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Masters Degrees (Narrative)

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature is the first of its kind in the world. It draws on world-level expertise to explore the various types of narrative produced in ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt.

Key Features

This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. It is taught by a team of scholars associated with the KYKNOS research centre, whose research in this field is internationally recognised.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature offers excellent preparation for students who intend to undertake further research in this exciting and rapidly developing area of Classical literature. Students will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Greek and/or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient Narrative Literature can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres

• Ancient Greek or Latin language

• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period

• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed

• Greek and Roman Magic :Exploring the Sources

• Reading Academic German

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

• Word, Metaphor, Allegory: effective models of reality

Student Quote

"I studied at Swansea University for my Undergraduate degree and fell in love with the city, the university campus and the lecturers and supporting staff at the university. Deciding to do my MA in Ancient Narrative Literature here was therefore partly influenced by this. However, Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University was an attractive choice mostly because of the quality of the lecturers here. Both Professor John Morgan who is already a highly esteemed scholar within the area of the Ancient Greek novels and Dr Ian Repath who is a rising star in the same subject area make Swansea University the ideal place to study Ancient Narrative Literature at MA level."

Ida Meland



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On this course you'll design visitor experiences and events for museums, brand, urban and community environments and work in small multidisciplinary teams to tell stories through text, image, sound and physical space. Read more

Introduction

On this course you'll design visitor experiences and events for museums, brand, urban and community environments and work in small multidisciplinary teams to tell stories through text, image, sound and physical space. You'll benefit from strong industry links that provide live, funded projects, mentors and placements.

Content

MA Narrative Environments is part of the Spatial Practices programme. The course combines storytelling with experience design, interaction design, museum studies, exhibition design, event design and communication design. You will develop and install interventions in cultural and corporate settings as well as making critical urban interventions in the public realm. You will undertake site and social research, visiting spaces, observing, filming and talking to visitors and inhabitants. You'll also produce proposals and make and test these in situ.

Distinct disciplines contribute to the postgraduate programme. Developing a new science centre, for example, draws on architects, curators, destination consultants, 3D designers, communication designers, interaction designers, time-based media designers, scenographers, writers, retailers and project managers. We value all.

Structure

MA Narrative Environments lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode'.

MA Narrative Environments is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises 2 units:

Unit 1 (60 credits) lasts 20 weeks.
Unit 2 (120 credits) runs for 10 weeks in the first year and 30 weeks in the second year.

Both units must be passed in order to achieve the MA, but the classification of the award of MA derives from your mark for Unit 2 only.

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Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them. . Read more

Human beings are great storytellers, making sense of their experiences by constructing narratives to help them analyse the things which have happened to them or to the world around them. 

Narrative research offers new areas of inquiry and creative solutions to problems in a wide variety of areas.

The University of East London has been a pioneer in the subject, establishing its prestigious international Centre for Narrative Research in 2000. It continues to attract leading academics and researchers from around the world. 

We understand that it is not always possible to make it on to campus to study. Many of our students live overseas, while others have family and work commitments to balance.

So, flexible learning is a key to this course. You will have the option of studying the full Associate PG certificate by distance learning. But, if you can, you are also welcome to attend our on-campus sessions. 



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The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms. Read more

The Sequential Design/Illustration MA attracts new and established illustrators, artists and designers from all over the world who are keen to explore the principles of sequence within their chosen field and make them visible through a variety of forms.

These forms have included written and illustrated books for children and adults, interactive design, film, graphic novels, stage and exhibition design, animation, book arts, narrative textiles, experimental writing, product design and even community projects that encourage social development through storytelling.

In its 25-year history, this course has built on the gathered knowledge and experience of its staff and students to cover topics that are relevant to all MA students interested in storytelling, visual narrative and delivering complex sequential messages.

Recent graduate work – ranging from a biography of Edith Sitwell to a series of calendars made from human hair – demonstrates the diversity of individual research. Other students have examined the legacy of recipes, the secret language of headscarves, the parallels between quantum physics and Taoism as demonstrated through a detective novel, and the role of plumage in communication.

Course structure

You can study on a part-time or full-time basis.

  • Part-time, for two years, is designed to fit in with your professional life and allows more time for reflection. Part-time students work on the course for two days a week – one day on site and one day working independently.
  • Full-time, for one year, is an intensive year of study. You work four days a week: two days with the course and two days independently.

Lectures, seminars, reviews and assessments are held at fixed times on Wednesdays. Other patterns of attendance vary according to individual circumstances. During holidays you will be engaged in independent study.

Your work will be predominantly project based, which may comprise of one or more parts focusing on a central theme or idea. A single project or investigation will in most cases sustain a student through the entire duration of the course, but at stage assessment, in consultation with tutors, it may naturally evolve into a new or related area of study.

The nature of the subject demands the continual interaction between research, analysis, and practical realisation, as well as an extended period of development for ideas to become fully meaningful. Throughout this investigation you will receive support and guidance from the course tutors.

