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Masters Degrees (Neuroradiology)

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This course is about the relationship between brain function and mechanisms that underpin behaviour. Computational neuroscience uses data to construct models of brain function. Read more

About the course

This course is about the relationship between brain function and mechanisms that underpin behaviour.

Computational neuroscience uses data to construct models of brain function. Cognitive neuroscience and human imaging relate function to its underlying neural substrate.

The course includes a long research
project which gives you the chance to carry out an in-depth imaging study. The computational and analytical skills you’ll learn are great preparation for a PhD.

The course takes students from both life sciences and the physical sciences and engineering. Appropriate training is given to ensure all students can master the required skills and complete the course successfully.

For the taught component of the course, students choose one of two options: either a pathway focused on mathematics, computational neuroscience and MR-physics or a pathway focused on ethics, clinical neurology, neuroradiology and neuroanatomy, which includes a practical human brain dissection course.

Where your masters can take you

You’ll develop the skills and knowledge for all sorts of careers. Many of our graduates continue to PhD level. Others work as research associates and assistant psychologists for employers such as universities and the NHS. Throughout your course, you’ll have frequent reviews with your tutor to discuss your learning needs and objectives.

Applying psychology in the real world

Our ongoing collaborative projects with hospitals, mental health care units, the police and prison service, and several leading firms in business and industry will show you how psychology can be applied in the real world.

You’ll also benefit from our research excellence. We don’t just focus on one or two specialisms – with active researchers in most areas of psychology, we are consistently one of the highest-ranked research departments in the UK.

Our facilities

Whatever your particular interest, we have the facilities for your research. Our research environment was rated amongst the best in the country in the last national assessment. We are exceptionally well resourced for research in Social and Health Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Developmental Psychology, with a dedicated suite of rooms for different participant groups.

To give you the right tools for your research, there is a fully equipped neuroscience unit with excellent facilities for brain imaging, neuroanatomy, electrophysiology, behavioural neuroscience and computational neuroscience. We have access to a small-bore MRI device and to the University’s MRI facility for human studies.

Studentships and bursaries

Please contact us for the latest funding opportunities.

Careers

The course is designed to prepare you for a PhD, but your experience could land you a job in the private sector as a lab technician or a developer.

Core modules

PATHWAY 1

Fundamentals of Cognitive Neuroscience; Fundamentals of Neuroscience; Computational Neuroscience 1: biologically grounded models; Mathematical Modelling and Research Skills; Brain Imaging and its Physical Foundations; Applied Neuroimaging, Neurophysiology and Psychiatry.

OR

PATHWAY 2

Fundamentals of Cognitive Neuroscience; Fundamentals of Neuroscience; Ethics and Public Awareness of Science; Neuroanatomy and Neuroradiology; Brain Imaging and Clinical Neurology; Applied Neuroimaging, Neurophysiology and Psychiatry.

Teaching

Teaching is through lectures, seminars and laboratory classes.

Assessment

There are examinations at the end of semesters one and two, written coursework and an extensive empirical research project over the summer.

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This MSc is specifically aimed at those pursuing a professional career in neuroimaging, either in clinical practice or in neuroscience research. Read more
This MSc is specifically aimed at those pursuing a professional career in neuroimaging, either in clinical practice or in neuroscience research. This multidisciplinary programme provides training in both the basic scientific and technological principles of modern neuroimaging methods, and in their application to understand neurological function and neurological disorders. Study by distance learning is also available.

Degree information

Students will develop a foundational knowledge of neuroanatomy, understand the principles and main technical aspects of neuroimaging instrumentation and data acquisition, basic image processing and image analysis techniques, and gain a good working knowledge of modern methods for scientific and clinical investigation of the human nervous system using neuroimaging.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), a library project (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma is offered for Full Time, Part Time and Distance Learning modes. This consists of six core modules (90 credits) and a Library Project (30 credits). All of the Advanced Neuroimaging modules are considered core modules. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Introductory Science and Methods
-Imaging Modalities
-Advanced Imaging
-Foundational Neuroanatomy, Systems and Disease
-Pathology and Diagnostic Imaging I
-Pathology and Diagnostic Imaging II

Please note: every face-to-face module has a distance learning equivalent with alternative learning activities.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake a library project which is assessed by a 5,000-word project, and a laboratory research project which culminates in a 10,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught by lectures and workshops delivered by experts in various clinical and technical fields of neuroimaging. Assessment is through written examination, coursework, presentations, research project, dissertation and viva voce. Distance learning students may spend up to three months in London carrying out the research project and receiving relevant training and mentoring. Alternatively they may carry out an extended systematic review of the literature related to a chosen field within neuroimaging. In exceptional circumstances students may carry out the research project remotely if they are based at a hospital with established research links with Principal Investigators at the UCL Institute of Neurology.

