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Masters Degrees (Narrative)

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Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them. Read more
Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them.

Narrative research offers new areas of inquiry and creative solutions to problems in a wide variety of areas.

The University of East London has been a pioneer in the subject, establishing its prestigious international Centre for Narrative Research in 2000. It continues to attract leading academics and researchers from around the world.

We understand that it is not always possible to make it on to campus to study. Many of our students live overseas, while others have family and work commitments to balance.

So, flexible learning is a key to this course. You will have the option of studying the full PG certificate by distance learning, including the Narrative Research and the unique Narrative Force modules. But, if you can, you are also welcome to attend our on-campus sessions.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

The course consists of two core 30-credit master’s-level modules in Narrative Research and Narrative Force – how a story can sometimes have a force or dynamic of its own.

Through a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives, it addresses key questions which will give you the skills to make decisions about how to conduct narrative research to produce the most meaningful results possible. These questions include:

How do people come to see themselves as distinct subjects about whom a story can be told? What role do memory and ideology play in people’s accounts of their lives?
How do class, ethnicity, gender and other social characteristics shape the stories people tell? How does culture intervene in the way narratives are produced?

How do we decide on a research question in narrative analysis? What are the advantages and disadvantages of different modes of narrative inquiry and analysis?
What are the possibilities and limitations of narrative research for drawing conclusions of theoretical and practical significance?

HOW YOU WILL LEARN

The learning materials for this course are detailed and activity-based to encourage you to engage actively with concepts, theories and techniques. We will provide you with key reading texts, while the learning material provides links to electronic journals and websites.

Online support is available through two platforms: UEL Direct and UEL Plus.
UEL Direct provides access to online services, enabling you to manage your account and view your assessment feedback and results online. It also provides general course information and some support material tailored to the needs of distance learners.

UEL Plus, the platform used for the delivery of the course, provides the academic content for each module and facilitates online discussions between learners and UEL staff. It also helps you download course material.

Sometimes we use Skype for tutorials and we encourage our students to interact with each other on their ideas and learning. This is part of a flexible approach to all of your learning.

Our academic team are actively involved in both international narrative research projects and in producing publications on the latest developments in practice across a variety of areas.

They have also written respected text books on narrative research. So you will have access to academics who are experts in both the practical and theoretic approaches to the subject.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Our students for distance learning are based all over the world – from Canada and New Zealand to Sweden and other parts of the UK – and their career paths go in many different directions.

Some are looking to use narrative research in their current jobs, returning to work with a completely new set of skills which will allow them to apply for more challenging roles within their organisation.

Others are PhD students or researchers intending to use narrative research in their work and adopt a more creative approach to their current role or research.

We have wide experience of teaching students from health services or organisations, especially the National Health Service in the UK. But our courses have also attracted people working in variety of industries from the media to public sector bodies and local authorities.

Using and applying narratives is an expanding area for careers, especially in fields such as academic social science and cultural studies, applied social policy and in the computer industry.

By working with some of the most experienced narrative research experts in the world – especially through the Centre for Narrative Research – you will finish the course with the knowledge and connections to help you in your current role and open up new career opportunities.

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The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. Read more
The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. The program fulfills these objectives by educating a leadership corps of health professionals and scholars from the humanities and social sciences who will imbue patient care and professional education with the skills and values of narrative understanding.
Health care and the illness experience are marked by uneasy and costly divides: between those in need who can access care and those who cannot, between health care professionals and patients, and between and among health care professionals themselves. Narrative medicine is an interdisciplinary field that challenges those divisions and seeks to bridge those divides. It addresses the need of patients and caregivers to voice their experience, to be heard and to be valued, and it acknowledges the power of narrative to change the way care is given and received.

Program structure

The Narrative Medicine graduate degree requires 38 points to complete. Those studying full-time can complete the program in one academic year plus the following summer, and for a few students, in one academic year. Students electing to study on a part-time basis can complete the degree in two years. The part-time option is designed to accommodate the professional obligations of students who are employed. This is a rigorous and concentrated program that demands a serious commitment of time and energy. Students are expected to devote significant time to completing reading assignments, class assignments, and term projects outside of class.
Degree requirements include the five Core Courses in Narrative Medicine (22 points) and the Research Methodology course (4 points), which is required for all students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research. The remaining 12 to 16 points may include any combination of (1) additional Topics in Narrative Medicine courses; (2) elective courses chosen from other departments (up to six points: note that many graduate courses in other departments are three points each); Independent Study (one to four points) and/or (4) a Capstone (two to four points).
The core curriculum of this pioneering M.S. in Narrative Medicine combines intensive exposure to narrative writing and close reading skills, literary and philosophical analysis, and experiential work, with the opportunity to apply this learning in clinical and educational settings. Core courses provide the conceptual grounding for work in narrative medicine, and introduce the direct practice of teaching narrative competence to others. Students combine core curriculum work with more focused study of important and current topics in the field. Focused seminars draw on the resources of more than one discipline. Courses rotate to reflect the current concerns, methodologies, and analytic approaches of narrative scholars and practitioners. To allow students to individualize their professional education in narrative medicine, they may choose electives from among a wide range of offerings at the University, with advice and approval of the faculty adviser. Electives enable students to gain knowledge in academic disciplines they wish to pursue (e.g., medical anthropology) or in subject areas of special professional interest (e.g. aging).The optional Capstone Project offers a wide range of opportunities for supervised or mentored work: a clinical placement, a program development and/or evaluation project, a scholarly thesis, or a writing project. It may combine independent work with a summer intensive workshop, such as the Columbia University Oral History summer workshop or an intensive writing workshop. The requirement can also be satisfied by clinical practicums that may include teaching, witnessing, or serving as a teaching assistant.

