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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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The Film. Theory and Practice MA provides you with a sophisticated understanding of films as systems of meaning. Your study covers areas such as film-making, historical cinema, screenwriting and narrative. Read more
The Film: Theory and Practice MA provides you with a sophisticated understanding of films as systems of meaning. Your study covers areas such as film-making, historical cinema, screenwriting and narrative.

The course will advance your knowledge of the musculature of cinematography and editing, and the nerve system of narrative conventions, authorship, genre, power, aesthetics, stardom and nationality. You can specialise in areas of film theory, or in film practice; the latter including screenwriting, film-making and cinema management.

You will develop your own scholarly approaches to film through exploring a range of positions in film studies, and a range of historical periods and national/transnational cinemas.

By the end of the course you will have acquired knowledge of a range of analytical and theoretical principles in film studies and an array of national/transnational cinemas, including: British; Chinese; French; American; North African; Spanish and Latin American.

If you choose to work in film production you will usually have a finished film within 12 weeks.

Our graduates have progressed into a variety of careers, including: academia, media and journalism, cinema management, and film production. Many of our MA students go on to PhD research.

The study of film has a long history at Newcastle. Our community of film scholars shares specialisms in: film genre; film stardom; gender and ethnic identities in cinema; writing on film.

Our research interests also range widely in Anglophone, French, Hispanic, East Asian and Middle Eastern cinemas.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/film-theory-practice-ma/#modules

How to Apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/film-theory-practice-ma/#howtoapply

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The course aims to provide an opportunity for graduates with relevant professional and/ or academic qualifications to study at an advanced academic and professional level while exploring the theory and practice of work with parents. Read more
The course aims to provide an opportunity for graduates with relevant professional and/ or academic qualifications to study at an advanced academic and professional level while exploring the theory and practice of work with parents.

•This is the first Master's level course designed specifically for people working in the field of parenting
•The high quality practice-related modules are designed to enable practitioners and clients to achieve planned change in parenting practice through the processes of education, development and practice-oriented research
•The course focuses on the development of the creative reflective practitioner committed to social justice, equality and innovatory and progressive practice
•The course aims to increase your systematic knowledge and critical awareness of the national and international literature and research, to extend your understanding of parenting through participation in analysis of theory and the challenges and opportunities in proposing, planning and delivering services for parents in a multi-cultural and inter-professional milieu.

This course consists of four core modules, and two option modules. The MSc is completed with a dissertation of 60 credits. In the first year of the course the modules include:

•Theory and Practice of Parenting: Knowledge and Skills for Practitioners (30 credits) is grounded in the latest research relevant to parenting
•Making Sense of Qualitative and Quantitative Data (15 credits) develops advanced and specialist knowledge in the fields of qualitative methods, narrative analysis and discourse analysis.
•Health and Social Research Methods (15 credits) introduces strategies and methods of social science research, including those commonly used by practitioner-research in social and healthcare settings
•Designing, Delivering and Assessing Learning (15 credits) aims to support and improve your knowledge and skills for designing, delivering and assessing learning of their staff and/or clients. These modules provide the foundation for the dissertation.
Optional modules:

•The Negotiated Module (15 credits) provides the opportunity to explore an idea or issue, or take forward your knowledge and understanding of a particular subject
•Managing Race and Diversity (15 credits) explores and critically reflects on the management of ethnic diversity as a concept
•Anti-Oppressive Practice (15 credits) aims to analyse concepts of oppression, discrimination and inequality
•Management of Services and People (15 credits) seeks to enhance your self-confidence and performance as a manager.
In the second year of the course the modules include:

•Working with Groups of Parents (15 credits) provides the opportunity to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to working with groups of parents
•Health and Social Research Methods 2 (15 credits) focuses on developing your understanding of research methods. You will consider key philosophical questions relating to knowledge generation, developing understanding of the range of methodological techniques available to researchers, and investigate the potential benefits ICT provides. The dissertation enables you to choose and research a particular topic in depth. The course commences with a one week teaching block in September/October, introducing you to the course team and each other, and focusing on the core modules to be studied during the first semester. You will be notified of the exact dates for the block teaching week once you have made a successful application.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature is the first of its kind in the world. It draws on world-level expertise to explore the various types of narrative produced in ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt.

Key Features

This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. It is taught by a team of scholars associated with the KYKNOS research centre, whose research in this field is internationally recognised.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature offers excellent preparation for students who intend to undertake further research in this exciting and rapidly developing area of Classical literature. Students will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Greek and/or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient Narrative Literature can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin language
• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Greek and Roman Magic :Exploring the Sources
• Reading Academic German
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Word, Metaphor, Allegory: effective models of reality

Student Quote

"I studied at Swansea University for my Undergraduate degree and fell in love with the city, the university campus and the lecturers and supporting staff at the university. Deciding to do my MA in Ancient Narrative Literature here was therefore partly influenced by this. However, Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University was an attractive choice mostly because of the quality of the lecturers here. Both Professor John Morgan who is already a highly esteemed scholar within the area of the Ancient Greek novels and Dr Ian Repath who is a rising star in the same subject area make Swansea University the ideal place to study Ancient Narrative Literature at MA level."

