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The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural world and contemporary journeying. Read more
The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural world and contemporary journeying. The course focuses on the application of writing skills to match the requirements of the travel and nature writing sector. To this end, students will learn from engagement, encounter, workshop, tuition and mentoring; they will develop their professional practice and produce a portfolio of work to help establish their careers in this highly competitive field.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

This is a low residency course over three semesters. It will normally consist of three week-long residential sessions, meeting visiting writers and industry specialists; distance learning modules designed to familiarise participants with the standards, interests and publishing requirements of the sector; one-to-one tutorials and mentoring providing the opportunity to turn experience into well-crafted writing of publication standard.

MODULES

The course begins with an intense six-day residential session for induction, introduction to distance learning, taught modules and mentoring sessions. The first two semesters involves writing regular pieces which are critiqued by tutors and peers. Through a business and context module, students can explore the ethics, history and development of a particular area of travel or nature writing. The second residency takes place in January or February. Throughout the course students will develop a portfolio of their best work and a journal tracking their submissions to publications; in this they will be supported by a mentor. The third residency will involve fieldwork, normally outside the UK.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Face-to-face seminars during intensive residency weeks, individual tutorials, directed study in writing and rewriting, online tutorials, Wikis, discussion boards, tutorial and peer critiques. Students will read extensively and are expected to be familiar with the subject and its contextual literature.

TUTORS

Bath Spa University can draw on the experience of professional writers, tutors and industry professionals of the highest standard.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The course totals 180 credits: modules in the first semester account for 30 credits, the second semester also accounts for 30 credits, professional practice develops through semesters one and two accounting for 30 credits and the portfolio amassed throughout all three semesters accounts for 90 credits.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The course is designed to introduce students to the workings of various travel and nature writing publishing opportunities and prepare them for the submission of their own work. It will also equip them with the practical and business skills to operate as freelance writers.

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Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?. Read more
Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?

Our MA in Creative Writing at Northumbria offers you the opportunity to explore your writing craft at an advanced level. You’ll gain a solid grounding in the techniques and skills of writing fiction, learn how to critique your own work and experiment with your writing voice.

A combination of core and option modules gives you the chance to develop your critical and analytical thinking. This course builds on your passion for creative writing, enhancing your career prospects as you develop a portfolio that reflects a broad range of genres.

You’ll graduate as a critical thinker with skills that will help you make a big difference in your chosen area of work and creative practice.

This course can also be taken part time, for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-writing-dtpcwr6/

Learn From The Best

Creative Writing at Northumbria enjoys international recognition for the quality of teaching and research, and our publications in Creative Writing and English Studies are ranked 15th in the country for their quality, by the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Our Creative Writing team is made up of award-winning novelist and poets, who are major figures in their field. Furthermore, through our partnership with New Writing North, the foremost literary promotion agency in the north of England, we give you opportunities to meet and learn from agents, publishers, and writers from across the country.

Teaching And Assessment

We aim to challenge you, to offer new insights and ways of thinking, while providing a firm grounding in creative writing techniques. You’re encouraged to experiment with and develop your own writing voice while being aware of the demands of the writing industry.

Workshops, seminars, critiquing sessions and small groups led by writers and editors provide an intellectually stimulating environment within which you can develop confidence in literary forms and techniques.

You’ll produce a portfolio of creative writing, including an accompanying commentary for assessment for each module. This is a substantial body of work that demonstrates your ability to develop your own writing voice and edit your own work.

You will build up your skills through core and option modules assessed by formative (non-graded) and summative (graded) assignments. A virtual learning platform (Blackboard) offers you space to share ideas, engage with interactive tasks and access online resources including reading lists.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7010 - Approaches to Writing (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7011 - Creativity (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7012 - Experiments in Form (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7020 - Professional Practice: Writing in an Industry Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7023 - Writing Research 1 (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7024 - Writing Portfolio (Core, 60 Credits)
EL7025 - Writing Research 2 (Optional, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Humanities at Northumbria is composed of three subject teams: History, Literature & Creative Writing, and English Language & Linguistics, and is also developing strengths in the fields of American Studies and Heritage Studies.

The Humanities department is made up of a community of learners all the way through from first year undergraduate to final year PhD level. All Humanities staff are engaged in research and actively create the knowledge that is taught in the department. Our Creative Writing team are all published and highly acclaimed for their work.

Creative Writing students, as part of Northumbria’s Humanities department, have access to the new Institute for Humanities which houses a range of specialist research resources. You’ll also get the chance to work with a range of cultural partners including New Writing North, who provide unique opportunities for creative writers.

The research of the Institute brings together the disciplines of Art History, American Studies, Creative Writing, English Language and Linguistics, English Literature, History and Media Studies.

Research-Rich Learning

We are recognised for world-leading research in all our Humanities’ disciplines. Our staff have attracted major funding from Research Councils UK as well as the British Academy, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

Northumbria is rated in the UK top 15 for the quality of its English Literature, Language and Creative Writing publications. You can explore some of the key themes here.

The Creative Writing team work across a range of genres and their interests encompass everything from identity, displacement and narratives of cultural difference to astronomy and visual perception, and how we represent animals in language.

You will join a lively community that regularly gives public readings and, through our association with the regional writing agency New Writing North, is formally involved with the Durham Book Festival and the Northern Writers' Awards.

Furthermore, you will have the opportunity to engage with the activities of the Institute for Humanities, which is home to five international journals and which regularly hosts an exciting range of seminars, symposia and conferences on topics as varied as Memory, Heritage and Identity; Transnationalism and Societal Change; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities; and American Studies.