For more information on the courses please visit the website: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/courses

Research Methodology

All students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research, are required to take our Research Methods in Narrative Medicine course

Funding and Financial Resources

We want to make sure that the cost of your continuing education and professional studies do not stand in the way of your goals.
Most students at the School of Professional Studies use a combination of savings, scholarships, loans, outside grants, sponsors, or employer tuition benefits to cover the cost of attendance. However you choose to finance your education, consider it an investment in your future, and know that we, in conjunction with the Office of Student Financial Planning, are here to help and advise you along the way.

You can find more information on the funding available here: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/tuition-and-financing/financial-resources

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature is the first of its kind in the world. It draws on world-level expertise to explore the various types of narrative produced in ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt.

Key Features

This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. It is taught by a team of scholars associated with the KYKNOS research centre, whose research in this field is internationally recognised.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature offers excellent preparation for students who intend to undertake further research in this exciting and rapidly developing area of Classical literature. Students will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Greek and/or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient Narrative Literature can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres

• Ancient Greek or Latin language

• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period

• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed

• Greek and Roman Magic :Exploring the Sources

• Reading Academic German

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

• Word, Metaphor, Allegory: effective models of reality

Student Quote

"I studied at Swansea University for my Undergraduate degree and fell in love with the city, the university campus and the lecturers and supporting staff at the university. Deciding to do my MA in Ancient Narrative Literature here was therefore partly influenced by this. However, Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University was an attractive choice mostly because of the quality of the lecturers here. Both Professor John Morgan who is already a highly esteemed scholar within the area of the Ancient Greek novels and Dr Ian Repath who is a rising star in the same subject area make Swansea University the ideal place to study Ancient Narrative Literature at MA level."

Ida Meland



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Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them. Read more
Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them.

Narrative research offers new areas of inquiry and creative solutions to problems and is increasingly used in a variety of areas. UEL has been a pioneering university in the subject, setting up the prestigious Centre for Narrative Research in 2000.

Throughout the course you’ll have access to the Centre, which supports research on spoken, written and visual narratives and fosters inter-disciplinary work. It brings together researchers from psychological, sociological, anthropological, cultural and media studies, humanities, arts and performance research traditions into a productive dialogue.

This MA is a unique, inter-disciplinary course, drawing on social sciences and the humanities to help you learn narrative theories and methods. It will give you experience in the application of narrative concept and analysis and guide you through the planning and performance of a piece of advanced and original narrative research.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

You will undertake four modules and a dissertation and you can study full-time for one year or part-time for two years. Through a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives, the MA addresses a number of key questions:

How do people constitute themselves as subjects within narratives? What role do memory, ideology and audience play in people's accounts of their lives? How do class, ethnicity, gender and other social characteristics shape the stories people tell? What are the ethics of narrative research? How does narrative research relate to discourse analysis, ethnography and other kinds of qualitative work? When we are embarking on narrative research, how do we decide on a programme of research, a procedure and means of analysis?

You’ll undertake a supervised research project in an area of your own interest. You can develop the dissertation from a proposal undertaken in the Narrative Practice module or you can develop something separately.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

UEL has enjoyed strong links with the National Health Service in the UK in the last 15 years, especially with staff involved in mental health care.

NHS professionals from the leading mental care centre at the Tavistock Clinic in London as well as general practitioners have studied on the MA course to understand how they can use narrative research in their daily work. The course has also attracted people working in such varied industries as the media, public-sector bodies and local authorities.

The course enables professionals to return to work with a completely new set of skills which allow them to apply for more challenging roles within their organisation or to adopt a more creative approach to their current role or research.

