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Masters Degrees (Narrative Studies)

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The Master’s programme in English Studies helps you develop your expertise in areas that are often separated in other programmes. Read more
The Master’s programme in English Studies helps you develop your expertise in areas that are often separated in other programmes: English language and linguistics, literature in English, and the teaching of English. Upon graduation, you will have excellent command of the English language. By working in a stimulating environment with accomplished researchers and teachers, you will also develop other skills needed in your future career, such as skills in presentation, independent and group work, and project management.

An MA in English Studies prepares you for a variety of jobs, and our graduates have been successful in finding employment. If combined with mandatory pedagogical studies, the Master’s degree in English Studies qualifies you to be a language teacher. Alternatively, you can find employment in media or publishing, business, or international organisations where language skills are required. English is used globally as the language of science, culture, business and tourism, and experts in English are required in all of these fields.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Courses in English Studies focus on several topics relating to the English language, literatures in English, and teaching English. You can choose to combine courses from one or more lines according to your interests. In Linguistics courses you will focus on the structure and uses of English as well as on language variation and change, sociolinguistics and corpus linguistics. In the Literature courses you will study several areas of the various literatures in English from narrative, cognitive, postcolonial and ecocritical perspectives. Courses in Applied Linguistics are tailored especially for future language teachers.

As a student in English Studies, you will attend lectures but also work in collaboration with other students, partly in digital learning environments. To assess your learning progress, several methods are used, such as examinations, essays and learning diaries. In English Studies you will also practice your spoken and presentation skills.

During your Master’s studies, you can:
-Progress further in your linguistic or literary studies and choose the most interesting courses.
-Strengthen your understanding of theory in your chosen field.
-Strengthen your language skills, academic writing skills and presentation skills.
-Participate in research projects.
-Participate in the Master’s thesis seminar, during which you will write your thesis.
-Complete studies abroad as an exchange student (if you have not done so already).
-Complete practical training, by working as a trainee or a substitute teacher, for instance.

Selection of the Major

You can choose between two specialisations, Teacher Training and General. For the teacher’s specialisation, pedagogical studies are mandatory, and there is a separate selection process for these studies. If you choose the General specialisation, you can combine English Studies with other studies according to your interests.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master’s degree is 120 credits (ECTS). The degree contains the following studies:
-Advanced studies in the discipline (60–120 credits) and
-If needed, you can take other courses to achieve the minimum credit requirement for the degree (a total of 120 credits).

With full-time studies you should be able to complete the Master’s degree in two years.

During your Master’s studies, you will focus mainly on your major subject, deepening your knowledge through coursework and writing your Master’s thesis. The advanced studies in your major subject include professional skills courses, which are typically completed as practical training.

Depending on your interests, you can also include minor subjects and other supporting studies.

To help you complete your studies systematically, you will prepare a personal study plan (PSP) at the beginning of your Master’s studies, with support especially from the programme staff and from the Faculty and University administrators.

Career Prospects

English Studies will prepare you for several careers in business and culture, as well as in public administration and education:
-With careful selection of supporting studies, you can find employment in government, the media, libraries and other cultural institutions, national and international organisations, or tourism.
-If you complete pedagogical studies for subject teachers, you will be qualified to teach English at comprehensive and upper secondary schools as well as in adult education.
-After successfully completing your Master’s degree, you can also apply to continue your studies as a postgraduate student and later build a career as a university researcher or teacher.

The University of Helsinki has the most comprehensive selection of disciplines in Finland, making it easier for you to plan your major and supporting studies to benefit your future career. Feel free to include the ones you find most interesting and useful in your degree.

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The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. Read more
The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. The program fulfills these objectives by educating a leadership corps of health professionals and scholars from the humanities and social sciences who will imbue patient care and professional education with the skills and values of narrative understanding.
Health care and the illness experience are marked by uneasy and costly divides: between those in need who can access care and those who cannot, between health care professionals and patients, and between and among health care professionals themselves. Narrative medicine is an interdisciplinary field that challenges those divisions and seeks to bridge those divides. It addresses the need of patients and caregivers to voice their experience, to be heard and to be valued, and it acknowledges the power of narrative to change the way care is given and received.

