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Masters Degrees (Nineteenth Century)

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The MA pathway in Nineteenth-Century Studies is an interdisciplinary programme for the study of nineteenth-century British culture which draws on modules in literature, history, music, and print culture and has contributions from cultural historians, literary scholars, and musicologists. Read more

The MA pathway in Nineteenth-Century Studies is an interdisciplinary programme for the study of nineteenth-century British culture which draws on modules in literature, history, music, and print culture and has contributions from cultural historians, literary scholars, and musicologists.

Introducing your degree

The MA pathway in Nineteenth-Century Studies will give you the opportunity to specialise in the culture and history of the nineteenth century. It is taught by world-leading experts in the period who are as passionate about the subject as you are, and is linked to the Southampton Centre for Nineteenth-Century Research. It will empower you to conduct advanced-level research and independent critical thinking in the field; to make effective use of archives, manuscripts, and research libraries; and examine how nineteenth- century literature and print culture shaped our understanding of education, class, consumerism, sexuality, science, economics, and more. Not only will you emerge with an internationally-recognised masters degree from a top Russell Group university, you will also acquire the critical thinking and writing skills that will give you the competitive edge, either as a future scholar or as a professional in areas such as secondary school teaching, librarianship, museums and galleries, publishing and roles in the heritage industry.

Overview

Our pathway in the Nineteenth Century allows you to specialise in the literary culture and history of the nineteenth century. It is taught by leading experts in the field and has a unique link to the Southampton Centre for Nineteenth-Century Research .

The MA English Literary Studies (Nineteenth Century) will enable you to work independently in the field; to explore how genres, authors, and texts participate in wider public discourses concerning class, race, gender, print culture, science, empire, and sexuality; and to evaluate unique publications and archival resources specific to nineteenth-century studies. It will develop your knowledge and understanding of critical and research methods appropriate to the period; raise your awareness of the historical and critical reception of literature and culture in the long nineteenth century; and empower you to explore the nuances of literary meaning in the contested cultural field of nineteenth-century public culture.

View the programme specification document for this course.

Career Opportunities

An MA in English Literary Studies is excellent preparation for a career in teaching, publishing and arts administration. Graduates of our programme go onto professional careers in writing (from journalism to fiction), education, international PhD programmes, teaching, broadcasting, and varied work in the creative industries. Former graduates and alumni return to give talks throughout the year, and you will help you make the most of the opportunities here.

A number of our graduates have gone on to careers in teaching, journalism, media and found the year-long course invaluable in shaping and developing their voice.



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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History.

MA Nineteenth Century Studies is designed to provide a methodologically informed study of 19th Century sources, including texts, objects and images. You will have the opportunity to make use of the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the literary manuscripts and extensive archive materials in the Tennyson archive at the Tennyson Research Centre.

You will have the chance to advance your knowledge of this historically significant period through themed modules which combine literature, history, visual and material culture, museum studies, religious studies, science history and book history.

As well as producing essays and presentations, you will have the opportunity to develop industry-relevant skills through projects, such as interpreting and documenting archives.

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Drawing on Birkbeck's position as a world-leading centre in the field of nineteenth-century studies, this MA offers you the chance to take a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to studying the literature, culture and history of Victorian Britain. Read more
Drawing on Birkbeck's position as a world-leading centre in the field of nineteenth-century studies, this MA offers you the chance to take a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to studying the literature, culture and history of Victorian Britain. You will encounter a compelling range of Victorian texts, contexts, themes and ideas on a degree course that does justice to the energy and variety of the Victorian period.

Two core modules, Progress and Anxiety, 1789-1859 and Modernising Victorians, introduce some of the most significant debates, ideas and events of the long nineteenth century, and offer you the chance to develop new critical approaches to Victorian studies. Weekly seminars take you from the French Revolution to the Boer War and investigate topics such as the discovery of geological time, movements for social and political reform, the aims and limits of realist fiction, the Great Exhibition, Darwinism, aestheticism, the religious imagination and the Gothic revival.