PhD students or other researchers use the course to expand their techniques and research capabilities. Using and applying narratives is an expanding area for careers, especially in fields such as academic social science and cultural studies, applied social policy areas, health services and in the computer industry, particularly in the development of narrative-based games. By studying this MA, you’ll be putting yourself at the heart of cutting-edge research which is globally recognized.

MODULES

Narrative Research (core)
Narrative Practice (core)
Political Narratives (optional)
Genealogical Research Strategies (optional)
Life-course narratives (optional)
Subjects in Culture (optional)
Feminist Postcolonialism: Orientalism, Gender, Sexuality (optional)
Psychosocial Analysis of Forced Migration (optional)
Dissertation (core)

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On this course you'll design visitor experiences and events for museums, brand, urban and community environments and work in small multidisciplinary teams to tell stories through text, image, sound and physical space. Read more

Introduction

On this course you'll design visitor experiences and events for museums, brand, urban and community environments and work in small multidisciplinary teams to tell stories through text, image, sound and physical space. You'll benefit from strong industry links that provide live, funded projects, mentors and placements.

Content

MA Narrative Environments is part of the Spatial Practices programme. The course combines storytelling with experience design, interaction design, museum studies, exhibition design, event design and communication design. You will develop and install interventions in cultural and corporate settings as well as making critical urban interventions in the public realm. You will undertake site and social research, visiting spaces, observing, filming and talking to visitors and inhabitants. You'll also produce proposals and make and test these in situ.

Distinct disciplines contribute to the postgraduate programme. Developing a new science centre, for example, draws on architects, curators, destination consultants, 3D designers, communication designers, interaction designers, time-based media designers, scenographers, writers, retailers and project managers. We value all.

Structure

MA Narrative Environments lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode'.

MA Narrative Environments is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises 2 units:

Unit 1 (60 credits) lasts 20 weeks.
Unit 2 (120 credits) runs for 10 weeks in the first year and 30 weeks in the second year.

Both units must be passed in order to achieve the MA, but the classification of the award of MA derives from your mark for Unit 2 only.

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The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms. Read more
The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms.

These forms have included written and illustrated books for children and adults, interactive design, film, graphic novels, stage and exhibition design, animation, book arts, narrative textiles, experimental writing, product design and even community projects that encourage social development through storytelling.

In its 25-year history, this course has built on the gathered knowledge and experience of its staff and students to cover topics that are relevant to all MA students interested in storytelling, visual narrative and delivering complex sequential messages.

Recent graduate work – ranging from a biography of Edith Sitwell to a series of calendars made from human hair – demonstrates the diversity of individual research. Other students have examined the legacy of recipes, the secret language of headscarves, the parallels between quantum physics and Taoism as demonstrated through a detective novel, and the role of plumage in communication.

Course structure

You can study on a part-time or full-time basis:

• Part-time, for two years, is designed to fit in with your professional life and allows more time for reflection. Part-time students work on the course for two days a week – one day on site and one day working independently.

• Full-time, for one year, is an intensive year of study. You work four days a week: two days with the course and two days independently.

Lectures, seminars, reviews and assessments are held at fixed times on Wednesdays. Other patterns of attendance vary according to individual circumstances. During holidays you will be engaged in independent study.

Your work will be predominantly project based, which may comprise of one or more parts focusing on a central theme or idea. A single project or investigation will in most cases sustain a student through the entire duration of the course, but at stage assessment, in consultation with tutors, it may naturally evolve into a new or related area of study.

The nature of the subject demands the continual interaction between research, analysis, and practical realisation, as well as an extended period of development for ideas to become fully meaningful. Throughout this investigation you will receive support and guidance from the course tutors.

Areas of study

As the course develops, there is increasing opportunity for independent and self-directed work, though each student is allocated a personal tutor who oversees the planning and content of individual projects. Besides practice-based work, the course also includes a written element in which you will be asked to reflect critically on the research and development of your project.

The Visual Narrative module includes lectures, themed group events and small practical activities such as the Surprise Project, where you are asked to deliver a surprise though a sequence of six images or objects, with the module group as your target audience. From this experience, you learn the nature and importance of surprise in basic storytelling and develop a vocabulary for narrative. In scheduled theme day events, such as Modern Cautionary Tales, you work in groups to challenge your quick-thinking skills in the invention, planning and presentation of a story.

While students accepted on the course should come with the technical skills necessary to fulfil their projects, access to the diverse workshops facilities – for example in bookbinding, letterpress, printmaking and photography – will be made available as appropriate to your project. There is also a substantial specialist library and a full range of computer facilities.

In order to bring together a variety of students and approaches, this course coexists with the Arts and Design by Independent Project MA. Both are based at our Grand Parade campus.

