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Development Studies is a dynamic field concerned with processes of change in the South - social and economic, political and cultural - and the major policy challenges they present to efforts to overcome poverty and insecurity. Read more
Development Studies is a dynamic field concerned with processes of change in the South - social and economic, political and cultural - and the major policy challenges they present to efforts to overcome poverty and insecurity. At SOAS, we seek not only to understand the major drivers of development, but also to critically evaluate them with a view towards informing more just and equitable approaches.

Course detail

This programme will provide you with a solid interdisciplinary social science formation in development theory and practice and will develop your capacity for independent and critical analysis. The emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and NGOs.

You will also have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective on issues such as: neoliberalism and its critiques, industrialisation, labour and capital, state failure, poverty and insecurity, gender and class analysis, and commodity chains and trade.

You will join a worldwide network of people who are passionate about thinking about and working towards development and equality for all.

Expert at where the world is changing

Many of our staff come from development practitioner backgrounds and this informs what we teach. We are all engaged in field research, which routinely sends us to places where development policies and approaches touch people’s lives in direct ways, and we draw on this experience in the classroom.

We regularly engage in a wide range of research with international development institutions, including United Nations agencies and NGOs, on crucial topics such as labour, violence, neoliberalism, peace and development, migration, development policy, aid and poverty reduction.

Format and assessment

The MSc Development Studies has four components: two compulsory modules (Political Economy of Development and Theory, and Policy and Practice of Development); one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Please see Postgraduate Modules for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department. For a full list of modules offered, please see the Postgraduate Handbook, available on the Development Studies homepage (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/).

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

Careers

A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. Read more
This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Students will gain a broad empirical knowledge of the diverse societies of Latin America and the Caribbean from the perspective of at least two disciplines, together with an awareness of the general patterns of differences and commonalities in the histories, politics, economies and cultures of the different linguistic territories of the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All option modules are subject to availability.

Core modules
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules - students choose four option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Democratisation in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Key Economic Thinkers of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Latin American Political Economy
-The Making of Modern Latin America: History, Politics and Society
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-Society and Development in Latin America
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-Latin American Economics: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Environmental Issues, Movements and Policies in the Americas
-International Politics of Latin America
-From Silver to Cocaine
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a topic relating to the Caribbean, or Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, independent reading and research. Assessment is through varied assignments including essays, an oral presentation and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master's students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.
There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance and international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Employability
Students will have excellent opportunities to expand professional networks enhancing their future employability. Through Institute staff members' extensive contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the diplomatic service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent graduates have found employment in government (Foreign & Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position at the core of academic study of the region in the UK, promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

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Providing a thorough grounding in the classical traditions of social and political theory, this MA addresses key concepts and ideas that are central to the analysis of contemporary society, politics and culture. Read more
Providing a thorough grounding in the classical traditions of social and political theory, this MA addresses key concepts and ideas that are central to the analysis of contemporary society, politics and culture. These include debates over the basis of contemporary capitalism, neoliberalism and biopolitics, and the fundamental socio-biological question of what it means to be ‘human’.

The programme anchors many of these debates and concerns within the history of social and political thought. You’ll study two core modules. The first — State, Capitalism and Market — reflects analytically and critically on capitalism and its recurrent crises, particularly the recent financial crisis. The second core module — Politics and Social Theory — focuses on the concept of ideology as a defining feature of politics, and especially the role that both religion and science have played in constituting modern political ideologies.

We also encourage you to pursue your own substantive interests by choosing from a wide range of optional modules. Questions can be explored through personal research in your final dissertation project. Following the course, you’ll be well-placed to move into a wide range of careers including teaching, media, accountancy, public and charitable sectors.

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Are you keen to develop your understanding of international relations and European politics, focusing particularly on the EU’s position in the context of the wider global political economy?. Read more
Are you keen to develop your understanding of international relations and European politics, focusing particularly on the EU’s position in the context of the wider global political economy?

You can choose to explore in depth either International Relations or International Political Economy. A core module on Europe and the World gives you the opportunity to contemplate questions on the role of the EU within the context of neoliberalism, foreign policy, human rights and the current economic crisis. Assessment combines academic essays with more policy-oriented assignments (e.g. policy reports), developing a wide range of academic and career-relevant skills.

Our recent IPEU postgraduates have advanced into careers in diplomacy, think-tanks, academia and roles within international institutions and NGOs.

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This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. It is also highly relevant to anyone working, or intending to work, in development advocacy, policy making, and global development policy analysis, in the NGO sector, government agencies, and international development organisations.

We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, but we also welcome students who have worked in the area of development, or in a related field.

