15-20,000 word mini-thesis, students may be awarded an MRes (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Mechanical engineering plays a role in nearly everything made by humans. From design to fabrication to final applications, mechanical engineers touch everything. Read more
Mechanical engineering plays a role in nearly everything made by humans. From design to fabrication to final applications, mechanical engineers touch everything.

Our program balances theory, design and laboratory experience in the areas of thermal fluids, mechanics, dynamic systems, design and materials. We aim to help students develop into leaders in the field. Students are eligible to specialize in any one of the following areas of emphasis:
- mechanics and design (with emphasis on solid mechanics/stress analysis, vibrations and simulation/control)
- materials (with emphasis on nanotechnology, microstructure/property relationships, thin films and materials processing)
- thermofluids (with emphasis on heat transfer, microfluidics and environmental/biological transport phenomena)

The master of science (MS) program provides a balance of advanced theory and practical knowledge necessary for either practice within the profession or advancement to a doctoral program.

The master of engineering (MEng) program prepares students for careers in professional practice through a flexible course selection and requires no thesis or project.

The PhD program prepares students for basic and applied research in mechanical engineering through multidisciplinary research areas reflective of the interests of ME faculty.

Recent doctoral graduate placements include: Caterpillar Inc., Universal Instruments, Corning Inc., General Electric Research, Apple, Electrolux.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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We offer specialized, individualized and interdisciplinary graduate programs in French immersion, French as a Second or Foreign Language [FSL, FFL], Asia-Pacific and the other modern languages education. Read more

Program Overview

We offer specialized, individualized and interdisciplinary graduate programs in French immersion, French as a Second or Foreign Language [FSL, FFL], Asia-Pacific and the other modern languages education. These programs involve study in second language curriculum, assessment, second language acquisition, bilingualism and intercultural education.

The MEd degree is a course-based degree (no thesis required) whereas the MA degree is research-based.

Recent thesis topics include teaching, instruction, acquisition, curriculum development, evaluation, language planning, interlanguage pragmatics, sociolinguistic and other applied linguistic approaches to modern languages education as well as post-structural, critical theory and feminist approaches to Asia-Pacific literature. Autonomous learning, multi-media, distance education, language acquisition, the role of the L1 and L2 in teaching, and the study of language loss are additional recent thesis topics.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts (research-based), Master of Education (course-based)
- Specialization: Modern Languages Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand. Read more

With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand.

As a world-leader in marine conservation, New Zealand is a great place to develop your expertise in the field. Its unique and lengthy coastline is home to numerous marine organisms—from the tiny phytoplankton to the endangered New Zealand sea lion.

Study with Victoria's School of Biological Sciences, a leader in marine biology research. Examine marine conservation issues and practice using examples from New Zealand, Australia, South Pacific and wider Indo-Pacific region, which can be applied worldwide.

Marine Conservation can be studied through two qualifications. The Master of Marine Conservation (MMarCon) is a taught Master's with no thesis component and is the only taught Marine Conservation Master's degree in New Zealand.

Or you can choose to study the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation (PGCertMarCon), a shorter qualification for those who want to expand their expertise into a new area of interest.

Master of Marine Conservation

The 180-point Master of Marine Conservation consists of three core courses and three courses chosen from a range of marine biology, biodiversity, ecology, ecological restoration and conservation courses. You can also choose courses that specialise in environmental management and conservation issues relating to New Zealand Māori and Pacific Island communities.

Two of your core courses, BIOL 424 New Zealand Conservation Practice and BIOL 529 Tropical Marine Conservation Practice, are field courses. You'll visit several world-renowned marine conservation sites in New Zealand and overseas.

The field courses will have costs over and above the course fees.

You'll also examine marine conservation issues of cultural and socioeconomic significance to Māori and Pacific peoples, such as exploitation of coastal regions and ecotourism, seabed and foreshore rights, and community-led conservation strategies.

Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation

The Postgraduate Certificate is made up of three courses totalling 90 points chosen from any of the courses in the MMarCon programme; however, you must include at least one of the core courses.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The Master of Marine Conservation can be completed in 12 months of full-time study, or in 24 months part time.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation can be completed in six months of full-time study or in 12 months part time.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll gain skills and knowledge in a wide range of areas within the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems, in both temperate and tropical climates. You might find work at Crown Research Institutes, private research institutes or with national government agencies managing marine conservation and fisheries.

Other organisations you may work with include regional authorities such as city, regional and district councils, consultancy firms carrying out contract marine biology work or non-government agencies and not-for-profit organisations.



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Human impact, loss of biodiversity and a growing awareness of environmental change make conservation biology more important every day. Read more

Human impact, loss of biodiversity and a growing awareness of environmental change make conservation biology more important every day.

Linking conservation, ecology, biodiversity and sustainability, the Master of Conservation Biology is a one-year, 180-point professional Master's. You'll get the scientific expertise you need to do conservation work in New Zealand and around the world.

Wellington is an international hot spot for biodiversity and studying with the School of Biological Sciences you'll learn from world leaders in conservation practice—internationally respected scientists whose work informs the management of New Zealand’s unique biota.

Using theoretical and field-based approaches in a range of terrestrial and marine environments, you’ll explore the processes of conservation biology. Examine internationally renowned examples of conservation best practice in action, and gain skills in experimental design, the collection and analysis of data and the presentation of research results.