Give Your Career An Edge

Employability, in the form of critical and creative skills, presentation skills and reflective and evaluative abilities, is embedded into your course. You will be able to demonstrate that you are self-motivated, show initiative and personal responsibility, and possess a thirst for independent learning.

During your course, you’ll be in constant contact with a range of professionals working in the arts and creative industries, helping you to build up networks and gain relevant experience.

All modules play a crucial role in developing the advanced skills and attributes necessary for employment, including effective time and workload management, oral and written communication, teamwork and creative analysis of complex problems. The core module, Professional Practice, is designed to give you insight into the world of literary publishing.

You will graduate with a qualification which may enhance your promotion prospects in professions such as the literary industries, partnerships and agencies, marketing and advertising.

Your Future

Given the postgraduate nature of this course the tutors (all published writers themselves) will be looking for signs of the ability to write at a professional level.

MA graduates have achieved notable success. Dan Smith publishes novels for adults and younger readers, most recently Boy X. Celia Bryce is an acclaimed novelist whose book Anthem for Jackson Dawes was nominated for the Carnegie Medal in 2014.

Helen Laws is a highly successful TV scriptwriter who originated 32 Brinkburn Street for BBC TV and has written for Casualty, Eastenders, Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps, Shameless and Doctors. She says the MA taught her the importance of story and gave her the confidence to keep trying.

There are also opportunities for you to advance your studies further with advice in writing PhD and funding applications available.

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This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Read more
This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. The programme, located in the School of Humanities and Cultural Industries, has become established as one of the leading courses of its kind.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.

The MA in Creative Writing is concerned with imaginative writing, which includes novels, short stories, poetry and non-fiction. The emphasis is upon encouragement, to help you to find and pursue a direction in your writing, and to understand the process of offering a manuscript for publication.

Because of the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who, every year, form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers. Frequent visits by other writers, literary agents, publishers, broadcasters and other professionals connected with writing ensure that students are given plentiful advice about how to place work and make decisions about their careers as writers.

The course is not for the writer whose only interest is in their own work, but rather for the writer who can benefit from working closely with fellow students and with tutors, many of whom are practising and published writers.

In recent years, several current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; Two were long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, three for the Orange Prize, one for the Costa Prize and one for the Guardian First Book Award. One received the Betty Trask Prize; another the Manchester Book Award; another a W.H. Smith New Talent Award. One reached the best-seller lists. Student poets have had their poetry accepted for publication in numerous literary journals, including Ambit, Magma, London Magazine, Poetry Wales, PN Review and The Reader, among others, and have been placed in such competitions as the Bridport, the Frogmore, Mslexia, and Writers Inc. Janklow and Nesbit Ltd, a leading literary agency, awards an annual prize for the best novel or novel in progress by a student on the course.

It is implicit in the course philosophy that critical reading aids the development of writers. Workshops, in which you look constructively at each other’s writing, and context modules, to study the ways in which writers meet certain challenges, are integral parts of the course.

MODULES

The full MA programme consists of two writing workshops, two context modules and the Manuscript (a double module):

Workshop One - You can either start with a general writing workshop in which you experiment with a range of forms, or a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Workshop Two - This is a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Context Modules - These modules examine genres and look at ways in which writers meet challenges from the public world. At least five of the following are offered each term:

• Writing and the Environmental Crisis
• Suspense Fiction
• Contemporary American Writing
• The Writer and Place
• Modernism and Postmodernism
• Writing and Gender
• The Short Story
• Writing and Politics
• Reviewing and Journalism
• Narrative Non-Fiction
• Genres of Television Drama
• The Love Story
• Writing for Young People

The Manuscript - For this module each student brings a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. You are assigned a specialist tutor.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Students take two three-hour seminars a week for the workshop and context modules. The Manuscript is completed between June and September. Students meet tutors regularly during this period. A residential writing weekend is an essential part of the course.

TUTORS

Tutors include prestigious, best selling and award winning writers, such as Gerard Woodward (novelist and poet); Tim Liardet (poet); Tessa Hadley (novelist); Andrew Miller (novelist); Carrie Etter (poet); Samantha Harvey (novelist); Steve May (radio dramatist, playwright and novelist); Richard Kerridge (nature writer); Paul Evans (nature writer); Lucy English (novelist and poet); Mimi Thebo (novelist); Jonathan Neale (novelist, dramatist and non-fiction writer); Tricia Wastvedt (novelist); Celia Brayfield (novelist); Jenni Mills (novelist); Neil Rollinson (poet). In addition you will have the opportunity to meet a wide range of writers, publishers and literary agents.

VISITING WRITERS

Readings and seminars conducted by writers are built into the programme. Visiting writers have included Moniza Alvi, John Burnside, Stevie Davies, Helen Dunmore, Roy Fisher, Peter Flannery, Nick Hornby, Michael Hulse, Emyr Humphreys, Kathleen Jamie, Mimi Khalvati, Toby Litt, Tony Lopez, Benjamin Markovits, Les A. Murray, Tim Pears, Ashley Pharoah, D.B.C. Pierre, Jem Poster, Philip Pullman, Fiona Sampson, Michael Schmidt, Matthew Sweeney and Fay Weldon. There will also be visits from publishers, literary agents and broadcasters. Every year there are opportunities to show work to agents and editors who visit.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment is by coursework only. Each writing workshop is assessed on the basis of a folder of creative writing and an early draft of part of the Manuscript. Each context module is assessed on the basis of an essay and a folder of creative responses. The Manuscript is 35,000–40,000 words (or the equivalent for poetry and scriptwriting).