Ida Meland

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Classics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Classics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Greek and Latin languages are the key to our knowledge of the ancient world, and the origin of many modern European languages. This MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in the ancient languages, and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world. In addition to developing their ability to read fluently in the ancient languages and to translate them accurately and sensitively, students are introduced to the critical and analytical methodologies that shape the study of Classical literature in the twenty-first century. Students in the MA in Classics should normally already have studied either Latin or Greek, and will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of the other.

Key Features of MA in Classics

The MA Classics studies Greek and Latin language, literature and civilisation.

The MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in ancient languages and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Classics MA is split across the year offering three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of your choosing.

Part-time Classics MA students take three modules in the first year, three in the second year and write the dissertation in the third year.

MA in Classics Aims

To acquire advanced reading skills in ancient Greek and Latin.
To develop the ability to translate from ancient Greek and Latin accurately and sensitively.
To develop the theoretical and analytical skills relevant to the study of ancient texts in the original languages.
To prepare for further text-based research on any aspect of Greek or Roman history and culture.
Through the precision and awareness to detail entailed in the study of ancient languages, to acquire a range of transferable skills relevant to a range of employment opportunities, including those which involve language acquisition and translation.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Classics course typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin Language
• Ancient Greek or Latin Texts
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, history and archaeology.
Particular strengths include:

• Ancient Narrative Literature
• The Ancient Novel
• Plato and Platonism
• Greek Tragedy
• Ancient Technology
• The Archaeology of Roman Egypt
• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation
• Greek Social History
• The History and Archaeology of Asia Minor
• Late Antiquity
• Roman Military History

All staff in History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. In addition, regular research seminars and lectures are run through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are
encouraged to attend.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Classics graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks. It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

You will be guided in the production of creative work in a range of genres and styles, and also in critical reflection on your own work and that of other writers. The course tutors and guest speakers are all established literary professionals.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-creative-writing

Who is the course designed for?

The MSt aims to facilitate students' creative practice, whether for their own personal creative development as writers or because their professional work impinges on these areas.

Examples could include teachers of English at secondary level for whom the teaching of creative writing is increasingly necessary for GCSE and A-level English Language and English Literature. It is also designed to be of professional value to those working in areas such as journalism, broadcasting, publishing and editing.

Aims of the programme

By the end of the course students should have:

- Developed their own writing and self-editing skills in a range of fiction and non-fiction genres
- Developed a solid and substantial understanding of the history (in terms of innovative developments) of fiction and non-fiction writing and of critical, analytical and narrative theory

Format

The MSt is structured around four modules, each of which includes a residential block at Madingley Hall that students must attend. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities, and followed by two writing assignments: one critical and one creative.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules to build a virtual community of practice.

Lectures, seminars and classes: 4 x 4-day residential sessions in Year 1; a 2-day residential session in Year 2.

Supervisions and tutorials: each student has their own tutor to whom they will have several one-to-one sessions during the first year. During the second year students have 5 x 1-hour sessions with their supervisor.

Year 1

The first year is characterised by variety. Students will engage and experiment with a wide variety of genres, building on existing strengths and exploring unfamiliar territories.

Module 1: Writing for readers: the art of poetry and the craft of criticism (17-20 October 2016)
This module will combine close critical reading of selected example of poetry and autobiographical prose with the writing of both by students.

Module 2: Writing for readers: imagined worlds - fiction, long and short (12-15 December 2016)
This module focuses on prose fiction, examining the relationship between memory, imagination and research and exploring the essential concerns of the fiction-writer, including plot and narrative, voice and character and the importance of place.

Module 3: Writing for performance: monologue and polyphonic scripts (13-16 February 2017)
This module explores various forms of writing for an audience, encompassing writing for radio, theatre, television, cinema and other forms of scripted public address and performance.

Module 4: Writing life: creative non-fiction (15-18 May 2017)
This module explores the concept of creative non-fiction and examines examples drawn from a range of sub-genres. These are likely to include biography, memoir, travel-writing and writing about the environment. Sessions on study and research skills will prepare students for Year 2. Visiting speakers for this module will include those from the world of publishing.

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on a specialist genre. Students will work independently to explore further and develop their own literary and critical skills, resulting in an extended piece or portfolio of writing. They will work under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact.

Students will have five supervisions in the second year. The first will take place in October 2017, ideally at Madingley Hall, but Skype can also be used. The dates of this and the next three supervisions will be arranged between you and your supervisor (these can also be face-to-face or via Skype). The fifth and final supervision will usually take place at Madingley Hall at the time of the only residency in the second year, the Presentation and Discussion of Portfolios, on 16-17 April 2018.

Assessment

- Year 1 -

Following the first residency students will produce 750 words of poetry and a critical commentary of 3,000 words. Following the other three residencies students will produce 4,000 words of creative prose and a critical commentary of 3,000 words.