Stage 1:

Sequential Project(s)
Visual Narrative
Research and Investigation

Stage 2:

Major Sequential Project(s)
Project Report

Visiting lecturers

We arrange a programme of weekly lectures by a range of practitioners and academics to broaden your experience and understanding of professional issues and activity. Lecturers describe their practice and professional experience, sharing insights about their research methods and discoveries.

The programme is organised to relate to specific stages of the course and varies on a two-year cycle, so part-time students have access to a different set of events in each of their two years of study.

Careers and employability

Because of the diversity of our students and the projects they create, their professional achievements are equally wide-ranging. Successful commercial enterprises have been established, research degrees undertaken, books published, collaborative design groups formed, and work exhibited in major galleries and institutions. Graduates have also participated in festivals and conferences around the world.

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The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing. This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Read more
The UK’s only dedicated degree in narrative non-fiction writing.

Who is it for?

This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. The unifying factor for all writers on the programme is their intention to deliver their research or story through a narrative structure.

Objectives

Our definition of narrative non-fiction includes biography, travel, history, life writing, true crime, sports and other forms of sustained and structured non-fiction storytelling. The Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA provides you with essential skills and a supportive and challenging environment in which to write a full-length work of narrative non-fiction. You will develop your research skills, experiment with different writing styles, reflect on your own and other writer’s work and learn the essentials of the publishing industry.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, all by published authors, across the two years is front-end loaded in terms 1 and 2 with workshops, with workshops, lectures and seminars held two days a week. Here you will extend your writing skills, your understanding of non-fiction genres and your awareness of creative possibilities. You will also analyse the work of leading writers and explore writing through a variety of exercises, encouraging you to experiment with new approaches.

All workshops are based around the students’ own writing assignments which work towards the completion, or opening chapters, of a book. We also closely analyse published works of non-fiction, taking apart books to examine their style, structure and research methods.

Throughout the two years there are readings and workshops with visiting authors. In terms 3, 4, 5 and 6 you work principally on your own book project with the support of one-to-one tutorials.

In term 6 (the final term) the lectures and guest sessions focus on the publishing industry which will provide you with the knowledge to be placed with a literary agent. During the final term you will have the opportunity to read from your work in progress, to contribute to anthology of writing and to submit a full draft of your book.

Modules

Term 1
-CWM 959 The Fundamentals of Non-fiction (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Term 2
-CWM957 The Process of Writing (core)
-CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
-CWM935 Storytelling (core)
-CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Terms 3,4,5 and 6
-CWM956 Complete Book

Career prospects

The MA creative writing non-fiction is proud of its track record in publishing with students from the programme winning publishing contracts every year.

Graduates include:
-Peter Moore, The Weather Experiment (Chatto and Windus),
-Anne Putnam, Navel Gazing (Faber and Faber)
-Bridge O’Donnell, Inspector Minahan Makes a Stand (Picador).

Graduates have also gone on to work for media outlets and used their transferrable skills in a variety of professions including teaching, political campaigning and in the charity sector.

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Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers. Read more
Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers.

If you want to make a career in writing, this course is for you. You already have talent and ideas, we’ll add the expertise you need to approach your chosen market with confidence, originality and skill. No ambitions are out of bounds: we love commercial genre fiction and literary experiments equally.

We aim to ensure our graduates are equipped to succeed - and to change the culture they choose to enter.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA-Creative-Writing-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

We take an innovative approach to the training and support of aspiring writers, driven by intellectual ambition and practical industry experience. There are four strands to the programme:

• developing narrative technique
• practising vocational skills (including abridgement, adaptation and collaborative creation)
• experimental, theoretical and personal development work
• regular one-to-one editorial mentoring

Uniquely, the course offers a dynamic range of cross-disciplinary options. Writing for graphic fiction, screenwriting, interactive media and creative non-fiction are all offered as specialisms, while our pioneering module in genre fiction covers crime, horror, fantasy and science fiction with YA options in each.

We host an exciting programme of lectures and master classes from award-winning authors and high-profile industry experts. In addition, an internationally recognised author joins us for 12 months as Writer in Residence, to develop new work alongside students, share experience and offer one-to-one consultations.

Our approach to full-length narrative development trains you to deploy a range of unique and dynamic pre-writing techniques invented by our programme. This energetic combination of conceptual development and critical self-reflection will transform you into a technically adept, purposeful writer ready to make your mark.

The course is taught by industry professionals Sam Kelly, a former literary agent and David Bishop, a successful working writer and former editor. In addition to campus facilities, our students have access to the Writers’ Room, a private workspace with Wi-Fi, available evenings and weekends. It houses an exclusive library of 2,000 hand-picked books, DVDs and graphic novels and is the venue for reading groups and social events.

The MA is piloting a Teaching Internship Scheme, offering selected graduates the opportunity to develop their teaching practice with the course for a further year.