Program structure

The Narrative Medicine graduate degree requires 38 points to complete. Those studying full-time can complete the program in one academic year plus the following summer, and for a few students, in one academic year. Students electing to study on a part-time basis can complete the degree in two years. The part-time option is designed to accommodate the professional obligations of students who are employed. This is a rigorous and concentrated program that demands a serious commitment of time and energy. Students are expected to devote significant time to completing reading assignments, class assignments, and term projects outside of class.
Degree requirements include the five Core Courses in Narrative Medicine (22 points) and the Research Methodology course (4 points), which is required for all students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research. The remaining 12 to 16 points may include any combination of (1) additional Topics in Narrative Medicine courses; (2) elective courses chosen from other departments (up to six points: note that many graduate courses in other departments are three points each); Independent Study (one to four points) and/or (4) a Capstone (two to four points).
The core curriculum of this pioneering M.S. in Narrative Medicine combines intensive exposure to narrative writing and close reading skills, literary and philosophical analysis, and experiential work, with the opportunity to apply this learning in clinical and educational settings. Core courses provide the conceptual grounding for work in narrative medicine, and introduce the direct practice of teaching narrative competence to others. Students combine core curriculum work with more focused study of important and current topics in the field. Focused seminars draw on the resources of more than one discipline. Courses rotate to reflect the current concerns, methodologies, and analytic approaches of narrative scholars and practitioners. To allow students to individualize their professional education in narrative medicine, they may choose electives from among a wide range of offerings at the University, with advice and approval of the faculty adviser. Electives enable students to gain knowledge in academic disciplines they wish to pursue (e.g., medical anthropology) or in subject areas of special professional interest (e.g. aging).The optional Capstone Project offers a wide range of opportunities for supervised or mentored work: a clinical placement, a program development and/or evaluation project, a scholarly thesis, or a writing project. It may combine independent work with a summer intensive workshop, such as the Columbia University Oral History summer workshop or an intensive writing workshop. The requirement can also be satisfied by clinical practicums that may include teaching, witnessing, or serving as a teaching assistant.

For more information on the courses please visit the website: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/courses

Research Methodology

All students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research, are required to take our Research Methods in Narrative Medicine course

Funding and Financial Resources

We want to make sure that the cost of your continuing education and professional studies do not stand in the way of your goals.
Most students at the School of Professional Studies use a combination of savings, scholarships, loans, outside grants, sponsors, or employer tuition benefits to cover the cost of attendance. However you choose to finance your education, consider it an investment in your future, and know that we, in conjunction with the Office of Student Financial Planning, are here to help and advise you along the way.

You can find more information on the funding available here: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/tuition-and-financing/financial-resources

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Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them. Read more
Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them.

Narrative research offers new areas of inquiry and creative solutions to problems in a wide variety of areas.

The University of East London has been a pioneer in the subject, establishing its prestigious international Centre for Narrative Research in 2000. It continues to attract leading academics and researchers from around the world.

We understand that it is not always possible to make it on to campus to study. Many of our students live overseas, while others have family and work commitments to balance.

So, flexible learning is a key to this course. You will have the option of studying the full PG certificate by distance learning, including the Narrative Research and the unique Narrative Force modules. But, if you can, you are also welcome to attend our on-campus sessions.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The course consists of two core 30-credit master’s-level modules in Narrative Research and Narrative Force – how a story can sometimes have a force or dynamic of its own.

Through a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives, it addresses key questions which will give you the skills to make decisions about how to conduct narrative research to produce the most meaningful results possible. These questions include:

How do people come to see themselves as distinct subjects about whom a story can be told? What role do memory and ideology play in people’s accounts of their lives?
How do class, ethnicity, gender and other social characteristics shape the stories people tell? How does culture intervene in the way narratives are produced?

How do we decide on a research question in narrative analysis? What are the advantages and disadvantages of different modes of narrative inquiry and analysis?
What are the possibilities and limitations of narrative research for drawing conclusions of theoretical and practical significance?