- Year 2 -

Students will produce a portfolio consisting of 15,000 words of creative prose (or 5,000 words of poetry) and a 3,000-word critical commentary.

- Feedback -

Students are given formal written feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course, including during tutorials and supervisions. Tutors produce a report for each student at the end of Year 1 and supervisors produce termly reports for each student during Year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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Experience a rigorous interdisciplinary graduate program in Social and Political Thought, in a supportive and personalized environment – the only one of its kind in Atlantic Canada. Read more
Experience a rigorous interdisciplinary graduate program in Social and Political Thought, in a supportive and personalized environment – the only one of its kind in Atlantic Canada.

In Acadia's graduate program in Social and Political Thought you will dive into the study of political and social life through theoretical questions and engagements. The program is interdisciplinary in nature since social and political thought is a nexus connecting political thought, social theory, philosophy, postcolonial thought, literary criticism, media studies, cultural studies, environment studies, and gender studies. Working in close collaboration with its nationally and internationally celebrated faculty, you will take courses spanning several disciplines, increase your exposure to other areas of inquiry and approaches to theory through the core colloquium, and undertake a final interdisciplinary thesis (in year two).

Be Inspired

As a graduate student of Social and Political Thought at Acadia, you will benefit from the small school environment with small class sizes and high faculty-to-student interaction. Only MA programs without PHD programs above them can promise this kind of support, attention and engagement. While having access to professors with a diverse set of research interests, you can also expect a personalized research agenda. To ensure attention to the interdisciplinary nature of the program, you will be guided in your research by your supervisor and a second reader (selected from another discipline).

This program is designed around student engagement. The Social and Political Thought program hosts: a bi-weekly colloquium attended by students, faculty and guest lectures; a newly-founded graduate journal in social and political thought titled: To Be Decided; a community speakers forum; a film series; and a robust graduate student culture. The program also hosts a bi-annual graduate conference on social and political thought in the spring, attracting students and scholars nationally and internationally.

Research Interests

-Paul Abela: Kant; Moral theory
-Andrew Biro: Critical theory; Environmental political theory; Political ecology/economy
-Rachel Brickner: Comparative political theory; Latin American politics
-James Brittain: Critical Development Studies; Latin American Society and Politics; Political Economy; Social Change and Revolution
-Michael Dennis: The political economy of the New Deal era; social movements and political reform in the United States; globalization and the American South; American economic history of the postwar period; and the civil rights movement.
-Marc Ramsay: Ethics and philosophy of law
-Jon Saklofske: Literary studies; Media forms and functions; Narrative ideologies; Digital cultures; Virtual environments; Video game studies
-Donna Seamone: Ritual studies; Ethnographic study of religion
-Tony Thomson: Marxism; Organized labour in Canada; Critical criminology; Social theory
-Brenda Trofanenko: Public history and pedagogy; Museum anthropology; Postcolonial theory; Memory studies
-Geoffrey Whitehall: International political theory; Contemporary Political Thought; Discourses of Culture and Technology; Philosophy of Space and Time
-Ian Wilks: Medieval philosophy; Philosophy of religion; Ethics and bioethics

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This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/

This programme joins theory and practice, equipping you to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

The programme allows for specialisation in photography and/or electronic arts – which, in addition to still photography, can include interactive, durational and internet work – but encompasses a broader interpretation of practice.

You'll look at the meaning, production and distribution of images, and the relationship between theory and practice in the context of debates about post-modernism and beyond.

You also participate in enabling sessions in photography:

medium/large format cameras
portable and studio lighting technologies and their use
film technology
cinematography
digital imaging
output systems and processes
and/or in electronic arts:

computer and video graphics
post-production
computer-aided design
digital publishing
animation
animatics
2D and 3D computer animation
still and durational image production and manipulation
web construction
interactivity
There is an MRes which follows the MA into a second year, in order to develop your work/voice. This will count as the first year of a PhD. Find out more about the MRes.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the convenor Nigel Perkins.

Modules & Structure

This programme uniquely joins theory and practice in a way that will equip you with the tools and the vision to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

You will study

Photography: Durational & Still; Analogue & Digital
Electronic Imagery: Motion & Still
Visualisation: Stand-alone & Interactive
The programme draws on a broad range of cultural references and technical practices. It offers the opportunity to take stock of evolving practices and developments in image media culture, and is structured to develop the intellectual imagination within each individual student. This is achieved through a combined study of practice and theory, with extensive instruction through ‘enabling sessions’ which engage technical familiarity; core tutorials; secondary tutorials; Issues in Media and Culture and additional theory course options.

Recognising the rapidly changing definitions and context of these practice areas,and the value/positioning of traditional practices, these categories may also be understood through a variety of practices which involve image construction and presentation both still and durational, including: film/video, animation, interactivity, installations, motion graphics, and hyperspace constructs, as well as evolving new exploratory categories.

