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This is a progressive and flexible programme of postgraduate study. There is an overarching theme of advanced practice in healthcare, yet the flexible, modular nature of this award permits healthcare professionals to structure their studies to meet with their own professional needs. Read more
This is a progressive and flexible programme of postgraduate study. There is an overarching theme of advanced practice in healthcare, yet the flexible, modular nature of this award permits healthcare professionals to structure their studies to meet with their own professional needs.

This will provide options for profession specific pathways through the programme if required. These may be clinical, managerial or more generic. Guidance will be provided by the Programme Co-Directors on module choice.‌

Students can register for an award and there are exit points at Postgraduate Certificate (PGC), Postgraduate Diploma (PGD) and Masters Level. The PGC or PGD may be taken as either free standing awards or as an intermediate exit award for any student who has successfully completed the modules required for these awards or who have failed to comply with the criteria which permits access to the next level of study. However, some students may wish to only register for an individual module for the purpose of continuing professional development. This is permissible and such students will not be registered on the programme.

However, students may accrue credit through taking some stand alone modules and then apply for APL transfer of these credits into the programme for a formal award. All students who undertake stand alone modules will be advised of appropriate combinations which can be mapped into the award.

The programme has one starting point per year: semester one (September), and is part-time. It is modular, with some modules being mandatory and others optional to suit the individual student needs. Teaching takes place in both semesters and the scheduling of the teaching will depend upon the modules taken. There are two assessment points per year (January and May), one at the end of each semester.

On this modular programme students can study stand alone credit rated modules (for which Credit Accumulation and Transfer (CATS) points will be awarded).

Or to achieve a:

- PGC a student must successfully complete 60 credits at M level, with not more than 15 credits at level 6 and no dissertation credits;
- PGD a student must successfully complete 120 credits at M level, with not more than 30 credits at level 6 and no dissertation credits;
- Masters degree a student must complete 180 credits at M level, with not more than 30 credits at level 6 and to include a 60 credit dissertation.

As previously stated, the programme is modular and the PGC stage incorporates some compulsory modules and some option modules dependent upon the pathway chosen by the student. The PGD is made up of optional modules although students hoping to progress to the dissertation stage must complete Introduction to Research Methodologies in Health and Social Care (HEAL402) prior to moving to the dissertations stage. The Masters degree is achieved by independent research and the submission of a dissertation.

Why Health Sciences?

Breadth of expertise

The School comprises the Directorates of Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Orthoptics and Physiotherapy and has a vibrant Postgraduate/CPD unit. The school is committed to delivering quality research to the highest ethical standards in order to improve knowledge and services for the health of the community. Our multi professional cohort of staff has a strong research profile and is committed to developing policy, practice and technology for the improvement of healthcare and service delivery.

Contributing to the advancement of health care practice

We offer taught modular postgraduate programmes, providing extensive opportunity for in-depth study and development of advanced clinical skills in a range of areas and contributing to the advancement of healthcare practice, management and professional education.

Continuing professional development provision

The School also offers a wide range of accredited and non-accredited CPD modules and hosts a vibrant daytime and evening short course programme to maximise opportunity for attendance. The most up-to-date information about these activities is to be found on the School website.

Career prospects

The taught postgraduate programmes provide opportunity for healthcare professionals to develop, specialise and extend the scope of their skills into new areas, to meet the constantly evolving service demands for advanced practitioners. The students who exit our taught postgrdaute programmes usually take up senior clinical/management positions within the NHS. We have students from multi-professional backgrounds as we encourage interprofessional learning and education as appropriate to foster understanding of the roles of colleagues.

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The MSc in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair is a three-year, inter-disciplinary, part-time, distance learning course. Read more
The MSc in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair is a three-year, inter-disciplinary, part-time, distance learning course. 

The course attracts healthcare professionals from fields such as nursing, medicine, pharmacy, podiatry and the pharmaceutical industry, and offers the opportunity to study at a distance alongside an international group of professionals from countries around the world.

It aims to enable you to explore and analyse existing and developing theories and concepts that underpin wound healing and tissue repair so facilitating professional and personal growth, building upon your educational and vocational experience and developing your ability to become a life-long learner.

Students are required to attend a five-day study block in year one and year two, otherwise no further attendance is required. 

The on-campus study blocks will consist of: introduction to e-learning on the Internet and using your individual home page; introduction to study skills, library resources and tutorial support; introduction to course work and assignment briefs; lead lectures – introduction to module content and theory; group interactive sessions - via workshop, discussions, case presentation; private and group tutorials; course committee meetings - providing an on-going evaluation of the course.

Between the annual study blocks, students are supported by online personal and group tutorials, and personal tutorials by email or telephone. In addition, there are dedicated distance learning library support staff to help ensure you can access necessary databases and full-text journals. The online information and resources are constantly updated for students to access through a virtual learning environment.

Distinctive features

• This is a well-established course, first conceived as a postgraduate diploma in 1996 and extended to a Master of Science (MSc) in 1999.

• The course has attracted healthcare professionals from the field of nursing, medicine, pharmacy, podiatry and the pharmaceutical industry, and offers the opportunity to study at a distance alongside an international group of professionals from countries such as Ireland, Holland, Italy, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and New Zealand.

• Hyperlinked reading lists to facilitate easy access to resource material.