Making sure that what you learn with us is relevant, up to date and what employers are looking for is our priority, so courses are reviewed and enhanced on an ongoing basis. When you have applied to us, you’ll be told about any new developments through our applicant portal.

Areas of study

As the course develops, there is increasing opportunity for independent and self-directed work, though each student is allocated a personal tutor who oversees the planning and content of individual projects. Besides practice-based work, the course also includes a written element in which you will be asked to reflect critically on the research and development of your project.

The Visual Narrative module includes lectures, themed group events and small practical activities such as the Surprise Project, where you are asked to deliver a surprise though a sequence of six images or objects, with the module group as your target audience. From this experience, you learn the nature and importance of surprise in basic storytelling and develop a vocabulary for narrative. In scheduled theme day events, such as Modern Cautionary Tales, you work in groups to challenge your quick-thinking skills in the invention, planning and presentation of a story.

While students accepted on the course should come with the technical skills necessary to fulfil their projects, access to the diverse workshops facilities – for example in bookbinding, letterpress, printmaking and photography – will be made available as appropriate to your project. There is also a substantial specialist library and a full range of computer facilities.

In order to bring together a variety of students and approaches, this course coexists with the Arts and Design by Independent Project MA. Both are based at our Grand Parade campus.

Stage 1

  • Sequential Project(s)
  • Visual Narrative
  • Research and Investigation

Stage 2

  • Major Sequential Project(s)
  • Project Report

Visiting lecturers

We arrange a programme of weekly lectures by a range of practitioners and academics to broaden your experience and understanding of professional issues and activity. Lecturers describe their practice and professional experience, sharing insights about their research methods and discoveries.

The programme is organised to relate to specific stages of the course and varies on a two-year cycle, so part-time students have access to a different set of events in each of their two years of study.

Careers and employability

Because of the diversity of our students and the projects they create, their professional achievements are equally wide-ranging. Successful commercial enterprises have been established, research degrees undertaken, books published, collaborative design groups formed, and work exhibited in major galleries and institutions. Graduates have also participated in festivals and conferences around the world.

Recent graduates include:

  • an art and display technician at the Littlehampton Academy
  • an associate teaching fellow at the University of Southampton
  • a book designer at Flukso Design
  • a designer and associate lecturer at the Open University
  • an exhibition and graphic designer at Hello Museum
  • an illustrator at Helen Murphy Freelance Illustration
  • a lecturer at Norwich University of the Arts
  • a mobile game designer at TieSense Information Company.


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Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers. Read more
Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers.

If you want to make a career in writing, this course is for you. You already have talent and ideas, we’ll add the expertise you need to approach your chosen market with confidence, originality and skill. No ambitions are out of bounds: we love commercial genre fiction and literary experiments equally.

We aim to ensure our graduates are equipped to succeed - and to change the culture they choose to enter.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA-Creative-Writing-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

We take an innovative approach to the training and support of aspiring writers, driven by intellectual ambition and practical industry experience. There are four strands to the programme:

• developing narrative technique
• practising vocational skills (including abridgement, adaptation and collaborative creation)
• experimental, theoretical and personal development work
• regular one-to-one editorial mentoring

Uniquely, the course offers a dynamic range of cross-disciplinary options. Writing for graphic fiction, screenwriting, interactive media and creative non-fiction are all offered as specialisms, while our pioneering module in genre fiction covers crime, horror, fantasy and science fiction with YA options in each.

We host an exciting programme of lectures and master classes from award-winning authors and high-profile industry experts. In addition, an internationally recognised author joins us for 12 months as Writer in Residence, to develop new work alongside students, share experience and offer one-to-one consultations.

Our approach to full-length narrative development trains you to deploy a range of unique and dynamic pre-writing techniques invented by our programme. This energetic combination of conceptual development and critical self-reflection will transform you into a technically adept, purposeful writer ready to make your mark.

The course is taught by industry professionals Sam Kelly, a former literary agent and David Bishop, a successful working writer and former editor. In addition to campus facilities, our students have access to the Writers’ Room, a private workspace with Wi-Fi, available evenings and weekends. It houses an exclusive library of 2,000 hand-picked books, DVDs and graphic novels and is the venue for reading groups and social events.

The MA is piloting a Teaching Internship Scheme, offering selected graduates the opportunity to develop their teaching practice with the course for a further year.

Modules

• Creating Narrative – Writer’s Toolkit
• Innovation and Authorship
• Creative and Editorial Development
• Writing Practice – First Person Narrative
• Writing Graphic Fiction
• Writing Genre Fiction
• Creative Non-Fiction
• Interactive Media
• Major Project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Among our graduates’ achievements are:

• book deals
• representation by literary agents
• international and national competition wins
• publication in magazines and anthologies
• Edinburgh International Book Festival appearances
• paid editing and writing commissions
• performances and teaching
• working for national literary organisations

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. Read more

Contemporary illustration practice has grown to encompass a broad range of ambitions and opportunities for image makers and storytellers. The growth of online digital cultures - and the impact of digital image creation on traditional image making - requires flexible and adaptable practitioners, and it provides unique opportunities for the entrepreneurial illustrator.