HOW YOU WILL LEARN

The learning materials for this course are detailed and activity-based to encourage you to engage actively with concepts, theories and techniques. We will provide you with key reading texts, while the learning material provides links to electronic journals and websites.

Online support is available through two platforms: UEL Direct and UEL Plus.
UEL Direct provides access to online services, enabling you to manage your account and view your assessment feedback and results online. It also provides general course information and some support material tailored to the needs of distance learners.

UEL Plus, the platform used for the delivery of the course, provides the academic content for each module and facilitates online discussions between learners and UEL staff. It also helps you download course material.

Sometimes we use Skype for tutorials and we encourage our students to interact with each other on their ideas and learning. This is part of a flexible approach to all of your learning.

Our academic team are actively involved in both international narrative research projects and in producing publications on the latest developments in practice across a variety of areas.

They have also written respected text books on narrative research. So you will have access to academics who are experts in both the practical and theoretic approaches to the subject.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Our students for distance learning are based all over the world – from Canada and New Zealand to Sweden and other parts of the UK – and their career paths go in many different directions.

Some are looking to use narrative research in their current jobs, returning to work with a completely new set of skills which will allow them to apply for more challenging roles within their organisation.

Others are PhD students or researchers intending to use narrative research in their work and adopt a more creative approach to their current role or research.

We have wide experience of teaching students from health services or organisations, especially the National Health Service in the UK. But our courses have also attracted people working in variety of industries from the media to public sector bodies and local authorities.

Using and applying narratives is an expanding area for careers, especially in fields such as academic social science and cultural studies, applied social policy and in the computer industry.

By working with some of the most experienced narrative research experts in the world – especially through the Centre for Narrative Research – you will finish the course with the knowledge and connections to help you in your current role and open up new career opportunities.

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Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them. Read more
Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them.

Narrative research offers new areas of inquiry and creative solutions to problems and is increasingly used in a variety of areas. UEL has been a pioneering university in the subject, setting up the prestigious Centre for Narrative Research in 2000.

Throughout the course you’ll have access to the Centre, which supports research on spoken, written and visual narratives and fosters inter-disciplinary work. It brings together researchers from psychological, sociological, anthropological, cultural and media studies, humanities, arts and performance research traditions into a productive dialogue.

This MA is a unique, inter-disciplinary course, drawing on social sciences and the humanities to help you learn narrative theories and methods. It will give you experience in the application of narrative concept and analysis and guide you through the planning and performance of a piece of advanced and original narrative research.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

You will undertake four modules and a dissertation and you can study full-time for one year or part-time for two years. Through a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives, the MA addresses a number of key questions:

How do people constitute themselves as subjects within narratives? What role do memory, ideology and audience play in people's accounts of their lives? How do class, ethnicity, gender and other social characteristics shape the stories people tell? What are the ethics of narrative research? How does narrative research relate to discourse analysis, ethnography and other kinds of qualitative work? When we are embarking on narrative research, how do we decide on a programme of research, a procedure and means of analysis?

You’ll undertake a supervised research project in an area of your own interest. You can develop the dissertation from a proposal undertaken in the Narrative Practice module or you can develop something separately.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

UEL has enjoyed strong links with the National Health Service in the UK in the last 15 years, especially with staff involved in mental health care.

NHS professionals from the leading mental care centre at the Tavistock Clinic in London as well as general practitioners have studied on the MA course to understand how they can use narrative research in their daily work. The course has also attracted people working in such varied industries as the media, public-sector bodies and local authorities.

The course enables professionals to return to work with a completely new set of skills which allow them to apply for more challenging roles within their organisation or to adopt a more creative approach to their current role or research.

PhD students or other researchers use the course to expand their techniques and research capabilities. Using and applying narratives is an expanding area for careers, especially in fields such as academic social science and cultural studies, applied social policy areas, health services and in the computer industry, particularly in the development of narrative-based games. By studying this MA, you’ll be putting yourself at the heart of cutting-edge research which is globally recognized.