These compulsory courses are supplemented by a wide range of option modules, which allow you to pursue your own interests in the field of Victorian Studies and beyond. Recently offered option modules are listed below.

Students in their final year of study have the chance to take an internship module. Successful interns spend a term working with one of London's Victorian cultural institutions, gaining first-hand experience of working in the cultural sector and using their host institution's archives to develop a unique research project. Previous interns have worked with the Dickens House Museum, the Salvation Army Heritage Centre and Archive, and the Guildhall Art Gallery, and have developed their projects into funded doctoral research topics.

A schedule of visiting speakers and other events, organised by Birkbeck's Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, ensures that you have the opportunity to engage with leading Victorian studies specialists from around the world, and are welcomed into one of the country's liveliest research communities.

Staff teaching on this MA include:

Professor Hilary Fraser
Professor Laurel Brake
Professor David Feldman
Dr Nicola Bown
Dr Carolyn Burdett (Course Director)
Dr Luisa Calè
Dr Julia Laite
Dr David McAllister
Dr Emily Senior
Dr Heather Tilley
Dr Ana Parejo Vadillo.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Explore this fascinating period through a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together literature, visual art, history and cultural studies.
Our graduates have an impressive record in competing for Arts and Humanities Research Council awards for research degrees.
Our lively Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies organises a dynamic range of year-round events that showcase the research of Birkbeck's academics, researchers and students, including our annual Dickens Day and our Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies. The Centre also established, and for many years hosted, the London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar.
Read 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, our free, open-access online journal that celebrated its tenth anniversary in November 2015 with a special issue on 'The Nineteenth-Century Digital Archive'.
Read more about our Dickens's Our Mutual Friend project, which culminated in November 2015 as part of the tenth-anniversary celebrations of 19.
Birkbeck is at the geographical centre of London's research library complex, a short distance from the British Library, the University of London Library, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.
The University of London Library has an outstanding collection of literary periodicals of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Studying English Literature at postgraduate level opens up a whole host of vibrant and intellectually stimulating avenues to explore. Read more

Studying English Literature at postgraduate level opens up a whole host of vibrant and intellectually stimulating avenues to explore.

At this level, English literary texts from the medieval period to present day are studied in and alongside their many different contexts – historical, social, political and/or material – and approached from a multitude of theoretical and methodological perspectives, enabling you to develop new and highly skilled ways of reading and interpreting a wide variety of cultural documents.

Our innovative programme draws on the wide-ranging research expertise of our staff in order to develop your critical and analytical skills in the field of literary and cultural studies. The programme allows you to take a general route, choosing core and optional from a variety of literary periods, or take one of a number of pathways, each focusing on a different historical period from the medieval through to the contemporary.

Please note: We offer additional opportunities to specialise in medieval literature via the MA Medieval Studiesand MRes Medieval Literature.

Course details

This programme will provide a solid grounding in the key intellectual debates within the scholarship surrounding a range of period and context specialisms, introduce you to the latest research in the field, and support your development of the skills required for writing a dissertation.

It includes a mixture of core and optional modules taken across the autumn and spring semesters.

Alongside the programme you will also have the chance to participate in a bespoke MA conference and become part of the department’s thriving academic research community.

Core modules 

Your core modules will either be from the same pathway, if you are specialising in a literary period, or can be chosen from different pathways if you are taking a general route through the degree.

  • Medieval pathway: Meeting Medieval Manuscripts; Understanding Medieval Literature
  • Reformation to Reform pathway: Writing Revolutions 1: Politics, Publics, and Professionalism in Literary Culture, 1580-1700 and Writing Revolutions 2: Politics, Publics and Professionalism in Literary Culture, 1700-1832
  • The Long Nineteenth Century pathway: Approaches to Nineteenth-Century Studies; Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century
  • Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literature: Modernism; Contemporary Literature.