Our MA Illustration course offers you the chance to challenge the boundaries of illustration, both in its practice and its context, and is primarily concerned with the illustrated narrative. It offers you a creative and intellectual environment in which you can rigorously pursue a project of self-directed study, and produce a body of work on a topic of your interest within the field of illustration.

Our course enjoys a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas. As a student here you'll get to explore narrative storytelling, authorship, self-publishing, book production and visual narratives through the development of a personal project.

This MA course supports you to develop your own independent voice and to identify an audience. You're encouraged to take a self-directed entrepreneurial approach, developing and exploring creative opportunities and options for your work. This entrepreneurial emphasis will be supported by access to specialist facilities such as digital media suites, photography, printmaking and bookmaking.

Our course also provides you with the opportunity for extended critical debate, a high degree of critical reflection and integration of theoretical and practical concerns as part of the realisation of an ambitious body of work. It will also promote in-depth, rigorously conducted research, to ensure you're able to contextualise your own work in relation to the leading edge practice in illustration.

Visiting lecturers and practitioners inform and cultivate professional development, encouraging you to question and debate. Recent visiting lecturers have included Graham Rawle, Olivier Kugler, Nick White, Luke Best, Mathew Richardson and Posy Simmonds.

Industry Partners

Illustration at UCA Farnham has a long tradition of original narrative and storytelling through images, reflecting staff expertise and practice in these areas.

Students on MA Illustration also benefit from well-established industry connections.

Careers

Graduates from our MA Illustration course go on to establish careers in a diverse range of exciting areas, such as:

-Freelance illustration

-Self-publishing

-Artist practice

-Printmaking

-Curation

-Editing

-Animation

-Project management

-Education

-Design

-Digital imaging

-Web authoring

-Multi-media production.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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Who is it for?. This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. Read more

Who is it for?

This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. The unifying factor for all writers on the programme is their intention to deliver their research or story through a narrative structure.

Objectives

Our definition of narrative non-fiction includes biography, travel, history, life writing, true crime, sports and other forms of sustained and structured non-fiction storytelling. The Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA provides you with essential skills and a supportive and challenging environment in which to write a full-length work of narrative non-fiction. You will develop your research skills, experiment with different writing styles, reflect on your own and other writer’s work and learn the essentials of the publishing industry.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, all by published authors, across the two years is front-end loaded in terms 1 and 2 with workshops, lectures and seminars held two evenings a week. Here you will extend your writing skills, your understanding of non-fiction genres and your awareness of creative possibilities. You will also analyse the work of leading writers and explore writing through a variety of exercises, encouraging you to experiment with new approaches.

All workshops are based around the students’ own writing assignments which work towards the completion, or opening chapters, of a book. We also closely analyse published works of non-fiction, taking apart books to examine their style, structure and research methods.

Throughout the two years there are readings and workshops with visiting authors. In terms 3, 4, 5 and 6 you work principally on your own book project with the support of one-to-one tutorials.

In term 6 (the final term) the lectures and guest sessions focus on the publishing industry which will provide you with the knowledge to be placed with a literary agent. During the final term you will have the opportunity to read from your work in progress, to contribute to an anthology of writing and to submit a full draft of your book.

Modules

Term 1

  • CWM 959 The Fundamentals of Non-fiction (core)
  • CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
  • CWM935 Storytelling (core)
  • CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Term 2

  • CWM957 The Process of Writing (core)
  • CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
  • CWM935 Storytelling (core)
  • CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Terms 3,4,5 and 6

  • CWM956 Complete Book

Career prospects

The MA creative writing non-fiction is proud of its track record in publishing with students from the programme winning publishing contracts every year.

Graduates include:

  • Peter Moore, The Weather Experiment (Chatto and Windus),
  • Anne Putnam, Navel Gazing (Faber and Faber)
  • Bridge O’Donnell, Inspector Minahan Makes a Stand (Picador).

Graduates have also gone on to work for media outlets and used their transferrable skills in a variety of professions including teaching, political campaigning and in the charity sector.



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Our Arts and Design by Independent Project MA is a highly individual course offering you the opportunity to propose and develop your own academic programme in a particular field of craft, design, communication or image-making within a stimulating educational context. Read more

Our Arts and Design by Independent Project MA is a highly individual course offering you the opportunity to propose and develop your own academic programme in a particular field of craft, design, communication or image-making within a stimulating educational context.

A central project forms the core of the course. The project encourages experimentation and innovation in a specific field. You will develop and consolidate your project in consultation with academic staff throughout the course, utilising facilities and drawing on expertise from our other arts and humanities courses, as well as other areas of the university.

There is an extensive programme of lectures, events, films, and seminars throughout. We ask you to keep a critical diary during the course and to write a project report at the end of each year. This report is a considered critique of your studio-based work and decision making.

Course structure

You can study on a part-time or full-time basis:

  • Part-time, for two years, is designed to fit in with your professional life and allows more time for reflection. Part-time students work on the course for two days a week – one day on site and one day working independently.
  • Full-time, for one year, is an intensive year of study. You work four days a week: two days with the course and two days independently.