The programme provides an opportunity to develop and/or research aspects of visual style, and draw on a broad range of cultural references as well as aesthetic and technical approaches engaged through ‘Practice Theory Sessions’, visiting lectures and the Issues in Media and Culture course. Fundamental to the programme is the space that it creates to make it possible for you to explore, question, change and consolidate your work and your ideas.

Assessment

Original portfolio submission; coursework and essays.

Tutorials

This course is interested in the development of the individual voice. To this end, there are two types of tutorial:

Core tutorials - which deal with overall development
Secondary tutorials - these are tutorials for each specific area of photographic media

Skills

You'll develop specific practice skills to a high level, and the articulation/understanding of the pleasures of media consumption.

Careers

Graduates from the programme are extremely successful, with finalists working commercially, developing as artists or continuing to enlarge their academic knowledge. During the course particular attention is given to the development of the individual voice. This, plus students' exposure to a range of technologies, means that our graduates can step into the arena of their choice, or sometimes of their making.

Here are just some examples of the sorts of careers graduates have gone onto:

Art Director
Artist
Animator
Senior Interactive Designer
Head of Creative Department
Head Technical Creative, Experimental Film and Dance
Commercial Photography (fashion, editorial, photobooks, social, advertising)
Director (commercial narrative)
Director Of Photography
Installation Artist
Interactive Artist
Producer
Curator

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This pioneering course provides students with a specific qualification in the assessment of child and adult attachment, parenting and family functioning. Read more

Summary

This pioneering course provides students with a specific qualification in the assessment of child and adult attachment, parenting and family functioning. It is designed for health and social care professionals, who wish to broaden their skills in assessing attachment, improve the outcome of interventions and want to conduct small or large scale research projects.

This unique programme draws on Patricia Crittenden’s Dynamic Maturational Model of attachment and we pride ourselves in taking a systemic, non- blaming culturally aware approach to the contribution attachment studies can make to alleviating human suffering. Our aim is to prepare you to be at the forefront of the next generation of attachment scholars.

You will also learn to conduct a wide range of assessment procedures and achieve clinical or research levels of reliability in analysing the results. Assessment includes physiological measures such as cortisol, EEG and heart rate variability. You will also be able to formulate intervention and treatment plans and select the therapeutic approach which is most likely to help your client.

You will develop sound foundations in attachment theory, current developments in neuro-science, research and practice, and broaden your observation and assessment skills, which are crucial to both research and practice. For example, you will observe and record human attachment in natural settings, where you will need to be aware of your own impact on the subjects you are studying. You will also be trained in the infant CARE-Index, and other procedures for screening for risk in children’s development. While attachment theory is traditionally focused on children, this course incorporates assessments of attachment applicable to older children, adults, families and wider social networks.

There is an integrated focus on practice and research, making this course invaluable for students interested in a research career in the field of attachment studies. Examples of PhD student’s research areas include the physiology of developmental trauma (PTSD) in children, attachment and family systems, the effectiveness of play therapy with traumatised children, the impact of early trauma on parents who abuse or neglect their children, and attachment in chimpanzees that are reared by humans.

Content

Initial modules will give you a historical and contemporary understanding of attachment theory, laying the groundwork for you to be able to critically evaluate the conclusions and therapeutic outcomes. You will also look at one of the most common practical procedures using attachment theory, the infant CARE-Index. This module will give you the knowledge to assesses the relationship between children, aged from 1 day to 15 months, and their carer (usually a parent or legal guardian), through a play-based framework. This procedure provides a screening tool for clinicians working with at risk families and gives a thorough grounding in the development of attachment and exploration.

In the second part of the course you learn to code the Adult Attachment Interview which assesses how adults process information about their childhood and how this impacts on their behaviour in the present. You also have the opportunity on the course to learn to implement and analyse the Strange Situation procedure, Pre-school Assessment of Attachment; Narrative Story Stems using the Child Attachment and Play Assessment and the Meaning of the Child to the Parent (a central part of parenting assessments).

Another key module will introduce you to the importance of naturalistic observation, which is the practice of observing naturally occurring behaviour, as a means of understanding human attachment. This module will focus not only on the traditional mother-child relationship, but encourage you to observe behaviour in older children, adults, family and wider systems including institutions, local and more complex communities. In building your practical observation skills, you will learn about the development of attachment in safe or typical children, and how these skills are used for the purpose of clinical assessment.

Other modules, for example the Clinical Intervention Seminars, are designed to help you understand the application of attachment theory and research in forensic settings, for example, helping you to be able to produce assessment reports, which are increasingly used in courts.

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If you are a mental health practitioner, then this course offers an inspiring, creative and enterprising approach to your continuing education. Read more
If you are a mental health practitioner, then this course offers an inspiring, creative and enterprising approach to your continuing education. You will develop your practical mental health skills and sharpen your critical thinking. You'll gain fresh knowledge and evidence-based expertise that meets the demands of contemporary mental health provision.

