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Masters Degrees (Nanoparticles)

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The University of Oxford’s online Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is an online course aimed at professionals from a diverse range of backgrounds who wish to learn more about the foundations of nanotechnology, technological advances and the applications enabled by nanotechnology. Read more
The University of Oxford’s online Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is an online course aimed at professionals from a diverse range of backgrounds who wish to learn more about the foundations of nanotechnology, technological advances and the applications enabled by nanotechnology. There are opportunities to access cutting-edge research and current practice in a wide range of nanotechnology topics.

The course provides relevant, meaningful and up-to-date learning to enhance career development that is recognised and accepted within industry. A modular structure allows a flexible approach to learning and each module may be taken as an individual short course. The tutor-led approach lends cohesion to the distance learning experience which is tailored for busy people in full-time employment who wish to minimise time away from the workplace to study.

Applications for October 2016 are now being accepted. In the meantime you may be interested in applying for one of the modules from the Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology as a short course.

Nanotechnology is the production and application of devices and systems at the nanometre scale, which is of the order of one billionth of a meter. Developments in this area of technology are now coming to fruition, and increasingly impacting our daily lives. However, it is recognised that there is a need for more people to understand the basics about this technology.

The University of Oxford's online Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology offers a nine-month introduction to the subject. The course is taken part-time and online meaning that it can be taken from anywhere in the world by those seeking a solid foundation in nanotechnology, whilst having the option of working full-time. The course uses a blend of individual study of online learning materials, together with group work during live online tutorials, discussions and research. The group sessions with tutors are particularly valuable because they offer highly authentic learning and assessment opportunities.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-nanotechnology

Features

Students study the Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology over three modules that introduce the most commonly used and most important analytical, quantitative and experimental methods in nanotechnology. The course has the following features:

- An online, part-time University of Oxford qualification aimed at industry;

- Three modules giving a thorough introduction to nanotechnology and the behaviour and characterisation of nanoparticles;

- The course is taken part-time so students can complete it whilst continuing to work full-time;

- The course is taught online and can be taken from anywhere in the world;

- Tutors provide online support and replicate electronically the famed Oxford tutorial system;

- Assessment throughout the modules ensures that students can monitor their progress;

- The course has a dedicated Course Director and administration team accustomed to supporting students undertaking distance learning courses;

- Students have access to staff at the University of Oxford’s Begbroke Science Park, particularly the Course Director, Dr Christiane Norenberg;

- Throughout the course, students can use the University of Oxford’s excellent electronic library resources to enable them to complete the assignment tasks.

Who is it for?

The Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology is a part-time, online course leading to a postgraduate qualification at the University of Oxford. The course is designed for students wishing to study part-time. It will appeal to those working in the commercial or healthcare sectors, who use, or expect to use, nanotechnology in their work. Previous students include electrical engineers, materials scientists, project managers, patent agents, chemists, medical practitioners, plastic surgeons and food technologists as well as those involved in manufacturing, research and legislation.

Programme details

The Postgraduate Certificate in Nanotechnology begins in October and runs for nine months. Students take three online nanotechnology modules. At the end of the third module, students are required to attend a residential weekend in nanoscale materials characterisation based in Oxford. This takes place at the University of Oxford's Begbroke Science Park in July 2017.

The content of each module contains up-to-the-minute thinking and reflects the University of Oxford's world-leading research in nanotechnology. Each module has a different focus:

- Module 1: The Wider Context of Nanotechnology (24 October - 4 December 2016) looks at the current state of the technology and addresses its implications;

- Module 2: The Fundamental Science of Nanotechnology (9 January - 18 March 2017) explains the physical and mathematical foundations of nanoscale phenomena and properties of nanoscale materials;

- Module 3: Fundamental Characterisation for Nanotechnology (24 April - 2 July 2017) explores methods for investigating nanoparticles, thin films and nanostructures.

Each module lasts for 7 or 10 weeks corresponding approximately to the University of Oxford's term calendar. Within each module, there are weekly live online tutorials lasting for one hour as well as assignments and problem sheets. Most students should expect to spend an average of between 10 and 15 hours per week on independent study in addition to the timetabled tutorials.