Lectures, seminars, reviews and assessments are held at fixed times on Wednesdays. Other patterns of attendance vary according to individual circumstances. During holidays you will be engaged in independent study.

Your work will be predominantly project based, which may comprise of one or more parts focusing on a central theme or idea. A single project or investigation will in most cases sustain a student through the entire duration of the course, but at stage assessment, in consultation with tutors, it may naturally evolve into a new or related area of study.

The nature of the subject demands the continual interaction between research, analysis, and practical realisation, as well as an extended period of development for ideas to become fully meaningful. Throughout this investigation you will receive support and guidance from the course tutors.

Areas of study

As the course develops, there is increasing opportunity for independent and self-directed work, though each student is allocated a personal tutor who oversees the planning and content of individual projects. Besides practice-based work, the course also includes a written element in which you will be asked to reflect critically on the research and development of your project.

The Visual Narrative module includes lectures, themed group events and small practical activities such as the Surprise Project, where you are asked to deliver a surprise though a sequence of six images or objects with the module group as your target audience. From this experience, you learn the nature and importance of surprise in basic storytelling and develop a vocabulary for narrative. In scheduled theme day events, such as Modern Cautionary Tales, you work in groups to challenge your quick-thinking skills in the invention, planning and presentation of a story.

While students accepted on the course should come with the technical skills necessary to fulfil their projects, access to the diverse workshops facilities – for example in bookbinding, letterpress, printmaking and photography – will be made available as appropriate to your project. There is also a substantial specialist library and a full range of computer facilities.

In order to bring together a variety of students and approaches, this course coexists with the Sequential Design/Illustration MA. Both are based at our Grand Parade campus.

Stage 1

  • Independent Project (Stage 1)
  • Visual Narrative: The Art and Design of Storytelling
  • Practice Based Research Methods

Stage 2

  • Major Independent Project (Stage 2)
  • Applied Research Methods
  • Completion Statement

Careers and employability

Because of the diversity of our students and the projects they create, their professional achievements are equally wide-ranging. Successful commercial enterprises have been established, research degrees undertaken, books published, collaborative design groups formed, and work exhibited in major galleries and institutions. Graduates have also participated in festivals and conferences around the world.

Recent graduates include:

  • an art and display technician at the Littlehampton Academy
  • an associate teaching fellow at the University of Southampton
  • a book designer at Flukso Design
  • a designer and associate lecturer at the Open University
  • an exhibition and graphic designer at Hello Museum
  • an illustrator at Helen Murphy Freelance Illustration
  • a lecturer at Norwich University of the Arts
  • a mobile game designer at TieSense Information Company.

Many of our graduates cite the course as having been a strong influence on their success. Kate Adams MBE, founder of Project Art Works, described the course as "richly diverse in the practice it promotes and encourages". She went on to say: "The analysis of working methodology was really formative and important for me. I founded Project Art Works a few years after completing the course and felt it had a big influence on how we expressed the conceptual and political drive of our early projects."



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Explore the creative potential of your narrative constructions, observations of character and the aesthetics of dialogue within the tradition and potentiality of Screenwriting as designed for the next generation of industry writers. Read more
Explore the creative potential of your narrative constructions, observations of character and the aesthetics of dialogue within the tradition and potentiality of Screenwriting as designed for the next generation of industry writers.

•This course runs on a biennial basis and the next intake will be 2016
•Part-time programme that can be completed alongside full-time employment in two years
•The £38million Redmonds Building provides state-of-the-art facilities for the Liverpool Screen School
•Skillset Accredited status ensures an exceptional quality course
•Liverpool Screen School is part of the BBC North Developing Talent Scheme


LJMU’s Skillset Accredited MA Screenwriting programme is designed to prepare screenwriters for the exacting demands of the industry.

The UK film and television industry is enjoying sustained growth and increasing international influence, and the demand for screenwriters with a distinct voice and original vision has never been greater.

Liverpool has established itself as a centre for regional film and television production both in the commercial sector, and increasingly through independent production.

This is a highly participatory course for committed writers of all ages who show originality and talent and is taught by experienced tutors with strong industry connections.

The course emphasises the development of practical screenwriting skills and the production of a portfolio of work, developed to the highest professional standards. An understanding of professional practice, pitching and marketing screenplays, and the critical analysis of films and screen texts are further key elements in the programme.

The course is regularly visited by industry professionals which means you will have great networking opportunities plus the chance to engage directly with leading practitioners in the field.

Throughout the two year programme, you will be engaged in the production of varied and increasingly challenging projects, beginning with short film scripts and culminating in the development of feature-length screenplays. All screenplays are developed in small group workshops.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.


