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The University of Oxford’s online Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is an online course aimed at professionals from a diverse range of backgrounds who wish to learn more about the foundations of nanotechnology, technological advances and the applications enabled by nanotechnology. Read more
The University of Oxford’s online Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is an online course aimed at professionals from a diverse range of backgrounds who wish to learn more about the foundations of nanotechnology, technological advances and the applications enabled by nanotechnology. There are opportunities to access cutting-edge research and current practice in a wide range of nanotechnology topics.

The course provides relevant, meaningful and up-to-date learning to enhance career development that is recognised and accepted within industry. A modular structure allows a flexible approach to learning and each module may be taken as an individual short course. The tutor-led approach lends cohesion to the distance learning experience which is tailored for busy people in full-time employment who wish to minimise time away from the workplace to study.

Applications for October 2016 are now being accepted. In the meantime you may be interested in applying for one of the modules from the Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology as a short course.

Nanotechnology is the production and application of devices and systems at the nanometre scale, which is of the order of one billionth of a meter. Developments in this area of technology are now coming to fruition, and increasingly impacting our daily lives. However, it is recognised that there is a need for more people to understand the basics about this technology.

The University of Oxford's online Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology offers a nine-month introduction to the subject. The course is taken part-time and online meaning that it can be taken from anywhere in the world by those seeking a solid foundation in nanotechnology, whilst having the option of working full-time. The course uses a blend of individual study of online learning materials, together with group work during live online tutorials, discussions and research. The group sessions with tutors are particularly valuable because they offer highly authentic learning and assessment opportunities.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-nanotechnology

Features

Students study the Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology over three modules that introduce the most commonly used and most important analytical, quantitative and experimental methods in nanotechnology. The course has the following features:

- An online, part-time University of Oxford qualification aimed at industry;

- Three modules giving a thorough introduction to nanotechnology and the behaviour and characterisation of nanoparticles;

- The course is taken part-time so students can complete it whilst continuing to work full-time;

- The course is taught online and can be taken from anywhere in the world;

- Tutors provide online support and replicate electronically the famed Oxford tutorial system;

- Assessment throughout the modules ensures that students can monitor their progress;

- The course has a dedicated Course Director and administration team accustomed to supporting students undertaking distance learning courses;

- Students have access to staff at the University of Oxford’s Begbroke Science Park, particularly the Course Director, Dr Christiane Norenberg;

- Throughout the course, students can use the University of Oxford’s excellent electronic library resources to enable them to complete the assignment tasks.

Who is it for?

The Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is a part-time, online course leading to a postgraduate qualification at the University of Oxford. The course is designed for students wishing to study part-time. It will appeal to those working in the commercial or healthcare sectors, who use, or expect to use, nanotechnology in their work. Previous students include electrical engineers, materials scientists, project managers, patent agents, chemists, medical practitioners, plastic surgeons and food technologists as well as those involved in manufacturing, research and legislation.

Programme details

The Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology begins in October and runs for nine months. Students take three online nanotechnology modules. At the end of the third module, students are required to attend a residential weekend in nanoscale materials characterisation based in Oxford. This takes place at the University of Oxford's Begbroke Science Park in July 2017.

The content of each module contains up-to-the-minute thinking and reflects the University of Oxford's world-leading research in nanotechnology. Each module has a different focus:

- Module 1: The Wider Context of Nanotechnology (24 October - 4 December 2016) looks at the current state of the technology and addresses its implications;

- Module 2: The Fundamental Science of Nanotechnology (9 January - 18 March 2017) explains the physical and mathematical foundations of nanoscale phenomena and properties of nanoscale materials;

- Module 3: Fundamental Characterisation for Nanotechnology (24 April - 2 July 2017) explores methods for investigating nanoparticles, thin films and nanostructures.

Each module lasts for 7 or 10 weeks corresponding approximately to the University of Oxford's term calendar. Within each module, there are weekly live online tutorials lasting for one hour as well as assignments and problem sheets. Most students should expect to spend an average of between 10 and 15 hours per week on independent study in addition to the timetabled tutorials.