MODULES

Narrative Research (core)
Narrative Practice (core)
Political Narratives (optional)
Genealogical Research Strategies (optional)
Life-course narratives (optional)
Subjects in Culture (optional)
Feminist Postcolonialism: Orientalism, Gender, Sexuality (optional)
Psychosocial Analysis of Forced Migration (optional)
Dissertation (core)

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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

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What is the Master of Cultural Studies about? . The term ‘cultural studies’ first of all refers to the study of cultural policy at all levels of policy-making and management in the public sector (local, regional, national, international). Cultural policies are anchored in legal texts and best practices. Read more

What is the Master of Cultural Studies about? 

The term ‘cultural studies’ first of all refers to the study of cultural policy at all levels of policy-making and management in the public sector (local, regional, national, international). Cultural policies are anchored in legal texts and best practices. Our programme has a strongly practice-based approach to these policies. ‘Cultural studies’ also refers to a specific type of analysis and interpretation of culture. This approach to cultural studies is mainly indebted to the Anglo-Saxon tradition. Our KU Leuven team has always been an active contributor to this particular field as well.

The MA in Cultural Studies places the following emphases:  

  • cultural theory and concepts
  • applied narrative
  • art, media and performance
  • contemporary culture
  • interdisciplinary objects of study and methodologies
  • project-based learning

Objectives

The Master of Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary programme that aims at preparing the student for a wide range of executive functions in the cultural field (cultural mediation, criticism, media, heritage). In order to achieve this goal, the programme offers a combination of theoretical and practical modules.

At the end of the programme, graduates:

  • have an in-depth knowledge of the structure of the cultural field and the aims and functions of cultural policy in Flanders (to a lesser extent) and Belgium/Europe (to a larger extent);
  • are fit for employment in a cultural institution or organisation;
  • are aware of the current definitions of culture and the theoretical debates on these definitions;
  • are capable of writing an individual research report;
  • have developed a solid scientific attitude towards the major methodological aspects and issues in the field of cultural studies.

Career perspectives

As both a hands-on and theoretically oriented programme, the Master of Arts in Cultural Studies prepares students for careers in a wide range of fields. On the one hand, many graduates become public servants and cultural policy officers at all levels of government (local, regional, national, international). On the other, many graduates enter the large field of creative industries (music, television, print and online media). The programme's regularly updated internship database provides a good overview of the possibilities open to students of cultural studies.

A fair number of students combine their studies (in 2 years) with a teachers' training programme, which prepares them for a teaching career. Students eager to find their way in the cultural sector should realise, however, that working in culture rarely entails a nine-to-five job. Special qualities such as passion, enthusiasm, creativity, flexibility, teamwork and good verbal and communicative skills are crucial. This programme in aims to hone those qualities.



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Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Read more
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programmes offer up-to-date training in research methods and skills and a wide selection of literature modules from which you choose three; you will also write a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to follow up particular interests by studying a named pathway, or to designate your own area of study within the broad MA in English Literary Studies, tailoring an individual programme based on period, theme or genre. An MA in English is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take one of the named pathways, you will be expected to select two modules from those available within a pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to your named pathway. You need not confine your choices to a named pathway, as on the broad MA in English Literary Studies you may choose any three from the full list of modules on offer if you prefer. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules:
Research Methods and Resources
Dissertation

Typical optional Modules might include:
Old Norse
Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
Old English Language and Literature
Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Renaissance Tragedy
Renaissance Humanism
Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
Romantic Forms of Grief
Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
The Literatures of Slavery
Literature of the Supernatural
Modernism and Touch
Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
Life Narratives
Post-War British Drama
Modern Poetry
The Contemporary US Novel
Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative
The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than twenty of the above will run in any one year.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management.

You’ll develop your understanding of the ways in which historians and cultural theorists have interpreted and represented architecture, material culture and museums over the past 2,000 years. You’ll look at different methods of display and interpretation and the methodologies behind museum practice and country house collections. Then you’ll choose from optional modules on topics such as cultural theory, sculpture, Hollywood icons or cinema.