Discovering the Screen as a Writer

Introduces practice creative, formal, research and technical skills appropriate to Screenwriting at masters level, allowing you to gain an understanding of the difference between writing for different mediums

Ongoing Narrative

Introduces the concepts behind writing something that has an ongoing narrative in order to create a dynamic world for stories to occur in engaging, complex characters

Writing the Feature Film

You will complete your first feature film draft and further develop research abilities, in particular, how to broaden your writing craft in order to have dramatic stories with a high level of realism or detail

The Importance of Rewriting and How to Do It

You will develop the ability to reappraise your own work, to enrich you with screenwriting concepts in order to write an accomplished second draft

The Third Act

Continue your growth as a feature film writer, deepening your creative voice and making you a more ambitious writer

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Read more

At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Working with professional writers, you will develop your skills to produce and share stories in a variety of genres.

Through creative workshops, you will partner with supportive lecturers and interdisciplinary postgraduate groups to develop advanced theories and practices that relate to the creative writing process. Both people with and without experience of creative writing should consider applying for this course, which aims to prepare you for a career as a freelancer or portfolio worker.

We have fantastic links with local publishers, writers and creative companies and offer a unique salon series where industry experts offer practical advice and insights. In semester two, you will apply your writing and creative practice in a workplace scenario, while being encouraged to work on your own interests and passions.

If you want to share your work, you have the opportunity to do so through our established student-led anthologies and open mic nights, which form part of Brighton's thriving creative scene.

Why study with us?

  • Chance to develop as a portfolio writer and creative practitioner – somebody who can apply good writing to real-world scenarios and work to specific briefs
  • A transformative experience that goes beyond looking to get your first novel published, so you can explore copywriting and publishing while nurturing your passion for storytelling
  • Guest lectures from publishers and professional writers including Mark Radcliffe and Isabel Ashdown, who runs the Prose Fiction module
  • Links with local publishers, writers and creative companies, with placements available across Brighton
  • Theatre visits, open mic nights and exciting events, including a short story slam at Brighton festival and writing workshops in Bucharest
  • Online journal and in-house creative anthology for you to share your work with other students and the wider community

Areas of study

You will be able to tailor your MA studies to reflect an interest in writing practice, literary theory, community engagement or any combination of these.

We identify the range of modules as intrinsic to catering to diverse creative and intellectual needs and understand that triggers for writing and creative practice can stem from a wide range of places and fields of study.

We have specific modules dedicated to engaging students with the wider Brighton community and local creative industries where they will become a writer in residence and work to link their individual creative practice with a professional scenario.

You will be able to identify teaching and learning opportunities that inspire your creative work and apply this to your professional, academic and personal development and planning.

Syllabus

Core modules

  • Practising Rhetoric: The History of Good Storytelling
  • Creative Writing: Craft and Creative Practice
  • Research Skills and Training
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

  • Prose Fiction
  • Creativity module: Placement
  • The Publishing Process
  • Poetry: Theory and Craft
  • Writing the City
  • The Ethics of Fiction
  • Twenty-first Century Literature
  • Performing Gender
  • Knowing Through Writing
  • Holocaust Memory
  • Aesthetics and Philosophy
  • Cultural Theory
  • History Making and the Screen Archive South
  • Grammar and the English Language
  • Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures
  • Cultural Memory in Ireland
  • Gender, Family and Empire
  • Screenwriting
  • Auto/Biographical Narrative
  • Visual Narrative
  • Cultures of Multimedia Authoring and Web Design
  • Critical and Media Concepts
  • Issues and Debates: Introduction to Critical Arts Practice
  • Traditions of Critical Theory
  • Critical Readings
  • Moral Thought and Practice
  • Globalisation and Culture
  • Aesthetics and Philosophy
  • Foundations of Critical Theory
  • Meaning and Truth
  • Discourses of Culture
  • Writing for Academic Publication
  • Literature and Conflict
  • Auto/Biographical Narrative Communication, Memory and Communication

Careers and employability

Our Creative Writing MA will develop your confidence with creative and critical writing and enhance your communication skills, which are highly valued in a range of professions including publishing, teaching, creative industry management, marketing, PR, journalism, health and wellbeing.

The ability to write for an audience is also fundamental for people working with social media and the web, and this course will ensure that you are able to produce writing that will be effective in these and other work-based scenarios.



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The Postgraduate Certificate of Special Study in Supporting Learning is a one-semester 20-credit module at level 7 (Masters level). Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate of Special Study in Supporting Learning is a one-semester 20-credit module at level 7 (Masters level). It is designed for colleagues in the University of Westminster (or teaching on University of Westminster programmes in partner colleges) who have a role in teaching/supporting the learning of students at the University of Westminster, but who do not have the full role of an academic member of staff. You might be interested in the module if you are for example:
-A research student or research fellow who tutors or demonstrates to students or who runs a seminar group
-A visiting lecturer with only a small teaching load
-A librarian or careers advisor who does face-to-face sessions with groups of students
-A member of the technical staff who supports students in the studio, laboratory or computer suite

It is normally necessary for you to have at least 15 hours of supporting student learning during the semester in which you would take the course.

The course is delivered by educational development specialists in the Department of Leadership and Professional Development (Westminster Business School), and led by Jennifer Bright. The educational development team supports the University in a range of teaching and learning developments, including the Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education (PGCHE), which is a course for new and established academic staff.