Course aims

By the end of the Postgraduate Certificate students will be expected to:

- Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the physical principles, mathematical methods and techniques appropriate for solving nanotechnology problems and be able to apply them to industrial problems through a critical comprehension of the relative advantages and disadvantages of these methods;

- Demonstrate an understanding of some of the most common applications of nanoscale phenomena and how these relate to the solution of nanotechnology problems in industry;

- Manage their learning and research and conduct independent and effective study;

- Apply skills gained in analytical techniques from across the physical sciences.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This MSc is designed for graduates from the physical sciences and relevant engineering disciplines who wish to develop skills in this new and exciting area. Read more
This MSc is designed for graduates from the physical sciences and relevant engineering disciplines who wish to develop skills in this new and exciting area. Nanotechnology is rapidly establishing itself as a key technology, in industries ranging from microelectronics to healthcare, with a consequent demand for appropriately trained graduates.

Degree information

The programme introduces students to and provides training in the skills essential for almost all fields of nanotechnology research, including key laboratory skills and techniques in planning, building devices, analysis, and results comparison. The core lecture programme covers essential topics in physics, electrical and electronic engineering, and biology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is offered. The diploma consists of six core modules (75 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits).

Core modules
-Physical Science for Nanotechnology
-Nanoscale Processing and Characterisation for Advanced Devices
-Instrumentation and Physical Techniques in the Life Sciences
-Experimental Techniques for Nanotechnology
-Nanotechnology and Society
-Nanoelectronic Devices

Optional modules
-Quantum Computation and Communication
-Order and Excitations in Condensed Matter
-Molecular Biophysics
-Molecular Physics
-Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practise
-Plastic and Molecular Electronics
-Physics and Optics of Nano-Structures
-Nanotechnology in Healthcare
-Innovation Practices

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an extensive research project on an experimental or theoretical topic which is assessed through two interim reports, dissertation and oral examination.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, laboratory classes, tutorials and seminars. Student performance is assessed through coursework, laboratory notebooks, case studies, written examination, a dissertation, and written and oral presentations.

Careers

Recent graduates have gone on to work as engineers for companies including EDF Energy and Intel, as analysts and consultants for firms including Standard Bank PLC and DN Capital, or to undertake PhD study at the Universities of Oxford, Bath and Glasgow.

Employability
This MSc programme provides a broad and comprehensive coverage of the technological and scientific foundations of nanotechnology, from the basis of the fabrication of nanostructures for advanced device applications, to fundamental quantum information and molecular biophysics, from nanotechnology in life science to nanotechnology in healthcare, and from experimental technology to theoretical modelling. Nanotechnology MSc graduates are expertly equipped either to pursue PhD study or become consultants or engineers in a wide range of nanotechnology fields.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) is a new UK-based multidisciplinary enterprise operating at the forefront of science and technology.

Forming a bridge between the physical and biomedical sciences, it brings together two of the world's leading institutions in nanotechnology, UCL (University College London) and Imperial College London.

The centre aims to provide leading-edge training in nanotechnology and students on this programme benefit from excellent new facilities, including a £14 million research building furnished with state-of-the art equipment, and a £1million teaching facility in UCL Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

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Oxford’s new MSc in Nanotechnology for Medicine and Health Care builds on the world-leading research in nanomedicine at the University’s Institute of Biomedical Engineering and other departments in the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS) Division and Medical Sciences Division. Read more
Oxford’s new MSc in Nanotechnology for Medicine and Health Care builds on the world-leading research in nanomedicine at the University’s Institute of Biomedical Engineering and other departments in the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS) Division and Medical Sciences Division. This advanced modular course is delivered by leading scientists and experts in this rapidly developing field and has been specifically designed for those who would value a part-time modular learning structure, for example those in full-time employment, both in the UK and overseas.

