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Our MSc Physics programme will provide you will have exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills in physics. Read more
Our MSc Physics programme will provide you will have exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills in physics. As well as the modules offered by the Department of Physics, many optional modules are available from across the University of London, such as Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London and University College London. You will undertake an extended research project supervised by one of our academic staff.

Key benefits

- King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.

- Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".

- The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".

- Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/physics-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme consists of taught components combining specialised taught material in current areas of Physics and related disciplines, general research techniques, transferable skills and specialised research techniques together with a major research project. The project starts in January carrying through to the end of the programme. Experts in the chosen field will act as project supervisors.

The programme is run by the Department of Physics with some modules provided by the Department of Mathematics, the Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics and other University of London Colleges.

Topics include: nanotechnology, biophysics, photonics, cosmology and particle physics.

- Course purpose -

The MSc programme provides experience of research in rapidly developing areas of physics and related disciplines. Provides experience of the planning, administration, execution and dissemination of research, and equips students with the background knowledge and transferable and generic skills required to become an effective researcher.

- Course format and assessment -

From October to March you will study specialised taught material, attend lectures and seminars, carry out related assessed tasks, prepare an assessed research proposal, select your project topic and plan how your project will be performed. Lecture courses attended between October and March will be assessed by examination in May. Other assessments include a project plan and a patent draft. You will carry out your project full-time from April with a mid-project review and submission and oral presentation in September. Your project will contribute 50 per cent of the marks for your degree and you must also achieve at least 50 per cent in each module. The taught material is also assessed by essays and exercises.

Career prospects

Many students go on to do a PhD in Physics, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Read more
The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Though it may be taken as a free-standing qualification, most students take this programme as a pathway to the MSc. This pathway forms the first year of a two-year programme with successful students (gaining a merit or distinction) progressing onto the MSc Physics in second year.

Key benefits

- King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.

- Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".

- The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".

- Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/physics-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Students will undertake a total of 120 credits, from the following modules:

- Mathematical Methods in Physics III
- Statistical Mechanics
- Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics
- Particle Physics
- Optics
- Solid State Physics
- General Relatvity and Cosmology
- Fundamentals of Biophysics and Nanotechnology
- Introduction to Medical Imaging
- Laboratory Physics II
- Computational Lab
- Nuclear Physics
- Quantum Mechanics for Physics I
- Mathematical methods in Physics
- Symmetry in Physics
- Electromagnetism
- Astrophysics

- Course purpose -

For students with an undergraduate degree or equivalent who wish to have the experience of one year in a leading UK Physics Department, or who may not be immediately eligible for entry to a higher degree in the UK and who wish to upgrade their degree. If you successfully complete this programme with a Merit or Distinction we may consider you for the MSc programme.

- Course format and assessment -

The compulsory modules are assessed via coursework. The majority of the other optional modules avaiable are assessed by written examinations.

Career prospects

Many students go on to do a higher Physics degree, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less
The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner

Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study. The different learning outcomes of the potential awards may be summarised as follows:

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
-Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Communications Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Communications Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

As a student on the MSc in Communications Engineering, you will be provided with an in-depth understanding of the technology and architecture of computer communications, photonics and telecommunication networks, wireless telecommunications and related wireless information technologies.

Key Features of MSc in Communications Engineering

The practical knowledge and skills you will gain as a student on the MSc Communications Engineering course include being presented with the essential element of modern optical communication systems based on single mode optical fibres from the core to the access, evaluating bandwidth-rich contemporary approaches.

The MSc Communications Engineering course also covers advanced networking topics including network performance and network security. This is supported with some practical knowledge and skills for project and business management principles.

As a student on the MSc Communications Engineering course, you will also be introduced to technologies underlying the compressions and transmission of digital video over networking platforms, gain knowledge on the channel models and associated impairments that typically limit the performance of wireless systems, and learn to design optimum digital communication receivers for some basic communications channel models.