The module aims to help you enhance your students’ learning by helping you to gain an understanding of effective learning design, planning and student engagement, and further aims to encourage a culture of quality enhancement in teaching and supporting learning.

Course content

You will be encouraged to consider current thinking in pedagogic practices in relation to designing, delivering and supporting student learning in HE through a reflective process using multiple feedback sources. The module activities will include evaluating the nature of the student learning experience in your own context, an observation of your own teaching/supporting learning activities (and that of others) and an investigation of relevant literature/theory.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Module topics and themes supporting this process include:
-The scholarship of learning and teaching and linking teaching and research
-Reflective practices and using student feedback for evaluation and development
-Threshold concepts, graduate attributes and signature pedagogies
-Session design and peer observation of teaching
-Learning design, sustainability and ethics
-Managing the learning environment
-Using technology to enhance student learning
-Student-centred and activity-based learning
-Facilitating student learning in different subject contexts and in face to face and online environments
-Facilitating one to one, small group and whole group learning
-Inclusive practices and using student diversity as a resource
-Personal and professional development planning

Teaching and learning methods used

-Work-based learning including teaching/supporting learning practice (15 hours minimum)
-Observation of your practice as well as your observation of the practice of an experienced peer
-On-line learning of approximately four hours per week
-Self-directed study and recording of on-going reflections on practice for reflective narrative-building and assessment, together with teaching observations and professional practice conversations with your subject mentor or educational development tutor, will comprise the remaining hours of this 20-credit module

The sessions will all take place on-line; however, when your teaching/supporting learning session is observed, your tutor will go to the location in which you work. (If you are teaching outside the University of Westminster, you will need to arrange for a tutor from your own institution to observe you.) There will also be a face-to-face Induction session which you will be invited to attend.

Assessment

Assessment is wholly coursework based; there are no examinations.
-The assessment will include formative piece of work that is compulsory but ungraded and which is submitted for feedback
-The final assessment is a reflexive narrative that integrates theory and practice supported by practice-based feedback from different sources. These will include two teaching practice observations by an experienced peer in your workplace (one of which may be a WEx tutor) plus your observation of an experienced peer.

The narrative will provide a place for you to evidence your continuing professional development in teaching and supporting learning.

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Our MRes in Storytelling is a cross-discipline combined critical/creative course that will give you a detailed understanding of the study of stories, storytelling and narrative in English. Read more

Our MRes in Storytelling is a cross-discipline combined critical/creative course that will give you a detailed understanding of the study of stories, storytelling and narrative in English. Uniquely working with the Department of English and Storyhouse in Chester, you will have the option to pursue either a critical or creative writing project for your dissertation.

Course overview

The Department of English will facilitate the opportunity for students to work with an external practitioner with links to University of Chester faculty colleagues in English and Drama. This list of external practitioners and organisations includes: Storyhouse, Chester Literature Festival, the Grosvenor Museum, Louder Than Words Festival and Gladstone's Library. You will have the option to pursue either a critical or creative writing project for your dissertation.

If you interested in doing MRes-level research in the Department, please contact one of our academics with an appropriate specialism, in the first instance, who would act as your supervisor should you be offered a place.

Why study Storytelling with us?

The Department of English offers expertise in a variety of writers and eras – including in the practice of creative writing and in a wide range of literary specialisms – which will facilitate your exploration of your own interests in particular forms of narrative and storytelling.

You will work alongside Storyhouse staff, who are committed to widening access to the magic of storytelling within the community of Chester. We also recognise the importance of pastoral support, and offer a supportive environment in which to learn and study.

What will I learn?

On the Telling Stories and Research Methods module, topics may include: storytelling practices; narrative studies; community storytelling; producing innovative writing and research; theoretical study and creative practice; praxis and critical appraisal; critical and creative writing pedagogies; traditional research methods; using libraries and archives; research for writing; writing as research; new practices in research methods/creative writing; creative writing as a research methodology.

The dissertation itself is on a topic of your own choice.

How will I be taught?

Teaching will take place at both the University of Chester’s Parkgate Road Campus and at Storyhouse. It will be delivered through lectures, seminars and one-to-one supervision with an academic and/or a member of Storyhouse staff.

As well as regular supervision between students and academics, the MRes in Storytelling will also require substantial independent study.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through written coursework comprising annotated bibliographies, essays, reports, reviews and oral presentations, as well as a final 28,000-word dissertation.

Course Fees

For our latest fees please visit our website.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please visit our website

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus.



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The Master of Counselling (MCouns) is established as a flagship degree that has seen 92% of graduates over the past six years gain successful employment. Read more

The Master of Counselling (MCouns) is established as a flagship degree that has seen 92% of graduates over the past six years gain successful employment.

The degree has specifically been designed for professional counsellors or supervisors interested in leadership roles within the New Zealand counselling profession.

The programme has a key teaching focus on providing experiences in which you can further develop your professional attitudes, knowledge and competencies in the areas of counselling, group leadership, mediation and practitioner research. You'll graduate with a high level of knowledge and understanding through the narrative practice this programme is known for.