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This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. Read more
This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. This is in both terms of a distinctive philosophy of writing (to answer the question, ‘What kind of writer am I?’), and in terms of the practicalities of making creative work public.

You should have some experience of writing fiction, poetry or prose (although there is not a requirement for this work to have been published), or scriptwriting, and wish to further your skills within the academic context of creative writing as an academic discipline. You will work with a core team of professional writers and other professionals to develop your creative work and nurture an understanding about the nature of your continuing creativity, aiming towards producing a final manuscript for possible publication.

What will I study?

You will begin straight away to experience the benefits of the regular workshops that form an integral part of the programme. You will discuss the work of others on the MA as well as learning from their discussion of your work. You will also receive tutor feedback.

You will study a variety of contemporary literature which will feed into your writing where needed, along with a study of the poetics of contemporary writers (that is, the things writers have written about their own writing philosophies and practices). The aim is to influence your practical development, allowing you to develop your own poetics and philosophy of composition.

In the first weeks of the course you will research markets and outlets for your work and complete submissions of your writing. You will also compile a professional development audit of your activities so far (which may not be extensive, of course). You will be asked to keep a log throughout the programme to enable you to track your development.

How will I study?

The writing workshops are always taught in small groups, but the discussion groups involve seminars with a lecture component.

During the manuscript module (a dissertation) you will work one-to-one with your manuscript supervisor, bringing your months of study to a final creative fruition. All the modules you will take have been designed specifically for writers.

This is not the kind of ‘Creative Writing’ course that requires you to pick from already existing English Literature modules. The modules have been custom-designed for you.

How will I be assessed?

You will present your creative writing with a short example of poetics relating to the piece. You will write about works of contemporary literature and about the poetics of these writers, though you will approach these tasks from the perspective of a fellow-writer. All this work will help you develop towards the final piece of work, The Manuscript. The professional development audit and logs will be marked on a pass / fail basis.

Who will be teaching me?

A team of seven, with extensive experience in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, short stories and scriptwriting teach on the programme. The team will be complemented by visiting speakers and visiting writers.

What are my career prospects?

The thinking behind the professional development strand is that writers seldom exclusively work as writers, but need to learn to combine their principal involvement and passion for literary composition with other activities (whether they are of a literary nature or not).

Of course, as a Masters in a humanities subject you will find this qualification useful in a variety of professional contexts, such as in school teaching, which encourages staff to work at Masters level. It provides a sound basis for further study (e.g. PhD work in Creative Writing).

Previous graduates have gone on to publish with major publishers, win prizes, edit magazines and books, and are active in the pedagogy of Creative Writing as a robust academic discipline.

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Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. Read more
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. You explore literature across time, geography, and genre, combining scholarly research with innovative, practical ways of engaging with texts.

You grapple with the challenges of conducting research into Shakespeare and other early modern literature, acquiring specialist skills in archival research, palaeography, and the study of rare and antiquated books. You study materials on 18th century drama and literature, visiting the UK’s only surviving Regency Theatre to investigate how architecture affected the content of drama, and how drama reflected Georgian society. You have the opportunity to explore the history of genres such as the novel and lyric poetry, and study a truly extensive range of work; your reading takes you from African American literature, through Caribbean literatures, to the literature and performance of New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow and London.

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have been Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Our Department is a vibrant conservatoire of scholars and practitioners who are committed to unlocking creative personal responses to literature. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning novelists, poets and playwrights, as well as leading literature specialists.

Our academic staff specialise in a range of areas including modernism, comparative and world literature, Shakespeare, the Renaissance, modernism, travel writing, nature writing, translated literature, cultural geography, Irish and Scottish writing, U.S. and Caribbean literatures, and the history of reading.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City (optional)
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean (optional)
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

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Essex is one of the oldest inhabited areas of the British Isles, a landscape shaped by human history. Our MA Wild Writing allows you to explore this landscape and the wilder landscapes of Britain, as well as those across the world, through a combination of science and literature modules. Read more
Essex is one of the oldest inhabited areas of the British Isles, a landscape shaped by human history. Our MA Wild Writing allows you to explore this landscape and the wilder landscapes of Britain, as well as those across the world, through a combination of science and literature modules. Our field trips take you outside the classroom, often in sun, sometimes in snow or rain. You gain an understanding of key environmental challenges while building your own ways of approaching writing about the wild: creative, critical, and scientific.

One of only five universities in the UK to offer a taught postgraduate course on literature and the environment, we are unique in our combination of modules on contemporary nature writing, ecocriticism, and psychogeographic literature.

Our full-year focus on writing about landscape, place, and the environment allows you the choice of focusing on developing your scholarly abilities through exploring ecocriticism, or on developing your creative writing practice about the natural world – or you can aim to advance both.

Your core modules cover topics including:
-The emergent creative non-fiction genre exemplified by figures such as Robert Macfarlane, Kathleen Jamie, and Helen Macdonald
19th – 21st century environmental poetry and prose
-Contemporary ecocriticism and environmental literature
-Psychogeography

An unusual collaboration between the departments of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies and Biological Sciences, we also offer you the opportunity to gain a greater scientific depth of knowledge about the natural world as you develop as a writer. You might want to explore the impacts and management of pollution or the ecology of fisheries.

You will explore the literature of landscape and the environment both within the seminar room and beyond, exploring the wild spaces of Essex and East Anglia through field trips that take you to wonderfully wild worlds in the company of leading experts. We visit inspiring areas including Mersea Island, Orford Ness, Tilbury, and the Norfolk Fens.