Modules

• Creating Narrative – Writer’s Toolkit
• Innovation and Authorship
• Creative and Editorial Development
• Writing Practice – First Person Narrative
• Writing Graphic Fiction
• Writing Genre Fiction
• Creative Non-Fiction
• Interactive Media
• Major Project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Among our graduates’ achievements are:

• book deals
• representation by literary agents
• international and national competition wins
• publication in magazines and anthologies
• Edinburgh International Book Festival appearances
• paid editing and writing commissions
• performances and teaching
• working for national literary organisations

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. Read more

Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. The growth of online digital cultures - and the impact of digital image creation on traditional image making - requires flexible and adaptable practitioners, and it provides unique opportunities for the entrepreneurial illustrator.

Our MA Illustration course offers you the chance to challenge the boundaries of illustration, both in its practice and its context, and is primarily concerned with the illustrated narrative. It offers you a creative and intellectual environment in which you can rigorously pursue a project of self-directed study, and produce a body of work on a topic of your interest within the field of illustration.

Our course enjoys a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas. As a student here you'll get to explore narrative storytelling, authorship, self-publishing, book production and visual narratives through the development of a personal project.

This MA course supports you to develop your own independent voice and to identify an audience. You're encouraged to take a self-directed entrepreneurial approach, developing and exploring creative opportunities and options for your work. This entrepreneurial emphasis will be supported by access to specialist facilities such as digital media suites, photography, printmaking and bookmaking.

Our course also provides you with the opportunity for extended critical debate, a high degree of critical reflection and integration of theoretical and practical concerns as part of the realisation of an ambitious body of work. It will also promote in-depth, rigorously conducted research, to ensure you're able to contextualise your own work in relation to the leading edge practice in illustration.

Visiting lecturers and practitioners inform and cultivate professional development, encouraging you to question and debate. Recent visiting lecturers have included Graham Rawle, Olivier Kugler, Nick White, Luke Best, Mathew Richardson and Posy Simmonds.

Industry Partners

Illustration at UCA Farnham has a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas.

Students on MA Illustration also benefit from well-established industry connections.

Careers

Graduates from our MA Illustration course go on to establish careers in a diverse range of exciting areas, such as:

-Freelance illustration

-Self-publishing

-Artist practice

-Printmaking

-Curation

-Editing

-Animation

-Project management

-Education

-Design

-Digital imaging

-Web authoring

-Multi-media production.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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The storyteller of the future is not just someone with ideas, but a person that is able to communicate concepts through a series of platforms, that can lead innovation and communicate effectively within an inter-disciplinary team. Read more
The storyteller of the future is not just someone with ideas, but a person that is able to communicate concepts through a series of platforms, that can lead innovation and communicate effectively within an inter-disciplinary team. Today’s designers, coders, journalists, documentary film makers, photographers, educators, broadcasters, radio producers and social campaigners need to have the appropriate digital media skills to “tell their stories” in an interactive way.

The Interactive Factual Narrative MA is designed to create a safe experimental environment where you will acquire the methodology you need in order to develop your interactive factual stories. As this is a new field, terminology is still confusing and you will have heard wording as varied as i-docs, web-docs, social apps, mobile news, immersive journalism, VR stories, factual digital experiences, serious games, stories for change, transmedia non-fiction and more.

We have conglomerated all these different terminologies into the larger family of interactive factual narratives, or “interfactuals” – stories that use digital interactive media to portray the world around us and who want to initiate change.

Course content

The Interactive Factual Narrative MA has a totally different approach from any masters degree course you might know of. It has been conceived as a multi-disciplinary lab that will be taught in burst mode - blocks of three full days every two to three weeks. This is to enable you to work alongside of your studies, while developing your dream personal project on the side. Perhaps you will use the course to research and develop your company’s special project, or as a way to stay creative and socially engaged while keeping your day-to-day job. Whatever your situation, the Interactive Factual Narrative MA offers you a creative space to engage with your passions.

Modules on this course are following the production schedule of an interactive project and adopt an iterative way of working. Testing and user experience is taken in consideration at each step of the creative process. It will feel as a safe playing ground where you will be encouraged to learn, fail, re-iterate and ultimately think outside of the box.

You will be asked to adopt a collaborative ethos and open your professional expertise to the benefit of your course peers. In doing so, you will feel part of a creative community that will support you when needed, and may serve you as a network even after the course has finished.

The modules will be very hands-on and will be lead by a mixture of professionals from the field and university staff. All modules will be compulsory – this is to allow the different groups to advance at a similar pace.