For the past 20 years, our teaching staff have been active in promoting narrative therapy, beginning with a book staff produced called Narrative Therapy in Practice. Today Waikato is considered a leader in this field with several local and international publications produced each year.

This notable reputation extends also into our thriving doctoral counselling programme.

Learning outcomes

As a graduate of the MCouns programme, you will have developed competence in the practices of counselling, and established a firm understanding in philosophical and ethical issues relating to professional counselling practice.

You'll learn how to engage critically with the theoretical concepts and research which underpins counselling practice and the knowledge of the professional context within which you work.

Not only will your studies set you up with a well-articulated theoretical position and reflective professional stance in your counselling work, you'll also gain a recognised qualification for membership of New Zealand Association of Counsellors.

Cultural experience

Manākitanga (hospitality and care) is offered by Tangata whenua, people of the land, who open the space for collaboration, with the intention of weaving cultural knowledge and practice into the shaping of our counsellor education programme. The significant contributions include interchanges, connections, noho marae and visits to the following marae:

  • Te Kohinga Marama Marae at the University of Waikato (over night noho)
  • Maniaroa Marae at Mokau (week long stay with workshops and presentations)
  • Parihaka (visit to learn about Māori passive resistance to land confiscation).

Practical experience

Professional papers offer students the opportunity to have supported professional experience in community and or education settings. Efforts are made to cater for and respond to the individual student’s particular background and professional education goals.

Practicum placements

In order to gain a place in the programme, students must be able to demonstrate a relationship with a community-based counselling service or school or mental health service, which will give them access to an appropriate practicum placement.

Students must have a commitment to ongoing appropriate professional supervision. However, students will not establish any formal contract with an agency until they have been selected into the Counsellor Education Programme and have received all the necessary information on practicum placements.

In general, students in the first year of a full-time programme complete 200 hours in a professional counselling setting and complete 80 hours of counselling. They will engage in professional supervision*. The supervisor must be a member of a professional helping body such as NZAC, NZASW, NZPsS, or NZAP. Students must engage in a minimum of 16 supervision sessions, in each of the practicum papers. Students should note that NZAC membership now requires supervision with an experienced NZAC Member.

In the second year of the full-time programme the practicum involves 450 hours in counselling settings. Up to three placements may be arranged.

Note: Successful applicants will be completely responsible for setting up an appropriate placement to meet the requirements of the counselling practicum for the various papers.

*There may be a cost involved.

Career opportunities

  • NGO Social Service practices
  • Hospice
  • Private practice
  • Family and relationship counselling
  • Corrections and Probation
  • Youth services
  • Career support
  • Pastoral care
  • School counselling


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Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs. Create, challenge, move, and inform through art and expression in our.  MFA in Film and Media Art program. Read more

Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs

Create, challenge, move, and inform through art and expression in our MFA in Film and Media Art program. Here, you’ll work with image and sound, and traditional and emergent media forms. You'll develop an understanding of film, video, audio, and interactive media production—and you will channel this understanding into the creation of multimedia works. To ensure that creative, talented students at every stage of development find a place in our program, we give you the opportunity to apply into the three-phase curriculum at whichever level best matches your experience.  

In this program, you will:

  • Explore a variety of media production genres and develop expertise in the use of media technologies, criticism and theory, and media business
  • Learn from faculty members who are themselves working artists (and whose ranks include Guggenheim and Fulbright fellows) and build a network of creative partnerships that will inspire and support you in your artistic career
  • Use our state-of-the-art facilities and immerse yourself in your specific area of interest, producing an ongoing body of work within a collaborative, creative environment

Whether you want to explore film, documentary, fiction narrative, experimental media, animation, installation, interactive art, or sound design, we will give you the tools, skills, and experience you need. Cultivate your creative voice. Apply to our graduate program in Film and Media Art today.

Program Summary

The MFA in Film & Media Art program seeks talented and ambitious students at all levels offering three entry points.

Our unique program provides students of all levels with the opportunity to develop as engaged and versatile creative professionals and media artists. Students will work with image and sound to entertain, inform, persuade, and challenge, using both traditional and emergent media forms. They will develop an understanding of the disciplines of film, video, audio, and interactive media production, bringing this understanding to bear on traditional and convergent media works.

The MFA in Film and Media Art is a terminal degree for students who wish to pursue careers as media production professionals and artists, or who want to teach at the college or university level. Students are able to explore a variety of media production genres—computer animation, documentary, experimental media, fiction narrative, installation, interactive art, and sound design—with a degree program that provides foundational knowledge in the use of media technologies, theory, critical and historical context, and media business while offering a set of courses of advanced training and mentorship in their specific area of interest.

Our program has three distinct entry points and varies in length from 2-3 years depending on which phase of the program you begin in. This approach allows us to welcome creative students at any stage of development. Once you are admitted to the program, the Graduate Program Director will work with you to create a custom curriculum based on your unique needs.

We have a place for all creative film and media artist­­s - whether you are new to the field and need to build a strong foundation before beginning your thesis project, or you are ready to dive right into thesis production. Take the next step and apply today! 