This exciting programme offers a critical examination of the contemporary process of globalisation and how it influences the developing world, both before and after the ongoing global crisis. The MSc Globalisation and Development blends, in equal measure, critical analysis of mainstream thinking, alternative theories and practices, and case studies of political, social and cultural aspects of globalisation and development.

This degree draws its strength from the unrivalled expertise at SOAS in development problems and processes. The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in how globalisation influences the developing world, and how the poor majority responds to these challenges.

Highlights include:

- Critical and historical approaches to globalisation and their relationship to neoliberalism, imperialism and US global hegemony.

- Contemporary globalising processes – capital flows, state-market relations, transnational corporations, global commodity chains, inequality and poverty on a global scale.

- Transformation of work in the age of globalisation – new types of work, informalisation and precarisation, labour migration, agrarian change and gender relations.

- Globalisation and imperialism – post-Cold War imperial and civil wars, global and regional challengers to US hegemony: China and Russia.

- Globalisation, democracy and culture – human rights, democratisation, cosmopolitanism, standardisation, homogenisation.

- Alternatives to neoliberal globalisation – global labour movement, transnational social movements and NGOs, environmental issues.

Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see 'Structure' for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Globalisation and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying optional modules to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 76kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/file101725.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Globalisation and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions. An MSc in Globalisation and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Global issues of environment, security and development have never been so important. Read more

Programme Overview

Global issues of environment, security and development have never been so important. A long war on terror with no end in sight, ongoing structural economic inequalities on a global scale, and the threat of climate change have brought questions of Western interventionary practices, neoliberalism and environmental sustainability to the fore. The MA in Environment, Society and Development is designed to enable students to synthesize both theoretical and practical concerns in bringing critical thinking to these vital challenges. The programme involves engagement with a number of core areas in critical human geography, including issues of geopolitics, development and political ecology, and exposes students to global concerns that encompass a complex and dynamic mesh of environmental, social and economic processes.

Field-Based Learning

Running through the MA is an overarching aim to impart understanding of how different philosophical and ideological approaches to environment-society relations influence policy formulation and implementation. In this context, our hope is to empower students to become critically informed by, and ethically engaged with, the various geopolitical, social, economic and environmental processes that shape the world in which we live. The practical emphasis of the MA is reflected in a field-based learning module in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where students intersect with the development work of UN agencies, and range of CSOs and NGOs. In connecting with the work of UN agencies like the United Nations Development Programme, a key challenge for students involves thinking through the scalar nature of all forms of development, in which initiatives on the ground are framed by broader geopolitical, economic and institutional structures that both enable and hinder development in complex ways.

Career Opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a range of workplaces including government departments, non-governmental organizations, planning and environmental management agencies and specialist research and policy institutes. The transferable and problem-solving skills gained from the field-based learning practices embedded in all modules are a particular strength for graduates. Each year, students gain vital experience working on the ground in Bosnia and Herzegovina with a variety of international development practitioners and local community leaders. Since its inception, the programme has had ICOS and other international students from a range of countries, including Ethiopia, Germany, Italy, Malawi, Norway, Russia, Sri Lanka, UAE, UK, USA and Vietnam. Many have gone on to work in NGOs and UN agencies and, in addition, to pursue PhD research in leading Geography Departments across the world. In terms of a critical human geography Masters, the depth and breadth of the programme puts students in a very strong position in applying for PhDs, and post-MA we strongly encourage applications, internationally, nationally and here at NUI Galway, where Geography has strong research clusters in Geopolitics and Justice and Planning and Sustainability.

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This MSc examines the theoretical and empirical issues raised by globalisation and its effects on Latin American economic development. Read more
This MSc examines the theoretical and empirical issues raised by globalisation and its effects on Latin American economic development. The programme highlights the importance of Latin American countries as dynamic emerging markets and explains the ways in which Latin American economic development is bound up with social and political processes.

Degree information

Students will gain a broad understanding of different theories of globalisation, key academic debates on economic growth and development, and current policy challenges to sustained and equitable economic growth in Latin America. Our programme prepares students for independent research, rigorous analysis of primary and secondary sources, and advanced level writing; and to foster students’ intellectual development and independent learning abilities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits).

Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core modules
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean
-Globalisation and Latin American Development: Latin America in the 21st Century

Optional modules - students choose four optional modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Democratization in Latin America
-Latin American Political Economy
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-From Silver to Cocaine: The History of Commodities in Latin America
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a research topic of their choice related to globalisation and economic development in Latin America.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, independent reading and research, seminar discussions and research skills training. Assessment is through essays, term papers, presentations, analytical exercises and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.
There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Some graduates from the MSc have gone on to PhD studies, while others have put their research skills to good use working in the policy sector. In terms of commercial opportunities, the alternative energy sector has provided employment for our graduates in recent years. Journalism is also a popular career path and the MSc has been used as a stepping stone into positions with global news agencies, broadcasting corporations and media groups. Many students find employment with NGOs and charitable organisations - working to improve the prospects of marginalised social groups in the region.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Partnership Officer, Imperial College London
-Economist Editor, The Economist
-Research and Policy Analyst, UK Collaborative on Development Sciences (UKCDS)
-Analysis Intern, AKE

Employability
Globalisation and Latin American Development MSc graduates will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. Numerous programme graduates have found employment in industry, state agencies and the third sector via these routes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of the Americas has the largest programme of teaching, research and events on the Americas in the UK, covering Latin America, the Caribbean, Canada and the United States.

In addition to tuition by world-leading scholars, students benefit from access to a wide range of events, seminars, and conferences on the Americas delivered by scholars, policy makers, diplomats, activists and other experts on the region.

The institute provides a unique environment in which to study the Americas and excellent networking opportunities are available through our strong links with academic, cultural, diplomatic, policy and business institutions with interests in the region.

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The Latin American Politics MSc provides students with an opportunity to develop their general and specialist knowledge of major issues in the politics of Latin America. Read more
The Latin American Politics MSc provides students with an opportunity to develop their general and specialist knowledge of major issues in the politics of Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Students will develop a detailed understanding of the political histories of major Latin American countries, key public policy issues, the challenges of democratisation and democratic consolidation, and the domestic and international influences on political developments in the region. They will gain the key research and analysis skills necessary for professional development in the field of Latin American politics.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (15 credits each), four optional modules (60 credits in total), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All option modules are subject to availability

Core modules
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean
-Democratisation in Latin America

Optional modules - students choose four option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
-Students may choose a maximum of 30 credits from other departments or from other University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a research topic of their choice (linked to the subject area of one of their taught modules), provided that as it contains a substantial politics focus.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, research skills training, and independent reading and research. Assessment is through essays, group and individual presentations, analytical exercises and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects. There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance, international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Risk Consultancy Intern, Control Risks
-Conference Producer, Euromoney Institutional Investor
-Project Manager, World Energy Council (WEC)

Employability
Students on this degree will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent programme graduates have found employment in government (the Foreign and Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In the UK the Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position in the academic study of the region in promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and it provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the social sciences and the humanities.

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This MA provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs. Read more
This MA provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Depending on their chosen areas of specialisation, students will develop analytical and critical perspectives in multidisciplinary aspects of Latin American anthropology, cultural studies, literature, economics, geography and environmental issues, as well as history, politics and international relations. They will gain key research skills, together with in-depth knowledge of current debates in the field of Latin American Studies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), five optional modules (75 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core module
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules - students choose five option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Confronting the Colossus: US Anti-imperialism, 1945-present
-Democratization in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-Students may choose a maximum of 30 credits from other departments or from other University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a research topic of their choice linked to the subject area of one of their taught modules.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, research skills training, and independent reading and research. Assessment is through essays, group and individual presentations, analytical exercises, and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects. There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The Institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance, international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Global Events Director, FC Business Intelligence
-Administrative Assistant, NHS (National Health Service)
-Production Manager, Red Bee Media
-International Observer, Declined to say

Employability
Students on this degree will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent programme graduates have found employment in government (Foreign and Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In the UK the Institute of the Americas occupies a core position in the academic study of the region in promoting, coordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MSc provides a detailed and systematic understanding of the international relations of the Americas, with regard both to inter-American relations and relations with the world beyond. Read more
This MSc provides a detailed and systematic understanding of the international relations of the Americas, with regard both to inter-American relations and relations with the world beyond. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

This programme, which is unique in the UK, introduces students to skills essential for the analytical study of the international relations of the Americas and assessment of the hemispherical and global issues currently facing foreign policymakers in the nation states of the Americas.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits). Please note: all option modules are subject to availability.