Careers

Graduates of the programme will have developed the necessary knowledge and skills essential for a future research career in the areas of neuroradiology, imaging neuroscience or neuroimaging technology.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Doctor, Addenbrooke's Hospital (NHS) and studying Radiology, University of Cambridge
-Research Assistant, National Tsing Hua University
-Hospital Consultant, Epsom Hospital (NHS)
-Radiographer, East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust
-Trainee Radiologist, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Employability
Students on this programme are immersed in a world-class clinical and scientific environment, taught by leading experts in the field. For clinicians, and professions allied to healthcare, the programme will equip them with a sound understanding of neuroimaging techniques. For medical physicists it will enable them to develop their theoretical understanding in an internationally renowned centre. A number of high-achieving students on the programme will be offered the opportunity to undertake a paid internship at a London-based company which runs neuroimaging clinical trials.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The focus of this degree is neuroimaging of neurological disease. Together with our associated hospital, the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, the UCL Institute of Neurology promotes research that is of direct clinical relevance to improved patient care and treatment.

With its concentration of clinical and applied scientific activity the institute is a unique national resource for postgraduate training in neurology, its associated disciplines and the basic neurosciences. During their time at Queen Square students will have the opportunity to contribute to world-leading research and have access to cutting-edge neuroimaging facilities.

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Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. Read more
Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. In Neuroscience it is being increasingly used to study the physiological correlates of mental processes. In Clinical practice it plays a prominent role in the detection and diagnosis of neurological and psychiatric illnesses and in the evaluation of new treatments. The techniques are getting increasingly sophisticated and as a result there is a high demand for well-trained professionals.

Our Neuroimaging MSc is one of only a few programmes dealing with modern neuroimaging in the UK. It is exceptional in its focus on practical and biomedical aspects of Neuroimaging. The success of the program is reflected in the success of our students with 60% either in further higher education, or fully employed in the first year after degree completion. This figure rises to 100% within 3 years of the degree.

The Neuroimaging MSc is designed to provide students with the background knowledge and technical skills to design, analyze and evaluate imaging data. The Neuroimaging MSc focuses on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based techniques, including functional MRI, anatomical imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, and Spectroscopy. Imaging techniques will be discussed with reference to relevant applications. The programme puts a strong emphasis on practical skills. In a dedicated computer lab, the students will learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Under supervision of our world-class academic staff, students will design their own imaging based studies, which will be run using the in-house 3T MRI scanner. Additional classes will provide students with a broad scope of professional skills.

The Neuroimaging MSc is especially suited for:
students interested in pursuing an Academic career in the field of Neuroimaging;
students looking to find a job as research staff in industry or academic labs involved in translational research;
medical professional, looking to develop skills in a new emergent technology and research field;
students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science who want to move into cognitive or clinical neuroscience;
students with a background in psychology or biology who want to improve your technical skills for a neuroscience career.

Content
The core of the Neuroimaging MSc consists of two modules on Neuroimaging. The first module concentrates on methodological aspects. It includes an introduction to the physics of MR imaging, the physiological basis of functional signals, processing and analysis of imaging data and the design of research studies. The second module provides an in-depth introduction to a number of specialized imaging techniques used to understand the biology of brain function in health and disease. The latter module aims to illustrate the use of imaging in the context of translational and clinical studies of disease processes affecting the human brain.

Both modules combine formal lectures, and computer-based laboratories, in which students learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Weekly practical labs and programming classes are held in a dedicated computer laboratory available to all students. The work done in the lab sections constitute 50% of the grade in first module, and 30% of the grade in the second module. The latter also includes student-led discussion of published scientific and clinical research.

In the weekly Bangor Imaging Group (BIG) meeting, academic staffs, postdocs and students discuss current research. All MSc and PhD students propose their research here.

Additional optional modules provide an in-depth view of several content areas of cognitive and clinical neuroscience (see below). Students are also welcome to attend weekly review of clinical scans performed at the local hospital for the purpose of patient recruitment and a monthly neuroradiology conference where cases of clinical interest are discussed. Journal-clubs and research meetings concerning fMRI, EEG, and TMS methodologies are open to all students.