Our expert staff

Our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies is ranked Top 200 in the QS World University Rankings (2016), with three-quarters of our research rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

Teachers on the course include the internationally renowned ecocriticism scholar Dr Susan Oliver, who is a specialist in Romantic and 19th-century studies; the poet and nature writer Dr Chris McCully; and, environmental scholar and writer Professor Jules Pretty.

The MA Wild Writing is led by the writer Dr James Canton, who recently spoke on Radio 4’s ‘Open Country’ about the landscapes of Essex, and specialises in nature and travel writing.

Specialist facilities

-Start to get some publications to your name by writing for our student nature writing blog Wildeasters
-Access our archives – the University of Essex is home to the notebooks, diaries, maps, letters, and binoculars of J. A. Baker, author of the critically acclaimed The Peregrine (1967)
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Hear writers talk about their craft and learn from leading literature specialists at the Essex Book Festival – the festival director is based in our department, and loads of events take place on campus
-Get involved onstage or behind the scenes at our on-campus Lakeside Theatre
-Learn a language for free alongside your course

Your future

A number of our graduates from the MA Wild Writing have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers; others are practicing artists, scholars or environmentalists. One now works on climate change in Washington, another is a “wild practitioner” who work on the relation between nature and mental health and another now works for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police around Chesapeake Bay!

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages. Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK, which means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

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This exciting new programme is ideal if you have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature, or work in education (e.g. Read more
This exciting new programme is ideal if you have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature, or work in education (e.g. as a teacher or librarian), publishing or children's media. It's also aimed at authors who want to create texts for children- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-childrens-literature/

Award-winning author Michael Rosen is just one of the leading teaching staff on this programme, which is taught mainly in the Department of Educational Studies at Goldsmiths, although those pursuing the Creative Writing pathway will also study modules in the Department of English and Comparative Literature.

From classic works to contemporary texts

You will deepen your familiarity with the range and diversity of genres for children from ‘classic’ works to contemporary texts and develop detailed knowledge and critical understanding of issues and debates in the field. Studying children’s literature at Goldsmiths will also involve examining how texts for children reflect contested constructions of childhood.

Creative writing opportunities

If you are already a committed writer, although you may not have experience of writing for children/young adults, the MA in children's Literature offers a Creative Writing pathway which is taught in partnership with the Department of English and Comparative Literature. You can select modules that will support creative writing practices and enable you to work with practising and published creative writing lecturers and education lecturers to study and explore the nature of writing for children/young adults, creating original texts in the genres of short story, novel and poetry (but not script/screen writing or picture books/graphic novels).

The sociopolitical contexts of children's literature

Goldsmiths' MA in Children’s Literature is unique in its focus on inclusive practices and social justice. We will question the sociopolitical contexts in which texts are produced and interpreted and you will be encouraged to explore how texts for children can challenge or reinforce dominant ideological constructions. We interrogate the power relations that determine what is published, distributed and selected to be read by children in schools.

You will explore the relationship between reader, writer, text and context, and consider the processes that underpin those interactions. We will also examine the inherent paradox that studying children’s literature will involve adults' writing, selecting and responding to texts that are normally intended for children.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maggie Pitfield.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to specialise in children’s literature in a range of careers:

Teaching
Publishing
Children’s media
Writing texts for children
Librarianship
Academic study
Youth and community work
Skills
You will acquire a wide-ranging understanding of the field of children’s literature and the social, political cultural processes that surround it. You will also develop your critical thinking, communication and research skills.

Additional Entry Requirement for the Creative Writing Pathway

To study on the Creative Writing Pathway as part of the MA in Children's Literature you should follow the usual application process. If offered a place on the programme, you will submit a substantial piece or pieces of original creative writing, up to a maximum of 3,000 words, prior to the beginning of the programme. This work does not have to be in the form of writing for children/young adults. It will be considered by the Moudle Leader of the Workshop in Creative and Life Writing.

Your submission should include one item from the following list: Your submission should include one item from the following list: 1 short story; 7-10 poems; 1 or 2 extracts from a novel; 1 or 2 extracts from non-fiction writing, for example, memoir.

Submissions can be emailed directly to Maggie Pitfield, Head of Programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our Creative Writing MPhil, PhD offers you the opportunity to develop a substantial, original piece of creative work and a related academic thesis. Read more

Course Overview

Our Creative Writing MPhil, PhD offers you the opportunity to develop a substantial, original piece of creative work and a related academic thesis. Our supervision expertise, partnerships and passion for creative writing offers you an energetic, creative and well-resourced research culture to immerse yourself in.

We offer supervision from a diverse range of experienced writers who are recognised specialists in their field. Areas of expertise include: poetry; prose fiction, including fiction for children or young adults; writing for stage, screen, or radio; writing creative non-fiction, including: memoir, biography, narrative non-fiction, essay writing, the literature of travel, nature and place.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-writing-mphil-phd/#profile

Training & Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-writing-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to Apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/creative-writing-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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The newly designed MA English Literature. Contemporary Writing pathway offers you the opportunity to engage with American, British, Irish, and world Anglophone literary cultures. Read more
The newly designed MA English Literature: Contemporary Writing pathway offers you the opportunity to engage with American, British, Irish, and world Anglophone literary cultures. The pathway brings together a variety of genres and critical approaches to contemporary literature, such that you will have the chance to explore fiction, poetry, and life writing, as well as debates in cultural theory and philosophy about the very nature and periodization of contemporaneity.