• One-to-one and group tutorials are arranged online to encourage both lecturer and peer support and to suit students in different time zones.

• Self-assessment tests from the course material are also linked to discussion board groups in order to facilitate sharing of information and further facilitate peer support.

Structure

The MSc consists of three stages:

• Stage T1 (first taught stage)
This stage lasts for one academic year, and consists of one five-day study block and five modules totalling 60 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7).

• Stage T2 (second taught stage)
This stage lasts for a further academic year, to a total of two years for the taught stages, and consists of a further five day study block and three 20-credit modules totalling 60 credits, at Level 7, to achieve a total of 120 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), to complete the taught stages.

• Stage R: MSc research dissertation stage
The dissertation stage lasts for a further academic year, to a total of three years, and will include a dissertation of 60 credits at Level 7, to achieve a combined total of 180 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), to complete the MSc programme.

The total normal duration to complete the full MSc course is three academic years (stages T1, T2 & R), from the date of initial registration.

You may exit after stage T1 with a Postgraduate Certificate, if you have gained at least 60 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), including the award of credit for any ‘required’ modules.

You may exit after stage T2 with a Postgraduate Diploma, if you have gained at least 120 credits (of which no greater than 20 credits shall be at level 6, with the remainder at Level 7), including the award of credit for any ‘required’ modules.

Your dissertation, which will normally be no longer than 20,000 words and supported by such other material as may be considered appropriate to the subject, will embody the results of your period of project work. The subject of each student’s dissertation will be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee.

For a list of modules please see the website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/wound-healing-and-tissue-repair-msc-part-time

Teaching

Taught stages - You will be taught through lectures, workshops, student presentations; tutorials; distance learning material; asynchronous discussion forums; synchronous online tutorials; written text in modules; self-assessment tests; recommended reading/links within module; feedback on plans, drafts and aims; feedback on assignments; external examiners’ feedback.

MSc dissertation - Studies at MSc dissertation level will largely consist of guided independent study and research, making use of the extensive learning and research facilities available. A project supervisor will be allocated to support and advise you on researching and writing up your specific dissertation topic.

Assessment

Summative assessment:
Coursework in the form of written assignments and moderated discussions including critical evaluation of recent research evidence are used to assess students’ critical reasoning and ability to present coherent written material.

Formative assessment:
Self-assessment tests and opportunities for reflection in the modules are included as a formative method of assessing progress. In addition students are allowed to submit a draft assignment prior to final submission. Students can also seek further advice on both pieces of coursework via the discussion board, online tutorial and also by email.

MSc dissertation:
The MSc dissertation stage will be wholly assessed based on the final dissertation. Expectations for the format, submission and marking of the dissertation will follow the current Senate Assessment Regulations, supplemented where appropriate with additional requirements of the Programme/School/College and any specific requirements arising from the nature of the project undertaken.

Career Prospects

Completion of this course could help you in the following areas:

Writing for publication.
Securing a specialist professional role.
External examining for other academic institutions.
Membership of wound healing association executive committees.
Invited speaker for national and international wound healing conferences.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Read more
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

The Divinity Faculty at Cambridge has distinguished international reputation for research, teaching and for the formation of graduate students in Theology and Religious Studies. Consistently rated as one of the top research units in the country in our subjects, it offers postgraduate training at an acknowledged world-class standard.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmlltr

Specialisms

The teaching officers of the Faculty include leading experts in a wide range of fields:

- Biblical Studies;
- Ancient, Medieval and Modern Judaism;
- Patristics;
- History of Christianity;
- Christian Systematic Theology;
- Philosophy of Religion and Ethics;
- Religion and the Natural Sciences;
- Religion and the Social Sciences;
- Study of World Religions (with special reference to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism).

Each major research area is centred on a senior seminar meeting fortnightly during term. In practice these seminars are often interdisciplinary in character (such as the D Society in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics and the Hebrew, Jewish and Early Christian Studies Seminar); and a variety of other informal graduate seminars and reading groups also helps to expand the repertoire of exchange. A number of named lectureships (the Stantons, the Hulseans etc) regularly bring international figures from outside Cambridge to contribute to the research culture.

First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Learning Outcomes

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Format

Supervisions are given on the dissertation, twelve hours per year full-time (reduced pro rata for part-time).

Feedback will be given by the supervisor in the course of supervisions and in termly reports. In addition, there will be a report from the assessors following the first-year examination.

Assessment

Dissertation of not more than 80,000 words with a compulsory viva.

A first-year examination for which students must submit the following:
- a summary of the scope, purpose, methodology and value of research project;
- a provisional outline of dissertation with a timetable for the conduct and completion of the research and writing;
- a bibliography of topic and its immediate intellectual context set out in accordance with the conventions current field of study;
- a sample of written-up research of no more than 10,000 words, with appropriate footnotes and bibliographical references (included in word-count).

Students will have a meeting with two assessors to discuss the submitted work.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Faculty Studentships:

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity &other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilizations)
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies0
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher. Read more
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher.

Course overview

The MA Historical Research is for students who want to develop their understanding of history and of the nature of historical research. It is a flexible course that will encourage you to develop as an independent researcher. You will be able to pursue your interests in history while discovering the ways in which historians work. You will also engage with the intellectual, practical and social facets of the profession.

