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This is a progressive and flexible programme of postgraduate study. There is an overarching theme of advanced practice in healthcare, yet the flexible, modular nature of this award permits healthcare professionals to structure their studies to meet with their own professional needs. Read more
This is a progressive and flexible programme of postgraduate study. There is an overarching theme of advanced practice in healthcare, yet the flexible, modular nature of this award permits healthcare professionals to structure their studies to meet with their own professional needs.

This will provide options for profession specific pathways through the programme if required. These may be clinical, managerial or more generic. Guidance will be provided by the Programme Co-Directors on module choice.‌

Students can register for an award and there are exit points at Postgraduate Certificate (PGC), Postgraduate Diploma (PGD) and Masters Level. The PGC or PGD may be taken as either free standing awards or as an intermediate exit award for any student who has successfully completed the modules required for these awards or who have failed to comply with the criteria which permits access to the next level of study. However, some students may wish to only register for an individual module for the purpose of continuing professional development. This is permissible and such students will not be registered on the programme.

However, students may accrue credit through taking some stand alone modules and then apply for APL transfer of these credits into the programme for a formal award. All students who undertake stand alone modules will be advised of appropriate combinations which can be mapped into the award.

The programme has one starting point per year: semester one (September), and is part-time. It is modular, with some modules being mandatory and others optional to suit the individual student needs. Teaching takes place in both semesters and the scheduling of the teaching will depend upon the modules taken. There are two assessment points per year (January and May), one at the end of each semester.

On this modular programme students can study stand alone credit rated modules (for which Credit Accumulation and Transfer (CATS) points will be awarded).

Or to achieve a:

- PGC a student must successfully complete 60 credits at M level, with not more than 15 credits at level 6 and no dissertation credits;
- PGD a student must successfully complete 120 credits at M level, with not more than 30 credits at level 6 and no dissertation credits;
- Masters degree a student must complete 180 credits at M level, with not more than 30 credits at level 6 and to include a 60 credit dissertation.

As previously stated, the programme is modular and the PGC stage incorporates some compulsory modules and some option modules dependent upon the pathway chosen by the student. The PGD is made up of optional modules although students hoping to progress to the dissertation stage must complete Introduction to Research Methodologies in Health and Social Care (HEAL402) prior to moving to the dissertations stage. The Masters degree is achieved by independent research and the submission of a dissertation.

Why Health Sciences?

Breadth of expertise

The School comprises the Directorates of Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Orthoptics and Physiotherapy and has a vibrant Postgraduate/CPD unit. The school is committed to delivering quality research to the highest ethical standards in order to improve knowledge and services for the health of the community. Our multi professional cohort of staff has a strong research profile and is committed to developing policy, practice and technology for the improvement of healthcare and service delivery.

Contributing to the advancement of health care practice

We offer taught modular postgraduate programmes, providing extensive opportunity for in-depth study and development of advanced clinical skills in a range of areas and contributing to the advancement of healthcare practice, management and professional education.

Continuing professional development provision

The School also offers a wide range of accredited and non-accredited CPD modules and hosts a vibrant daytime and evening short course programme to maximise opportunity for attendance. The most up-to-date information about these activities is to be found on the School website.

Career prospects

The taught postgraduate programmes provide opportunity for healthcare professionals to develop, specialise and extend the scope of their skills into new areas, to meet the constantly evolving service demands for advanced practitioners. The students who exit our taught postgrdaute programmes usually take up senior clinical/management positions within the NHS. We have students from multi-professional backgrounds as we encourage interprofessional learning and education as appropriate to foster understanding of the roles of colleagues.

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The MSc in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair is a three-year, inter-disciplinary, part-time, distance learning course. Read more
The MSc in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair is a three-year, inter-disciplinary, part-time, distance learning course. 

The course attracts healthcare professionals from fields such as nursing, medicine, pharmacy, podiatry and the pharmaceutical industry, and offers the opportunity to study at a distance alongside an international group of professionals from countries around the world.

It aims to enable you to explore and analyse existing and developing theories and concepts that underpin wound healing and tissue repair so facilitating professional and personal growth, building upon your educational and vocational experience and developing your ability to become a life-long learner.

Students are required to attend a five-day study block in year one and year two, otherwise no further attendance is required. 

The on-campus study blocks will consist of: introduction to e-learning on the Internet and using your individual home page; introduction to study skills, library resources and tutorial support; introduction to course work and assignment briefs; lead lectures – introduction to module content and theory; group interactive sessions - via workshop, discussions, case presentation; private and group tutorials; course committee meetings - providing an on-going evaluation of the course.

Between the annual study blocks, students are supported by online personal and group tutorials, and personal tutorials by email or telephone. In addition, there are dedicated distance learning library support staff to help ensure you can access necessary databases and full-text journals. The online information and resources are constantly updated for students to access through a virtual learning environment.

Distinctive features

• This is a well-established course, first conceived as a postgraduate diploma in 1996 and extended to a Master of Science (MSc) in 1999.

• The course has attracted healthcare professionals from the field of nursing, medicine, pharmacy, podiatry and the pharmaceutical industry, and offers the opportunity to study at a distance alongside an international group of professionals from countries such as Ireland, Holland, Italy, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and New Zealand.

• Hyperlinked reading lists to facilitate easy access to resource material.

• One-to-one and group tutorials are arranged online to encourage both lecturer and peer support and to suit students in different time zones.

• Self-assessment tests from the course material are also linked to discussion board groups in order to facilitate sharing of information and further facilitate peer support.

Structure

The MSc consists of three stages:

• Stage T1 (first taught stage)
This stage lasts for one academic year, and consists of one five-day study block and five modules totalling 60 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7).