At the same time, you’ll develop practical skills. You’ll work on an interpretation project in our Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery and you’ll even undertake a negotiated work placement in your second semester. Supported by the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills for a successful career in the museum and art gallery sector.

You’ll study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a national museum, nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many private and charitable museums and galleries.

We’re also a short bus or train journey away from everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Bronte Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage

All students on the degree become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy opportunities from networking events and links to alumni to conferences, seminars and reading groups.

Course content

A set of core modules form the bedrock of the programme, introducing you to the concept of the ‘museum’ and the ways in which Western museums have represented and interpreted history and historical material.

You’ll also use contemporary theory to consider 20th-century museum practice and key questions around curatorship, museology and museum management. The role of the curator, funding and sponsorship and the display and interpretation of objects are among the topics you’ll cover.

Your core modules will give you the chance to apply your theoretical knowledge and gain practical skills. You’ll take part in an interpretation project in the University’s Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery, as well as completing a work placement in an external arts or heritage organisation.

All MA students in the School take two core modules which develop the research skills to complete research projects such as your essays and dissertation.

This will build to our unique MA Symposium in Semester 2, where you present some of your own research across interdisciplinary panels, and a dissertation which enables you to undertake research in a topic of interest to you.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Advanced Research Skills 1 5 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 2 5 credits
  • History and the Museum: Representation, Narrative and Memory 30 credits
  • Museum, Object, Practice 30 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • Dissertation for the MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies 50 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Beyond the Trench: Collaborative Projects on the History, Remembrance and Critical Heritage of the First World War 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Critical and Curatorial Challenges in Contemporary Art: The Documenta Exhibitions at Kassel 1992-2012 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Art Gallery and Museum Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Art Gallery and Museum Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

You’ll also learn from practical experience when you undertake your work placement, and a variety of external speakers will give you an insight into contemporary practice in the sector. Independent study is an important element of the degree, allowing you to develop your research and critical skills.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work.

It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to art gallery and museum studies, as well as practical work experience – a combination which is very valuable to employers. You’ll also develop advanced skills in communication, research and analysis as well as cultural awareness.

Our graduates now work as heads of collection, curators and education staff in local authority museums, for national heritage organisations like the National Trust, charitable trusts and in arts marketing and public relations.

A significant number have also returned as research students and have secured scholarships to pursue their research topics, including Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) scholarships. Former research students are now forging academic careers in the UK, Canada and the US.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.



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Our taught MA pathway in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. Read more
Our taught MA pathway in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the field. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the beginnings of the literature of revolution, to life writing, to contemporary US crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programme offers up-to-date training in research methods and skills. You will choose three modules, at least two of which are from within the pathway, and you will write a dissertation on a subject related to twentieth- and twenty-first-century studies.

An MA in Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literary Studies is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take this named pathway, you will be expected to select at least two modules from those available within the pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to it. Your third optional module may, if you wish, be chosen from the full list of MA modules on offer in the Department. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Typical modules might include:
-Modern Poetry
-Literatures of Slavery
-Modernism and Touch
-Life Narratives
-Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
-Post-War British Drama
-The Contemporary US Novel
-The Writing of Poetry
-Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative.
-Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than five of the above will run in any one year.

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to indicate your choice of modules as well as to provide a personal statemen

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Studies. All students take 3 modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating eighteen hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities.

All students register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of teaching over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Written work for the RMR module involves significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by three and a half hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish ().

We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office at

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Our students come to us from a variety of backgrounds and jobs and with widely differing undergraduate degrees. Psychosocial studies is the study of the relationship between individuals and their social worlds. Read more
Our students come to us from a variety of backgrounds and jobs and with widely differing undergraduate degrees.

Psychosocial studies is the study of the relationship between individuals and their social worlds. It’s a cross-disciplinary course united by the belief that, to understand the contemporary human world, we need to use ideas from psychology, psychoanalysis, sociology, literature, history and cultural studies.

Individuals are psychologically complex and we focus on the interactions between them and the entwinement of that complexity with the social world.