Core modules emphasise the nature of the discipline or historical research, its evolution (History in the Past or Historians on History) and the preparatory work for independent research (The Profession of the Historian or the Dissertation Feasibility Study). These modules will give you the grounding needed to engage with your own research project in the dissertation module.

Design your MA studies according to your preferred methods of learning. If you prefer to work independently you may choose to opt for the Extended History Dissertation, whereas if you prefer more taught elements you can opt for the History Dissertation. This will allow you to place more or less emphasis on independent work and research. The Extended History Dissertation is a great opportunity for those wanting to move on to further research or who want to develop a career in which research is a key element. In both cases, the project will be negotiated with the teaching team to reflect both you and your lecturers’ research interests.

The course is designed to implement the research-led curriculum of the university in which you become involved in research through the guidance of research-active members of staff - all staff members on the teaching team are research active.

You will graduate with a firm grounding in the way history evolves through an understanding of the nature of the discipline in all its diversity and of the challenges it faces. This, combined with an engagement with a specific subject area, will foster a critical understanding of history, necessary for a wide range of careers in research, academia, law, journalism and the cultural sector.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core module:
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-Dissertation Feasibility study (30 Credits)
-The profession of the historian (15 Credits)
-The Profession of the historian (Symposium/Webinar) (15 Credits)

Dissertation modules:
-History Dissertation (60 Credits)
-Extended History Dissertation (90 Credits)

Optional modules (for students choosing the Dissertation module HISM40) would typically include:
-Suicide Until the Reformation
-Suicide Since the Reformation
-Law, Family and Community Relations 1550-1800
-Law, Treason and Rebellion 1550-1800
-Britain Between the Wars: The Changing Party System
-Britain Between the Wars: The Challenges of the Inter War Years
-Foundations of Liberty - Obedience and Resistance
-Foundations of liberty - Religious toleration
-Human Rights in History: Ideas and Movements
-Human Rights in History: Organizations, Activists and Campaigns
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920

You will normally choose your options during the induction week when the full list of optional modules available that year will be presented to you. The number of optional modules offered will depend on the size of the cohort and the availability of staff. Not all options will be available every year. In any one academic year no more than three optional modules (3 x 15 credits) will be offered. Optional modules all run in Semester 2.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to history, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-House of Commons Parliamentary Papers including bills, registers and journals
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers, with full runs of 48 titles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database

Archives
The Murray Library at the University also contains the physical archive of the North East England Mining Archive and Resource Centre. This contains mining records, technical reports, trade union records and health & safety information.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of professions, highlighting as it does critical and analytical skills and an ability to develop and effectively advance an argument. A large number of transferable skills will be gained: research skills, writing skills, presentation skills, analytical and critical skills. These will be valuable in a huge range of careers and activities.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, with a focus on the way research skills can be transferred to the work place.

History by nature is a subject that includes a number of transferable skills such as critical thinking, collecting and analysing data critically, working independently and to a deadline, developing a coherent argument, writing, and oral skills. The QAA Subject Benchmark statement for History (December 2014) lists the some following (§3.3):
-Self discipline
-Independence of mind, and initiative
-A questioning disposition and the ability to formulate and pursue clearly defined questions and enquiries
-Ability to work with others, and to have respect for others' reasoned views
-Ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and familiarity with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information
-Analytical ability, and the capacity to consider and solve problems, including complex problems to which there is no single solution
-Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of both oral and written expression
-Imaginative insight and creativity
-Awareness of ethical issues and responsibilities that arise from research into the past and the reuse of the research and writing of others

These transferable skills will be fostered through each module and particularly emphasised in core modules. Furthermore, the research skills module The profession of the historian Symposium/Webinar will involve the organisation of a mini symposium. You will be expected to engage with some of the administrative and practical skills involved in organising an academic event.

During the dissertation feasibility study, you will be expected to deliver papers to an audience of staff and peers, allowing you to practice your oral and presentational skills.

MA Historical Research graduates can expect to be employed in:
-Teaching
-Archives
-Libraries
-Museums
-Journalism
-Law

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Are you a HR or management professional? Hoping to build on your HR skills and broaden your career prospects? Southampton Solent’s flexible personnel and development master’s degree provides the ideal route to advance your management career, expanding both your decision making skills and your core personnel and development competencies. Read more

Overview

Are you a HR or management professional? Hoping to build on your HR skills and broaden your career prospects? Southampton Solent’s flexible personnel and development master’s degree provides the ideal route to advance your management career, expanding both your decision making skills and your core personnel and development competencies.

- A flexible study approach allows students to study around their job, with six classroom-based sessions held on Saturdays.
- Course tutors have extensive HR and industry experience, supporting students in translating knowledge into practical skills and real-life scenarios.
- Students can choose from a range of dissertation topics best suited to their professional interests.
- A one-year ‘top-up’ from the Postgraduate Diploma is available - http://www.solent.ac.uk/courses/2016/professional/pgd-personnel-and-development/course-details.aspx
- Former students are regularly invited to come in and share their study experiences and research.

The programme -

This higher-level course aims to help students develop the skills required to be an effective manager of people in changing employment conditions. Students will have the opportunity to explore a specific personnel issue in depth and develop both operationally and strategically. Through six weekend tuition sessions and online study, students are able to apply their studies to their current employment.