All pathways also include a compulsory ‘Research Skills’ module. For full descriptions, see 'modules' below.

Optional modules

You will choose optional modules from a range covering a variety of authors and themes from the medieval period to the 21st century. If you are following a pathway through the MA, one of your options can be taken from outside your literary period. If you are following a more general route through the degree you can pick optional modules from any literary period.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by written assignment although some also require a presentation.

Over the course of the year you will also complete a supervised 15,000-word dissertation, with support from a supervisor. In order to complete your dissertation you will undertake independent research which may be based on (but will certainly extend) work undertaken for previous modules in the programme. There should be some element of originality to the research and staff will support your research in this regard; work should also aim towards making some contribution toward the field of study.

Please note: this programme outline relates to 2017/18 and is subject to change in future years.

Learning and teaching

You will be supported by literature staff in the department who research, publish, and teach across the full chronological range of English Literature from Old English to the present day, helping you to explore your specific interests.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: English Literature

Birmingham's English Literature postgraduates develop a range of skills including presentation, communication and analytical skills, as well as the ability to work independently, think critically and develop opinions.

Over the past three years, over 94% of English Literature postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Many of our graduates go on to further study or academia, while others use their transferable skills in a wide variety of occupations including copywriting, PR, marketing, publishing and teaching.



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The MA in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture explores the dynamic relationship between literary texts of the long 19th century (1789-1914) and the fascinating culture from which they emerged. Read more

The MA in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture explores the dynamic relationship between literary texts of the long 19th century (1789-1914) and the fascinating culture from which they emerged.

Why Study Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture with us?

The Department of English, housed in a Grade II-listed Vicarage designed by John Douglas, in a University founded in 1839 and officially opened by Gladstone in 1842, has longstanding teaching and research strengths in 19th-century literature.

Our course is taught by a dedicated and experienced team of tutors with expertise in a wide range of areas, including Romantic poetry; the Sensation novel; detective fiction; the Gothic; and 19th-century Irish, American and South African literature. Our research publications include work on Shelley, Coleridge, the Brontës, Dickens, Collins, Eliot, travel literature, women and material culture, the Victorian periodical press, literature of the Great Famine, colonialism, Neo-Victorian literature, and representations of the body.

What will I learn?

The course offers a wide-ranging exploration of the representation of ideas such as revolution, crime, the body, gender, performance, domestic life, religious belief, nationality, empire, science, technology, and medicine, in 19th-century literature and culture.

Authors studied may include Austen, Shelley, Dickens, Gaskell, Alcott, Conan Doyle, Zola, Wells, and Conrad. You will also have the opportunity to develop your own research interests and expertise through the Research Methods module and your Dissertation.

How will I be taught?

Nineteenth-Century Literature, Nineteenth-Century Culture, Research Methods, and Special Author(s)/Topic(s) will be taught by seminars (typically nine seminars per 20-credit module, and 18 per 40-credit module). For the Dissertation, you will work one-to-one with a supervisor.

Total workload (including reading, preparation, seminars, tutorials, research, and writing) is approximately 37.5 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by coursework, including essays, research portfolios, presentations, and a 16,000-word Dissertation. There are no formal exams.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



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The MA in English Literary Studies offers several different pathways each specialising in a period or area of study, and enabling students to craft a degree that suits them. Read more

The MA in English Literary Studies offers several different pathways each specialising in a period or area of study, and enabling students to craft a degree that suits them:

  • English Literary Studies which allows study across a range of periods and subjects
  • Early Modern Literature including Shakespeare and the Renaissance
  • Romantic and Victorian Literature
  • Modern and Contemporary Literary Studies including Film and Media
  • Critical-Creative Writing which combines critical approaches to writing with the practice of writing itself, including fiction and poetry
  • Literary and Cultural Studies which is taught with the Department of Sociology and explores contemporary debates in cultural theory

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Combination of coursework, dissertation and research methodology portfolio



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Britain was the world’s earliest modern democracy, its first industrial nation and, until the era of the superpowers, the greatest modern empire. Read more
Britain was the world’s earliest modern democracy, its first industrial nation and, until the era of the superpowers, the greatest modern empire. Even today, Britain retains global reach, known for its cultural innovation, its economic power, its particular brand of politics, and its sustained international ambitions.