Are human beings best understood as products of biology and evolution with instincts that can be tamed or liberated within different social contexts? Or do characteristics need to be understood as products of more distinctly human cultural processes that are subject to historical shifts? How do we treat each other? How can we live together and understand each other?

We apply these questions to practical applications on a distance learning course which allows you to study in a way that accommodates your work and family commitments and lets you learn at your own pace.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

This part-time course begins with a module that introduces the forces which led to the development of psychosocial studies as a distinct area of inquiry and by identifying the subject’s key themes.

The second and third modules include an analysis of the theoretical approaches to individuality and the examination of an influential set of ideas which suggests that individual psychological development can only be understood in terms of the social relationships surrounding it. The fourth module focuses on the application of psychosocial studies.

The course concludes by teaching research strategies in the fifth module, providing you with key skills to help you complete your final dissertation module.

Our students come from a variety of different backgrounds, from teaching and psychotherapy to fashion and social work, and we encourage you to choose a dissertation subject that reflects your individual area of interest.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

This MA course started in September 2013 and has already attracted students from a range of careers who are keen to improve their understanding of psychosocial studies and to apply them to their current roles.

Our students have included a psychiatrist, a teacher and an expert in fashion. It’s evidence that the course is relevant to a range of careers.

The trend towards globalisation and an increasingly diverse society is changing the way many people live and work. This course enables you to adapt to these changes and to relate psychosocial developments to your everyday working life and to your management of situations and staff.

It also provides you with an opportunity to change direction in your career and to seek out a new role which requires more psychosocial expertise.

By working closely with our academic staff, you will gain an insight into how they use their psychosocial skills in practical situations.

MODULES

Framing Psychosocial Studies (core)
Know Thyself? Changing conceptions of the self (option)
Applying Psychosocial Studies (option)
Research Strategies in Psychosocial Studies (core)
Dissertation (core)

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Our taught MA pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. Read more
Our taught MA pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the fields of Medieval and Renaissance studies. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from Old Norse to Renaissance Tragedy, from medieval manuscripts to critical theory. The Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies pathway is especially strong in offering interdisciplinary modules taught in collaboration with specialists from other departments including History and Archaeology. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programme offers up-to-date training in research methods and skills. You will choose three modules, at least two of which are from within the pathway, and you will write a dissertation on a subject related to Medieval and/or Renaissance studies.

An MA in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take this named pathway, you will be expected to select at least two modules from those available within the pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to it. Your third optional module may, if you wish, be chosen from the full list of MA modules on offer in the Department. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Typical modules might include:
-Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
-Old Norse
-Old English Language and Literature
-The Anglo-Norman World
-Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
-Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
-Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
-Renaissance Tragedy
-Renaissance Humanism
-John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
-Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more then six of the above will run in any one year.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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Physician Associates are healthcare professionals that support doctors in diagnosing and managing patient treatment. The PG Dip in Physician Associate Studies in Swansea is one of the first courses of its kind in Wales. Read more
Physician Associates are healthcare professionals that support doctors in diagnosing and managing patient treatment. The PG Dip in Physician Associate Studies in Swansea is one of the first courses of its kind in Wales. Developed as a collaborative venture between Swansea University Medical School and the College of Human and Health Science this integrated two year course will teach students the knowledge and clinical skills they require to pass the National Certification Examination and start work as a Physician Associate.

Key Features of the Physician Associate Studies Programme

Students will spend the majority of Year 1 of the Physician Associate Studies course undertaking university based theory and practical sessions with some early clinical exposure to the working environment . Teaching will be divided into four week blocks according to body systems and Anatomy and Clinical Skills teaching will be integrated into this structure. Teaching will be case based and will involve a combination of lectures, seminars, project work and small group learning.

Year 2 of the Physician Associate Studies course is largely spent on clinical placements, with students applying their learning in the care of real patients under the supervision of a clinically qualified mentor. Students will have to work towards an agreed level of competence at a range of clinical skills and must be assessed as safe and competent in those skills. The “Competence and Curriculum Framework for the Physician Assistant (2012)” prescribes, to a large extent, the range of clinical environments in which students will spend their placements.