Students are guided as they write a dissertation and are encouraged to choose a topic that draws on their current working environment, enabling them to put knowledge gained into practice in a ‘real-world’ scenario.

The course is ideal for those involved in the management of people at a senior and strategic level and is particularly suited to HR professionals, middle and senior managers, and trade union officials.

The academic team has extensive and wide-ranging industry experience across the business and not-for-profit sectors. Their unique experience informs teaching and learning throughout the course.

Teaching, learning and assessment

The MA is classroom-based, with plenty of group discussion. You will be allocated a supervisor, with regular communication and meetings to support you during your studies.

Work experience -

You can choose a dissertation topic that draws on your current working environment and experience. This enables you to apply your skills and knowledge to real-world scenarios and situations.
Past students have covered a whole host of themes in their dissertations, such as work–life balance, employee wellbeing and engagement, leadership, bullying at work, talent management, HR and strategic HRM.

Assessment -

Assessment is via:
25 per cent research proposal – 3,500 words plus presentation, and
75 per cent dissertation – 20,000 words.

Attendance -

Early sessions: You’ll attend two consecutive Saturdays starting in the first week in October to learn about dissertation work and research methodologies.

Dissertation timescales: You will agree your dissertation topic with the course leader before the end of October. You are then matched with appropriate supervisors and begin work on your proposal.

Dissertation proposal: You will attend a session on the second Saturday in November and look at different methods of data collection and analysis, and completion of the dissertation proposal. You will submit your dissertation proposal in mid-December.

Presentation: A further session (on the second Saturday in December) gives students the chance to deliver a presentation on their research topic to their tutors and peers. Most students will gather their primary research data early in the New Year.

Write-up: A further session will be held shortly before the Easter break (second Saturday in February and third Saturday in March) to discuss any issues. You will submit the dissertation in late May.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City Living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

This master’s course will enhance your career prospects and broaden your opportunities in the HR field. The course has directly helped many of our graduates to progress to senior HR positions.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- HR
- Management
- Personnel
- Trade union official

Links with industry -

Our tutors have wide-ranging industry experience across the business and not-for-profit sectors, which informs teaching and learning throughout the course.

You will have opportunities to apply your knowledge and skills to real-world scenarios from your workplace.

We invite former students to come in and talk about their study experience and research, which current students learn a lot from.

Transferable skills -

This course develops a range of transferable skills, such as research, independent working, effective organisation, writing and strategic/creative thinking.

Examples of employment obtained by recent graduates -

We find that our graduates are quickly promoted after completing this course or move to higher posts in other companies. Many graduates find themselves in very senior positions in HR after completing the course.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU part-time fees: £2,640 per year for Years 1 and 2; £2,215 for Year 3

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Graduation costs

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Are you ready to take the next step in your HR or management career? With its flexible learning approach and emphasis on applying theory to real-world scenarios, Southampton Solent’s personnel and development master’s degree is the ideal path to enhancing your career prospects in the HR field.

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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This specialism offers a rigorous and practical program of study into the process of civil litigation and alternative forms of dispute resolution including arbitration and mediation. Read more
This specialism offers a rigorous and practical program of study into the process of civil litigation and alternative forms of dispute resolution including arbitration and mediation.

Who is it for?

The Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution LLM degree should interest and benefit a broad range of students. If you are already professionally qualified having taken the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) or Legal Practice Course (LPC) it will develop your understanding of practice and enhance your career. If you have legal qualifications in another jurisdiction it will provide understanding of legal process in England. You can enrol in the course straight after a law degree, although some experience of legal practice is an advantage.

Objectives

This Specialist LLM in Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution programme provides a unique opportunity to enhance the development of a career in legal professional practice as a barrister, solicitor or other qualified legal practitioner. The course investigates the ways in which civil litigation can be managed strategically and effectively, and provides a practice-focused understanding of mediation and arbitration as alternative ways of resolving a dispute, both of which are becoming increasingly important to commercial and non-commercial practice alike.

This innovative specialist Masters degree is designed to provide a sound understanding of the rules under which litigation, arbitration and mediation operate, based on current scholarship including areas such as procedure, evidence and ethics.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

All modules are structured as 10 weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform Moodle.

Assessment

Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help them develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either 5 modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or 4 modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take 4 modules you will take 2 per term in each term and if you take 5 modules you will have 3 in one term and 2 in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write their dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30-credit modules:
-Commercial/High Value Litigation in London
-Civil Dispute Resolution Options - Strategic Use of ADR
-Arbitration
-Mediation and Negotiation
-International Commercial Arbitration
-International Dispute Settlement
-EU Litigation

Elective modules - for your remaining elective modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering diverse subjects – everything from Human Rights and Energy Law to Mergers or Money Laundering.

Dissertation - those students who start the course in January will take two (or three) taught modules in the spring term (January-April), write their dissertation over the summer, before completing the remaining taught modules in the autumn term (September – December). Please be reassured that this structure does not disadvantage January entry students in any way; the dissertation is a separate piece of individual work, it does not directly build on the teaching and assessment which takes place on the taught modules. All students are allocated dissertation supervisors who assist students topic selection and in research methodology.

Dissertation (incorporating research methods training)
-10,000 word Supervised Dissertation (30 credits) OR
-20,000 word Supervised Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

It is an important objective of this course to assist individual students who wish to build effective careers in managing and conducting civil cases, whether through litigation, arbitration, negotiation or mediation. With so much competition for those seeking to enter and develop a career in the legal profession, this LLM is designed to provide a depth of understanding and a range of skills that can make a real difference in building your career.