• Stage T2 (second taught stage)
This stage lasts for a further academic year, to a total of two years for the taught stages, and consists of a further five day study block and three 20-credit modules totalling 60 credits, at Level 7, to achieve a total of 120 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), to complete the taught stages.

• Stage R: MSc research dissertation stage
The dissertation stage lasts for a further academic year, to a total of three years, and will include a dissertation of 60 credits at Level 7, to achieve a combined total of 180 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), to complete the MSc programme.

The total normal duration to complete the full MSc course is three academic years (stages T1, T2 & R), from the date of initial registration.

You may exit after stage T1 with a Postgraduate Certificate, if you have gained at least 60 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), including the award of credit for any ‘required’ modules.

You may exit after stage T2 with a Postgraduate Diploma, if you have gained at least 120 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), including the award of credit for any ‘required’ modules.

Your dissertation, which will normally be no longer than 20,000 words and supported by such other material as may be considered appropriate to the subject, will embody the results of your period of project work. The subject of each student’s dissertation will be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee.

For a list of modules please see the website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/wound-healing-and-tissue-repair-msc-part-time

Teaching

Taught stages - You will be taught through lectures, workshops, student presentations; tutorials; distance learning material; asynchronous discussion forums; synchronous online tutorials; written text in modules; self-assessment tests; recommended reading/links within module; feedback on plans, drafts and aims; feedback on assignments; external examiners’ feedback.

MSc dissertation - Studies at MSc dissertation level will largely consist of guided independent study and research, making use of the extensive learning and research facilities available. A project supervisor will be allocated to support and advise you on researching and writing up your specific dissertation topic.

Assessment

Summative assessment:
Coursework in the form of written assignments and moderated discussions including critical evaluation of recent research evidence are used to assess students’ critical reasoning and ability to present coherent written material.

Formative assessment:
Self-assessment tests and opportunities for reflection in the modules are included as a formative method of assessing progress. In addition students are allowed to submit a draft assignment prior to final submission. Students can also seek further advice on both pieces of coursework via the discussion board, online tutorial and also by email.

MSc dissertation:
The MSc dissertation stage will be wholly assessed based on the final dissertation. Expectations for the format, submission and marking of the dissertation will follow the current Senate Assessment Regulations, supplemented where appropriate with additional requirements of the Programme/School/College and any specific requirements arising from the nature of the project undertaken.

Career Prospects

Completion of this course could help you in the following areas:

Writing for publication.
Securing a specialist professional role.
External examining for other academic institutions.
Membership of wound healing association executive committees.
Invited speaker for national and international wound healing conferences.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Read more
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

The Divinity Faculty at Cambridge has distinguished international reputation for research, teaching and for the formation of graduate students in Theology and Religious Studies. Consistently rated as one of the top research units in the country in our subjects, it offers postgraduate training at an acknowledged world-class standard.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmlltr

Specialisms

The teaching officers of the Faculty include leading experts in a wide range of fields:

- Biblical Studies;
- Ancient, Medieval and Modern Judaism;
- Patristics;
- History of Christianity;
- Christian Systematic Theology;
- Philosophy of Religion and Ethics;
- Religion and the Natural Sciences;
- Religion and the Social Sciences;
- Study of World Religions (with special reference to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism).

Each major research area is centred on a senior seminar meeting fortnightly during term. In practice these seminars are often interdisciplinary in character (such as the D Society in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics and the Hebrew, Jewish and Early Christian Studies Seminar); and a variety of other informal graduate seminars and reading groups also helps to expand the repertoire of exchange. A number of named lectureships (the Stantons, the Hulseans etc) regularly bring international figures from outside Cambridge to contribute to the research culture.

First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Learning Outcomes

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Format

Supervisions are given on the dissertation, twelve hours per year full-time (reduced pro rata for part-time).

Feedback will be given by the supervisor in the course of supervisions and in termly reports. In addition, there will be a report from the assessors following the first-year examination.

Assessment

Dissertation of not more than 80,000 words with a compulsory viva.

A first-year examination for which students must submit the following:
- a summary of the scope, purpose, methodology and value of research project;
- a provisional outline of dissertation with a timetable for the conduct and completion of the research and writing;
- a bibliography of topic and its immediate intellectual context set out in accordance with the conventions current field of study;
- a sample of written-up research of no more than 10,000 words, with appropriate footnotes and bibliographical references (included in word-count).

Students will have a meeting with two assessors to discuss the submitted work.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Faculty Studentships:

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity &other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilizations)
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies0
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Do you want research-led teaching by experts in a wide range of areas of analytical philosophy?. Would you like dedicated support in dissertation planning, research and presentation skills, including help preparing for PhD research?. Read more
  • Do you want research-led teaching by experts in a wide range of areas of analytical philosophy?
  • Would you like dedicated support in dissertation planning, research and presentation skills, including help preparing for PhD research?
  • Are you interested in small seminar-style classes with an emphasis on staff/student interaction?

Philosophy at Manchester offers an intellectually stimulating and supportive postgraduate environment. You'll be taught and supervised by members of staff who are all actively involved in research.

The MA Philosophy course combines the in-depth study of specialised areas of analytical philosophy, extensive research training to provide the skills necessary to complete a Master's dissertation, and a dissertation supervised by a member of staff with expertise in the area you wish to study in more depth.  

The course is ideal both for those wishing to go on to do a PhD in Philosophy, and for those students who want instead to improve their employability through the development of rigorous critical, analytical and research skills. It provides a deeper knowledge of a wide variety of areas of philosophy than is possible at undergraduate level, and equips students with the ability to plan, organise and work autonomously on a substantial individual project. This project will take the form either of a dissertation of 9000- 12000 words, or of a longer dissertation of up to 20,000 words.