Students are also required to take at least one additional module in advanced statistics or advanced computing. The module Communicating Research completes the curriculum by training students in a broad scope of professional skills.

The Bangor Imaging Unit houses a state-of-the-art 3T MRI machine, available for student projects. Setups for the measurement of eye-movement, arm and hand movement, and physiological parameters are also available.

In the beginning of the year you will choose your academic supervisor. The supervisor will be responsible for helping you plan, design and draft your research thesis. From your project proposal you will review the relevant literature, and formally outline your study. In the weekly Bangor-Imaging Group meeting we learn about and discuss proposed, ongoing and completed studies and important new publications in the field. Moreover, all MSc and PhD students present their proposed plan of research in this forum. Thus, you are tightly integrated into the research environment at the Bangor Imaging Unit, and profit from interactions with older PhD students, post-docs, and other supervisors. Your final research project is conducted over the summer months, most likely using the in-house, research-dedicated 3T MRI scanner. The course ends with the successful submission of your research thesis.

Structure
The Neuroimaging MSc consists of two parts. Part one comprises taught modules over two semesters. You are required to take the two core modules in Neuroimaging, which include a large component of laboratory work. You will also choose two 'content' modules, each designed to provide knowledge and promote understanding in a specific core area of neuroscience. You also take three 'skills' modules designed to hone your research skills. In addition, you will partner with one of the academic faculty in order to jointly develop a research proposal for your thesis. On successful completion of Part One, you'll proceed to Part Two (in the third semester), when you will carry out your research study and write your thesis.

Research Thesis
The thesis is the 'crown' of the Neuroimaging MSc and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others.
Career Prospects

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The MPhil in Radiology is entirely research-based with students undertaking a project in one of the active research themes in the Department, currently. Read more
The MPhil in Radiology is entirely research-based with students undertaking a project in one of the active research themes in the Department, currently: MRI, Hyperpolarised MRI, PET, Imaging in Oncology, Breast Imaging and Neuroradiology. The MPhil degree is examined by research dissertation (up to a maximum of 20,000 words) and oral examination.

The University Department of Radiology is fully integrated into Addenbrooke's Hospital and students will work with both University and NHS specialists in their research area. Being able to work well as part of a team is essential, but students must also be self-motivated. They will be working under a supervisor who will guide them through their research project.

In addition to the research training provided within the Department, as part of the Graduate School of Life Sciences students will have access to several other courses to widen their experience and to enable them to acquire additional practical skills. Students are also likely to attend external meetings and conferences.

The Department may accept one or two MPhil students each year.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvrdmpmsc

Course detail

The MPhil course in Radiology is exclusively research-based. The research area and supervisor will be confirmed during the application process. Students will conduct their research with both University and NHS specialists in their field of study and may be co-supervised by someone on the Addenbrooke's staff.

Format

Supervisions are usually weekly for about an hour.

Students are likely to attend research group meetings where research results are presented and discussed.

Students are expected to attend the weekly Radiology Forum lecture (Wednesdays at 5.00 p.m.).

Students may be involved in the recruitment of patients onto trials and help to monitor their progress. Depending on their training, students may also undertake some basic procedures, such as sample collection.

There may be an opportunity to participate in small group teaching if this is relevant to the student's project. More general small group teaching may be available.

The Departmental Journal Club meets during lunchtime every two weeks in term time.

Students are expected to undertake a literature review relevant to their chosen research project.

There are radiology conferences in the UK and overseas throughout the year. If a student has developed his or her research to a sufficient level to coincide with a relevant conference, then there could be the opportunity to present a poster.

The supervisor will provide feedback to the student each term. The feedback will relate to the progress the student has made as well as specific comment on their research project. This will be discussed with the student in advance of the submission of the report to the University.

Assessment

The MPhil is examined on a written research dissertation (up to 20,000 words) and a viva.

In addition to the research dissertation, there is an oral examination on the research project conducted by internal and external examiners appointed by the Faculty Degree Committee.

Continuing

Those who wish to progress to a PhD after completing an MPhil will be required to satisfy their potential supervisor, Head of Department and the Faculty Degree Committee that they have the skills and ability to achieve the higher degree.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding via a Departmental research grant may be available. If it is, a studentship will be advertised on the University's web-site (http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/?category=6) as well as the Department's web-site (http://radiology.medschl.cam.ac.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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