The MSc is designed to be completed part-time, normally over a two- to three-year period, and so provides a path to career development that is flexible and recognised within academia and industry. The programme comprises three online modules exploring the fundamentals of science and materials characterisation at the nanoscale, three intensive five-day face-to-face modules describing the clinical and commercial application of such science, and a piece of original lab-based research leading to the submission of a dissertation. This modular structure provides an adaptable approach to learning, and each module may also be taken as an individual short course.

There are opportunities to access and learn about cutting-edge research and current practice in a wide range of nanotechnology and healthcare topics from experts with experience of taking nanotechnologies from basic concept through clinical validation to market realisation. The tutor-led approach lends cohesion to the modular experience which is tailored for busy people in full-time employment who wish to minimise time away from the workplace to study.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-nanotechnology-for-medicine-and-health-care

The first deadline for applications is Friday 20 January 2017

If your application is completed by this January deadline and you fulfil the eligibility criteria, you will be automatically considered for a graduate scholarship. For full details please see: http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/graduate-scholarships.

Description

Nanotechnology is the production and application of devices and systems at the nanometre scale, which is of the order of one billionth of a metre. Developments in this area of technology are now coming to fruition, and increasingly impacting on our daily lives. In particular, nanotechnology is becoming a crucial driving force behind innovation in medicine and healthcare, with a range of advances including nanoscale therapeutics, biosensors, implantable devices and imaging systems. However, the pace with which this revolution is occurring has left even some of its leading practitioners lacking in aspects of the key fundamental knowledge or the information required to navigate the regulatory and clinical pathway to achieve market realisation.

The University of Oxford's MSc in Nanotechnology for Medicine and Health Care offers a detailed and cutting-edge education in this subject and builds on the successful Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology, which was launched in 2006. The course is taken part-time as a mixture of online and face-to-face modules, meaning it can fit around the demands of those working full-time and can be studied by international students without the requirement to relocate. The course uses a blend of individual study of learning materials, together with group work during live online tutorials, conventional lectures and discussions and also requires the student to submit a dissertation reporting an original piece of nanomedicine-based research. The group sessions with tutors are particularly valuable because they offer highly focused learning and assessment opportunities.

Programme details

The MSc in Nanotechnology for Medicine and Health Care is a part-time course consisting of six modules and a research project and associated dissertation. The programme is normally completed in two to three years. Students are full members of the University of Oxford and are matriculated as members of an Oxford college.

The modules in this programme can also be taken as individual short courses. It is possible to transfer credit from up to three previously completed modules into the MSc programme, if the time elapsed between commencement of the accredited module(s) and registration on the MSc is not more than two years.

The course comprises:

- three online modules giving a thorough introduction to the fundamental science of nanotechnology and the behaviour and characterisation of nanoscale materials;

- three five-day modules taught face-to-face in Oxford explaining the scientific, regulatory, clinical and commercial aspects of the application of nanotechnology to medicine and healthcare

- an original research project of approximately 18 weeks to be written up as a dissertation

The course has a dedicated Course Director, Associate Director and administration team accustomed to supporting students undertaking distance learning and face-to-face courses. Students have access to staff at the University of Oxford’s Begbroke Science Park and Institute of Biomedical Engineering, particularly the Course Director, Professor Robert Carlisle and the Associate Course Director, Dr Christiane Norenberg.

Throughout the course, students can use the University of Oxford’s excellent electronic library resources to enable them to complete the assignment tasks.

Programme modules:

- Module 1: The Wider Context of Nanotechnology (online)
- Module 2: The Fundamental Science of Nanotechnology (online)
- Module 3: Fundamental Characterisation for Nanotechnology (online with two-day component in Oxford)
- Module 4: Introduction to Bionanotechnology (in Oxford)
- Module 5: Nanomedicine – Science and Applications (in Oxford)
- Module 6: Clinical Translation and Commercialisation of Nanomedicine (in Oxford)

To complete the MSc, students need to attend the six modules and complete the assessed written assignments for each module, and complete a research project with dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor and the Course Director.