The MSc in Communications Engineering is modular in structure. Communications Engineering students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students on the Communications Engineering course must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time MSc in Communications Engineering Delivery mode:

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Communications Engineering scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Timetables for the Communications Engineering programme are typically available one week prior to each semester.

Modules

Modules on the MSc Communications Engineering course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

RF and Microwave
Signals and Systems
Entrepreneurship for Engineers
Nanophotonics
Micro and Nano Electro-Mechnical Systems
Lasers and applications
Wireless Communications
Digital Communications
Optical Communications
Optical Networks
Communication Skills for Research Engineers
Research Dissertation
MSc Dissertation - Communications Engineering

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Engineering at Swansea University has extensive IT facilities and provides extensive software licenses and packages to support teaching which benefit students on the MSc in Communications Engineering course. In addition the University provides open access IT resources.

Links with Industry

At Swansea University, Electronic and Electrical Engineering has an active interface with industry and many of our activities are sponsored by companies such as Agilent, Auto Glass, BT and Siemens.

This discipline has a good track record of working with industry both at research level and in linking industry-related work to our postgraduate courses. We also have an industrial advisory board that ensures our taught courses maintain relevance.

Our research groups work with many major UK, Japanese, European and American multinational companies and numerous small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to pioneer research. This activity filters down and influences the project work that is undertaken by all our postgraduate students.

Careers

The MSc Communications Engineering is suitable for those who have a career interest in the field of communication systems, which has been fundamentally changing the whole world in virtually every aspect, and would like to gain lasting career skills and in-depth knowledge to carry out development projects and advanced research in the area of communication systems.

Communications Engineering graduates can seek employment in wireless communication systems and network administration, and mobile applications development.

Student Quotes

“I was fascinated by the natural beauty of Swansea before I came here. Swansea University is near the beach so you can walk around the beach at any time. This Master’s is very useful to enhance your ability and enrich your principle of the academic knowledge.”

Zhang Daping, MSc Communication Systems (now Communications Engineering)

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

With recent academic appointments strengthening electronics research at the College, the Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) has been re-launched to support these activities.

The Centre aims to represent all major electronics research within the College and to promote the Electrical and Electronics Engineering degree.

Best known for its research in ground-breaking Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics, the Centre is also a world leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.

Read less
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

Why not discover more about the subject in our video?

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner
-Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes
-Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Whether you intend to gain skills and expertise that will enable you to take up a position in a key industrial sector or embark on further postgraduate… Read more

Course Summary

Whether you intend to gain skills and expertise that will enable you to take up a position in a key industrial sector or embark on further postgraduate research, you will find that our MSc Photonic Technologies will give you the solid intellectual foundation and hands-on practical and technical skills that you need for a successful professional career in science, engineering and related photonics-based industry.

Working in our new, state-of-the-art cleanroom complex with access to our extensive range of optical laboratories, as part of the course you will work with leading local and national photonics companies, and see first-hand their products and emerging photonics technologies.

Our broad programme will give you the solid intellectual foundation and hands-on practical and technical skills that you need for a successful professional career in science, engineering and related photonics-based industry, or to embark on further postgraduate research.

Modules

Semester one
Compulsory modules: Lasers; Microfabrication; Photonics Laboratory and Study Skills
Optional modules: Light and Matter; Matlab/Numerical Methods; Silicon Photonics

Semester two
Compulsory modules: Solid State and Ultrafast Lasers; Photonic Materials; Plasmonics, Metamaterials and Nanophotonics
Optional modules: Nanoscience Technology and Advanced Materials; MEMS Sensors and Actuators

Semester three
Lab and cleanroom project; four-month, independent research project culminating in a dissertation

Visit our website for further information...



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This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry. Read more
This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry.