Course aims

By the end of the Postgraduate Certificate students will be expected to:

- Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the physical principles, mathematical methods and techniques appropriate for solving nanotechnology problems and be able to apply them to industrial problems through a critical comprehension of the relative advantages and disadvantages of these methods;

- Demonstrate an understanding of some of the most common applications of nanoscale phenomena and how these relate to the solution of nanotechnology problems in industry;

- Manage their learning and research and conduct independent and effective study;

- Apply skills gained in analytical techniques from across the physical sciences.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The MSc Environmental Engineering course provides highly employable graduates who will act as managers and leaders serving the environmental needs of the process industries. Read more
The MSc Environmental Engineering course provides highly employable graduates who will act as managers and leaders serving the environmental needs of the process industries.

The scale of modern industralisation has given rise to environmental problems of unprecedented complexity. This MSc examines environmental problems like toxic waste, air pollution, waste disposal, global warming, contaminated land and water. The challenge for today’s environmental engineers is to manage these problems through a high level of resource management and technological innovation.

Today’s environmental problems require innovation in improvements to manufacturing processes and in the utilisation
of natural resources. Both the assessment and management of the effects of natural and human activity on the natural and built
environment are examined in this course. The course demands a high level of resource management and is designed to enable graduates to work across the interface between engineering and the environment.

Students will develop:
a solid understanding of existing technology and its application, and an appreciation of the economic, legal, social and ethical aspects of the problems presented
skills in research, project management, problem solving and reporting
the ability to communicate ideas effectively in written reports, verbally and by means of presentations to groups
the ability to exercise original thought
the ability to plan and undertake an individual project
the ability to understand and apply the theory, method and
practice of environmental engineering
interpersonal communication and professional skill

Previous research projects have included:
assessment of energy crops for combined heat and power systems
bio-diesel process optimisation
microbial Fuel Cells
nanobots for contaminated land remediation
metal contamination of lakes near Nottingham
starch nanoparticles for water treatment
renewable energy at point of consumption

Scholarship information can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/graduateschool/funding/index.aspx

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Advance your knowledge of analytical chemistry, your practical skills and professional and organisation skills on this course. You learn the fundamentals of analytical chemistry and how it is applied to pharmaceutical, environmental and materials analyses. Read more

Advance your knowledge of analytical chemistry, your practical skills and professional and organisation skills on this course. You learn the fundamentals of analytical chemistry and how it is applied to pharmaceutical, environmental and materials analyses.

The course is taught by researchers with an international reputation in advanced analytical techniques, such as the application of mass spectrometry to the analysis of biological matrices. Tutors also have expertise in production and detection of nanoparticles and detection of pollutants, particularly in soil.

This course is suitable if you wish to increase your knowledge and skills and increase your competitiveness in the job market or pursue a PhD. It will also suit you if you work in a chemistry-related profession and are seeking to further your career prospects.

You gain experience and understanding of

  • key techniques in separation sciences, including liquid and gas chromatography
  • atomic and molecular spectroscopy, such as atomic absorption and emission, NMR and IR
  • analytical technologies applied in process control and solving complex biological problems

This is a multi-disciplinary course where you learn about various topics including statistics, laboratory quality assurance and control, environmental analysis and fundamentals of analytical instrumentation.

You also gain the transferable skills needed to continue developing your knowledge in science, such as data interpretation and analysis, experimental design and communication and presentation skills.

You complete a research project to develop your research skills and their application to real world situations. You are supported by a tutor who is an expert in analytical chemistry.

Your laboratory work is carried out in our teaching laboratories which are extensively equipped with the latest models of analytical instruments such as HPLCs and GCs. This is supplemented by access to our research facilities where you have access to more sophisticated equipment, such as NMR and a suite of various types of mass spectrometers.

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Applicants should normally have a degree (bachelors or equivalent) in chemistry that is accredited by the RSC. Applicants whose first degree is not accredited by the RSC, or with overseas degrees or degrees in which chemistry is a minor component will be considered on a case by case basis on submission of their first degree transcript.

Candidates who do not meet the RSC criteria for accreditation will be awarded a non-accredited masters qualification on successful completion of the programme.

Applicants will be informed in writing at the start of the programme whether or not they possess an acceptable qualification and, if successful on the masters programme, will receive an RSC accredited degree. If you do not meet the RSC criteria for accreditation, you will be awarded a non-accredited masters after successfully completing the programme.

Course structure

The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits.