On this MA, you will study British history from the nineteenth century to the present, and develop an advanced understanding of historical approaches and research methods. You will also have the opportunity to take part in the high profile activities of the Mile End Group (MEG). Working with the School of History, MEG has unrivalled links to government, think tanks, the media and industry.


This programme will:

- Expose you to the major themes in 19th, 20th and 21st century British history and will challenge you to think about how historians research and explain them
- Concentrate on politics, contemporary politics, international affairs, war and its memory, gender and emotions
- Allow you to design a bespoke programme that reflects your interests
- Give you exceptional research skills

Why study Modern and Contemporary British History at Queen Mary?

Our high-quality teaching is inspired and informed by our research, and carried out in a friendly atmosphere. Our academic staff have outstanding research reputations and include six Fellows of the British Academy, the former President of the Royal Historical Society and two recipients of the French distinction of the Ordre des Palmes Académiques.
We have been renowned for excellence in the modern and contemporary history of Britain for over 25 years. Now, with 15 British historians, the School of History have research and teaching expertise from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first and their research specialities range from the history of government and politics, foreign affairs and war to gender, emotions, medicine and psychology.

The Mile End Group seminar series attracts major speakers from national politics, the civil service, industry and the media. Recent speakers include Sir John Major, Dame Eliza Manningham-Buller, Jeremy Paxman, Lord Melvyn Bragg, Lord Douglas Hurd and John Bercow MP. They are an unrivalled forum in which students work and study and gain access to influential figures.
Members of the School co-convene seminars at the Institute of Historical Research and host regular international symposia.

-We have an excellent reputation for research and teaching in modern and contemporary British history
-Three fully funded Mile End Group bursaries are offered annually
-Our London location is close to research libraries, the Institute of Historical Research, and the National Archives

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The MLitt in German Studies is a one-year taught programme run by the Department of German in the School of Modern Languages. The programme is aimed at those looking to expand their understanding and knowledge of the literature, culture and history of German or to continue at PhD level. Read more

The MLitt in German Studies is a one-year taught programme run by the Department of German in the School of Modern Languages. The programme is aimed at those looking to expand their understanding and knowledge of the literature, culture and history of German or to continue at PhD level.

Highlights

  • Students receive a carefully balanced combination of training in advanced research techniques and skills, an overview of the state of the art of German studies and specialisation in any area of German studies.
  • You will have personal access to teachers with expertise in a wider range of areas in German Studies (medieval literature, the nineteenth century, realism, historiography, cultural memory and film).
  • Teaching is geared towards encouraging and directing independent research.
  • You will be part of our friendly department and thriving and a close-knit postgraduate community, with many students from our partner university in Bonn.
  • The course offers access to teachers with expertise in a wide range of areas in German Studies including medieval literature, the nineteenth century, realism, historiography, cultural memory and film.

Teaching format

The taught portion of the course consists of five compulsory modules involving literary theory, research skills, and German literature and culture. Classes are delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and fortnightly tutorials, with class sizes ranging from individual one-to-one teaching up to 20 students. Modules are assessed through coursework; there are no final exams for this programme. 

You will spend the summer months focusing on researching and writing a final dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MA in Gender and Women’s Studies and English combines teaching and scholarship in Gender and Women’s Studies and in English Literature. Read more

The MA in Gender and Women’s Studies and English combines teaching and scholarship in Gender and Women’s Studies and in English Literature. This is a unique MA for students interested in Gender and Women’s Studies who want to pursue literary studies or who have a particular interest in women’s literature or feminist literary theory.