You'll graduate with the expertise to make a valuable contribution to the conservation of the natural environment.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Field course

One of your core courses is held in the field, visiting key conservation sites in New Zealand.

BIOL 424 New Zealand Conservation Practice involves travel around the country to observe management practices and become familiar with the unique plants and animals of New Zealand.

How you'll study

You'll study three core courses and 90 points worth of approved courses of your choice.

If you're starting in January, you'll begin with the four-week field course, BIOL 424. The course sits outside normal trimester dates with the timing changing from year to year to allow for tide times. Usual timing for the start of the course is late January/early February and actual dates can be confirmed at least six months prior.

The July start to the programme includes the core course, BIOL 405 Biosecurity, which involves biosecurity management from both biological and legal perspectives.

While there is no thesis component to the MConBio, you can do small research projects through the elective BIOL 440. You'll need a supervisor for this course—talk to staff within the School of Biological Sciences about potential projects.

Study abroad

Broaden your horizons with the student exchange programme, Victoria Abroad. Study towards your Victoria University degree at one of 100 partner universities around the world. Talk to the programme manager if you're thinking about including an exchange in your programme of study.

Victoria Abroad

Prime location

Studying in Wellington offers unparalleled access to the natural wealth of New Zealand. Private and public conservation sites close by create opportunities for gaining research experience and learning conservation techniques.

Zealandia and Otari-Wilton's Bush are within the city boundaries and an ecological restoration programme is underway on Matiu/Somes Island in Wellington Harbour.

Two marine reserves are also close to Wellington city—Taputeranga on the south coast and Kapiti, an hour's drive north.



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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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A total of 30 hours of graduate work is required to obtain a master’s degree in mathematics. Candidates for the master’s degree may choose one of two plans. Read more

Degree Plans

A total of 30 hours of graduate work is required to obtain a master’s degree in mathematics. Candidates for the master’s degree may choose one of two plans:

Plan I requires successful completion of 24 semester hours of course work, plus a thesis supervised by a graduate faculty in mathematics. Students completing this plan will enroll in 6 hours of MATH 599: Thesis Research. A copy of your thesis or project must be available to each committee member at least two weeks prior to the presentation.

Plan II requires no thesis, but 27 semester hours of courses plus 3 hours of research (MATH 598: Non-Thesis Project) devoted to a project supervised by a member of the graduate faculty in mathematics. A copy of the master’s degree approved project or thesis must be provided to mathematics department.

There is also a one-year or three-semester master’s degree program. The graduate program director can provide further information.

Concentrations

Candidates for the master’s degree in mathematics can specialize in pure or applied mathematics, mathematics education, or mathematics finance.

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The department offers programs leading to the master of arts (M.A.) and master of public administration (M.P.A.) degrees. As a graduate student in Political Science, you are considered an important part of Department life. Read more
The department offers programs leading to the master of arts (M.A.) and master of public administration (M.P.A.) degrees.

As a graduate student in Political Science, you are considered an important part of Department life. Our graduate programs are designed to bridge the gap between your undergraduate education and your future professional life as a political scientist or public administrator. In that sense, you have made an important leap in your academic career. No longer will your classes consist merely of taking notes, writing papers, and passing exams. As a pre-professional, you are expected to contribute to the learning environment by participating actively in seminars, learning the research methods and theoretical perspectives that are relevant to your program of study, and, where appropriate, contribute original research to your field. In return, we promise to work with you to help you achieve your goals.

Master of Arts

Admission Requirements

Applicants for admission to the M.A. program must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination general test. Additional information is in the “Academic Policies” section of this catalog.

Degree Requirements

Plans I and II. M.A. students may follow either Plan I, requiring 30 semester hours of coursework, a written comprehensive examination, a thesis, and an oral examination in defense of the thesis; or Plan II, requiring 36 hours of coursework and a written comprehensive examination.

Course requirements. Under either plan, students must take courses in three of five fields, including a core seminar in each. The available fields are American politics, comparative politics, international relations, public policy and administration, and political theory. Plan I students take 9 hours in the major field and 6 in each of two minor fields; Plan II students take 12 hours in the major field and 6 in each of two minor fields. The core seminars are PSC 610 Core Seminar in American Politics, PSC 631 Seminar in Comparative Politics, PSC 642 Concepts and Theories of International Relations, PSC 651 Political Theory Seminar, and PSC 565 Survey of Public Administration.

All students must complete PSC 521 Research Design and PSC 522 Quantitative Methods in Political Science I (or approved substitutes).

Comprehensive examination. The written comprehensive examination will cover the student’s major field and will require integration of material across courses in the field.

Thesis. After passing the written examination, a student following Plan I should prepare a thesis prospectus, which should describe the substance and methods of the thesis research, outline the thesis itself, and provide a preliminary bibliography. Once the prospectus has been approved, the chairperson will formally appoint a committee of three faculty members to supervise the thesis. The student must submit four copies of the completed thesis and must take a final oral examination to defend it and show competence in the field in which it lies. Except in unusual circumstances, the final oral examination must be taken during the fall or spring semester and before final course examinations begin. After the examination, the student must deposit two copies of the approved thesis with the Graduate School and two copies with the department.

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