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in litigation and dispute resolution.

100% of graduates responding to the 2014/15 DLHE survey were in employment or further study six months after graduation.

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The MA Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy has been designed to serve as professional qualification for students seeking a career as a qualified counsellor/psychotherapist working in the statutory and voluntary sectors, in business or private practice. Read more
The MA Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy has been designed to serve as professional qualification for students seeking a career as a qualified counsellor/psychotherapist working in the statutory and voluntary sectors, in business or private practice. This counselling course emphasises the integration of theory, research, practice, and self-awareness to help you develop and train to become a competent and ethically-sound counsellor.

The MA is a three year course, made up of two years training on the Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy, plus one year completing the Masters research and dissertation stage. On completion of the USW Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy you may choose to exit the programme with your Diploma, or you can carry on to complete the MA by undertaking a research project and writing it up in the form of a dissertation. If you already have a Postgraduate Diploma in integrative counselling and/or psychotherapy you can apply to join the Masters research and dissertation stage directly.

Further information on the Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy course is available here.

The University of South Wales has an established national reputation for excellence for its delivery of a range of counselling and psychotherapy courses.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1263-ma-integrative-counselling-and-psychotherapy

What you will study

After successful completion of the PG Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy, students can proceed to the final Masters stage.

- Masters Stage
Dissertation: At the masters stage, you will learn about the different research methods which help develop knowledge about counselling and psychotherapy. You will then put this into action in your own choice of research project, on a topic relevant to integrative counselling and psychotherapy. You will be allocated a personal supervisor to provide expert guidance, advice and support.

Learning and teaching methods

During the Masters research and dissertation stage, you will have research training days including practical and interactive sessions, seminars, computer-based research training and individual dissertation supervision. You will be an independent learner on your own project.

- Attendance
The Masters research and dissertation stage takes one year part-time to complete, following completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy. You will attend for 6 days of teaching plus you will have individual supervision of your research project at the University, or by phone, Skype or email if that suits you better.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The Masters research and dissertation stage does not have a requirement for practice hours but most students will remain in practice, developing their experience and building the hours to achieve personal BACP accreditation. There may be voluntary and/or occasional paid opportunities for practice in the University’s community counselling service.

Former students from the course have enhanced their career profile within their current employment or found new positions in the voluntary sector, in health settings, in Higher or Further Education, in Employment Assistance Programmes (EAPs), in business and in private practice. It is also possible to undertake further specialised training in order to work with children and young people, or to apply for a research PhD.

Assessment methods

Masters research and dissertation stage: Research proposal, presentation, dissertation (20,000 words).

Facilities

We offer a suite of five spacious, dedicated rooms used by the counselling/psychotherapy courses, and a digital recording system for use in class.

Personal Therapy

There is no requirement for personal therapy during the Masters research and dissertation stage. Students on the Postgraduate Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy are required to have a minimum of 10 hours personal therapy for each of the two academic years.

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The MA by Dissertation consists of a 30,000-word thesis, researched and written over a period of one year full-time or two years part-time. Read more
The MA by Dissertation consists of a 30,000-word thesis, researched and written over a period of one year full-time or two years part-time.

Examiners

The dissertation is the sole component of this degree; there is no taught element. It is read by one external and one internal examiner. The external is an expert in the field in which the dissertation is written.

Result

There are no marks awarded and examiners decide solely on pass, fail or referral.

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The part-time course is suitable for registered nurses holding a degree and a Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing who want to top up to a full masters degree. Read more
The part-time course is suitable for registered nurses holding a degree and a Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing who want to top up to a full masters degree.

The course involves you completing a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits) on a subject of your choice, within a framework of independent learning and research, such as primary research, systematic/critical literature review or service development.

Your progress is supervised by an academic with expertise in your area of study. The course is driven by you so there are no timetabled study days, but you meet your supervisor at regular intervals for guidance and support. We also provide optional dissertation workshops and electronic resources are available through our learning centres.

The first part of the dissertation involves you submitting your proposal for academic approval. This rigorous formality ensures that your work meets all the criteria for a dissertation. Once approved, you can begin your dissertation and have up to three years to complete it.

Before you can start the dissertation, you need to have completed a postgraduate level research module. If you have not previously studied one, you can take our research methods for practice module (15 credits) and a 45 credit dissertation.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/msc-nursing-top-up

Course structure

Typically 1 year with a maximum of 3 years. We offer flexible start dates to suit you. Supervision sessions are arranged between you and your supervisor at mutually agreed times and dates. The research methods for practice module starts in January or September and can be studied through distance learning or class-based attendance.

Dissertation
-You complete a 15,000 word dissertation.

Research methods for practice
This module consists of three main sections
-Introduction to research principles.
-Overview of quantitative research methods.
-Overview of qualitative research methods.

Assessment: 15,000 word dissertation. The research methods for practice module includes written and other assessments.

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This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/. Read more
This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/

Increasingly, no matter how we live, we know this 'world' primarily through the experience of living within and between cities. These cities continuously produce new challenges for their inhabitants and administrators. In doing so, they also produce opportunities for understanding the constraints and potentials of both human and non-human life.