Students take core courses in each of the disciplines and can choose from a range of optional courses in addition to these. This combination is administered from the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies - one of the largest centres in the UK for feminist research, gender studies and women’s studies.

Taught jointly with the http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/english-and-creative-writing/, the programme is run by the http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sociology/research/research-centres/centre-for-gender-and-womens-studies/, part of the Sociology Department at Lancaster and one of the largest centres in the UK for feminist research, gender studies and women’s studies.

As an MA student, you will be immersed in the busy academic and social life of the centre, and part of a supportive and dynamic community of students and researchers from across the world. It is an ideal environment in which to learn and carry out research – and allows you to meet other scholars and activists, take part in seminars and workshops, and exchange ideas and insights with world-leading feminist and literary academics.

Graduates from this MA are now working in universities throughout the world, having used the programme as a springboard to PhD study. Others have gone on to work in local and national government, in public-sector, non-governmental or voluntary organisations, or are teaching in schools and colleges.

Find out more about the http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sociology/research/, research centres and conferences that make studying in the Sociology Department at Lancaster so stimulating.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. Read more
As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world.

It combines a focus on both the local and the global author through compulsory modules contextualising the variety of ways in which Dickens engaged with the social, cultural and political issues of his age. Interdisciplinary approaches are employed, using Dickens as a focus, to consider the relationships between19th-century fiction and journalism, the Victorians’ engagement with material culture, and their fascination with the body and its metaphors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/219/dickens-victorian-culture

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation on a subject related to Dickens and/or Victorian culture between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In 2015 the following three specialist modules were available: EN836 Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel, EN876 Dickens and the Condition of England, EN835 Dickens, the Victorians and the Body. Students would be required to take at least two. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide excellent postgraduate-level study that deepens and extends your understanding of work in the field of Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of studies in Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your research skills in the relevant field so as to provide a pathway for you to undertake PhD work in the area of Dickens and Victorian culture

- build upon and extend an already-established reputation at Kent for distinction in the learning and teaching of Dickens and Victorian culture.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/staff).

- Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid:

Lecturer in English and American Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture, especially representations of nature and the environment, time, history, queer theory; sublimity; ecology and psychogeography.

- Dr Sara Lyons:

Lecturer in Victorian Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture; Victorian poetry and critical prose; fin-de-siècle aestheticism and decadence; the interrelations between literature, religion, secularism in the long nineteenth century.

- Professor Wendy Parkins:

Professor of Victorian Literature
Victorian modernity; gender and sexuality in the 19th century; the Victorian novel (especially Dickens, Gaskell, Collins); literature of the fin-desiècle period; aestheticism and William Morris.

- Dr Catherine Waters:

Professor of 19th-Century Studies
Victorian literature and culture, especially fiction and journalism; Dickens; Sala; George Eliot; literature and gender.

- Dr Sarah Wood:

Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature
Creative critical writing; 19th and 20th-century poetry and fiction, especially Robert Browning and Elizabeth Bowen; writing and visual art; literary theory; deconstruction, especially Derrida; psychoanalysis; continental philosophy.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline. Read more
Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline.

Students will be able to appreciate the differences in garden-making over time and in different countries, from the 16th century to the present day in Britain, Europe and America. Emphasis will be on design and management, ownership, and the culture from which these examples have evolved.

This degree will provide an academically rigorous environment in which students will learn a range of academic research and writing skills. Teaching will be undertaken at the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/), with a strong emphasis on tutor/student interaction in class. There will be practical sessions at museums and libraries, as well as visits to gardens in London. There will also be an optional field trip to Italy in the spring.

Structure

The course will be run on a full-time basis over one year. Teaching will take place on Thursdays from 10:00 to 17:00 and will be divided between two terms. The third term will be dedicated to dissertation preparation and writing. Please get in touch if you would like to see the full timetable.