The optional professional placement component gives you the opportunity to gain experience from working in industry, which cannot normally be offered by the standard technically-focused one-year Masters programme.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Electronic Engineering Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering graduates and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies. Current pathways offered include:
-Communications Networks and Software
-RF and Microwave Engineering
-Mobile Communications Systems
-Mobile and Satellite Communications
-Mobile Media Communications
-Computer Vision, Robotics and Machine Learning
-Satellite Communications Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Space Engineering
-Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy
-Medical Imaging

Please note that at applicant stage, it is necessary to apply for the Electronic Engineering (Euromasters). If you wish to specialise in one of the other pathways mentioned above, you can adjust your Euromaster programme accordingly on starting the course.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 24 months and part-time over 60 months. It consists of ten taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VHDL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering Optional
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-Engineering Professional Studies 1 (with industrial Placement)
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

PARTNERS

The MSc Euromasters complies with the structure defined by the Bologna Agreement, and thus it is in harmony with the Masters programme formats adhered to in European universities. Consequently, it facilitates student exchanges with our partner universities in the Erasmus Exchange programme.

A number of bilateral partnerships exist with partner institutions at which students can undertake their project. Current partnerships held by the Department include the following:
-Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
-University of Prague, Czech Republic
-Universität di Bologna, Italy
-Universität Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
-Universita' degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in electronic engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, computing and communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Enhanced capabilities of MSc (Euromasters) graduates:
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Use of quantitative methods for problem solving. Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The optoelectronics market is expected to grow significantly in coming years. This specialist optoelectronics Masters course will give you access to optoelectronics expertise, so you can take advantage of new opportunities in this field. Read more
The optoelectronics market is expected to grow significantly in coming years. This specialist optoelectronics Masters course will give you access to optoelectronics expertise, so you can take advantage of new opportunities in this field.

Optoelectronics includes electronic devices that source, detect and control light. On this course you will benefit from high-level vocational training in lasers, LED lighting and semiconductors, tailored to the needs of the optoelectronics and optical communications industries.

As part of your studies, you will also benefit from the latest research within the field. You will be able to attend relevant research seminars and departmental seminars that are held regularly throughout the year. These events reflect the most up-to-date thinking from academics and specialists from industry.

The teaching team, many of whom have published research in optoelectronics, lead the University’s Wireless and Optoelectronics Research and Innovation Centre This informs our teaching, so you will benefit from cutting-edge Course Content that embodies the latest research.

Routes of study:
The course is available to study via two routes:
- MSc Optoelectronics (with internship)
- MSc Optoelectronics (without internship)

Please note: *Internships are optional and available to full-time students only. Internship places are limited. Students have the opportunity to work in a participating UK company or within a Research Centre at the University. You can also opt to study the course without an internship which will reduce your course length.

What you will study

You will study the following modules:
- Physics in Modern Optics
- Optoelectronics Devices for Telecommunications
- Optoelectronics Devices for Life Science & Measurement
- Applied Digital Signal Processing
- Embedded System Design
- Product Innovation and Entrepreneurship
- Six month Internship
- Masters Major Individual Project

Learning and teaching methods

The optoelectronics course offers an intensive but flexible learning pattern, with two start points each year – February and September. There are three major blocks during the 18 months’ study (full-time), which includes 12 months of teaching and a possible six months of internship*. Throughout your studies you will complete a 15-week final research project.

You will be taught through lectures, tutorials and workshops involving hands-on systems modeling and simulations using state-of-the-art hardware and software facilities (Zemax, Lightools etc). Students will also engage in supervised research supported by full access to world-class online and library facilities.

You are also expected to regularly attend relevant research seminars and departmental colloquia, which reflect the up-to-date research interests of the Wireless and Optoelectronics Research and Innovation Centre (WORIC).

The optoelectronics course is available to study via two main routes, you can opt to add further value to your studies by undertaking an internship or simply focus on building your academic knowledge through a on-campus study as detailed below:

- MSc Optoelectronics (with internship):
Delivery: Full-time only | Start dates: September and February

If you choose to undertake an internship, your course will be delivered in four major blocks that offer an intensive but flexible learning pattern. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week. This is followed by 6 month period of internship, after which the student returns to undertake a 16-week major research project. Please note: Course length may vary dependent on your chosen start date.