The MA Cities and Society is a research and training programme designed to support strategic interventions in urban governance, design, institution-building and change, as well as social-spatial development. Distinguished by it's theoretical rigour, integrity and amenability to experimental empirical research, the programme focuses particularly on:

The organisation of contemporary urban economies, including the production of built and virtual environments, physical and social infrastructure
The ways in which different forms of economic accumulation and economic practices impact upon cities, and how any city reflects a particular set of constraints and possibilities
The proliferation of technical systems, media, and practices of interpretation and organisation that change our notions about the ‘proper’ use of things and bodies
The intersections of finance, governance, ecology, and culture in producing multiple forms for assessing urban futures; particularly calculations of risk, sustainability, productivity and creativity
This programme covers the following disciplines: geography, anthropology, architecture, cultural studies, fine arts, media and communications.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Alex Rhys-Taylor.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

-Three core modules
-A specialist option module taken from the department's extensive list, or from the departments of Anthropology, Media and Communications, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Music, Educational Studies or the Centre for Cultural Studies
-A dissertation

Dissertation (60 credits)
In the summer term you complete a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff. 
The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Teaching

One hour lectures address the core themes of each module, followed by one hour seminars in small groups (under 20). You'll be encouraged to attend dissertation classes that train you in the basic principles of dissertation preparation, research and writing. You are also assigned a dissertation supervisor who will be available when you are writing the dissertation (approximately one hour contact time per month).

The main aim of the program is thus to explore new approaches to thinking about and researching the city formation and urban life. This can be broken down into three inter-related aims:

To promote an appreciation of the relevance of the social, sociological knowledge and ways of knowing in the understanding of cities, urban economy, culture and politics, and the management of social change, and to encourage critical understanding of interrelated concepts, debates and themes.
To enable students critically to engage sociological and geographical theories and methodologies relevant to the studies of cities and urbanities, controversies and social change, and conduct an intellectually informed sustained investigation.
To expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the Sociology and related departments and centres to provide a catalyst for independent thought and study.

Expert walks and seminars

The course is also accompanied by a series of expert 'London walks' spread across the year. These are led by a range of researchers from within the Centre for Urban and Community Research, as well as project managers and planners from organisations such as the Greater London Authority, and take students through the sites of that their work focuses on. The Centre for Urban Community research also holds regular seminars with a range of urban professionals, architects and academics from outside the university, giving the MA Cities and Society a spaces to join in with the Centre’s intellectual community.

Asssessment

Essays and dissertation.

MA granted on the completion of 180 CATS (all coursework and dissertation); Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education granted on the completion of 120 CATS (all coursework without dissertation); Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education granted on the completion of 60 CATS (the completion of two core modules).

Skills

Analytical and research skills that intersect basic sociological knowledge with that of architecture, the built environment, cultural and postcolonial theory, geography, planning, digital communications, and ethnography as they apply to the study of cities across the world.

Careers

The training in this programme is applicable to work in multilateral institutions, NGOs, urban research institutes, municipal government, cultural and policy institutions, urban design firms, and universities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc Degree in Pain Management is an inter-professional, e-learning programme intended for health care professionals who want to specialise in the field of pain management. Read more
The MSc Degree in Pain Management is an inter-professional, e-learning programme intended for health care professionals who want to specialise in the field of pain management. It is also aimed at educationalists to provide the appropriate knowledge and expertise on pain to teach others from various disciplines.

Pain is a multidimensional phenomenon and as such needs to be managed through multidisciplinary initiatives. These initiatives must be based on specialist knowledge, rigorous research and an advanced understanding of the physiological and behavioural concepts involved.

This two-year course begins by introducing you to the multifaceted nature of caring for patients who have pain. The modules are designed to provide you with the ability to understand the biopsychosocial aspects of pain and to evaluate the various approaches to assessing and managing patients in pain. Professional issues, including clinical governance and inter-professional practice, will be covered. The course is suitable for the needs of primary, secondary and tertiary care professionals.

E-learning assessment strategies enable students to focus on their areas of interest and are structured to allow students to evaluate the topic in relation to their practice and professional base.

Approximately 40 places are offered each year and the majority of students are self-funded, though some obtain awards from charities and trusts.  The course takes two years to complete inclusive of the dissertation component (nine months for the postgraduate certificate stage; nine months for the postgraduate diploma stage and a further six months for the dissertation stage).

There are no residential components in this course as it is purely e-learning - so there is no requirement to travel to Cardiff for course purposes. 

Distinctive features

• Inter-professional plus e-learning.

• The first postgraduate Diploma/MSc in Pain Management course to be developed.

• Emphasis on a biopsychosocial approach.

• Suitable for primary, secondary and tertiary care.

• A new primary care pathway is available within the MSc Pain Management to reflect the move of chronic pain services closer to people’s homes and this is facilitated and managed by an inter-professional, expert primary care faculty including leading GPs with a special interest in pain within the UK.

Structure

This part-time MSc consists of three stages – stage T1 (3 x 20 credit modules), stage T2 (3 x 20 credit modules) and stage R (60 credit research dissertation).

The total normal duration to complete the full MSc programme is two years (stages T1, T2 and R), from the date of initial registration on the MSc.

You may leave at the end of stage T1 with a postgraduate certificate, if you have obtained a minimum of 60 credits and have completed any required modules.