By the end of the year you will have expanded your ideas of what an interactive narrative can be, acquired a solid knowledge of the field, consolidated a multi-skilled network of people and developed a digital prototype of your group idea. By then your project should be ready to be presented to potential financers and media partners.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. For more details on course structure and modules, and how you will be taught and assessed, see the full course document.
-INTERACTIVE FACTUAL FUNDAMENTALS (IF FUNDAMENTALS)
-IDEATION: INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING AND PROTOTYPING
-BUILDING 1: PLATFORMS, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
-BUILDING 2: THE BUSINESS OF INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
-MAJOR PROJECT

Associated careers

The course is mainly geared at giving you the right support and methodology to develop your interactive project during the course. The critical awareness and the iterative methodology that you will gain will then serve you to remain competitive in the digital creative industries you might enter in the future, regardless of the technologies they use.

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Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Read more
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programmes offer up-to-date training in research methods and skills and a wide selection of literature modules from which you choose three; you will also write a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to follow up particular interests by studying a named pathway, or to designate your own area of study within the broad MA in English Literary Studies, tailoring an individual programme based on period, theme or genre. An MA in English is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take one of the named pathways, you will be expected to select two modules from those available within a pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to your named pathway. You need not confine your choices to a named pathway, as on the broad MA in English Literary Studies you may choose any three from the full list of modules on offer if you prefer. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules:
Research Methods and Resources
Dissertation

Typical optional Modules might include:
Old Norse
Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
Old English Language and Literature
Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Renaissance Tragedy
Renaissance Humanism
Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
Romantic Forms of Grief
Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
The Literatures of Slavery
Literature of the Supernatural
Modernism and Touch
Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
Life Narratives
Post-War British Drama
Modern Poetry
The Contemporary US Novel
Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative
The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than twenty of the above will run in any one year.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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Our Arts and Design by Independent Project MA is a highly individual course offering you the opportunity to propose and develop your own academic programme in a particular field of craft, design, communication or image-making within a stimulating educational context. Read more
Our Arts and Design by Independent Project MA is a highly individual course offering you the opportunity to propose and develop your own academic programme in a particular field of craft, design, communication or image-making within a stimulating educational context.

A central project forms the core of the course. The project encourages experimentation and innovation in a specific field. You will develop and consolidate your project in consultation with academic staff throughout the course, utilising facilities and drawing on expertise from our other arts and humanities courses, as well as other areas of the university.

There is an extensive programme of lectures, events, films, and seminars throughout. We ask you to keep a critical diary during the course and to write a project report at the end of each year. This report is a considered critique of your studio-based work and decision making.

Course structure

You can study on a part-time or full-time basis:

• Part-time, for two years, is designed to fit in with your professional life and allows more time for reflection. Part-time students work on the course for two days a week – one day on site and one day working independently.

• Full-time, for one year, is an intensive year of study. You work four days a week: two days with the course and two days independently.
Lectures, seminars, reviews and assessments are held at fixed times on Wednesdays. Other patterns of attendance vary according to individual circumstances. During holidays you will be engaged in independent study.

Your work will be predominantly project based, which may comprise of one or more parts focusing on a central theme or idea. A single project or investigation will in most cases sustain a student through the entire duration of the course, but at stage assessment, in consultation with tutors, it may naturally evolve into a new or related area of study.

The nature of the subject demands the continual interaction between research, analysis, and practical realisation, as well as an extended period of development for ideas to become fully meaningful. Throughout this investigation you will receive support and guidance from the course tutors.

Areas of study

As the course develops, there is increasing opportunity for independent and self-directed work, though each student is allocated a personal tutor who oversees the planning and content of individual projects. Besides practice-based work, the course also includes a written element in which you will be asked to reflect critically on the research and development of your project.

The Visual Narrative module includes lectures, themed group events and small practical activities such as the Surprise Project, where you are asked to deliver a surprise though a sequence of six images or objects with the module group as your target audience. From this experience, you learn the nature and importance of surprise in basic storytelling and develop a vocabulary for narrative. In scheduled theme day events, such as Modern Cautionary Tales, you work in groups to challenge your quick-thinking skills in the invention, planning and presentation of a story.

While students accepted on the course should come with the technical skills necessary to fulfil their projects, access to the diverse workshops facilities – for example in bookbinding, letterpress, printmaking and photography – will be made available as appropriate to your project. There is also a substantial specialist library and a full range of computer facilities.

In order to bring together a variety of students and approaches, this course coexists with the Sequential Design/Illustration MA. Both are based at our Grand Parade campus.

Stage 1:

Independent Project (Stage 1)
Visual Narrative: The Art and Design of Storytelling
Practice Based Research Methods

Stage 2:

Major Independent Project (Stage 2)
Applied Research Methods
Completion Statement

Visiting lecturers

We arrange a programme of weekly lectures by a range of practitioners and academics to broaden your experience and understanding of professional issues and activity. Lecturers describe their practice and professional experience, sharing insights about their research methods and discoveries.