In addition to conferences, workshops and reading groups, we host two regular research seminars, one organized by staff and another by postgraduates (with both groups participating in both) with papers presented by visiting speakers, staff and postgraduate students. We offer bursaries for conference trips, and outstanding student support and resources: the University Library is one of only five National Research Libraries, and one of the best-resourced in the UK 

Papers, monographs and edited collections by our academic staff are regularly published in international journals and by prominent academic publishers. We also host a wide variety of conferences at which you can hear cutting-edge philosophical arguments from leaders in the field, ranging from small workshops to large international conferences.

Course Director: Dr David Liggins. Please contact David if you have any questions about the course by emailing him at  

Aims

The course aims to equip students with a strong background in analytical philosophy with exemplary research and analytical skills of a standard to equip them to pursue doctoral study, or to pursue careers in areas that require exemplary skills in argumentation, analysis and research. It aims to do this by providing a deeper understanding of a variety of areas of philosophy through very personalised teaching delivery, with small-group `research seminar'-style classes and a focus on the individual development of research skills.

Special features

The 15 credit course units are specialized 'Research Paper' units, taught by members of staff on their own area of research. The 30 credit course unit provides the grounding required to prepare students for writing a dissertation and provides the opportunity to develop a doctoral research proposal. There are two options when it comes to dissertation length. There is an option to complete a more substantial dissertation than is possible with many other Masters courses (90 credits, 17,500-20,000 words). Alternatively, students may complete a shorter, 60 credit dissertation of 9 000 - 12 000 words, and complete an extra two 15 credit modules.

Teaching and learning

All our Master's modules are taught through small-group seminars. The seminars usually involve some general context-setting and guidance from the course convenor, but are often largely focussed on student-led discussion of set texts that you will have studied in advance in preparation for the discussion. This fosters a proactive and collaborative approach to engaging with the topic and to developing your own views and arguments. All modules apart from Research Skills run for one semester.

The Research Skills module runs through both semesters. Its purpose is (i) to develop students' research, writing and presentation skills and (ii) to guide them through the planning of their dissertation, from selecting a topic and a supervisor and identifying and reviewing key literature through to thinking about what makes for the best philosophical writing. Through taking this module, students will have made substantial progress on planning their dissertation well before the start of the summer vacation. They should also have the foundational skills and knowledge required for further graduate work in philosophy, if desired.

All students are allocated an appropriate supervisor for their dissertations; in practice, you can almost always choose your own dissertation supervisor. You will work throughout the academic year on your dissertation in consultation with your supervisor - focussing on the assessed elements of the Research Skills module during the teaching year, and then, over the summer (and into the autumn for part-time students), on writing.

Important note on part-time study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the modules to ensure that you are able to attend the seminars for the modules you enrol in.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

Career opportunities

Many of our MA Philosophy graduates go on to pursue a PhD in Philosophy. Others embark on careers such as the Civil Service, journalism, teaching, law, and a wide range of related positions in both the public and private sectors.



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About the program. The Master of Arts (Coursework) program offers an opportunity for graduates to continue studies in a particular area, or branch out into other areas. Read more

About the program

The Master of Arts (Coursework) program offers an opportunity for graduates to continue studies in a particular area, or branch out into other areas. Graduates of this program will possess a strong and broad set of skills essential to all professions, no matter what their chosen career. A range of majors are available in the program allowing students to tailor their qualifications to suit their specific career interests.

Specialise your knowledge

Growth in corporate organisations require graduates to obtain specialist knowledge. The Master of Arts (Coursework) allows graduates to tailor their studies to specialisations of interest. Graduates can choose from an array of disciplines, from Criminology, to International Relations and Communication. This flexible approach ensures graduates enhance their knowledge and specific skill set in an area of interest.

Flexibility

Students in the Master of Arts (Coursework) program are required to complete a major dissertation or a minor dissertation. Students can choose from a variety of foundation subjects that will support their dissertation. This flexibility ensure students are able to focus on an area of interest and graduate with desired specialist knowledge.

Structure & subjects

View the Master of Arts (Coursework) - Program Structure and Sequencing

The Master of Arts (Coursework) comprises 12 subjects, as follows:

Core subjects (2)

Foundation subjects (6)

Students can choose any six (6) subjects from the following list:

Dissertation/Elective option (4)

Students must choose one (1) of the following suites of subjects:

Or

  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio A (HUMR71-705)
  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio B (HUMR71-706)
  • Plus two (2) elective subjects from the Faculty of Society & Design list of available postgraduate subjects. (Internship and further Minor Dissertation/Portfolio subjects are available as elective subject options).

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.



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Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher. Read more
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher.

Course overview

The MA Historical Research is for students who want to develop their understanding of history and of the nature of historical research. It is a flexible course that will encourage you to develop as an independent researcher. You will be able to pursue your interests in history while discovering the ways in which historians work. You will also engage with the intellectual, practical and social facets of the profession.

Core modules emphasise the nature of the discipline or historical research, its evolution (History in the Past or Historians on History) and the preparatory work for independent research (The Profession of the Historian or the Dissertation Feasibility Study). These modules will give you the grounding needed to engage with your own research project in the dissertation module.

Design your MA studies according to your preferred methods of learning. If you prefer to work independently you may choose to opt for the Extended History Dissertation, whereas if you prefer more taught elements you can opt for the History Dissertation. This will allow you to place more or less emphasis on independent work and research. The Extended History Dissertation is a great opportunity for those wanting to move on to further research or who want to develop a career in which research is a key element. In both cases, the project will be negotiated with the teaching team to reflect both you and your lecturers’ research interests.