You may leave at the end of stage T2 with a postgraduate diploma, if you have obtained a minimum of 120 credits and have completed any required modules.

The dissertation is normally not more than 20,000 words. The subject of each student’s dissertation shall be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee.

Core modules:

Fundamentals of Pain Management
Biopsychosocial Principles in Pain Management
Research, Statistics & Evidence Based Medicine
Patient Case Studies - Options
Clinical Management - Options
Professional Issues - Options
Dissertation: Pain Management

Assessment

The assessments have been chosen to ensure that the learning outcomes are appropriately tested and provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate they have met them. Specific module assessment methods for each module shall be determined by the relevant Board of Studies and are detailed within the relevant Module Description.

There are a variety of formative and summative assessment methods used, such as:

Assignments
Wiki development
Blogs
Multiple choice questions
Group work
Development of guidelines / PowerPoint presentations.

The MSc dissertation stage will be assessed based on the final dissertation. Expectations for the format, submission and marking of the dissertation will follow the current Senate Assessment Regulations, supplemented where appropriate with additional requirements of the Programme/School/College and any specific requirements arising from the nature of the project undertaken.

Career Prospects

Many students have reported that attainment or current participation on the MSc led directly to promotion.  Many students were also stimulated to pursue academic careers via further study up to PhD.

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The aim of the part-time Executive MBA is to help you become a reflective practitioner by encouraging you to integrate the theories and knowledge gained from the programme with the skills, values and insights derived from experience you gained before and after the MBA. Read more
The aim of the part-time Executive MBA is to help you become a reflective practitioner by encouraging you to integrate the theories and knowledge gained from the programme with the skills, values and insights derived from experience you gained before and after the MBA.

Our Executive MBA consists of ten core modules, two elective modules and a dissertation. The programme runs for 28 months (4 taught semesters and a dissertation). It has been designed to meet the needs of experienced middle managers looking for ways to develop their understanding and knowledge of business.

The dissertation enables you to conduct an investigation into a significant challenge facing your organisation and produce practical recommendations for improvement.

You will benefit from insights from internationally renowned academics, industry experts and business practitioners and will learn with and from experienced managers from a variety of specialisms and sectors.

On completion of the programme you will have enhanced self-understanding and an ability to demonstrate leadership of your team and organisation.

Distinctive features:

• A programme designed to fit around work commitments, only requiring three days away from the office at any one time.

• You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.

• You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).

• You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

Structure

Our two-year part-time MBA programme has been designed to fit around work commitments, with modules delivered in weekday blocks of three days.

• Part one:

The structure of the degree consists of 12 x 10 credit modules in part one. This will consist of 10 core modules and a choice of two electives from three in any one academic session.

• Part two:

Part two will consist of a 60 credit dissertation which describes an individual piece of research work conducted within your own organisation or industry.

You will be expected to submit your dissertation no later than the January following the end of year two. This is to allow you to schedule your research work around the normal commitments of your employment and family life.

Year one

In year one you will undertake core modules and one optional module.

Intellectual skills are promoted within teaching blocks through presentations, the examination of case studies, group discussion, debate and assignment. The case study sessions will enable you to apply the theoretical concepts taught in the lectures to real-world contexts.

Core modules:

Corporate Finance
Operations Management
Marketing
Strategic Management
Organisational Behaviour
Leadership and Professional Development

Optional modules:

Business Analysis
Lean Thinking
Management Consulting

Year two

In year two you will take the following core modules and can choose one of the two optional modules not taken in the first year.

Upon successful completion of the taught modules you will undertake a dissertation based on a piece of research within your own organisation. The dissertation is submitted in January following the end of the second year.

Core modules:

Human Resource Management
International Business
Business Economics
Sustainable Business Management
Dissertation MBA Part Time

Optional modules:

Business Analysis
Lean Thinking
Management Consulting

Teaching

Our teaching is heavily informed by research and combines academic rigour with practical relevance. Our internationally leading faculty consists of academics who are at the forefront of knowledge within their field. They bring the lessons learnt from their most recent research into the classroom, giving you access to up to date real life examples and scenarios and critical business thinking.

Your teaching and learning resources will be provided and we will be responsive to your needs and views. For your part, you will need to put in the necessary amount of work both during and outside formal teaching sessions, and to make good use of the facilities provided.

The Executive MBA is taught in thirteen blocks of three days which typically run from 9am to 5pm. Once a module is completed you will have approximately four weeks to complete an assignment. A great deal of learning happens within the cohort itself as you learn about other sectors, and how to bring about organisational change, together.

Support

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the beginning of your studies. Your personal tutor will be able to give you advice on academic issues, including elective module choice and assessment. If you encounter any problems which affect your studies, your personal tutor should always be your first point of contact; she/he will be able to put you in touch with the wide range of expert student support services provided by the University and the Students' Union as appropriate.

The Executive MBA Programme Director is also on hand to provide advice and guidance and to help with any issues you may encounter whilst undertaking the course.

For day-to-day information, the staff of our Postgraduate Student Hub are available, in person, by telephone or by email, from 8am to 6pm each weekday during term time to answer your questions.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with regular feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback, personalised feedback on written work and generic written feedback.

When undertaking the dissertation/project you are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to review progress and discuss any questions. Your supervisor will be able to provide feedback on your research plan and drafts of your work as you progress.