Who is it for?

This is a part-time, modular course leading to a postgraduate qualification at the University of Oxford. The course is designed for students wishing to study part-time. It will appeal to those working in the commercial, research or healthcare sectors who use or develop nanotechnology in their work. Applications are welcome from biomedical engineers, materials scientists, biotech-entrepreneurs, medical practitioners, chemists, pharmacists, electrical engineers, project managers in related industries, patent agents, legislators, as well as those involved in commercial or academic research in this area of science.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage. Read more
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials – such as graphene – and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised, practical skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Completion of the programme will provide you with the skills essential to furthering your career in this rapidly emerging field.

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Energy Economics and Technology
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Renewable Energy Technology
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

NANOTECHNOLOGY AT SURREY

We are one of the leading institutions developing nanotechnology and the next generation of materials and nanoelectronic devices.

Taught by internationally-recognised experts within the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), on this programme you will discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of- the-art equipment and facilities.

The ATI is a £10 million investment in advanced research and is the flagship institute of the University of Surrey in the area of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. The ATI brings together under one roof the major research activities of the University from the Department of Electronic Engineering and the Department of Physics in the area of nanotechnology and electronic devices.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning – know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin Nanoscience and nanotechnology for renewable systems
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within Nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoelectronics for renewable energy
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research and development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability.
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Nanotechnology (Physics) enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

For MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) programme you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

This MSc by Research in Nanotechnology comes under the Nano-physics and the life sciences research area at Swansea. The fundamental understanding of the electronic, structural, chemical and optical properties of materials on the nano-scale is essential for advances in nanotechnology, in particular the development of new devices via the incorporation of novel materials. Advances in experimental physics underpin these developments via characterisation and quantification of quantum phenomena which dominate at these length scales.

The Nanotechnology research concentrates on two main areas: determining properties of materials (e.g., graphene) on the nano-scale using scanning probe based techniques; the development of imaging and laser based spectroscopic techniques to study biological samples (e.g., imaging of cellular components and bacteria).

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Our world-class Systems and Process Engineering Centre brings together academic expertise from across the University, incorporating state-of-the-art facilities. With our enviable reputation for research in Nanotechnology, Swansea University provides an excellent base for your research as a MSc by Research student in Nanotechnology.

Key Features of MSc by Research in Nanotechnology

At Swansea University, the emphasis of our nanotechnology research is on the development of applications-driven research and the transfer of technology from the laboratory to the workplace or health centre.

Interaction with industry is a key component of the centre’s strategy. We are a world-leader in power electronics, telecommunications, nanotechnology and biometrics and modelling of nanoelectronic devices research.

MSc by Research in Nanotechnology typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Facilities

The new home of the Nanotechnology programme is at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Links with industry

Nanotechnology research at Swansea University places a strong emphasis on the development of applications-driven research and the transfer of technology from the laboratory to the work place or health centre. Interaction with industry is therefore a key component of the Centre’s strategy and we have collaborated with major multinational companies such as Agilent, Boots and Sharp, as well as a number of smaller Welsh-based companies.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK
Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK
Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK

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The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. Read more
The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. This multidisciplinary programme complements backgrounds in electronics, materials science, or physics.

Why this programme

-◾The University of Glasgow is a recognised pioneer in many of the most exciting aspects of nanotechnology, with an international reputation in micro and nanofabrication for applications including nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and bioelectronics.
◾You will have access to the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) cleanrooms and the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre. The JWNC holds a number of world records in nanofabrication including records for the performance of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices.
◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾This MSc caters to a growing demand for scientists and engineers who can fabricate systems of sensors, actuators, functional materials and who can integrate electronics at the micro and nano scale. As a graduate you will also possess the necessary insights in nanoscience to develop new products using these skills.
◾You will be taught by experts in the field and have access to research seminars given by our international collaborators, many of whom are world leaders in nanoscience.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Electronic devices
◾Introduction to research in nanoscience and nanotechnology
◾Micro- and nano-technology
◾Nanofabrication
◾Research methods and techniques
◾MSc project.