The programme is organised to relate to specific stages of the course and varies on a two-year cycle, so part-time students have access to a different set of events in each of their two years of study.

Careers and employability

Because of the diversity of our students and the projects they create, their professional achievements are equally wide-ranging. Successful commercial enterprises have been established, research degrees undertaken, books published, collaborative design groups formed, and work exhibited in major galleries and institutions. Graduates have also participated in festivals and conferences around the world.

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Explore the creative potential of your narrative constructions, observations of character and the aesthetics of dialogue within the tradition and potentiality of Screenwriting as designed for the next generation of industry writers. Read more
Explore the creative potential of your narrative constructions, observations of character and the aesthetics of dialogue within the tradition and potentiality of Screenwriting as designed for the next generation of industry writers.

•This course runs on a biennial basis and the next intake will be 2016
•Part-time programme that can be completed alongside full-time employment in two years
•The £38million Redmonds Building provides state-of-the-art facilities for the Liverpool Screen School
•Skillset Accredited status ensures an exceptional quality course
•Liverpool Screen School is part of the BBC North Developing Talent Scheme


LJMU’s Skillset Accredited MA Screenwriting programme is designed to prepare screenwriters for the exacting demands of the industry.

The UK film and television industry is enjoying sustained growth and increasing international influence, and the demand for screenwriters with a distinct voice and original vision has never been greater.

Liverpool has established itself as a centre for regional film and television production both in the commercial sector, and increasingly through independent production.

This is a highly participatory course for committed writers of all ages who show originality and talent and is taught by experienced tutors with strong industry connections.

The course emphasises the development of practical screenwriting skills and the production of a portfolio of work, developed to the highest professional standards. An understanding of professional practice, pitching and marketing screenplays, and the critical analysis of films and screen texts are further key elements in the programme.

The course is regularly visited by industry professionals which means you will have great networking opportunities plus the chance to engage directly with leading practitioners in the field.

Throughout the two year programme, you will be engaged in the production of varied and increasingly challenging projects, beginning with short film scripts and culminating in the development of feature-length screenplays. All screenplays are developed in small group workshops.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.


Discovering the Screen as a Writer

Introduces practice creative, formal, research and technical skills appropriate to Screenwriting at masters level, allowing you to gain an understanding of the difference between writing for different mediums

Ongoing Narrative

Introduces the concepts behind writing something that has an ongoing narrative in order to create a dynamic world for stories to occur in engaging, complex characters

Writing the Feature Film

You will complete your first feature film draft and further develop research abilities, in particular, how to broaden your writing craft in order to have dramatic stories with a high level of realism or detail

The Importance of Rewriting and How to Do It

You will develop the ability to reappraise your own work, to enrich you with screenwriting concepts in order to write an accomplished second draft

The Third Act

Continue your growth as a feature film writer, deepening your creative voice and making you a more ambitious writer

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Read more
At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Working with professional writers, you will develop your skills to produce and share stories in a variety of genres.

Through creative workshops, you will partner with supportive lecturers and interdisciplinary postgraduate groups to develop advanced theories and practices that relate to the creative writing process. Both people with and without experience of creative writing should consider applying for this course, which aims to prepare you for a career as a freelancer or portfolio worker.

We have fantastic links with local publishers, writers and creative companies and offer a unique salon series where industry experts offer practical advice and insights. In semester two, you will apply your writing and creative practice in a workplace scenario, while being encouraged to work on your own interests and passions.

If you want to share your work, you have the opportunity to do so through our established student-led anthologies and open mic nights, which form part of Brighton's thriving creative scene.

Why study with us?

• Chance to develop as a portfolio writer and creative practitioner – somebody who can apply good writing to real-world scenarios and work to specific briefs

• A transformative experience that goes beyond looking to get your first novel published, so you can explore copywriting and publishing while nurturing your passion for storytelling

• Guest lectures from publishers and professional writers including Mark Radcliffe and Isabel Ashdown, who runs the Prose Fiction module

• Links with local publishers, writers and creative companies, with placements available across Brighton

• Theatre visits, open mic nights and exciting events, including a short story slam at Brighton festival and writing workshops in Bucharest

• Online journal and in-house creative anthology for you to share your work with other students and the wider community

Areas of study

You will be able to tailor your MA studies to reflect an interest in writing practice, literary theory, community engagement or any combination of these.

We identify the range of modules as intrinsic to catering to diverse creative and intellectual needs and understand that triggers for writing and creative practice can stem from a wide range of places and fields of study.

We have specific modules dedicated to engaging students with the wider Brighton community and local creative industries where they will become a writer in residence and work to link their individual creative practice with a professional scenario.

You will be able to identify teaching and learning opportunities that inspire your creative work and apply this to your professional, academic and personal development and planning.