We are home to one of the largest and most diverse groups of staff in this field of any department in the country, and expertise in late-twentieth- and twenty-first-century culture brings together perspectives that are regional and transnational, theoretical and historicist. Distinctively, the pathway will also give you the opportunity of working with our leading postcolonial scholars, and to think about contemporary cultural production in global contexts of reception.

A range of option modules will enable you to study major novelists and poets from national literary traditions within and beyond an Anglo-American frame. The core module, ‘Writing and the Present’, equips you with a set of critical vocabularies with which to engage historically, formally, and philosophically with contemporary literature. The core syllabi will allow you to explore contemporary writing in relation to broader contentions about the present, including the problems of periodicity along with the current state and function of criticism. One of the key aims of the core module is to establish a context of non-fictional writing, philosophy, and social theory that will help you to characterize the contemporary epoch. Special attention will be devoted to issues of technology, innovation and social change that bring into question the category of ‘writing’ itself, its role in theoretical debates, its place in contemporary philosophy, and its transformations in the context of digital culture.

The pathway as whole thus facilitates a twin focus on the notions of writing and the present, encouraging you to examine the most urgent intellectual issues of our time that relate to the notion of ‘the contemporary’, not only in academic contexts but also in lived social experience.

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The School of English and Journalism offers advanced research opportunities within the subject of Creative Writing. Read more
The School of English and Journalism offers advanced research opportunities within the subject of Creative Writing.

As an MPhil/PhD student you will be supervised by published writers and be given the opportunity to develop skills so that you may produce work of a publishable standard and engage in creative practice at doctoral level.

Regular research seminars and postgraduate study groups aim to provide a stimulating environment in which to discuss and debate work being undertaken in the School and Creative Writing has strong links to English and Journalism as well as with the Schools of Film and Media, History and Heritage and Fine and Performing Arts.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Members of staff involved in teaching Creative Writing have experience of teaching the subject at undergraduate and postgraduate levels – there are around one hundred students practicing Creative Writing at BA, MA and PhD levels currently in what is a thriving area of the School of English and Journalism.

Topics of interest to them are:
-Poetry
-Experimental fiction
-The short story
-The historical Novel
-Television drama
-Adaptation
-Film scripting
-Realism
-The publishing industry

Staff have published in a variety of these areas and have also worked in the publishing industry.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on the writing practice of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you will be expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at this level of study takes the form of an 80,000 word thesis.

The Creative Writing dissertation will comprise 60,000 words of creative writing plus a 20,000 word analysis of the creative piece(s).

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

A doctoral qualification may be regarded as the capstone of academic achievement and may mark the beginning of a career in academia or research.

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Literature at Brighton is framed by an awareness of contexts and the social production of texts. As a product of this culture, the Literature MA offers a distinctive combination of practice-based literary studies and critical textual analysis. Read more
Literature at Brighton is framed by an awareness of contexts and the social production of texts. As a product of this culture, the Literature MA offers a distinctive combination of practice-based literary studies and critical textual analysis. One of the original aspects of the course lies in its approach to marrying critical approaches to literary studies with an awareness of writing as a creative and critical practice. This course enjoys a distinct identity in its pronounced focus on the practice of writing as a craft, one best understood through both engaging in practice and studying the practice of others. Combining critical, experimental, historical and philosophical approaches in and beyond academia, the study of textual practices - the questioning of representations, tensions and innovations - forms a discursive framework around which understandings of the place and function of writing in contemporary society take place. Core modules address texts, theories and cultures, practising rhetoric and location-focused literary studies: option modules offer experience in the emerging fields of twenty-first century literature, gender and performance, literature and conflict, American fiction and poetry, Victorian journalism, screenwriting and writing as a creative craft. Founded on the belief that good writers also make good readers, the Literature MA makes the necessary connections between critical and creative approaches to the discipline in the twenty-first century.

Areas of study
The course is structured around essential core modules, a research skills module and the dissertation. Options allow you to explore areas of personal interest in literature and further afield in the arts.

Practising Rhetoric
Rhetoric and rhetoric studies offer a distinctive third way between creative and critical approaches to the theory and practice of writing, and enables students to see their own and others writing within a long and valued tradition on the form, place(s) and functions of effective communication. Students are encouraged to assess and analyse a wide variety of genres and modes of writing (from conventional literary texts to political speeches and advertisements), and to practice their own writing in critical, creative or professional outputs through placing language use and affect as central to their writing and speaking practice.

Cultural Theory
This core module offers an advanced introduction to the field of cultural theory and its application to literary texts. Based around close readings of key texts, the course critically interrogates central cultural concepts and thematics in the work of key cultural theorists working in the last half of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. More generally, the course aims to examine and assess the nature and purpose of cultural theory in the contemporary world, and does so by tracing theoretical shifts and reconceptualisations of culture in relation to social, political, and geographical contexts.

Writing the City
This module uses Brighton as a case study to move from a local to a global understanding of the relationship between texts and contexts, literature and location. The module is a celebration and critical review of representations of the city, as well as a space to consider some familiar and some lesser-known cultural responses. Examining representations of cities as well as work from their communities of writers and artists, students are encouraged to theorise texts in terms of space and place as well as reframe political topographies and geographies. Developing students? understanding of the ways in which texts engage with socio-cultural contexts and enter into dialogue with representations of the past, present and future, the module will encourage critical and creative reflection on student experience of the city and promote their active role in (re)presenting location in literature.