The course is designed to implement the research-led curriculum of the university in which you become involved in research through the guidance of research-active members of staff - all staff members on the teaching team are research active.

You will graduate with a firm grounding in the way history evolves through an understanding of the nature of the discipline in all its diversity and of the challenges it faces. This, combined with an engagement with a specific subject area, will foster a critical understanding of history, necessary for a wide range of careers in research, academia, law, journalism and the cultural sector.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core module:
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-Dissertation Feasibility study (30 Credits)
-The profession of the historian (15 Credits)
-The Profession of the historian (Symposium/Webinar) (15 Credits)

Dissertation modules:
-History Dissertation (60 Credits)
-Extended History Dissertation (90 Credits)

Optional modules (for students choosing the Dissertation module HISM40) would typically include:
-Suicide Until the Reformation
-Suicide Since the Reformation
-Law, Family and Community Relations 1550-1800
-Law, Treason and Rebellion 1550-1800
-Britain Between the Wars: The Changing Party System
-Britain Between the Wars: The Challenges of the Inter War Years
-Foundations of Liberty - Obedience and Resistance
-Foundations of liberty - Religious toleration
-Human Rights in History: Ideas and Movements
-Human Rights in History: Organizations, Activists and Campaigns
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920

You will normally choose your options during the induction week when the full list of optional modules available that year will be presented to you. The number of optional modules offered will depend on the size of the cohort and the availability of staff. Not all options will be available every year. In any one academic year no more than three optional modules (3 x 15 credits) will be offered. Optional modules all run in Semester 2.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to history, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-House of Commons Parliamentary Papers including bills, registers and journals
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers, with full runs of 48 titles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database

Archives
The Murray Library at the University also contains the physical archive of the North East England Mining Archive and Resource Centre. This contains mining records, technical reports, trade union records and health & safety information.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of professions, highlighting as it does critical and analytical skills and an ability to develop and effectively advance an argument. A large number of transferable skills will be gained: research skills, writing skills, presentation skills, analytical and critical skills. These will be valuable in a huge range of careers and activities.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, with a focus on the way research skills can be transferred to the work place.

History by nature is a subject that includes a number of transferable skills such as critical thinking, collecting and analysing data critically, working independently and to a deadline, developing a coherent argument, writing, and oral skills. The QAA Subject Benchmark statement for History (December 2014) lists the some following (§3.3):
-Self discipline
-Independence of mind, and initiative
-A questioning disposition and the ability to formulate and pursue clearly defined questions and enquiries
-Ability to work with others, and to have respect for others' reasoned views
-Ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and familiarity with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information
-Analytical ability, and the capacity to consider and solve problems, including complex problems to which there is no single solution
-Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of both oral and written expression
-Imaginative insight and creativity
-Awareness of ethical issues and responsibilities that arise from research into the past and the reuse of the research and writing of others

These transferable skills will be fostered through each module and particularly emphasised in core modules. Furthermore, the research skills module The profession of the historian Symposium/Webinar will involve the organisation of a mini symposium. You will be expected to engage with some of the administrative and practical skills involved in organising an academic event.

During the dissertation feasibility study, you will be expected to deliver papers to an audience of staff and peers, allowing you to practice your oral and presentational skills.

MA Historical Research graduates can expect to be employed in:
-Teaching
-Archives
-Libraries
-Museums
-Journalism
-Law

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Who is it for?. The Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution LLM degree should interest and benefit a broad range of students. If you are already professionally qualified having taken the . Read more

Who is it for?

The Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution LLM degree should interest and benefit a broad range of students.

If you are already professionally qualified having taken the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) or Legal Practice Course (LPC) it will develop your understanding of practice and enhance your career.

If you have legal qualifications in another jurisdiction it will provide understanding of legal process in England. You can enrol in the course straight after a law degree, although some experience of legal practice is an advantage.

Objectives

This Specialist LLM in Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution programme provides a unique opportunity to enhance the development of a career in legal professional practice as a barrister, solicitor or other qualified legal practitioner.

The Masters course investigates the ways in which civil litigation can be managed strategically and effectively, and provides a practice-focused understanding of mediation and arbitration as alternative ways of resolving a dispute, both of which are becoming increasingly important to commercial and non-commercial practice alike.

This innovative specialist Masters degree is designed to provide a sound understanding of the rules under which litigation, arbitration and mediation operate, based on current scholarship including areas such as procedure, evidence and ethics.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

All modules are structured as 10 weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform Moodle.

Assessment

Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help them develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either 5 modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or 4 modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words).

All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take 4 modules you will take 2 per term in each term and if you take 5 modules you will have 3 in one term and 2 in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write their dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules

Choose from the following 30-credit modules:

  • Advocacy: Trial Stories
  • Commercial/High Value Litigation in London
  • Civil Dispute Resolution Options - Strategic Use of ADR
  • Arbitration
  • Mediation and Negotiation
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • International Energy Litigation

Elective modules

For your remaining elective modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering diverse subjects – everything from Human Rights and Energy Law to Mergers or Money Laundering.

Dissertation

Those students who start the course in January will take two (or three) taught modules in the spring term (January-April), write their dissertation over the summer, before completing the remaining taught modules in the autumn term (September – December).  Please be reassured that this structure does not disadvantage January entry students in any way; the dissertation is a separate piece of individual work, it does not directly build on the teaching and assessment which takes place on the taught modules. All students are allocated dissertation supervisors who assist students topic selection and in research methodology.