Assessment

All modules are assessed by a written assignment of 3,000 words given to you at the end of each module. You will have around four weeks to complete each assignment.

You are also required to submit a 20,000 word dissertation.

Career prospects

If you joined us you would find yourself part of a group of roughly 20 managers from a broad range of organisations. Over the last few years this has included Admiral Insurance, Scottish & Southern Electricity, Deloitte, Cardiff Council, NHS, Amazon, General Electric, Fire & Rescue Service, and many other successful private and public organisations.

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Our MSc programmes in Economics will give you the opportunity to equip yourself with the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue a career in economics and related disciplines. Read more
Our MSc programmes in Economics will give you the opportunity to equip yourself with the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue a career in economics and related disciplines. The programme consists of a set of core and elective modules, culminating in a practice-based business project or a research-based dissertation.

Core and elective modules

You will study:
-Advanced Macroeconomics
-Advanced Microeconomics
Based on your prior knowledge and experience you will be streamed to study one of the following module pairings:
-Econometrics I and Econometrics II
-Econometrics I and Microeconometrics
-Econometric Methods and Microeconometrics
-Econometric Methods and Financial Modelling and Business Forecasting

You will then choose four elective modules. The list of modules may vary from year to year, but has typically included: Behavioural Finance and Economics; Development Economics; Econometrics II; Environmental Economics and Policy; Environmental Valuation; Experimental Economics and Finance; Game Theory; Industrial Organisation; International Economics; International Finance; Market Microstructure; Microeconometrics; Monetary Economics; Money and Banking; Natural Resource Management; Public Choice; Public Economics.

Dissertation/Business Project or Placement

In the third term you will complete a 12,000 word dissertation which may be undertaken as a consultancy project within an organisation, during a placement or with one of our international partner institutions. Supervised by a faculty member with relevant experience, you’ll investigate in greater detail a subject that you’ve already studied as part of your programme. This is an opportunity for you to develop your business insight and present your analysis and ideas in a scholarly and professional manner; combine critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the opinions of others.

Additional Resources

The School has made a significant investment in database resources to give you access to both live and historical data from providers which include Thomson Reuters, Bloomberg, Datasteam and Orbis. These state-of-the-art databases give you the opportunity to interrogate the financial records of millions of companies worldwide and add valuable insight to your research.

Adding to your experience

International Opportunities:
We’re proud of our strong international connections. Helping you get an inside perspective on global business is a key part of the programme. That’s why we offer a range of opportunities to help you immerse yourself in a country’s business and academic environment, make new contacts and stand out in a competitive job market. These include:
-Dissertation Abroad: If your ambitions lie beyond the UK, we offer a number of places on our unique Dissertation Abroad scheme. This will involve writing a dissertation at one of our international partner institutions in the period June to August. A number of scholarships are available.
-International Study Tour: We organise an optional International Study Tour to a European destination, typically Switzerland. This intensive programme takes place over several days, normally in March/April, and offers you a great opportunity to get an ‘inside perspective’ on international business, and to network with key staff within organisations.

Guest Speakers

As part of your programme, you have the opportunity to enjoy presentations by academics and practitioners within your chosen area of interest. Past speakers have included representatives of major global multinationals and leading academics , providing an ideal opportunity to gain practical knowledge and progressive insight.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, and practicals. Lectures provide key contents of a particular topic. Occasionally lectures might be delivered by guest speakers who are internationally recognised academic experts or practitioners in their field. Students can also attend the Durham Speaker Series, providing the opportunity to network with senior business leaders, staff and alumni.

Seminars provide the opportunity for smaller groups of students to solve problems and discuss and debate issues based on knowledge gained through lectures and independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practicals are medium sized group sessions, where students practice computer software, applying topics from lectures and seminars.

Students study 3 core modules including the dissertation, a further 2 compulsory paired modules (which vary depending on students’ prior knowledge) and 4 elective modules chosen from a list of options. This enables them to undertake more in-depth study of particular topics. The 12,000 word dissertation allows students to carry out independent research and develop their skills in analysis and scholarly expression, using an appropriate theoretical framework. They are supported in writing their dissertation through the study of research methods, and attending individual meetings with an allocated supervisor who monitors their progress and provides advice.

Academic Support:
-Throughout the year, students may have the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities. They also have the opportunity to attend an International Study Week at an overseas location at the end of Term 2, which gives students the opportunity to learn about the business, economy and culture of another country, gain an ‘insider perspective’ on international businesses and network with key business staff.

Learning Resource:
-Outside of timetabled contact hours, students are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study in preparation for teaching sessions, assignments and other forms of assessment including exams, and general background reading to broaden their subject knowledge. All students have an Academic Adviser who is able to provide general advice on academic matters. Teaching staff are also available to provide additional support on a one-to-one basis via weekly consultation hours.

Students also have access to the facilities available at Mill Hill Lane including dedicated postgraduate working spaces, an onsite library and IT helpdesk.

Other admission details

The University is under no obligation to make any offer of a place on the programme to any applicant, nor is the University obligated to fill all spaces available on the programme. Consideration of any application received by the University after expiry of the deadlines specified herein, shall be made at the sole discretion of the University. The Masters in Economics is designed for new or recent graduates. You should have a strong background in a related discipline.

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