Core modules
-International Politics of Latin America
-Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy
-Either Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean
OR
-Researching the Americas: The United States

Optional modules - students choose three option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Politics of US Foreign Policy
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America
-US Presidents and the Presidency
-The Making of Modern Latin America: History, Politics and Society
-Latin American Economics: Beyond Neoliberalism
-The Culture Wars: Arenas and Issues in Contemporary US Political Conflict
-Confronting the Colossus: US Anti-Imperialism, 1945-present
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-Latin American Political Economy
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-Key Economic Thinkers of Latin America
-Democratization in Latin America
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-Race and US Foreign Policy

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, independent reading and research. Assessment is through written assignments including essays and primary source analysis, and a dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master's students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects. There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance and international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Employability
This MSc enhances employability for those interested in careers in the diplomatic service, think tanks, journalism, and business with Americas markets.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position at the core of academic study of the region in the UK, promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas - Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

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This newly launched MA in Consumption, Culture & Marketing is an interdisciplinary masters programme that draws together content and teaching from the subject areas of marketing and sociology. Read more
This newly launched MA in Consumption, Culture & Marketing is an interdisciplinary masters programme that draws together content and teaching from the subject areas of marketing and sociology. The programme explores claims that our contemporary world can be best understood as a consumer society and a brand culture and explores how marketing and consumerism increasingly define our experiences, social relationships and civic infrastructure. As such we seek to analyse marketing behaviour with a view to better understand how it functions as a determinative mode of production and mediation whose influence reaches well beyond spheres of consumer behaviour and marketing management and into the realms of politics, culture and the environment.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/management/coursefinder/maconsumption,cultureandmarketing.aspx

Why choose this course?

We live in an age that is often described as a Consumer Culture, as though the primary way in which we relate to each other and understand ourselves is through our own consumer behaviour. In such a world everything becomes reconfigured according to the logic of marketing and branding. This course looks in-depth at the claims of a Consumer Culture and seeks to understand it and will engage in a number of theoretical areas: branding, marketing, bio-power and neoliberalism. In short, this is a programme that seeks to develop understandings of the world in which we now live.

Department research and industry highlights

- ESRC project - Branded Consumption and Social Identification: Young People and Alcohol
- ESRC Seminar Series Award for Motherhoods, Markets and Consumption 2009-2010

Course content and structure

You will study three core units and and three elective units (one in Marketing and one in Sociology) over the first two terms. In the third term you will complete a dissertation.

On completion of the programme graduates will have:
- Considered a wide range of theoretical issues relating to contemporary lives that form the basis of marketing practice.
- This knowledge may be useful for a career in marketing professions however the primary motivation for students should be the desire to understand.
- An opportunity to pursue a research career; or use their studies to augment and progress their current careers in fields such as marketing, education, health and social care, journalism, development, social policy and politics.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, group projects and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including:
- Senior Associate at Bank of China International
- Reporter at Xinhua News Agency
- Senior Associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers
- Finance Officer at Ealing Borough Council
- Relationship Manager (Investments) at Barclays Bank

This taught masters course equips postgraduate students with the subject knowledge and expertise required to pursue a successful career, or provides a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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International Political Economy(IPE) (some prefer Global Political Economy) is a vibrant and rapidly growing field of study. It has always been concerned with the connections between politics and economics, the national and the global, under conditions of globalisation. Read more
International Political Economy(IPE) (some prefer Global Political Economy) is a vibrant and rapidly growing field of study. It has always been concerned with the connections between politics and economics, the national and the global, under conditions of globalisation. More recently, IPE has become an especially productive field for critical social science research into such pressing global issues as world poverty, inequality, gender relations, economic crises, and the environment. The MA in IPE at Manchester reflects the research interests and strengths of our IPE specialists in the Politics discipline area, and focuses on introducing students to a broad range of orthodox and critical theories, and to the politics of globalisation today, through two compulsory modules. Students can then take a range of optional courses that examine specific issues relating to global governance, development and inequality, gender, environmental politics, global production and work, finance (or financialisation), capitalist diversity, ideology (including neoliberalism), economic crisis, and the politics of resistance and revolt - among others.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

Facilities

The School of Social Sciences is in a purpose-built building which allows 24/7 access and there are dedicated areas in the atrium with computer terminals.

Read less
International Political Economy(IPE) (some prefer Global Political Economy) is a vibrant and rapidly growing field of study. It has always been concerned with the connections between politics and economics, the national and the global, under conditions of globalisation. Read more
International Political Economy(IPE) (some prefer Global Political Economy) is a vibrant and rapidly growing field of study. It has always been concerned with the connections between politics and economics, the national and the global, under conditions of globalisation. More recently, IPE has become an especially productive field for critical social science research into such pressing global issues as world poverty, inequality, gender relations, economic crises, and the environment. The MA in IPE at Manchester reflects the research interests and strengths of our IPE specialists in the Politics discipline area, and focuses on introducing students to a broad range of orthodox and critical theories, and to the politics of globalisation today, through two compulsory modules. Students can then take a range of optional courses that examine specific issues relating to global governance, development and inequality, gender, environmental politics, global production and work, finance (or financialisation), capitalist diversity, ideology (including neoliberalism), economic crisis, and the politics of resistance and revolt - among others.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

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