Dissertation (incorporating research methods training)

  • 10,000 word Supervised Dissertation (30 credits) OR
  • 20,000 word Supervised Dissertation (60 credits)

Example topics include:

  • The implementation of the Jackson Review of Costs - is it possible to control litigation costs effectively?
  • Current issues in international arbitration
  • Is the use of mediation effectively becoming compulsory in some cases? Is this in the best interests of parties to a civil dispute?
  • How can expert evidence best be used to achieve a fair outcome to a dispute at a reasonable cost?
  • What are the implications of third party funding for civil dispute resolution?

Career prospects

It is an important objective of this course to assist individual students who wish to build effective careers in managing and conducting civil cases, whether through litigation, arbitration, negotiation or mediation.

With so much competition for those seeking to enter and develop a career in the legal profession, this LLM is designed to provide a depth of understanding and a range of skills that can make a real difference in building your career.

As a graduate of this specialist LLM programme you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in litigation and dispute resolution.

100% of graduates responding to the 2014/15 DLHE survey were in employment or further study six months after graduation.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.



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The MA Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy has been designed to serve as professional qualification for students seeking a career as a qualified counsellor/psychotherapist working in the statutory and voluntary sectors, in business or private practice. Read more
The MA Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy has been designed to serve as professional qualification for students seeking a career as a qualified counsellor/psychotherapist working in the statutory and voluntary sectors, in business or private practice. This counselling course emphasises the integration of theory, research, practice, and self-awareness to help you develop and train to become a competent and ethically-sound counsellor.

The MA is a three year course, made up of two years training on the Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy, plus one year completing the Masters research and dissertation stage. On completion of the USW Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy you may choose to exit the programme with your Diploma, or you can carry on to complete the MA by undertaking a research project and writing it up in the form of a dissertation. If you already have a Postgraduate Diploma in integrative counselling and/or psychotherapy you can apply to join the Masters research and dissertation stage directly.

Further information on the Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy course is available here.

The University of South Wales has an established national reputation for excellence for its delivery of a range of counselling and psychotherapy courses.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1263-ma-integrative-counselling-and-psychotherapy

What you will study

After successful completion of the PG Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy, students can proceed to the final Masters stage.

- Masters Stage
Dissertation: At the masters stage, you will learn about the different research methods which help develop knowledge about counselling and psychotherapy. You will then put this into action in your own choice of research project, on a topic relevant to integrative counselling and psychotherapy. You will be allocated a personal supervisor to provide expert guidance, advice and support.

Learning and teaching methods

During the Masters research and dissertation stage, you will have research training days including practical and interactive sessions, seminars, computer-based research training and individual dissertation supervision. You will be an independent learner on your own project.

- Attendance
The Masters research and dissertation stage takes one year part-time to complete, following completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy. You will attend for 6 days of teaching plus you will have individual supervision of your research project at the University, or by phone, Skype or email if that suits you better.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The Masters research and dissertation stage does not have a requirement for practice hours but most students will remain in practice, developing their experience and building the hours to achieve personal BACP accreditation. There may be voluntary and/or occasional paid opportunities for practice in the University’s community counselling service.

Former students from the course have enhanced their career profile within their current employment or found new positions in the voluntary sector, in health settings, in Higher or Further Education, in Employment Assistance Programmes (EAPs), in business and in private practice. It is also possible to undertake further specialised training in order to work with children and young people, or to apply for a research PhD.

Assessment methods

Masters research and dissertation stage: Research proposal, presentation, dissertation (20,000 words).

Facilities

We offer a suite of five spacious, dedicated rooms used by the counselling/psychotherapy courses, and a digital recording system for use in class.

Personal Therapy

There is no requirement for personal therapy during the Masters research and dissertation stage. Students on the Postgraduate Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy are required to have a minimum of 10 hours personal therapy for each of the two academic years.

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The MA by Dissertation consists of a 30,000-word thesis, researched and written over a period of one year full-time or two years part-time. Read more
The MA by Dissertation consists of a 30,000-word thesis, researched and written over a period of one year full-time or two years part-time.

Examiners

The dissertation is the sole component of this degree; there is no taught element. It is read by one external and one internal examiner. The external is an expert in the field in which the dissertation is written.

Result

There are no marks awarded and examiners decide solely on pass, fail or referral.

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The MSc Degree in Pain Management is an inter-professional, e-learning programme intended for health care professionals who want to specialise in the field of pain management. Read more
The MSc Degree in Pain Management is an inter-professional, e-learning programme intended for health care professionals who want to specialise in the field of pain management. It is also aimed at educationalists to provide the appropriate knowledge and expertise on pain to teach others from various disciplines.

Pain is a multidimensional phenomenon and as such needs to be managed through multidisciplinary initiatives. These initiatives must be based on specialist knowledge, rigorous research and an advanced understanding of the physiological and behavioural concepts involved.

This two-year course begins by introducing you to the multifaceted nature of caring for patients who have pain. The modules are designed to provide you with the ability to understand the biopsychosocial aspects of pain and to evaluate the various approaches to assessing and managing patients in pain. Professional issues, including clinical governance and inter-professional practice, will be covered. The course is suitable for the needs of primary, secondary and tertiary care professionals.

E-learning assessment strategies enable students to focus on their areas of interest and are structured to allow students to evaluate the topic in relation to their practice and professional base.

Approximately 40 places are offered each year and the majority of students are self-funded, though some obtain awards from charities and trusts.  The course takes two years to complete inclusive of the dissertation component (nine months for the postgraduate certificate stage; nine months for the postgraduate diploma stage and a further six months for the dissertation stage).

There are no residential components in this course as it is purely e-learning - so there is no requirement to travel to Cardiff for course purposes. 

Distinctive features

• Inter-professional plus e-learning.

• The first postgraduate Diploma/MSc in Pain Management course to be developed.

• Emphasis on a biopsychosocial approach.

• Suitable for primary, secondary and tertiary care.