Optional courses

◾Applied optics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Microwave electronic & optoelectronic devices
◾Microwave and mm wave circuit design
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nano and atomic scale imaging
◾Semiconductor physics.

Projects

◾The programme builds towards an extended project, which is an integral part of the MSc programme: many projects are linked to industry or related to research in the school. Our contacts with industry and our research collaborations will make this a meaningful and valuable experience, giving you the opportunity to apply your newly learnt skills.
◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits that will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers your ability to apply them in industrially relevant problems.
◾MSc projects are associated with Glasgow's James Watt Nanofabrication Centre, one of Europe's premier research cleanrooms. Projects range from basic research into nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation, to development of systems in optoelectronics, microbiology and electronic devices which require such fabrication.
◾You can choose from a list of approximately 30 projects published yearly in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾Over 250 international companies have undertaken commercial or collaborative work with the JWNC in the last 5 years and over 90 different universities from around the globe presently have collaborations with Glasgow in nanoscience and nanotechnology.
◾Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the nanofabrication industry.

Career prospects

Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.

Former Glasgow graduates in the subject area of nanoscience and nanotechnology are now working for companies including Intel, TSMC, IBM, ST Microelectronics, Freescale, Oxford Instruments Plama Technology, ASM, and Applied Materials.

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Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine are rapidly expanding fields with the potential to revolutionise modern medicine. This cross-disciplinary programme provides students with a robust scientific understanding in these fields, combined with a "hands-on" practical and translational focus. Read more
Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine are rapidly expanding fields with the potential to revolutionise modern medicine. This cross-disciplinary programme provides students with a robust scientific understanding in these fields, combined with a "hands-on" practical and translational focus.

Degree information

This programme will equip students with a critical understanding of:
-How nanotechnology can be harnessed for the improved detection and treatment of disease.
-The use of stem cells in medicine.
-Tissue engineering strategies for tissue regeneration.
-Improving biomaterials for directing cell behaviour.
-The regulatory, ethical and commercial hurdles for the translation of these emerging technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project (90 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is offered. The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits) and two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules
-Nanotechnology in Medicine *
-Applied Tissue Engineering *
-Biomaterials
-Research Methodologies
-Practical Bio-Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine
-*PG Cert - compulsory modules

Optional modules - choose one of the following options; attendance at the other module is possible but will not be assessed.
-Stem Cells in Medicine and their Applications in Surgery
-Translation of Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an extensive laboratory-based (90 credits) research project which culminates in a dissertation of c.15,000 words and an individual viva voce.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, workshops, group discussions, practical sessions, and demonstrations. Assessment is through presentations, problem-solving workshops, written practical reports, coursework, unseen written examinations and the dissertation.

Careers

Student career options and progression during and following the completion of the degree are considered to be of the utmost importance. Personal tutors will offer individual advice and seminars are arranged on a variety of career competencies including CV writing, writing research proposals and positive personal presentation.

Networking with world-leading scientists, new biotechnology CEO's and clinicians is encouraged and enabled throughout the programme. Research output in terms of publishing papers and presenting at conferences is also promoted.

Recent career destinations include:
-PhD or Medicine at UCL, Imperial College London and Universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-Clinical PhD training programmes
-NHS hospitals in the UK
-EU and overseas hospitals and research facilities

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Health Careers Program, Harvard University
-PhD Medicine, Queen's University, Belfast
-PhD Bioengineering, Imperial College London
-PhD Nanomedicine, UCL
-DPhil Researcher (Biomedical Sciences), University of Oxford and studying MSc Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, -University College London (UCL)

Employability
Graduates of the programme gain the transferable laboratory, critical and soft skills, such as science communication, necessary to pursue a scientific or clinical research career in the fields of nanomedicine and regenerative medicine.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Based within the world-leading medical research environment of the UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science this MSc retains a clinical focus and addresses real medicine needs. Students learn about the route of translation from research ideas into actual products which can benefit patients.