- MSc Optoelectronics (without internship):
Delivery: Full-time and Part-time | Start dates: September and February

The study pathway available without internship is available full-time and part-time. The full-time route is delivered in three major blocks. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week followed by a 16-week major research project. The full-time course duration is about 12 months, if you study part-time then you will complete the course in three years. Part-time study involves completing three modules in each of the first two years and a major research project in the final year. The use of block-mode delivery in this way allows flexible entry and exit, and also enables practising engineers to attend a single module as a short course.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Many industries need specialists in optoelectronics systems design. Careers are available in industrial and technology sectors such as automotives, computers, consumer electronics, communications, industrial optical sensing equipment and medical laser equipment.

The major project gives you a great opportunity to deepen your knowledge and hone your skills in a specialist topic informed by your planned career, and the period of internship gives you an industrial experience that can set you apart from others immediately upon graduation.

Internship

Internships are only available to students studying full-time: Following successful completion of six taught modules, you will be competitively selected to join participating UK companies or University Research Centres on a six-month period of unpaid work placement before returning to undertake your major research project. All students who have an offer for the MSc Optoelectronics (with internship) are guaranteed an internship either in industry or in a University Research Centre.

There are 25 internship places available. Students who wish to undertake an internship must apply for the MSc Optoelectronics (with internship). It is anticipated that there will be significant demand for this programme and applicants are advised to apply as soon as possible to avoid disappointment. Applications will be considered on a first come first served basis and the numbers of students offered a place on the programme with internship will be capped.

If the course is already full and we are unable to offer you a place on the Masters course with internship, we may be able to consider you for the standard MSc Optoelectronics (without internship) which is a shorter programme.

Assessment methods

Each of the six taught modules is typically assessed through 50% coursework and 50% closed-book class test. The major project is assessed through presentation to a panel of examiners, viva and written report. Work for lecture modules is assessed largely through examinations whereas the laboratory work is assessed in a continuous manner. Lecture courses are examined at the end of each teaching block.

Facilities

There are two optoelectronics and two RF laboratories equipped with £1million worth of experimental equipments and modeling facilities. These state-of-the-art facilities are home to:

The Innova® Sabre® MotoFreD™ ion laser
Newfocus TLM-8700 fast sweep tunable laser source
Agilent 8164B Lightwave Measurement System
RENISHAW ML-10 Measurement Systems
Beam profilers: Thorlabs BC106-VIS – CCD Camera Beam Profiler, Thorlabs BP109-IR – Beam Profiler
Scanning Fabry-Perot Spectrum Analyzer. e.g. Thorlabs SA200-5B, Coherence 0464H08
Anritsu MS9710B Optical Spectrum Analyzer
Ocean Optics spectrometers. e.g. HR4000 and USB4000
Edwards E306A Coating System Thermal Vacuum Evaporator
SCS G3-8 Spin Coater
ZEPTO laboratory plasma cleaner ZEPTO
FUJIKURA FSM-40S ARC FUSION SPLICER
National Instruments FPGA and Digitizer
Signal generator: TG210 2MhZ function Generator
Oscilloscopes: HP infinium Oscilloscope, HM507 Combiscope
Anechoic Chamber suitable for frequencies above 1 GHz.
Various measurement systems for 2, 10, 20, 40, & 60 GHz links
VubiQ 60 GHz development kits
Three 60 GHz Backhaul links (Sub10 Systems)
Antenna radiation patterns measurement system
Two equipped vans for outdoor measurements
Programmable or Reconfigurable Platform (DSPs, FPGAs, GPPs)
The modeling facilities include high performance computing facilities (e.g. a 24-core cluster) equipped with various optoelectronic and EM modeling packages such as FDTD solutions, Zemax, FEKO, and VPI Photonics suites. We also in-house novel RF Ray-tracing and Physical Optics EM planning tools developed by members of WORIC.