Physician Associate Studies students will be provided with the opportunities to:

1. seek out and recognise the clinical applications of their theoretical learning
2. apply learning within the practice setting
3. reflect on practice to identify their individual learning needs
4. develop clinical reasoning skills
5. develop a range of practical skills
6. recognise, in practice, those principles, assumptions, beliefs and theories which shape that practice
7. work effectively with patients and where appropriate with carers
8. work within a clear understanding of the limitations of their knowledge and skills

The modular structure for Year 1 comprises two 40 credit modules delivered by Swansea University Medical School ( SUMS) and three modules delivered by the College of Human and Health Science (CHHS) with a combined value of 40 credits. The knowledge based module (Foundations in Clinical Medicine for Physician Associates) will be assessed by two summative Progress Tests. The “Physician Associate Clinical Skills” module will be assessed by Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE's). The CHHS modules are “An introduction to Sociology and Psychology for Physician Associates” ( 10 credits), “An introduction to Health Care Law and Ethics for Physician Associates” ( 10 credits) and “An introduction to Research, Evidence based practice and Reflection for Physician Associates” ( 20 credits) The CHHS modules will be assessed by a combination of essays, a research presentation and a reflective portfolio.

The modular structure for Year 2 contains two 40 credit modules delivered by SUMS. The “Foundations in Clinical Medicine” module will be assessed by two summative Progress Tests. The “Clinical Skills” module will be assessed by two OSCE's as well as workplace based assessments (Mini-CEX) and satisfactory completion of the learning log. The CHHS modules are” Public Health and Epidemiology for Physician Associates” ( 10 credits), “Learning,Teaching and Assessing for Physician Associates” (10 credits) and “Critical reflection for Physician Associates” (20 credits) The CHHS modules will be assessed by a combination of an essay, a presentation, a written narrative and completion of a reflective portfolio.

The Physician Associate Studies course is designed so that all examinations and assessments, including supplementaries, will be concluded by the end of August allowing students to be ready to sit the National Certification Examination for Physician Associates in early September.

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Your programme of study. If you want to go into consultancy or professional translation on behalf of wide ranging sectors, Translations Studies enables you to specialist and advance your skills with a professional environment. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to go into consultancy or professional translation on behalf of wide ranging sectors, Translations Studies enables you to specialist and advance your skills with a professional environment. Languages you can study include Arabic, French, German, Irish, Mandarin, Spanish and Welsh with other languages which may be available on demand. You can specialise in more than one language at Aberdeen which makes it a very attractive centre to study. You get a range of courses to really test you out and ensure you know the various techniques involved in translation at speed for example, narrative, arguments, texts and different applications.  You can apply your skills within business, law, medicine in particular to ensure you have a range of applications and solid rigour to your skills.  There are a number of optional courses which enable you to specialise even more into areas such as translation technologies which may allow you to get involved in software design for example or apps. You can also study, liaison interpreting, inter-cultural skills and professional skills looking at proof reading, editing and reviewing.

Translation Studies allows you to put your skills to good use in a range of exciting international and national careers with advanced level linguistics and communications skills as a translator.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Introduction

Key Concepts and Methods for Translation Studies

Language- Specific Translation Portfolio - all course

Elective courses

Compulsory

Language - Specific Translation Portfolio

Key Concepts and Methods in Translation Studies

Editing, Proofreading and Reviewing for Translators 

Semester 2

Language - Specific Translation Portfolio

Intercultural Communication

Additional Language

Literary Translation

Translation Technology

Professional Skills for Translation

Semester 3

Dissertation in Translation Studies

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by professionals who are academics in the field of Translation Studies
  • Aberdeen is an educational partner of the European Graduate Placement Scheme which provides students with practical skills
  • Our research centre was rated world leading and internationally excellent in Modern Languages (REF 2014)

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Months Part Time
  • September Start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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The PG Certificate in Dementia Studies (Arts and Activities) is a one year part-time distance learning programme that will explore potential for the creative arts, participatory approaches and novel forms of self-expression to enhance well-being and social participation for people with dementia. Read more
The PG Certificate in Dementia Studies (Arts and Activities) is a one year part-time distance learning programme that will explore potential for the creative arts, participatory approaches and novel forms of self-expression to enhance well-being and social participation for people with dementia.