An in-depth laboratory-based research project is an integral component of the programme: expert support allows students to investigate cutting-edge projects and thereby open up opportunities for further research and publications.

Students are embedded within the vibrant research community of the Faculty of Medical Sciences which provides students - through research seminars, symposia and eminent guest lecturers - outstanding networking opportunities within the research, clinical and translational science communities.

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Many future applications within electronics, telecommunication, information systems, medicine, and natural or artificial biosystems build upon progress in nanoscale technologies. Read more
Many future applications within electronics, telecommunication, information systems, medicine, and natural or artificial biosystems build upon progress in nanoscale technologies. On the nanoscale, new physical, chemical, and biological properties become important, and research often takes place on the borders between these disciplines. Proficiency in theoretical and practical aspects of these fields will therefore be important both within the industry and the academia. The nanotechnology programme is based on both physics and chemistry and will give you a thorough, yet advanced knowledge of the nanoscale system properties.

Programme description

Besides equipping you with a solid theoretical background in the physics, chemistry and technology of nanoscale systems the programme will also provide you with unique competencies, such as knowledge of the innovative possibilities of nanotechnology and ample hands-on experience in experimental techniques. You will be working in the MC2 cleanroom environment (one of few cleanrooms worldwide to allow Master's level student projects in the facilities) and other modern laboratories for both manufacturing and analysis, already during your first year. You will have the possibility to continue working in the laboratories as part of your Master's thesis.

Science on the nanoscale is typically carried out either in a “bottom-up” approach, where functional nanostructures are formed through molecular interactions, or by nanostructuring in a “top-down” approach. The core curriculum consists of a handful of compulsory courses that create a solid basis for both approaches. The programme also includes several semi-compulsory courses, creating a number of possible tracks within the program, as well as a number of courses that can be chosen to provide you with a deeper knowledge of your choice of area within nanotechnology. The conclusion of the programme consists of a thesis based on a half- or full-year research work carried out with some of the researchers in the area, either within our departments or with industrial partners.

The research conducted comprises three profile areas:
Nanophysics research, with a top-down perspective, includes studies of engineered nanosystems such as quantum computers, nanoelectronics and spintronics, applications and fundamental science of carbon nanotubes and graphene, nanosensors for bioanalytics and measurement technologies, and nano-optics with applications in, e.g. efficient solar energy production.

Nanochemistry, with a bottom-up focus, targets the ultimate miniaturization of electronics and photonics, molecular electronics, and the development of molecular methods to create nanodevices.

The Nanobiophysics activity, which forms a bridge between the other two and focuses on nanofluidics, soft matter nanotechnology, DNA-based self-assembly and biomimetic material science.

As a unique feature of the programme you will become part of this research and have access to our cleanroom and other world-class facilities for labs and group projects.

The Master’s Programme in Nanotechnology is tailored towards students aiming at international careers in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology, both in fundamental nanoscience and in the design and creation of components on the nanoscale.

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Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

Read less
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

Read less
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

Read less
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

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The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are… Read more
The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are brought together to deliver a one-year Master’s degree combining an in-depth multidisciplinary scientific programme with a global perspective on the commercial opportunities and business practice necessary for the successful exploitation in the rapidly developing fields of nanotechnology and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

The programme is intended for those with a good first degree in the physical sciences and engineering who wish to develop research skills and a commercial awareness in micro- and nanotechnology. It combines cutting-edge science with business practice skills, giving students knowledge and experience of a range of disciplines. This should enable students graduating from the course to evaluate the scientific importance and technological potential of new developments in the field of the field of Micro and Nanotechnology and provides an unparalleled educational experience for entrepreneurs in these fields.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmne

Course detail

Students will:

- be able to develop a discipline-specific terminology to describe and discuss relevant aspects of Micro and Nanotechnology, as well as Business;
- be able to develop their scientific writing skills through lab reports, literature survey, project dissertation, and scientific communication skills through oral presentations;
- be able to develop independence and critical thinking, as well as project management skills;
- have the opportunity develop team project skills.