• A new primary care pathway is available within the MSc Pain Management to reflect the move of chronic pain services closer to people’s homes and this is facilitated and managed by an inter-professional, expert primary care faculty including leading GPs with a special interest in pain within the UK.

Structure

This part-time MSc consists of three stages – stage T1 (3 x 20 credit modules), stage T2 (3 x 20 credit modules) and stage R (60 credit research dissertation).

The total normal duration to complete the full MSc programme is two years (stages T1, T2 and R), from the date of initial registration on the MSc.

You may leave at the end of stage T1 with a postgraduate certificate, if you have obtained a minimum of 60 credits and have completed any required modules.

You may leave at the end of stage T2 with a postgraduate diploma, if you have obtained a minimum of 120 credits and have completed any required modules.

The dissertation is normally not more than 20,000 words. The subject of each student’s dissertation shall be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee.

Core modules:

Fundamentals of Pain Management
Biopsychosocial Principles in Pain Management
Research, Statistics & Evidence Based Medicine
Patient Case Studies - Options
Clinical Management - Options
Professional Issues - Options
Dissertation: Pain Management

Assessment

The assessments have been chosen to ensure that the learning outcomes are appropriately tested and provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate they have met them. Specific module assessment methods for each module shall be determined by the relevant Board of Studies and are detailed within the relevant Module Description.

There are a variety of formative and summative assessment methods used, such as:

Assignments
Wiki development
Blogs
Multiple choice questions
Group work
Development of guidelines / PowerPoint presentations.

The MSc dissertation stage will be assessed based on the final dissertation. Expectations for the format, submission and marking of the dissertation will follow the current Senate Assessment Regulations, supplemented where appropriate with additional requirements of the Programme/School/College and any specific requirements arising from the nature of the project undertaken.

Career Prospects

Many students have reported that attainment or current participation on the MSc led directly to promotion.  Many students were also stimulated to pursue academic careers via further study up to PhD.

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The aim of the part-time Executive MBA is to help you become a reflective practitioner by encouraging you to integrate the theories and knowledge gained from the programme with the skills, values and insights derived from experience you gained before and after the MBA. Read more
The aim of the part-time Executive MBA is to help you become a reflective practitioner by encouraging you to integrate the theories and knowledge gained from the programme with the skills, values and insights derived from experience you gained before and after the MBA.

Our Executive MBA consists of ten core modules, two elective modules and a dissertation. The programme runs for 28 months (4 taught semesters and a dissertation). It has been designed to meet the needs of experienced middle managers looking for ways to develop their understanding and knowledge of business.

The dissertation enables you to conduct an investigation into a significant challenge facing your organisation and produce practical recommendations for improvement.

You will benefit from insights from internationally renowned academics, industry experts and business practitioners and will learn with and from experienced managers from a variety of specialisms and sectors.

On completion of the programme you will have enhanced self-understanding and an ability to demonstrate leadership of your team and organisation.

Distinctive features:

• A programme designed to fit around work commitments, only requiring three days away from the office at any one time.

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

Structure

Our two-year part-time MBA programme has been designed to fit around work commitments, with modules delivered in weekday blocks of three days.

• Part one:

The structure of the degree consists of 12 x 10 credit modules in part one. This will consist of 10 core modules and a choice of two electives from three in any one academic session.

• Part two:

Part two will consist of a 60 credit dissertation which describes an individual piece of research work conducted within your own organisation or industry.

You will be expected to submit your dissertation no later than the January following the end of year two. This is to allow you to schedule your research work around the normal commitments of your employment and family life.

Year one

In year one you will undertake core modules and one optional module.

Intellectual skills are promoted within teaching blocks through presentations, the examination of case studies, group discussion, debate and assignment. The case study sessions will enable you to apply the theoretical concepts taught in the lectures to real-world contexts.

Core modules:

Corporate Finance
Operations Management
Marketing
Strategic Management
Organisational Behaviour
Leadership and Professional Development

Optional modules:

Business Analysis
Lean Thinking
Management Consulting

Year two

In year two you will take the following core modules and can choose one of the two optional modules not taken in the first year.

Upon successful completion of the taught modules you will undertake a dissertation based on a piece of research within your own organisation. The dissertation is submitted in January following the end of the second year.

Core modules:

Human Resource Management
International Business
Business Economics
Sustainable Business Management
Dissertation MBA Part Time

Optional modules:

Business Analysis
Lean Thinking
Management Consulting

Teaching

Our teaching is heavily informed by research and combines academic rigour with practical relevance. Our internationally leading faculty consists of academics who are at the forefront of knowledge within their field. They bring the lessons learnt from their most recent research into the classroom, giving you access to up to date real life examples and scenarios and critical business thinking.

Your teaching and learning resources will be provided and we will be responsive to your needs and views. For your part, you will need to put in the necessary amount of work both during and outside formal teaching sessions, and to make good use of the facilities provided.

The Executive MBA is taught in thirteen blocks of three days which typically run from 9am to 5pm. Once a module is completed you will have approximately four weeks to complete an assignment. A great deal of learning happens within the cohort itself as you learn about other sectors, and how to bring about organisational change, together.

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including elective module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate.

The Executive MBA Programme Director is also on hand to provide advice and guidance and to help with any issues you may encounter whilst undertaking the course.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work and generic written feedback.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

All modules are assessed by a written assignment of 3,000 words given to you at the end of each module. You will have around four weeks to complete each assignment.

You are also required to submit a 20,000 word dissertation.

Career prospects

If you joined us you would find yourself part of a group of roughly 20 managers from a broad range of organisations. Over the last few years this has included Admiral Insurance, Scottish & Southern Electricity, Deloitte, Cardiff Council, NHS, Amazon, General Electric, Fire & Rescue Service, and many other successful private and public organisations.