Core modules:

  • Quality issues, laboratory accreditation and the analytical approach (15 credits)
  • Separation, detection and online techniques (15 credits)
  • Surface analysis and related techniques (15 credits)
  • Drug detection and analysis (15 credits)
  • Methods for analysis of molecular structure (15 credits)
  • Process analytical technology (15 credits)
  • Professional development (15 credits)
  • Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
  • Research project (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment methods include written examinations and coursework including

  • problem-solving exercises
  • case studies
  • reports from practical work.

Research project assessment includes a written report and viva voce. 

Employability

This course is aimed at either recent graduates or those already in employment who wish to develop a career in analytical chemistry or enhance their laboratory skills and knowledge in the techniques and methods used in a modern analytical science laboratory. It also offers you the training and knowledge to go on to research at PhD level in analytical science.



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Whether you are a new graduate or already employed and seeking to further your career prospects, this course offers a solid career development path. Read more

Whether you are a new graduate or already employed and seeking to further your career prospects, this course offers a solid career development path. You can also choose this course if you wish to pursue research in biotechnology at PhD level.

Biotechnology is the application of biological processes and is underpinned by • cell biology • molecular biology • bioinformatics • structural biology. It encompasses a wide range of technologies for modifying living organisms or their products according to human needs.

Applications of biotechnology span medicine, technology and engineering.

Important biotechnological advances including

  • the production of therapeutic proteins using cloned DNA, for example insulin and clotting factors
  • the application of stem cells to treat human disease
  • the enhancement of crop yields and plants with increased nutritional value
  • herbicide and insect resistant plants
  • production of recombinant antibodies for the treatment of disease
  • edible vaccines, in the form of modified plants
  • development of biosensors for the detection of biological and inorganic analytes

You gain

  • up-to-date knowledge of the cellular and molecular basis of biological processes
  • an advanced understanding of DNA technology and molecular biotechnology
  • knowledge of developing and applying biotechnology to diagnosis and treatment of human diseases
  • practical skills applicable in a range of bioscience laboratories
  • the transferable and research skills to enable you to continue developing your knowledge and improving your employment potential

The course is led by academics who are actively involved in biotechnology research and its application to the manipulation of proteins, DNA, mammalian cells and plants. Staff also have expertise in the use of nanoparticles in drug delivery and the manipulation of microbes in industrial and environmental biotechnology.

You are supported throughout your studies by an academic advisor who will help you develop your study and personal skills.

What is biotechnology

Biotechnology is the basis for the production of current leading biopharmaceuticals and has already provided us with the 'clot-busting' drug, tissue plasminogen activator for the treatment of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. It also holds the promise of new treatments for neurodegeneration and cancer through recombinant antibodies.

Genetically modified plants have improved crop yields and are able to grow in a changing environment. Manipulation of cellular organisms through gene editing methods have also yielded a greater understanding of many disease states and have allowed us to understand how life itself functions.

Course structure

You begin your studies focusing on the fundamentals of advanced cell biology and molecular biology before specialising in both molecular and plant biotechnology. Practical skills are developed throughout the course and you gain experience in molecular biology techniques such as PCR and sub cloning alongside tissue culture.

Core to the program is the practical module where you gain experience in a range of techniques used in the determination of transcription and translational levels, for example.

All practicals are supported by experienced academic staff, skilled in the latest biotechnological techniques.

Research and statistical skills are developed throughout the program. Towards the end of the program you apply your skills on a two month research project into a current biotechnological application. Employability skills are developed throughout the course in two modules.

The masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits. 

Core modules:

  • Cell biology (15 credits)
  • Biotechnology (15 credits)
  • Plant biotechnology (15 credits)
  • Molecular biology (15 credits)
  • Applied biomedical techniques (15 credits)
  • Professional development (15 credits)
  • Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
  • Research project (60 credits)

Optional modules :

  • Human genomics and proteomics (15 credits)
  • Cellular and molecular basis of disease (15 credits)
  • Cellular and molecular basis of cancer (15 credits)

Assessment

As students progress through the course they are exposed to a wide range of teaching and learning activities. The assessment strategy of the postgraduate course considers diverse assessment methods. Some modules offer dedicated formative feedback to aid skills development with assessments going through several rounds of formative tutor and peer feedback. Summative assessment methods are diverse, with examinations present in theory-based modules to test independent knowledge and data analysis. Several modules are entirely coursework-based, with a portfolio of skills such laboratory practical's and research proposals generated throughout the course forming the summative tasks. In all cases, the assessment criteria for all assessed assignments are made available to student prior to submission. 