Research Skills and Training
Studies are framed around the broad question what is research?, and seeks to place the student?s own practice and academic work in this context. Having considered the value of research into the arts and culture a series of seminars and workshops will introduce students to the key research methods. These will be discussed throughout in the context of the student?s own plans for research. As these discussions develop students move towards direct consideration of a research proposal which will in turn form the basis of the assessment.

Dissertation
The dissertation is the culmination of the degree and provides an opportunity for students to explore their research in a focused and organised fashion through a project of their own design. Building upon the learning students have benefited from throughout the programme they will be encouraged to develop their thinking on the dissertation. The intention is for students to develop a reflexive and critically engaged dissertation that makes a genuine contribution to debates in literature.

Options
Students can choose literature options and from across the faculty?s disciplines including performing gender, the ethics of fiction, creative writing, screenwriting and humanities.

Syllabus
Three literature core modules
Practising Rhetoric
Cultural Theory
Writing The City
Two research modules
Research Skills and Training
Dissertation
Two options
Students may choose from literature option modules:
Twenty-first Century Literature
Performing Gender
American Poetry in Twentieth Century History
The Ethics of FictionLiterature and Conflict
Knowing Through Writing
Victorian Journalism
Screenwriting: Craft and Creative Practices
And/or from a suite of wider subjects including:
Holocaust Memory
Gender, Family and Empire
Visual Narrative
Critical and Media Concepts

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You want to write a novel. We have an Master's degree that will help you write it. And we think what we do is unique. Why? Because the St Mary's Creative Writing MA works with a very small cohort. Read more
You want to write a novel. We have an Master's degree that will help you write it. And we think what we do is unique.

Why? Because the St Mary's Creative Writing MA works with a very small cohort. This means you will receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to other Creative Writing postgraduate courses. Here, you will be personally guided through the journey of your first draft, rather than being another student at the back of a large class. No short stories, no poetry, no screenplay. Just your novel.

Your novel deserves a tutor that understands all, and not just some of its parts. And you deserve a tutor who will coach not just the first draft of your novel, but also the development of your creative process.

Why St Mary's?

St Mary's tutors have published novels and are publishing now. Drawing on our connections with the industry we have, in the first year alone, brought in the winner of The Costa Novel award (2014), the fiction director of Bloomsbury, and The Bookseller's Agent of the Year (2014).

When you have finished the degree, you can choose to continue workshopping and drafting with the dedicated cohorts we establish every year.

We are passionate about our craft, and about your craft too. It is why our first PhD student in Creative Writing struck a two-book deal with Canongate and sales in multiple foreign territories.

Not convinced? Pick up the phone or email Programme Director and author Christie Watson today – she wants to hear about your novel – the one you know you have to write.

Course Content

You will study individually and as part of a group. At the beginning of the course, you will be allocated a personal supervisor who will oversee the development of your draft through tutorials.

Group work seeks to cultivate the collaborative atmosphere and productivity of an artist’s colony, through peer led workshops, meetings with experienced authors and encounter with readers. The supportive and comitted nature of our cohort is important to us, and we seek to put together the best possible people, for the best possible learning experience.

The course takes you from the exploratory phase of writing through to re-drafting, in five modules, across three semesters and a lecture series.

In addition to the modules and workshops, your cohort will be visited by working authors and industry figures, who will talk about their working practice and experiences in publishing.

Assessment

Each module produces a creative element of your draft which will be assessed. In the seminar modules, you will also be assessed by presentation to the group.

One-to-one tutorial feedback and support is essential for the writer aiming to complete a productive draft in just one year.

We are excited about starting this course at St Mary’s, where teaching was ranked first among our 20 competitor institutions and second for overall satisfaction in The National Student Satisfaction Survey (NSS). St Mary’s Creative Writing tutors score very highly in the quality of this provision and outside of our immediate competitors the university is ranked 15th in the country.

Your tutorial time will be scheduled but as with our undergraduate courses, we like to think the door is always open.

In formal assessment, each module will produce a mixture of creative submission to deadline, workshop engagement, critical reflection and seminar presentation. The weight of marking always rests with creative submission and the aim is to complete a draft of a novel through continuous assessment.

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PLEASE NOTE. This course will run in September 2016. This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor. Read more
PLEASE NOTE: This course will run in September 2016

This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor.

Between retreats the course is run via distance-learning with a website, chat room and e-tutorials. This makes it possible for those living outside the UK, and those with busy working lives, for instance freelancers and those in the film and TV industries, to take time out to attend. We have a wide variety of students on the course including established actors, comedy writers, editors, producers, novelists and many others.

During the MASTFiR course (MA in Screenwriting for Televion and Film - Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. You will develop a range of ideas, then go on to write film and television outlines, and several drafts of a feature film screenplay, a TV single drama, or a TV series or serial bible and sample episodes. You will be immersed in a creative atmosphere conducive to concentrated learning and group interaction; a core unit is the Development Lab, where you will present your work in progress to the group for criticism and feedback, and experiment with co-writing.

You will also meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mascreenwritingfortelevisionandfilmretreat.aspx

Why choose this course?

- in the fast-changing world of digital drama, new media and new film markets, you will become skilled in producing strong and original fiction writing.

- the course director is Ivan Levene, a practising screenwriter and script editor with over 15 years of experience in the industry. He currently has two produced feature films, and has been involved in the development of numerous other film and TV projects, including a recent major international release. Before this he worked in acquisitions and development, advancing over £15m of film and TV production from inception to marketplace. Current commissions include a supernatural thriller with Matthew Rhys, and a biopic set in Gilded Age New York about Harriet Hubbard Ayer - socialite, proto-feminist, and the first person to create an international cosmetics business.