Students must complete core module 1, core module 2 (selecting three options from the six provided), and core module 3 - a 15,000 word dissertation in order to be awarded the full MA.

However, there are a range of options available for flexible study:

Those wishing to pursue this course on a part-time basis can complete Modules 1 and 2 (the taught elements of the course) in their first year and Module 3, the dissertation, in their second year
Module 1 can be undertaken as a standalone unit leading to a PGCert, the credit for which can be banked should the student wish to complete the MA at a later date (within a prescribed time frame) Please enquire for further details.
Module 1: Researching Garden History (60 credits)

The first term will showcase the huge variety of resources available to study garden and landscape history from archaeology, architecture, cartography, horticulture, manuscripts, paintings and other works of art, from the sixteenth century to the present day.

Sessions include:

Early maps of gardens (British library)
Garden Archaeology (Hampton Court)
Gardens and Architecture referencing Drawings Collection at the RIBA and V&A
The Italian Renaissance and English Gardens
The eighteenth century garden + visit to Chiswick House
Gardening and Photographic images
Assessment

A 5,000 word report on the history of a garden chosen by the student and an accompanying presentation.

Module 2: Culture and Politics of Gardens (60 credits)

This module consists of six optional units of which students must choose three.

These sessions aim to:

Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of gardens and landscapes in different countries
Develop students’ critical analysis and judgement
Demonstrate the importance of context and the relationship of garden and landscape history to other disciplines such as literature, social history, film and visual media and the history of ideas
The module will look at Historiography, theory, the connection between culture and politics in landscape making and the expansion of the skills of term one across regional boundaries.

For instance, the influence in Britain of the Italian Renaissance’s new ideas on garden making, including architecture, sculpture and hydraulic engineering; iconography in gardens and landscapes; formality in garden-making as an indicator of the power of the owner, from the sixteenth century onwards, as in France; different aspects of the ‘natural’ garden from the eighteenth century onwards; conflict between the ‘natural’ and the formal in the nineteenth century between William Robinson and Reginald Blomfield in Britain; gender and garden making; and shifting boundaries between architect, landscape architect and plantsman relating to the status of those designing gardens and landscapes in the 21st century.

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Group A
French gardens of the seventeenth century
The evolution of the English garden in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries

Group B
The eighteenth-century garden
The American garden

Group C
The Suburban Garden in England between the wars
Twentieth- and twenty-first-century gardens

Please note: Optional units are subject to change. Please consider this a guide only.

Assessment

Two 5,000 word assessed essays on two of the three options taken, and an assessed student presentation on the outline of the intended dissertation.

Module 3: Dissertation (60 credits), 15,000 words

Mode of study

12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

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This pathway of the MA in Literary Studies aims to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the literature of nineteenth-century Britain and its relationship to a wide variety of cultural, intellectual, geographic and historical contexts. Read more

This pathway of the MA in Literary Studies aims to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the literature of nineteenth-century Britain and its relationship to a wide variety of cultural, intellectual, geographic and historical contexts.

The core module which is at the centre of this pathway, Nineteenth-Century Literature: Romanticisms, will engage you in the study of notions of Romanticism throughout the nineteenth century, and consolidate your knowledge of Romantic and Victorian literature.

In particular, you will study some of the ways in which writers sought to understand Britain’s place in European and global contexts, and in terms of the example of Classical civilisations; attempts to engage with radicalism and revolutionary change; the development of new forms and literary movements, and the adaptation of established genres to ensure the continuing importance of literature in a self-consciously modern age; notions of influence and intertextuality in the context of Romantic and Victorian writing.

While the core module gives you a strong grounding in this field, the flexible structure of the MA will offer you the opportunity to pursue your wider interests by studying three options from the large provision of the department, choosing at least one of these in an area that is relevant to nineteenth-century literature. Core module and options will draw on a variety of medias (verbal, visual, filmic). Both the core module and the options are taught by leading specialists of the subject.