Employability

The course is suitable for people wishing to develop their knowledge of molecular and cell biotechnology and its application to solving health and industrial problems.

You can find career opportunities in areas such as

  • biotechnology research
  • medical research in universities and hospitals
  • government research agencies
  • biotechnology industry
  • pharmaceutical industry.

Students on this course have gone on to roles including experimental officers in contract research, research and development in scientists, diagnostics specialists and applications specialists. Many of our graduates also go on to study for PhDs and continue as academic lecturers.



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The Biomedical Engineering MSc enables you to widen your biomedical engineering knowledge and skills. You develop these to a postgraduate level with the opportunity to undertake in-depth studies through your research projects. Read more
The Biomedical Engineering MSc enables you to widen your biomedical engineering knowledge and skills. You develop these to a postgraduate level with the opportunity to undertake in-depth studies through your research projects.

This one year course is intended for honours graduates (or an international equivalent) in mechanical or mechanical-related engineering (eg biomedical, materials or design), maths, physics or a related discipline.

A two year MSc is also available for non-native speakers of English that includes a preliminary year.

The taught part of the course covers major biomedical engineering themes, including:
-Bioengineering
-Manufacturing
-Nanomaterials
-Biomaterials
-Tissue engineering
-BioMEMs and microsystems engineering
-Design for human-systems integration

Your project is chosen from an extensive range of subjects. Project work can range from fundamental studies in areas of basic biomedical engineering science to practical design, make and test investigations.

Recent projects include:
-Investigations of bone cutting
-Assessment of finger splints
-Design of assistive technology
-Testing of artificial shoulder joints
-Design of a rig to flex spinal segments
-Investigation of nanoparticles
-Measuring the material properties of orthopaedic biopolymers

Some research may be undertaken in collaboration with industry.

The course is delivered by the School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering. The School has an established programme of research seminars. These are delivered by guest speakers from academia and industry (both national and international), providing excellent insights into a wide variety of engineering research.

Effective communication is an important skill for the modern professional engineer. This course includes sessions to help develop your ability, both through formal guidance sessions dedicated to good practice in report writing, and through oral/poster presentations of project work.

Delivery

The taught component of the course makes use of a combination of lectures, tutorials/labs and seminars. Assessment is by written examination and submitted in-course assignments.

The research project (worth 60 credits) is undertaken throughout the duration of the Master's course. Project work is assessed by dissertation and oral/poster presentations. You will be allocated, and meet regularly with, project supervisors.

Accreditation

The courses have been accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC).

An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Every day we are hearing of ground breaking advances in the field of tissue engineering which offer tremendous potential for the future of regenerative medicine and health care. Staff at Swansea University are active in many aspects of tissue engineering.

Key Features of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

We are actively researching many aspects of tissue engineering including the following areas:

- Characterisation and control of the stem cell niche

- Mechanical characterisation of stem cells and tissues

- Production of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering

- Electrospinning of scaffold materials

- Cartilage repair and replacement

- Bone repair and replacement

- The application of nanotechnology to regenerative medicine

- Wound healing engineering

- Reproductive Immunobiology

- Bioreactor design

As an MSc By Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine student, you will join one of the teams at Swansea University working in tissue engineering and use state of the art research equipment within the Centre for NanoHealth, a collaborative initiative between the College of Engineering and Swansea University Medical School.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Aim of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine programme

The aim of this MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine is to provide you with a solid grounding within the field of tissue engineering and its application within regenerative medicine.

This will be achieved through a year of research in a relevant area of tissue engineering identified after discussion with Swansea academic staff. Working with two academic supervisors you will undertake a comprehensive literature survey which will enable the formulation of an experimental research programme.

As a student on the MSc by Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine course, you will be given the relevant laboratory training to undertake the research program. The research will be written up as a thesis that is examined. You will also be encouraged to present your work in the form of scientific communications such as journals and conference poster presentation.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine will equip you with a wealth of research experience and knowledge that will benefit your future career in academia or the health care industries.