- teaching television is screenwriting lecturer Adam Ganz, whose TV credits include Pillow Talk and Murder Without Motive; and guest lecturing in television are Gillian Gordon and Jonathan Powell.

- despite the first students only graduating in 2008, we have already had a host of successes with many of our students finding success in the industry.

- you will meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

Department research and industry highlights

- the MA Screenwriting for Television and Film Retreat course (MASTFiR) only began graduating students in 2008 but already we have had a host of successes - Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units.

Core course units:
Script Craft
This unit will focus on the acquisition of basic writing skills, and is a gateway to the ‘Story and Theme’ unit. You will explore the specifics of scene and dialogue construction, formatting and issues around research and around adaptation from source materials – e.g. plays, novels and news stories.

Story and Theme
This unit teaches the essential components of story and structure, the specific language of film storytelling and genre. It will include lectures, screenings of films and extracts, and individual and group analysis of films. You will produce ideas, formal outlines and a feature-length screenplay or TV series bibles and episode.

Development Lab
This is a discussion forum to which you bring the work above, where it is critiqued and debated from a number of points of view including aesthetic, generic, marketing, audience and budget. Development Lab is interactive and is at the core of the course; it replicates many of the development processes you will face in the film and television industry.

Contexts: Current British Film and TV Practice
This unit covers current aesthetic and generic trends in British film and television. There will also be lectures and seminars on budget, schedule, commissioning, finance, contracts, casting and marketing, and you will explore the production and marketing implications of your own screenplay projects.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- the ability to discriminate between project ideas, present ideas and drafts to others effectively, and both give and receive constructive criticism

- the understanding of the aesthetic and economic conditions of the marketplace, how their work may be viewed in terms of budget and audience, and the stages a screenplay will go through in development and production

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of the film and television screenplay- how it signifies, how it communicates meaning to the film producer, director, actor and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the processes of writing a screenplay, from initial concept to final draft

- advanced understanding of the various stages of script development and how each is documented- outlines, treatments, pitch documents and so on

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years, particularly in the context of economic and market developments in these industries

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of writing and development, and how the roles played by the various parties- producer, script editor, director and so on- shape and influence the screenplay.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including script outlines and scenes, a completed feature film screenplay and/or TV series episode and ‘bible’, and marketing and pitch documents.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, you will be well prepared for careers in television and feature film screenwriting and script development.

Our recent graduate successes include:

Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The NFTS screenwriting course has produced some of the outstanding writers of our generation. The course prepares writers for work in film and television. Read more
The NFTS screenwriting course has produced some of the outstanding writers of our generation. The course prepares writers for work in film and television. Taught by working writers, producers and commissioners, the course addresses the main aspects of the profession of writing. Recent students' work has been nominated for an Oscar, a Bafta, several Royal Television Society awards and countless other awards

Quick Facts

- 2 Year Course
- Full-time
- Course runs Jan-Dec each year
- Next intake: January 2017
- NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/screenwriting

COURSE OVERVIEW

Graduating screenwriters will have had the opportunity to complete a range of work for their portfolio, demonstrating their talent and unique voice. Introductions are made to literary agents, broadcasters and film and television production companies. Unlike a Screenwriting MA based in an academic institution, this course is set in a working film and television studio. It covers all aspects of screenwriting, from the development of ideas through to production and post-production. Screenwriting students have their writing work-shopped by professional directors and actors. Working with student producers and directors, they have the chance to see their writing tested in production.

The NFTS programme also includes masterclasses from eminent practitioners in all fields, and regular previews of current film releases. Screenwriting graduates have access to feature and TV project development opportunities, set up by the School in partnership with broadcasters and film companies such as BBC Films and Vertigo Films. There are also extended industry–oriented script development workshops like Regards Croisés and Writers for Europe.

*There are a number of different scholarships that support this course, including the Wellcome Trust Science Media Studentship. For more information see Scholarships and the Wellcome Trust (http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Public-engagement/Funding-schemes/Broadcast-games-and-film-awards/Science-Media-Studentships/index.htm).

CURRICULUM

The first year of the course deals with the basic principles of storytelling, the craft of screenwriting for film and television, and the collaborative nature of production via exercises with other departments; some shorter writing assignments; and the formal groundwork for writing industry-length material. Writing for the expanding field of animation will be introduced via a series of practical collaborations. Writers also learn about writing for the stage and their short plays are performed to the school by a professional cast.

The second year is a project-based course focussing on longer writing assignments. Individual talents and interests will determine the content of the final portfolio, though this must include at least one full-length screenplay (feature film or television-hour), plus a short piece (a short fiction, animation, short stage play or sitcom). At the School’s discretion, one or more of the short pieces may be filmed. Writers may opt to write two feature screenplays. The second year will also feature specialist modules tailored to the interests of the students, e.g. comedy, horror, factual-based drama, radio. There is also an introduction to online drama and virals.

The course ends with extensive introductions to the industry with preparation on the practicalities and legalities of working. In this process, writers learn to pitch the projects in their portfolio. This has resulted in many graduating students securing agents either prior to graduation, or immediately following their studies.