With a diverse number of modules to choose from, you can tailor the course to meet your learning and development needs whatever your practice area. Delivered part-time, it will fit around your work and personal commitments. You can study a full masters degree, take individual modules that reflect your interests, or choose to take a number of modules toward a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma, all of which will enhance your professional career.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 20% of our research in the Public Health, Health Services and Primary Care unit is world leading or internationally excellent.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/mentalhealth_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

If you are a mental health worker, our course - which is designed in collaboration with our partners in health and social care - offers you the opportunity to study for an academic award, develop your mental health practice and enhance your employability.

- Mental Health Practitioner
- Counsellor
- Social Worker

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course is designed to develop your practical mental health skills and equip you with critical thinking skills. We have a large range of option modules to choose from, and our inter-professional, adult learning approach is based on experiential and reflective learning, which will benefit both you and your place of work.

We have a strong track record in education and training with regional, national and international links. We maintain contact with practice areas through honorary contracts as practitioners, service development and implementation consultancy and evaluation.

Core Modules

Contemporary Context of Mental Health & Recovery
Explore the contemporary context of mental health and gain a critical understanding of mental health and mental health practice, with a focus on the narrative and the ethos of recovery.

Understanding & Evaluating the Evidence
Explore different types of information about health and social care and critically evaluate research material from a range of study designs.

Working with Complex Cases in Mental Health Practice
Develop your critical understanding of the theory, research, legal, political and social drivers that are influencing contemporary mental health practice in relation to people considered to be complex cases.

Understanding Social Research & Evaluation
Gain a theoretical, methodological and practical foundation for social research enabling you to act as a social researcher to resolve practice based problems.

Research in Practice (Dissertation)
Produce a substantial research project on a self-selected topic of interest, demonstrating your developmental learning in addition to a variety of academic and practical skills.

Option Modules

Cognitive Behavioural Approaches to Psychosis
You'll be introduced to working with psychosis from a psychological and social perspective. You will develop your critical thinking and skills for working in this area, with particular reference to the skills of cognitive behaviour therapy.

Working with Depression & Anxiety
You will be introduced to current research, theory and guidance for practice, and will be encouraged to develop your existing skills for application in practice.

Applied Counselling Skills in the Workplace
Develop a critical understanding of counselling theories and how counselling as an intervention can be utilised in your practice area.

Foundations of PSI for Psychosis
Engage with contemporary research, theory and policy in the field, and have the opportunity to develop your therapeutic skills by applying them in practice with individuals and their families and carers.

Theory and Practice of Coaching
Develop a critical understanding of coaching theory and how coaching tools and techniques can be utilised in your practice area.

Working with Families & Carers in Practice
Gain a critical foundation in some core theories and concepts to enable you to work with families and carers in your practice area.

Practical Foundations of CBT
Gain a critical understanding of the foundations of cognitive and cognitive behavioural approaches, as well as a reflexive understanding of a range of the theories and skills in practice.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Literature at Brighton is framed by an awareness of contexts and the social production of texts. As a product of this culture, the Literature MA offers a distinctive combination of practice-based literary studies and critical textual analysis. Read more
Literature at Brighton is framed by an awareness of contexts and the social production of texts. As a product of this culture, the Literature MA offers a distinctive combination of practice-based literary studies and critical textual analysis. One of the original aspects of the course lies in its approach to marrying critical approaches to literary studies with an awareness of writing as a creative and critical practice. This course enjoys a distinct identity in its pronounced focus on the practice of writing as a craft, one best understood through both engaging in practice and studying the practice of others. Combining critical, experimental, historical and philosophical approaches in and beyond academia, the study of textual practices - the questioning of representations, tensions and innovations - forms a discursive framework around which understandings of the place and function of writing in contemporary society take place. Core modules address texts, theories and cultures, practising rhetoric and location-focused literary studies: option modules offer experience in the emerging fields of twenty-first century literature, gender and performance, literature and conflict, American fiction and poetry, Victorian journalism, screenwriting and writing as a creative craft. Founded on the belief that good writers also make good readers, the Literature MA makes the necessary connections between critical and creative approaches to the discipline in the twenty-first century.

Areas of study
The course is structured around essential core modules, a research skills module and the dissertation. Options allow you to explore areas of personal interest in literature and further afield in the arts.

Practising Rhetoric
Rhetoric and rhetoric studies offer a distinctive third way between creative and critical approaches to the theory and practice of writing, and enables students to see their own and others writing within a long and valued tradition on the form, place(s) and functions of effective communication. Students are encouraged to assess and analyse a wide variety of genres and modes of writing (from conventional literary texts to political speeches and advertisements), and to practice their own writing in critical, creative or professional outputs through placing language use and affect as central to their writing and speaking practice.

Cultural Theory
This core module offers an advanced introduction to the field of cultural theory and its application to literary texts. Based around close readings of key texts, the course critically interrogates central cultural concepts and thematics in the work of key cultural theorists working in the last half of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. More generally, the course aims to examine and assess the nature and purpose of cultural theory in the contemporary world, and does so by tracing theoretical shifts and reconceptualisations of culture in relation to social, political, and geographical contexts.