This programme will enable you to develop your skills in designing, delivering and evaluating activities and will enhance your opportunities for gaining employment in this field or attracting funding for your projects. This course is intended for UK and international students who are:
-Arts practitioners, activity coordinators and others with an interest in developing and delivering creative activities with people who have dementia
-Volunteers who have contact with people with dementia

Why Bradford?

All teaching on the programme is research-informed and delivered by an academic team who are actively involved in relevant fields of dementia research. Members of the course team have completed research projects and studies using film, music, photography, narrative, conversation analysis and other participatory methods to enhance understanding of the experience of dementia.
Our distance-learning educational courses in Dementia are designed to be directly applicable to the workplace and to equip students with the skills to implement service delivery improvements.

Our focus is on developing person-centred dementia care in practice, to drive real world change. The programmes are designed for practitioners working in all areas and roles within health and social care, through offering choice in assignment topics meaning work can be tailored to each student's individual interests and role.

As our courses use distance and online learning methods, we enable practitioners and professionals to develop their knowledge in a flexible manner which supports study alongside work and family commitments.

We use the latest in e-learning technology to support students to be in regular contact with tutors and peers to facilitate communities of learning.

The University of Bradford has been providing accredited programmes in Dementia Studies since 2002, and has a long history of cutting-edge research related to person-centred dementia care and innovative methodologies for researching and developing practice in health and social care for people with dementia.

All teaching on the programme is research-informed and delivered by an academic team who are actively involved in relevant fields of dementia research. Members of the course team have completed research projects and studies using film, music, photography, narrative, conversation analysis and other participatory methods to enhance understanding of the experience of dementia.

For each module you are provided with a module study guide produced by the course team. It contains exercises, activities and links to audio and visual materials. To enhance the learning experience you are asked to contribute to on-line discussion groups and take part in real time tutorials.

Rankings

Ranked 6th in the UK for Nursing and Midwifery in the Guardian University League Tables 2017.

Modules

Arts and activities in Dementia Care
Understanding the Experiences of People with Dementia

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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If you want to widen the scope of careers open to you within the discipline or go on to teach, work in the ministry, in church leadership or charitable organisations this programme may help you achieve your career aspirations. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to widen the scope of careers open to you within the discipline or go on to teach, work in the ministry, in church leadership or charitable organisations this programme may help you achieve your career aspirations. Biblical and Religious Studies has been taught at Aberdeen since its inauguration in 1495 making it one of the oldest and most established universities to study this discipline area. Teachers are highly regarded internationally and the programme is made up of wide ranging spiritual areas of study. Students come from the British Isles and overseas and follow a wide range of professions upon graduation.

The programme in Biblical Studies is designed to stimulate reflection on the use of the Bible in theology by crossing the conventional disciplinary boundaries between biblical exegesis and systematic theology. Special attention will be given to the issues of canonical criticism, narrative reading, and the use of Scripture in the construction of theological arguments.

Courses listed for the programme

The Emergence of Christology
Jewish History and Culture
Readings in Systematic Theology
The Christian Doctrine of God
Creation in Christian Ethics
Great Thinkers in Theological Ethics
Spiritual Formation
Patterns and Principles of Church Leadership
Special Subjects x 2
Senior Honours Special Subject x 2
Reading New Testament Greek x 2
Hebrew Language lii and lv

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/922/biblical-studies/

Why study at Aberdeen?

• One of the oldest universities in the UK, with one of the oldest departments founded in 1495
• Alumni have gone on to teach, work in the ministry, church leadership, charitable organisations and doctoral studies
• You are taught by a great range of experts with access to the library and special collections

Where you study

• University of Aberdeen
• Full Time and Part Time
• 12 Months and 24 Months
• September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:
• Your Accommodation
• Campus Facilities
• Aberdeen City
• Student Support
• Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:
https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php

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