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The PMPDP is an industry-inspired partnership concerned with practice based learning for project management development. The course embodies critical thinking and reflective practice, both through the dissertation phase and throughout the taught modules. Read more

The PMPDP is an industry-inspired partnership concerned with practice based learning for project management development. The course embodies critical thinking and reflective practice, both through the dissertation phase and throughout the taught modules. PMPDP promotes and supports a community of practice (CoP) for delegates, enabling networking and communication with their peers; sharing experiences and practices across a wide array of project environments. The course is increasingly becoming sustainable across various sectors with the curriculum and delivery methodology continuously improving.

The Taught Component

Throughout the taught component of the course there are two study cycles per year April - October and October - April. In each six month period there is a plenary session, 1 midterm session and 1 study day session.

The Dissertation Component

After all the 8 taught modules are completed, delegates start the dissertation. This takes 12 months to complete. There are 2 routes: Research or Reflective.

The dissertation delegates that choose the traditional research route will be allocated a research supervisor. Delegates maintain contact with their supervisor through the year on a one to one basis. The alternative route is the reflective dissertation route. In this option the supervisor arranges meetings or workshops normally three times during the dissertation phase.

Accreditation

Aims

The PMPDP has the following objectives:

  • To provide education in the management of projects;
  • To continuously improve  the competence profile of both delegates and their organisations;
  • To support professional career development in the management of projects;
  • To raise the profile of Project Management in participating organisations;
  • To create a group of project management professionals and develop and sustain communities of learning and practice.

Special features

How can I benefit from blended learning?

  • You can accommodate studying with your busy lifestyle
  • You will enjoy a mix of face to face on online learning
  • Your residential sessions consist of lectures, leading industry speakers, workshops, seminars and case studies. The aim is to help ground all new knowledge and ideas in context.
  • Your assessments focus on experience and application, rather than just demonstrating knowledge acquisition.
  • You can easily access materials and engage with colleagues and members of staff, via our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE is also used as a means of allowing virtual groups to work on tasks and collective assessments.

How will part-time study support my work and development?

  • Both you, as employee, and your employer, as sponsor will benefit - your assignments are focused on your real work. Your final dissertation is practise-based to add value to practitioner and sponsoring organisation alike.
  • Tangible benefits for the participant's company can be delivered as an additional outcome
  • You will be working with leading experts in their field, generating new ideas and knowledge through coursework and assessment.

Coursework and assessment

In any six month study period delegates can study one or two modules. Module 1 must be taken first and Module 8 last, but Modules 2 through to 7 can be taken in any order, subject to advice on combinations. The taught modules are assessed by 100% coursework.

The coursework assignment/s for each Module are issued, submitted and marked during the 6 month study period. End of cycle module assessments take place at the end of the 6 month study period.

Following successful completion of 4 taught Modules, delegates may exit the course with a Post Graduate Certificate in Project Management (60 credits). Successful completion of all 8 taught Modules will give delegates sufficient credits for the Post Graduate Diploma award in Project Management (120 credits). Successful completion of the 8 taught modules and a dissertation (worth 60 credits) will give delegates an MSc award in Project Management (180 credits).

Course unit details

The 8 compulsory modules are: 

  • MACE 60071 - Module 1: Introduction to Project Management
  • MACE 60072 - Module 2: Integration Management, Integrated Master Scheduling, and Governance
  • MACE 60073 - Module 3: Project Planning and Resource Management
  • MACE 60074 - Module 4: Project Cost, Risk and Benefits Management
  • MACE 60075 - Module 5: Project Contract, Commercial and Procurement Management
  • MACE 60076 - Module 6: Project Scope and Quality Management
  • MACE 60077 - Module 7: People, Organisation and Culture
  • MACE 60078 - Module 8: Managing Research Projects

Following the successful completion all 8 modules delegates undertake the dissertation.

  • MACE 61110 - PMPDP Dissertation

Facilities

The School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering has modern facilities and a strong professional support staff. The delegates on this programme are not based at the University but do attend for plenary and midterm events. 

Plenary and midterm events normally take place in the Manchester Conference Centre (MCC) which is located adjacent to the School. The delegates have access to the University's librarys both when they are here and remotely. They have full access to any information on the University 's and School  web. Additionally all student facilities are available to PM PDP students when they are in attendance at the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

CPD opportunities

Delegates have the opportunity to study one module which can be undertaken for 15 credits. This is classed as a Continual Professional Development (CPD) qualification.

CPD qualification shows a commitment to structured skill enhancement and personal or professional competence. If delegates chose to study for a CPD module they would initially have to complete module 1 which fundamentally acts as an overview to industry related project management. Then any of the modules from 2 - 7 can be taken depending on what is most relevant to the individuals professional development within the project management sector.



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The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in health care ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. Read more

The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in health care ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. There is an emphasis on the application of bioethical and legal theory to real world scenarios, thus catering to the practical needs of health care and legal professionals and those in related fields. Students gain an expert knowledge and understanding of bioethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts. They will also develop the ethical and medico-legal knowledge and research skills required for writing a Masters-level dissertation, and will be well prepared for further research if they so desire.

You study a wide variety of ethical and legal subjects including autonomy, consent, refusal of treatment, confidentiality, the moral status of the foetus, resource allocation, genetic testing, HIV testing, medical malpractice, clinical negligence, organ and tissue transplantation, fertility treatment, genetic manipulation, research ethics, stem cell research and euthanasia.