Format

The programme is modular in structure and lasts ten months. It is envisaged that students attend all modules, which consist of no more than 16 hours of lectures per module with additional discussion groups and personal study time. The students will be examined on all core modules and may select which elective modules they are examined on. The modules are taught in the first two terms and will be followed by formal examinations. The modules are drawn from Science and Technology, Business Management and Innovation strands and so cover the many complexities involved in the processes of discovery and exploitation.

Written or oral feedback is provided after completion of assessed course work. In addition students must sit a mock exam at the beginning of the Lent Term; detailed individual feedback is provided by the Course Directors, who are also available for consultation throughout the academic year.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words in length (including tables, figure legends and appendices, but excluding bibliography) on a major project, involving (i) in-depth scientific research (following a literature survey in the same scientific field), or (ii) an in-depth case study concerned with a topic in science, business, ethics, law or policy (related to the topic covered during the literature survey). The assessment will include a viva voce examination.

No more than eight essays, each of not more than 3,000 words in length, covering the fields of science, ethics, law, and policy, and the interface of micro- and nanoscience and business.

A literature survey report of not more than 5000 words in length on a scientific topic, to be followed by either a major research project in the same field, or a business, ethics, law, or policy-related case study, concerning the scientific topic.

Course work, which may include written work, group work, and class participation.

Two unseen written examination papers, which may cover all core and elective scientific subjects prescribed in the syllabus.

Five practical assessments.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This Master of Science programme is taught entirely in English to stimulate the student in acquiring greater familiarity with the terminology used internationally. Read more

Mission and Goals

This Master of Science programme is taught entirely in English to stimulate the student in acquiring greater familiarity with the terminology used internationally. The objective of the programme is to prepare a professional figure expert in materials and in the design of processes and manufactured goods. Within the scope of the study plan a number of specific specialisations are foreseen:
- Surface Engineering
- Polymer Engineering
- Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology
- Engineering Applications
- Micromechanical Engineering

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/materials-engineering-and-nanotechnology/

Career Opportunities

The Master of Science graduate in Materials and Nanotechnology Engineering has the ability to devise and manage innovation in the materials industry; he/she finds employment mainly in companies specialised in producing, processing and design various materials and components, as well as in the area of the development of new applications in the mechanical, chemical, electronics, energy, telecommunications, construction, transport, biomedical, environmental and restoration industries as well as in research and development centres of companies and public bodies.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Materials_Engineering_and_Nanotechnology_04.pdf
The Master of science programme aims at preparing specialists with strong technical skills for innovation of processes and applications of new materials and nanotechnologies. One of the major focuses of the MSc is on sustainable technologies and nanotechnologies for advanced applications. The city of Milan and its surroundings are fertile ground for social and technical culture, with a variety of small enterprises open to innovation and new technologies and working in niche fields, where non-traditional materials are key to future developments. The job market welcomes Material Engineers as professionals capable of handling complex problems directly related to the production, treatment and applications of materials, acknowledging the high level of education obtained at the Politecnico di Milano through original methodologies and new technologies.
The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

- Mathematical methods for materials engineering
- Advanced materials chemistry
- Polymer science and engineering
- Principles of polymer chemistry + Fundamentals of polymer mechanics
- Solid state physics
- Mechanical behavior of materials
- Cementitous and ceramic materials engineering
- Advanced Materials
- Functional materials + nanostructured materials
- Durability of materials
- Failure and control of Materials
- Surface engineering
- Thesis work

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/materials-engineering-and-nanotechnology/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/materials-engineering-and-nanotechnology/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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