Teaching

The academic staff teaching on the MSc Optoelectronics are the same people who lead and work in the WORIC. This international centre has a significant track record of innovation in lasers, sensors, nanophotonics, wireless communications, telecommunications, and optical communications and aims to provide industry with access to cutting edge innovative ideas and knowledge. WORIC has won many grants from EPSRC, TSB, EADS, as well as A4B is keen to solve real industrial problems with innovation that provides enormous market.

Read less
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage. Read more
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials – such as graphene – and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised, practical skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Completion of the programme will provide you with the skills essential to furthering your career in this rapidly emerging field.

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Energy Economics and Technology
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Renewable Energy Technology
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

NANOTECHNOLOGY AT SURREY

We are one of the leading institutions developing nanotechnology and the next generation of materials and nanoelectronic devices.

Taught by internationally-recognised experts within the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), on this programme you will discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of- the-art equipment and facilities.

The ATI is a £10 million investment in advanced research and is the flagship institute of the University of Surrey in the area of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. The ATI brings together under one roof the major research activities of the University from the Department of Electronic Engineering and the Department of Physics in the area of nanotechnology and electronic devices.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning – know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin Nanoscience and nanotechnology for renewable systems
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within Nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoelectronics for renewable energy
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research and development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability.
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Physics has always remained and still is at the center of science and technology. The laws of physics that are reached through observations and careful experimentation find applications from the subatomic particles to the astronomic formations such as stars and galaxies. Read more
Physics has always remained and still is at the center of science and technology. The laws of physics that are reached through observations and careful experimentation find applications from the subatomic particles to the astronomic formations such as stars and galaxies. On the other hand, design of advanced technology materials, fabrication of semiconductor devices, the development of optical communication systems have all evolved as applications of physics. Our department has both theoretical and experimental research activites. Quantum information theory, gravitation and condensed matter physics are among our theoretical research interests. On the experimental research side, we have three advanced laboratories where we focus on solid state lasers, optoelectronic and nano-photonic materials and devices. Our M. S. Program aims at teaching fundamental physics at a high level and coupling this knowledge with a research experience in either theoretical or applied physics depending on the interests of the student.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Photonic and Laser Materials
• Microphotonics
• Nanophotonics
• Gravitation, Cosmology, and Numerical Relativity
• Mathematical Physics
• Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Information Theory
• Theoretical High Energy Physics
• Quantum Optics, atomic, molecular and optical physics
• Statistical mechanics of biophysical systems

Read less
At the University of Surrey we leads the way in areas such as nanotechnology, vision and signal processing, mobile and wireless communications, multimedia engineering and space and satellite engineering. Read more
At the University of Surrey we leads the way in areas such as nanotechnology, vision and signal processing, mobile and wireless communications, multimedia engineering and space and satellite engineering.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our MSc Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering students and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies in the selected pathway, with enhanced project, as well as training in transferable skills including business awareness and management.

We offer numerous Electronic Engineering MScs in more specialised fields of study, from space engineering to mobile communications systems, and if you wish to specialise in one of these pathways you can adjust your course accordingly.

The advanced taught technical content is in sub-disciplines of electronic engineering closely aligned with the internationally-leading research conducted in the four research centres of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied part-time over 48 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a standard project. Each student will undertake one short course, following which they will be provided with distance learning material in order to study for the subsequent assessment. The students may be assessed for either one or two modules from the short course they undertake.

Typically a student would complete two modules and therefore up to two short courses within the space of year, though they are at liberty to study for more modules if they have the time. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-IP Networking Protocols and Technologies
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communication
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Spacecraft System Design
-Satellite Communications
-Internet of Things
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VDHL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-60-Credit Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resource
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

Read less
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

Read less
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

Read less
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

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