Teaching and learning

Teaching tends to defy the traditional boundaries associated with lectures and seminars. Generally, each class in a course unit has a duration of 2 or 3 hours per week, and is split roughly equally between a formal, didactic period and a structured discussion period (most often based on the so-called challenge-response model). Nevertheless, each class is considered a seminar or lecture, and attendance of all classes of a course unit for which a student is enrolled is thus compulsory . For course units of 15 credit value there will generally be 15 hours of face-to-face teaching throughout the semester in which the unit is delivered, and twice that amount for 30 credit units.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment of all taught course units (to a total of 120 credits) is by assessed coursework in the form of essays of 4,000 words per 15 credit course unit and up to 7,000 words for the two 30 credit core course units. In addition, students who wish to complete the MA must submit a 12,000 to 15,000 word dissertation by independent research (60 credits); no dissertation is required for the PGDip or PGCert. Part-time students undertake a supervised dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Those who do not successfully complete the MA you may be considered for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. 

Those who do not successfully complete the Postgraduate Diploma may be considered for the award of the Postgraduate Certificate.

The awards of the MA or Postgraduate Diploma are classified according to Pass/Merit/Distinction. The Postgraduate Certificate is awarded unclassified.

Course unit details

Students will be required to complete 180 credits: 120 credits comprised of taught course units (each of 15 or 30 credits value), and an independent research element of the course worth 60 credits by way of a Masters dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, which is undertaken over the summer months of the course. The dissertation should be predominantly law-based.

On the full time course, the 120 taught credits can be split in one of two ways: (1) 60 credits in each of the two semesters; or (2) 75 credits in semester one and 45 credits in semester two.

Students registered on the MA in Healthcare Ethics and Law would need to select a majority of their optional courses from the 'ethics' list (Ethics, Genetics and Genomics; Research Ethics). Global Health Law and Bioethics can count as an ethics or law course.

Details of all current course units available in the School of Law can be found on the Faculty of Humanities website.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Successful graduates are able to progress within a wide variety of roles in both medical, legal and ethical fields. Graduates from previous years have, for example, proceeded to specialise in medico-legal practice and academic careers, and the degrees have enhanced the careers of healthcare professionals.



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The MSc in Occupational Health is a part-time distance e-learning programme that offers knowledge and expertise in the science underpinning occupational health and safety. Read more
The MSc in Occupational Health is a part-time distance e-learning programme that offers knowledge and expertise in the science underpinning occupational health and safety.

It offers a convenient means for nurses, doctors, health and safety advisors or managers with busy work schedules and other responsibilities, to gain a postgraduate degree in Occupational Health.

The emphasis is on common occupational health and safety issues encountered in the workplace.

The course encourages self-directed learning, critical thinking and comparative analysis of occupational health systems and practice. This is done within a structured and dynamic on-line learning environment that provides interactive multidisciplinary learning and the opportunity for mutual support and collaboration. 

Structure

All students register initially for the MSc.

The MSc consists of three stages:

• Stage T1 (first taught stage)
This stage lasts for one academic year, and consists of three 20-credit modules, totalling 60 credits, at Level 7.

• Stage T2 (second taught stage)
This stage lasts for one further academic year, to a total of 2 academic years for stages T1 and T2, and consists of a further three 20-credit modules at least to the value of 60 credits at Level 7, to achieve a total of at least 120 credits at Level 7.

• Stage R: MSc research dissertation stage
This stage lasts for one further academic year, to a total of three academic years for the full MSc programme (stages T1, T2 and R), and includes a dissertation of 60 credits at Level 7, to achieve a total of at least 180 credits at Level 7 to complete the MSc programme.

The total normal duration to complete the full MSc programme (stages T1, T2 and R) is three academic years on a part-time basis, from the date of initial registration on the MSc programme.

You may exit after stage T1 with a Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert), if you have gained at least 60 credits, only where this includes the award of credit for three particular modules.

You may exit after stage T2 with a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip), or progress to the MSc dissertation, if you have gained at least 120 credits, only where this includes the award of credit for four particular modules.

Your dissertation, which will normally be no longer than 20,000 words and supported by such other material as may be considered appropriate to the subject, will embody the results of your period of project work. The subject of each student’s dissertation will be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee.

Core modules:

Occupational Risk Assessment & Control
Occupational Health Law & Ethics
Occupational Health Statistics, Epidemiology & Evidence Based Practice
Occupational Health Processes & Management
Dissertation: Occupational Health (Policy and Practice)

Assessment

During the taught stages, formative assessment will include online discussions examining specific occupational health issues. Summative assessment will consist of written assignments examining aspects of occupational health theory and practice, enabling the student to critically appraise the context and scientific literature, demonstrate a detailed understanding of the topic and reflect on how their new knowledge will affect their practice.

The MSc dissertation stage will be wholly assessed based on the final dissertation. Expectations for the format, submission and marking of the dissertation will follow the current Senate Assessment Regulations, supplemented where appropriate with additional requirements of the Programme/School/College and any specific requirements arising from the nature of the project undertaken.

During the Master’s stage you will be expected to keep in regular contact with your supervisor. You will also complete a progress report every two months in conjunction with your supervisor.

Career Prospects

At present there is a shortage of occupational health clinicians/practitioners of all levels in the UK. Although this course will not give you formal professional accreditation, it provides the opportunity to gain a sound basis of knowledge for practice, and demonstrates a commitment to your own further professional development in occupational health.

For qualified doctors wanting to enter specialist training in occupational medicine, the Postgraduate Diploma stage of the course will provide knowledge of the bulk of the topics needed for part 1 of the Membership Exam of the Faculty of Occupational Medicine (MFOM). Further information on specialist training can be found on the Faculty of Occupational Medicine Web-site.

N.B. the course does not contribute to specialist accreditation for nurses.

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