You will be able to further develop your interest in Romantic and Victorian literature and culture through a 15,000-word dissertation to be submitted at the end of your programme of study. 

Modules & structure

Core module

In addition to the core module and dissertation, you also take three option modules. Please visit the website for more information.

Skills

You'll develop transferable skills, including:

  • enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
  • the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
  • the ability to organise information; the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to pursue careers in:

  • publishing
  • journalism
  • public relations
  • teaching
  • advertising
  • the civil service
  • business
  • industry
  • the media

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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The programme offers a high quality student experience through a strong programme of study within the field of Church History, encouraging the student to explore in depth a range of topics relating to the history of the Christian church from its inception to the present. Read more
The programme offers a high quality student experience through a strong programme of study within the field of Church History, encouraging the student to explore in depth a range of topics relating to the history of the Christian church from its inception to the present.

Course Overview

The School is part of a university which was established in 1822, with Church History having been a core subject in the theological curriculum from the beginning. Drawing on expertise throughout the Faculty of Humanities, our staff has an international profile in scholarship with published expertise in monasticism and medieval Christianity, Protestant nonconformity, nineteenth century and twentieth century religious thought as well as Christianity in Wales.

The School of Theology, Religious Studies and Islamic Studies has a vibrant research culture and MTh students are encouraged to participate in research seminars.

There are two parts to the MTh. Part I consists of six taught modules, on completion of which the student progresses to Part II, a 15,000 word dissertation. The MTh comprises three compulsory modules and three options, devised in such a way as to equip the student with essential knowledge of key aspects of the Christian tradition, along with a dissertation on a specialist topic of the student’s choice.

The Compulsory modules comprise Study Skills which introduces students to the basic skills needed to be a successful researcher including how to access and utilize bibliographical resources. Two further modules at the start of the programme provide the student with an overview of two key epochs in Christian history, namely the patristic or early church period, and the Protestant Reformation. The Church Fathers and the Making of Doctrine introduces the way in which Christian faith developed and was formularized by its leading theologians and thinkers during the first five centuries while The Reformation provides an insight into the way in which Christian Europe responded to the challenge of renewal during the sixteenth century and beyond.

The student is required to complete three of the four option modules which cover medieval Christianity (Cîteaux and the Growth of the Cistercian Order and St Thomas Beckett: Archbishop, Martyr, Saint), popular Protestantism during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (The Evangelical Revival in England and Wales), and religion and society during the twentieth century (Christianity, Culture and Society in Twentieth Century Britain).

Modules

-Study Skills for Theology and Religious Studies
-The Church Fathers and the Making of Christian Doctrine
-The Reformation
-The Cistercian World 1: Citeaux and the Growth of the Cistercian Order
-Thomas Becket: Archbishop, Martyr, Saint
-The Eighteenth Century Evangelical Revival in England and Wales
-Christianity, Culture and Society in Twentieth Century Britain
-Dissertation

Key Features

The programme is based upon an established pool of expertise in related concerns, and covers a range of projects undertaken over a number of years:

Staff are research active and regularly attend academic conferences.

Study cutting edge areas of academic interest

The staff expertise represents a considerable bank of knowledge and skills that will underpin this programme and will ensure student experience a high quality educational experience.

In addition Students will benefit from the:
-Opportunity to specialise in the chosen area of Church history
-We have a long and distinguished tradition of specialist teaching in church History
-Vibrant research culture

Assessment

Assessment is usually based on written work in the form of long and short essays, reports, book reviews and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

The programme has been designed to attract students interested in developing both their generic as well as their subject-specific skills. It offers opportunities for students who have recently graduated to move on to work at level 7 in their specialist field of study and help prepare them for careers in education, ministry and research. The programme also offers excellent continuing professional development for teachers at various stages of their career, ministers currently in pastoral charge seeking further professional development and other interested parties. In addition, the programme will be attractive to students who wish to study out of personal interest or faith commitment.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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