Writing the City
This module uses Brighton as a case study to move from a local to a global understanding of the relationship between texts and contexts, literature and location. The module is a celebration and critical review of representations of the city, as well as a space to consider some familiar and some lesser-known cultural responses. Examining representations of cities as well as work from their communities of writers and artists, students are encouraged to theorise texts in terms of space and place as well as reframe political topographies and geographies. Developing students? understanding of the ways in which texts engage with socio-cultural contexts and enter into dialogue with representations of the past, present and future, the module will encourage critical and creative reflection on student experience of the city and promote their active role in (re)presenting location in literature.

Research Skills and Training
Studies are framed around the broad question what is research?, and seeks to place the student?s own practice and academic work in this context. Having considered the value of research into the arts and culture a series of seminars and workshops will introduce students to the key research methods. These will be discussed throughout in the context of the student?s own plans for research. As these discussions develop students move towards direct consideration of a research proposal which will in turn form the basis of the assessment.

Dissertation
The dissertation is the culmination of the degree and provides an opportunity for students to explore their research in a focused and organised fashion through a project of their own design. Building upon the learning students have benefited from throughout the programme they will be encouraged to develop their thinking on the dissertation. The intention is for students to develop a reflexive and critically engaged dissertation that makes a genuine contribution to debates in literature.

Options
Students can choose literature options and from across the faculty?s disciplines including performing gender, the ethics of fiction, creative writing, screenwriting and humanities.

Syllabus
Three literature core modules
Practising Rhetoric
Cultural Theory
Writing The City
Two research modules
Research Skills and Training
Dissertation
Two options
Students may choose from literature option modules:
Twenty-first Century Literature
Performing Gender
American Poetry in Twentieth Century History
The Ethics of FictionLiterature and Conflict
Knowing Through Writing
Victorian Journalism
Screenwriting: Craft and Creative Practices
And/or from a suite of wider subjects including:
Holocaust Memory
Gender, Family and Empire
Visual Narrative
Critical and Media Concepts

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The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. Read more
The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. The new 18 month part-time NFTS Diploma in Writing and Producing Comedy will enable students to develop all forms of scripted and unscripted comedy including, sitcoms, sketch shows, and panel shows for radio and tv. The course is run in partnership with Channel 4.

Quick Facts

- 18 Month Course
- Part-time
- Course starts in January
- Next intake: January 2017
- UK and EEA applicants only

- The world's first Diploma course in Writing and Producing Comedy.
- Delivered in partnership with Channel 4
- Part-time, evening course
- Regular Industry speakers
- Develop and write an original show and make a taster tape.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/writing-and-producing-comedy

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. Students will be taught by NFTS writing and producing tutors supported by guest sessions from the people responsible for some of the UK’s most iconic UK shows including Peep Show, Father Ted, Have I Got News for You, Spitting Image, Horrible Histories and Green Wing.

The course advisory board includes:

Ash Atalla – The Office, Cuckoo, Trollied
Dawson Bros – The Peter Serafinowicz Show, That Mitchell & Webb Look, Big School
Sam Bain - Peep Show, Fresh Meat, Rev
Richard Boden – Blackadder, 'Allo 'Allo, IT Crowd
Gregor Cameron – Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show, Fighting Talk
Saurabh Kakkar – Head of Development – Comedy – Big Talk
Graham Linehan – Father Ted, IT Crowd, Count Arthur Strong
Arabella McGuigan – Smack the Pony, Brass Eye
Caroline Norris - Horrible Histories, The Armstrong & Miller Show, Dead Ringers
John O’Farrell – Spitting Image, Have I Got News For You, Novelist
Richard Preddy – Green Wing, Campus
Lucy Robinson - Co-Founder Little Comet Film & TV/Head of Comedy Brothers and Sisters
Helen Spencer -Salford Comedy Festival, Salford Sitcom Showcase, Jesting About
Lorna Watson & Ingrid Oliver – Watson & Oliver

The course is part-time (one evening a week and occasional Saturdays) over eighteen months and is delivered in central London. You will be expected to spend at least 8 hours a week working on assignments for the course. You will leave the course with a portfolio of material developed during the course, this could include a ten-minute taster tape of an idea you have developed, or a full script and some sketches and one-liners.

Specifically you will learn about:

- Comedy landscape
- Radio comedy
- Sketches
- Panel shows and formats
- Characterisation
- Story structure
- Narrative TV comedy
- Script editing
- Topical one-liners
- Outlines and treatments
- Pitching
- Commissioning processes
- Working with performers
- Compliance issues
- Working with writers
- Writing briefs

Students graduate able to:

- generate comedy programme ideas
- write or produce a narrative comedy, sketch show or comedy entertainment show
- pitch ideas to commissioning editors
- work with writers and help them develop their ideas

So you think you’re funny? Apply Now!