Syllabus

Core modules:

Practising Rhetoric: The History of Good Storytelling
Creative Writing: Craft and Creative Practice
Research Skills and Training
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Prose Fiction
Creativity module: Placement
The Publishing Process
Poetry: Theory and Craft
Writing the City
The Ethics of Fiction
Twenty-first Century Literature
Performing Gender
Knowing Through Writing
Holocaust Memory
Aesthetics and Philosophy
Cultural Theory
History Making and the Screen Archive South
Grammar and the English Language
Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures
Cultural Memory in Ireland
Gender, Family and Empire
Screenwriting
Auto/Biographical Narrative
Visual Narrative
Cultures of Multimedia Authoring and Web Design
Critical and Media Concepts
Issues and Debates: Introduction to Critical Arts Practice
Traditions of Critical Theory
Critical Readings
Moral Thought and Practice
Globalisation and Culture
Aesthetics and Philosophy
Foundations of Critical Theory
Meaning and Truth
Discourses of Culture
Writing for Academic Publication
Literature and Conflict
Auto/Biographical Narrative Communication, Memory and Communication

Careers and employability

Our Creative Writing MA will develop your confidence with creative and critical writing and enhance your communication skills, which are highly valued in a range of professions including publishing, teaching, creative industry management, marketing, PR, journalism, health and wellbeing.

The ability to write for an audience is also fundamental for people working with social media and the web, and this course will ensure that you are able to produce writing that will be effective in these and other work-based scenarios.

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The Postgraduate Certificate of Special Study in Supporting Learning is a one-semester 20-credit module at level 7 (Masters level). Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate of Special Study in Supporting Learning is a one-semester 20-credit module at level 7 (Masters level). It is designed for colleagues in the University of Westminster (or teaching on University of Westminster programmes in partner colleges) who have a role in teaching/supporting the learning of students at the University of Westminster, but who do not have the full role of an academic member of staff. You might be interested in the module if you are for example:
-A research student or research fellow who tutors or demonstrates to students or who runs a seminar group
-A visiting lecturer with only a small teaching load
-A librarian or careers advisor who does face-to-face sessions with groups of students
-A member of the technical staff who supports students in the studio, laboratory or computer suite

It is normally necessary for you to have at least 15 hours of supporting student learning during the semester in which you would take the course.

The course is delivered by educational development specialists in the Department of Leadership and Professional Development (Westminster Business School), and led by Jennifer Bright. The educational development team supports the University in a range of teaching and learning developments, including the Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education (PGCHE), which is a course for new and established academic staff.

The module aims to help you enhance your students’ learning by helping you to gain an understanding of effective learning design, planning and student engagement, and further aims to encourage a culture of quality enhancement in teaching and supporting learning.

Course content

You will be encouraged to consider current thinking in pedagogic practices in relation to designing, delivering and supporting student learning in HE through a reflective process using multiple feedback sources. The module activities will include evaluating the nature of the student learning experience in your own context, an observation of your own teaching/supporting learning activities (and that of others) and an investigation of relevant literature/theory.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Module topics and themes supporting this process include:
-The scholarship of learning and teaching and linking teaching and research
-Reflective practices and using student feedback for evaluation and development
-Threshold concepts, graduate attributes and signature pedagogies
-Session design and peer observation of teaching
-Learning design, sustainability and ethics
-Managing the learning environment
-Using technology to enhance student learning
-Student-centred and activity-based learning
-Facilitating student learning in different subject contexts and in face to face and online environments
-Facilitating one to one, small group and whole group learning
-Inclusive practices and using student diversity as a resource
-Personal and professional development planning

Teaching and learning methods used

-Work-based learning including teaching/supporting learning practice (15 hours minimum)
-Observation of your practice as well as your observation of the practice of an experienced peer
-On-line learning of approximately four hours per week
-Self-directed study and recording of on-going reflections on practice for reflective narrative-building and assessment, together with teaching observations and professional practice conversations with your subject mentor or educational development tutor, will comprise the remaining hours of this 20-credit module

The sessions will all take place on-line; however, when your teaching/supporting learning session is observed, your tutor will go to the location in which you work. (If you are teaching outside the University of Westminster, you will need to arrange for a tutor from your own institution to observe you.) There will also be a face-to-face Induction session which you will be invited to attend.

Assessment

Assessment is wholly coursework based; there are no examinations.
-The assessment will include formative piece of work that is compulsory but ungraded and which is submitted for feedback
-The final assessment is a reflexive narrative that integrates theory and practice supported by practice-based feedback from different sources. These will include two teaching practice observations by an experienced peer in your workplace (one of which may be a WEx tutor) plus your observation of an experienced peer.

The narrative will provide a place for you to evidence your continuing professional development in teaching and supporting learning.

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