The course is full time and requires a high level of dedication; a prolific output, and the ability to meet professional–style deadlines. Graduation is also based on completion of a tutored dissertation.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

TUTORS

Brian Ward (The Interpreter, Death Defying Acts, Tabloid, Shoebox Zoo) is the NFTS Head of Screenwriting. Other tutors include Simon Beaufoy, Visiting Chair in Screenwriting (Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours, The Full Monty), Holly Phillips (Sugar Rush, As If, Trinity), Peter Berry (The Luzhin Defence, The Last Enemy, Prime Suspect), Clive Bradley (City of Vice, The Harlot’s Progress, Last Rites), Brian Ward (Death Defying Acts, Shoe Box Zoo, The Interpreter), Roger Smith (Script Consultant: My Name is Joe , Sweet Sixteen; Writer: Up The Junction), Sarah Golding (Script Consultant; Head of Development at Rainy day Films and previously at Potboiler Productions (The Constant Gardener, Brothers of the Head), Rob Ritchie (Script consultant; Writer: Who Bombed Birmingham; ex-literary manager Royal Court Theatre).

ALUMNI

Ashley Pharoah (Ashes to Ashes, Life on Mars), Shawn Slovo (A World Apart, Captain Corelli’s Mandolin), Sandy Welch (Jane Eyre, Emma), Amanda Coe (Filth, Margot), Simon van der Borgh (Script Consultant: Kidulthood), Ben Court & Caroline Ip (The Hole, Cracks, Whitechapel), Amanda Coe (Room at the Top, Elizabeth David -A Life in Recipes, Filth – The Mary Whitehouse Story), and Nick Hoare (Waterloo Road) studied at the NFTS.

APPLY WITH

- One original screenplay, typed, twenty pages in length, together with a two-page (A4) synopsis. The screenplay may be short (up to twenty pages) or the first twenty pages of a longer work. All work must be original and must not be adapted or co-authored. Uploaded or e-mail to as a Word, Final Draft or pdf document

- Optional: If your writing to date has been in a different field (other than screenplays) you may consider that you are better able to demonstrate your ability by submitting a piece of original fiction typed and double spaced, together with a two-page (A4) synopsis. This piece of fiction may be a story, novel or play. It may be a short work, up to twenty pages, or the first twenty pages of a longer work.
You must also submit the screenplay. Uploaded or e-mail to as a Word, Final Draft or pdf document.

HOW TO APPLY

The application deadline has now passed, however there may still be a chance to apply. Please contact registry via email stating your name, course of interest and contact details:

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Creative Writing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Creative Writing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Creative Writing is a unique programme that offers integrated training in the writing of literary and media text. The MA in Creative Writing is taught by prize-winning writers of fiction, poetry and drama who provide core training and individual pathways in the major genres of contemporary literary and media writing. Modules on the Creative Writing programme are taught through workshop sessions, group work and one-to-one mentoring between students and a tutor. Courses include the writing of prose fiction, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative nonfiction. Writers and representatives from the arts world and the publishing industry are invited to address the MA Creative Writing group about creative work and publishing. We have strong links with Swansea’s Dylan Thomas Centre, which offers a lively programme of events throughout the year.

Key Features of the MA in Creative Writing

- The MA in Creative Writing is taught by experienced writers and offers a wide range of writing genres including fiction, short story, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.
- Drama writing is a particular strength, including the relatively new and unexplored field of Dramaturgy.
- Regular play readings and students' dramatic writing is often performed by professional actors in the Rough Diamonds mini-festival in the summer.
- Creative Writers have a close relationship with National Theatre Wales and also open-mic poetry events at local venues such as the Dylan Thomas Centre and Howl.
- There is scope for work experience with local publishers.
- The writing programme has an online journal, The Swansea Review, and students write for The Siren, a student-run online journal, and The Waterfront student newspaper.
- Creative Writing students have free membership of Literature Wales, the national literature promotion agency.
- Students are involved in the annual Writers’ Day at the Dylan Thomas Centre, where they meet editors, agents, publishers and writers to discuss the ins and outs of publication and the craft of writing.
- Students are part of a vibrant community of writers and artists – Swansea, the birthplace of Dylan Thomas, having a fair claim to being Wales’s city of culture.
- The programme has connection with and experience of the unique literary culture of Wales, home to possibly the oldest (but still vibrant) bardic tradition in Europe.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Creative Writing typically include:

• Writing Fiction
• Writing Poetry
• Genre: Writing for Stage
• Creative Non-Fiction and Travel Writing
• Nature Writing
• Screenwriting
• Writing Radio Drama
• The Art of Short Story
• Writing the Self
• International Dramaturgy

Who should Apply?

Students or Professionals interested in Creative and Professional Writing. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD.

MA in Creative Writing Aims

- To offer students the chance to belong to a warmly supportive community of writers, passionate about their art.
- To give students the opportunity to discuss literary matters with agents, editors and publishers.
- To provide active participation in Swansea’s burgeoning literary scene and have students’ dramatic writing performed by professional actors at the Dylan Thomas Literature Centre.
- To offer research seminars presented by eminent creative writers and academics.
- To develop study and research skills in Creative Writing research and practice methodologies.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Creative Writing graduates. MA degree holders enter careers in professional and creative writing, publishing, education, global marketing and advertising, media, business, heritage and tourism, and performing arts. Some graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Student Quote

"Since graduating with an MA with Distinction in Creative Writing from Swansea University, I have published three collections of poetry, founded Grievous Jones Press, and begun lecturing in Creative Writing. In the near future I will finish my PhD in Creative Writing and have books forthcoming with Blackheath Books and Seren Books. The training, experience, and rigour of the Swansea MA in Creative Writing was invaluable for launching my career as a writer and publisher. Without the inspiration, guidance, and critique of the excellent faculty and peers, my own writing would not have grown and my flame for creation might have faltered."

David Oprava, Creative Writing, MA

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