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

The NFTS want to encourage applications from the brightest and best talent out there….from all backgrounds. We are actively seeking to redress imbalances within the Industry by encouraging applications from under-represented groups, and have bursaries of £4650 on offer to 2 of the successful candidates. Bursaries will be awarded to stand out talent who can demonstrate that without this funding they would not be able to afford the course, or who can demonstrate they bring a unique and distinct perspective and voice to the course.

CURRICULUM

The course is made up of a number of modules and workshops, you learn by ‘doing’ as well as understanding theory and developing a variety of practical and creative skills.

Module 1: Writing and producing sketch shows
 A sketch needs a premise, a core funny idea that is its reason to exist. As soon as a sketch begins, the audience looks for this premise and it needs to be apparent. You will learn how this works by writing sketches for different shows and getting feedback on them from established sketch performers and producers. You will have your material read by experienced sketch performers, and the chance to have your material performed for an invited audience.

Module 2: Topical one-liners, formats and panel shows. Topical one-liners for Have I Got News for You, The News Quiz and other topical shows is often the entry point for writers. You will learn by a mixture of practice, theory and feedback, the basics of writing topical jokes. You will learn how to develop your own format or panel show idea.

Module 3: Radio Comedy 
Many comedy writers and producers have worked in both television and radio with many shows starting out on radio and moving to television. It is the entry point for many established comedy writers and producers. You will develop and test your skills by developing material for Radio 4 and pitch ideas to radio comedy producers.

Module 4: Writing/Producing an existing sitcom 
You will learn about writing for a situation and a bunch of characters that already exist, concentrating on pitching appropriate story ideas to the creators of those shows. You will also learn about script editing and how to give notes.

Module 5: Writing a TV narrative comedy 
You will develop an idea for a television narrative comedy (sitcom), pitch it, and write the first draft of a script.

Module 6: Graduation project 
Working on your own, or in a pair, you will develop a sitcom, comedy drama or sketch show for TV or radio. You will write one episode, and either shoot a taster tape or have some scenes performed by professional actors or produce a radio show.

NFTS BENEFITS

Comedy course participants will have full access to the NFTS’ optional creative stimulus strands, including: Passport to Cinema (weekly screenings of classic and pre-release films in the state-of-the-art campus cinema); and NFTS Masterclasses (major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include Graham King (producer, Hugo, The Departed), Guy Ritchie (Director, Sherlock Holmes), Danny Boyle (Director, Slumdog Millionaire) and Ian Livingstone (former President and CEO, Eidos).

TUTORS

Many of the people on the course advisory board will also teach on the course. In addition the course is supported by Channel 4 commissioners and executives.

APPLY WITH

- Two TV or radio sketches of no more than 400 words each. One of these should be set on a polar landscape.
- An outline for a comedy series, no more than 600 words
- Two short proposed story outlines for an existing sitcom. Each of the 2 episode outlines should be no more than 200 words. The sitcom we want you to write for is Bluestone 42
Each of your 2 stories should have a beginning, middle and an end. Make sure you do your background research and ensure you understand how Bluestone 42 operates as a sitcom

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR WRITING AND PRODUCING COMEDY COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=656

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

The Hispanic Studies division was rated 5A in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise.

Supervision is provided in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies. Members of staff have research interests in the following fields: Medieval: modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts; mythology and fantasy; oral literature; questions of transmission and textual criticism; Golden Age: Cervantes and the development of fiction; political and social thought; theatre; European Baroque culture; Modern Peninsular: Generation of 98; modern and contemporary fiction; narrative forms; Spanish American and Brazilian: Argentinian culture; women writers; gender, sexuality and representation; and theory.

Training and support

We offer supervision in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish-American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies, with particular research strengths in the 19th century, theatre of all periods, and the visual arts.

Thanks to the breadth of language research undertaken within the graduate school here at Edinburgh, we can also accommodate an interest in cross-cultural research with a programme of joint supervision.

Our staff pursue a diversity of research interests, offering you a wide choice of areas for study. Research staff have interests in the following fields:

Cervantes and the development of fiction
European Baroque culture
gender, sexuality and representation
Golden Age
medieval (modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts)
modern and contemporary fiction
modern peninsular: generation of ’98
mythology and fantasy
narrative forms
oral literature
political and social thought
questions of transmission and textual criticism
Spanish American, Brazilian and Argentinian culture
the essay and newspaper columns
theatre
women writers

Facilities

You will have access to the impressive collections of the University’s Main Library, in addition to the nearby National Library of Scotland and its outstanding collection of early modern Spanish material.