Curriculum Overview

There are 3 distinct phases to the program to help students acquire the specialized skills and creative resources required for the collaborative nature of production work. Students in the Film and Media Art program study the history and critical theories that provide the foundation for their work, so as to understand the context of their creative output and to be able to evaluate its effectiveness.

Students will have the opportunity to apply for advanced standing during the admissions process. Advanced standing will allow a student to begin the program in either Phase II or Phase III.

Phase I – Foundational (6 semesters; 64 credits)

Most students will begin the program in this phase. It builds a solid foundation in the first semester in theory and history and an intensive introduction to writing and production skills in a variety of media platforms.

Phase II – Intermediate Practitioner (5 semesters; 52 credits)

After meeting with the Graduate Program Director, students will develop a customized plan of study that allows for artistic exploration while developing the technical proficiency to undertake their thesis project.

Students will begin to focus in one or more areas of media production, computer animation, documentary, experimental media, fiction narrative, installation, interactive art, and sound design or an individualized hybrid form.

For example, a student pursuing professional and artistic development as a documentary filmmaker could take the History of Documentary seminar and the Documentary Workshop and Advanced Documentary courses. Electives and directed study in advanced production (e.g. cinematography, producing, editing and interactive media) are also available, so the aspiring documentarian could also opt to take courses in interactive media and computer animation.

Phase III - Advanced practitioner (4 semesters; 40 credits) 

Students in Phase III come ready to begin working on their thesis project. Students meet with their program advisor to select courses that support their thesis work as well as their specific learning needs. In addition, students concentrate on developing their artistic vision through the thesis proposal process while building new skills and learning advanced production techniques. The MFA Production Workshop is a key component to the program and provides students with support in producing an ongoing body of work within a collaborative, creative community. In the MFA Production Workshop, students present works-in-progress to their peers and faculty for critiques.

Once you have completed your thesis project, all students take part in a public screening of MFA works for the year. This is the last MFA requirement and a celebration of student achievements.



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New for 2018/19, this. MFA. provides extended practical training in creative documentary film and aims to provide all the technical and intellectual resources required to make outstanding non-fiction moving image. Read more

New for 2018/19, this MFA provides extended practical training in creative documentary film and aims to provide all the technical and intellectual resources required to make outstanding non-fiction moving image. It draws on broad based anthropological and critical thinking about the social and cultural world but above all will leave you with a deep practical understanding of the craft of factual film making, culminating in the production of a medium-length feature documentary film.

 

About this degree

You will acquire advanced camera and editing skills in a context of critical enquiry about the social world. You will learn and explore diverse forms of factual storytelling including how to work with an ‘external commissioner’. You will learn how to take risks in pushing the boundaries of film form. You will deepen your knowledge of documentary film history and learn how to tell long-form stories through images.

Students undertake modules to the value of 300 credits.

In the first full calendar year the programme consists of four core modules (total 135 credits) and three optional /elective modules (45 credits) - a total 180 credits. In the second (academic length) year you complete a graduation project (120 credits).

 

Core modules

Introduction to the practice of Documentary and Ethnographic Film (30 credits)

Advanced practice of Documentary and Ethnographic Film (60 credits)

Short 'commissioned' Practical Film Project and sustained reflection (15 credits)

Research Work and Book (30 credits). The research work and accompanying book refers to preparatory work for your final graduation project.

 

Optional modules

An Introduction to Social Theory (15 credits)

The Story and I – Finding the Form (15 credits)

Time and the Staged Index – The evolving narrative of Photography and Film (15 credits)

Experimental and Interactive Storytelling – Form and Narrative (15 credits)

Documentary Radio – a practice based introduction (15 credits)

Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye (15 credits)

The Idea of Documentary (15 credits)

Russian Cinema: Epochs and genres (15 credits)

Global Cinemas (15 credits)

East and South Asian Cinemas (15 credits)

Performance, visual media and popular culture in Africa (15 credits)

The French New Wave (15 credits)

Genre in Italian Cinema (15 credits)

Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme (15 credits)

The Latin American Cinematic Tradition (15 credits)

New Argentine Cinemas (15 credits)

Hollywood Genres (15 credits)

 

Dissertation/report

In your graduation film ('research project/design project') you will independently make a medium length creative documentary film/moving image story on a subject of your choosing. Pre-production begins at the outset of the second year supervised by the course tutors and project mentors. You will also produce a project diary reflecting on the entire work process.

 

Teaching and learning

All practice based courses are delivered in lectures, masterclasses and tutorials followed by supervised project work. Across the MFA you will spend significant time each week completing camera and editing exercises, building up a portfolio of work. All work is assessed, either formatively or formally, by the MFA teaching team.

 

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

 

Employability

Graduates of the programme will develop a series of practical and transferable skills including:

Solving complex problems - developing lateral thinking and creative questioning

Managing time and production flows in complex projects and effectively integrating research into film practice

Communicating effectively and succinctly

To be able to pitch and sell stories/product to potential clients

Be able to find the form best suited for a particular 'narrative, be this in media or other contexts.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Application Dates

All applicants

Open: 16 March 2018

Close: 5 September 2018



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