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The Postgraduate Certificate of Special Study in Supporting Learning is a one-semester 20-credit module at level 7 (Masters level). Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate of Special Study in Supporting Learning is a one-semester 20-credit module at level 7 (Masters level). It is designed for colleagues in the University of Westminster (or teaching on University of Westminster programmes in partner colleges) who have a role in teaching/supporting the learning of students at the University of Westminster, but who do not have the full role of an academic member of staff. You might be interested in the module if you are for example:
-A research student or research fellow who tutors or demonstrates to students or who runs a seminar group
-A visiting lecturer with only a small teaching load
-A librarian or careers advisor who does face-to-face sessions with groups of students
-A member of the technical staff who supports students in the studio, laboratory or computer suite

It is normally necessary for you to have at least 15 hours of supporting student learning during the semester in which you would take the course.

The course is delivered by educational development specialists in the Department of Leadership and Professional Development (Westminster Business School), and led by Jennifer Bright. The educational development team supports the University in a range of teaching and learning developments, including the Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education (PGCHE), which is a course for new and established academic staff.

The module aims to help you enhance your students’ learning by helping you to gain an understanding of effective learning design, planning and student engagement, and further aims to encourage a culture of quality enhancement in teaching and supporting learning.

Course content

You will be encouraged to consider current thinking in pedagogic practices in relation to designing, delivering and supporting student learning in HE through a reflective process using multiple feedback sources. The module activities will include evaluating the nature of the student learning experience in your own context, an observation of your own teaching/supporting learning activities (and that of others) and an investigation of relevant literature/theory.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Module topics and themes supporting this process include:
-The scholarship of learning and teaching and linking teaching and research
-Reflective practices and using student feedback for evaluation and development
-Threshold concepts, graduate attributes and signature pedagogies
-Session design and peer observation of teaching
-Learning design, sustainability and ethics
-Managing the learning environment
-Using technology to enhance student learning
-Student-centred and activity-based learning
-Facilitating student learning in different subject contexts and in face to face and online environments
-Facilitating one to one, small group and whole group learning
-Inclusive practices and using student diversity as a resource
-Personal and professional development planning

Teaching and learning methods used

-Work-based learning including teaching/supporting learning practice (15 hours minimum)
-Observation of your practice as well as your observation of the practice of an experienced peer
-On-line learning of approximately four hours per week
-Self-directed study and recording of on-going reflections on practice for reflective narrative-building and assessment, together with teaching observations and professional practice conversations with your subject mentor or educational development tutor, will comprise the remaining hours of this 20-credit module

The sessions will all take place on-line; however, when your teaching/supporting learning session is observed, your tutor will go to the location in which you work. (If you are teaching outside the University of Westminster, you will need to arrange for a tutor from your own institution to observe you.) There will also be a face-to-face Induction session which you will be invited to attend.

Assessment

Assessment is wholly coursework based; there are no examinations.
-The assessment will include formative piece of work that is compulsory but ungraded and which is submitted for feedback
-The final assessment is a reflexive narrative that integrates theory and practice supported by practice-based feedback from different sources. These will include two teaching practice observations by an experienced peer in your workplace (one of which may be a WEx tutor) plus your observation of an experienced peer.

The narrative will provide a place for you to evidence your continuing professional development in teaching and supporting learning.

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The Master’s programme in Media Studies at Leiden University has four specialisations, each of which considers the different forms of the media, and how these inter-relate. Read more
The Master’s programme in Media Studies at Leiden University has four specialisations, each of which considers the different forms of the media, and how these inter-relate.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/media-studies/en/introduction

Course detail

Available specialisations:

- Book and Digital Media Studies
- Comparative Literature and Literary Theory
- Film and Photographic Studies
- Journalism and New Media

Reasons to choose Media Studies at Leiden University

- Study the media from a broad perspective, from literature, film and photography to the new media. This breadth will give you ample opportunity to create cross-connections between the different specialisations.

- Explore present-day media forms and how these are related to one another, while at the same time investigating the roots of this relatively new field.

Comparative Literature and Literary Theory

One of the roots of this relatively new field is Film Studies that since the sixties has borrowed from Literature Studies such methodologies as ‘author theory’ and ‘textual analysis’. The specialisation in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory focuses upon literary techniques and practices from an intermedial perspective.

Like Book and Digital Media Studies, Comparative Literature is concerned with the history of the book as a vehicle for information and with present-day adaptations of this medium. Within Film and Photographic Studies, too, you study the relationship between art forms and media: what do literature, film and photography have in common and what is specific to these three fields? What is their narrative potential?

Comparative Literature also shares with Journalism and New Media an interest in the sources and modern versions of rhetoric, while the audiovisual branch of journalism is related to film and photography, both documentary and aesthetic.

Within Media Studies you have every opportunity to bring together the different elements of the programme through your choice of electives. If you wish to make a broader study of the interconnections between the different media, the Research Master’s in Literary Studies is a good option as this programme forms a bridge between the Literary Studies, Media Studies and Arts and Culture programmes.

Careers

Alumni can be found employed in a wide variety of fields. Some work within public relations, journalism, in translation agencies, or as copywriters, correctors, education-centre directors, policy makers in city counsels and ministries, cultural representatives, art editors for newspapers, librarians or lectors at publishing houses. In addition, you will also be qualified to continue in academic research and could choose to apply for a PhD programme.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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