Recent MSc by Research theses supervised in the area of Tissue Engineering at Swansea University include:

- Quality assurance of human stem cell/primary cell bank

- The development of electrospinning techniques for the production of novel tissue engineering scaffolds.

- The incorporation of pulsed electromagnetic fields into wound dressings.

- The application of pulsed electromagnetic fields for improved wound healing.

- The use of nanoparticles in the control of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds.

- The control of bacterial adhesion at surfaces relevant to regenerative medicine.

- The production of micro-porous particles for bone repair

Facilities

The £22 million Centre for Nanohealth is a unique facility linking engineering and medicine, and will house a unique micro-nanofabrication clean room embedded within a biological research laboratory and with immediate access to clinical research facilities run by local NHS clinicians.

Links with industry

The academic staff of the Medical Engineering discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London also offers the opportunity for collaborative research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK

Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK

Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK



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The MPhil is offered by the Department of Chemistry as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Read more
The MPhil is offered by the Department of Chemistry as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Students are integrated into the research culture of the Department by joining a research group, supervised by one of our academic staff, in one of the following areas of Chemistry:

Biological:

with a focus on enzymes, nucleic acids, protein folding and misfolding, and physical techniques; with relevance to health and disease, drug discovery, sensors, nanotechnology, ageing and energy research applications.

Materials Chemistry:

including surfaces, interfaces, polymers, nanoparticles and nanoporous materials, self assembly, and biomaterials, with applications relevant to: oil recovery and separation, catalysis, photovoltaics, fuel cells and batteries, crystallization and pharmaceutical formulation, gas sorption, energy, functional materials, biocompatible materials, computer memory, and sensors.

Physical Chemistry:

including atmospheric sciences, surfaces and interfaces, materials, and physical and chemical aspects of the behaviour of biopolymers and other soft systems.

Synthetic Chemistry:

including complex molecule synthesis, synthetic catalysis, synthetic assembly, synthetic biology and medicine, new technology for efficient synthesis, green synthesis, and preparation of new materials.

Theory, Modelling and Informatics:

including quantum dynamics, modelling soft materials, protein folding and binding, biomolecules in motion, pharmacological activity, molecular switches, redox chemistry, designing bioactive molecule and drugs, chemical biology, crystallography, and simulation of spectroscopic studies.

Potential supervisors and their area of research expertise may be found at Department of Chemistry (Research): http://www.ch.cam.ac.uk/research

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcchmpmch

Course detail

Educational aims of the MPhil programme:

- to give students with relevant experience at first degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in the discipline under close supervision; and

- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests and a broader set of transferable skills.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The MPhil involves minimal formal teaching. Students may attend the Department's programme of research seminars and other graduate courses, including the Transferable Skills programme that forms part of the PhD programme. Informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring and other opportunities by fellow students and members of staff. However, most research training is provided within the research group structure and all students are assigned a research supervisor.

All graduate students receive termly reports written by their supervisors.

Assessment

The scheme of examination for the MPhil in Chemistry shall consist of a thesis, of not more than 15,000 words in length, exclusive of tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Physics and Chemistry, submitted for examination at the end of 11 months. The examination shall include an oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. The thesis shall provide evidence to satisfy the Examiners that a candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspectives of the subject.

Continuing

The Department offers a PhD in Chemistry course and MPhil students can apply to continue as a graduate student on this course.

MPhil students currently studying a relevant course at the University of Cambridge will need to pass their MPhil course (if examined only by thesis) or obtain a minimum merit (if there is a marked element) in order to be eligible to continue onto the PhD in Chemistry.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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. Research profile. Pursuing a research degree at the School of Chemistry could be one of the best experiences of your life. Read more

Research profile

Pursuing a research degree at the School of Chemistry could be one of the best experiences of your life.

In addition to gaining research skills, making friends, meeting eminent researchers and being part of the research community, a research degree will help you to develop invaluable transferable skills which you can apply to academic life or a variety of professions outside of academia.

The Chemistry/Biology Interface

This is a broad area, with particular strengths in the areas of protein structure and function, mechanistic enzymology, proteomics, peptide and protein synthesis, protein folding, recombinant and synthetic DNA methodology, biologically targeted synthesis and the application of high throughput and combinatorial approaches. We also focus on biophysical chemistry, the development and application of physicochemical techniques to biological systems. This includes mass spectrometry, advanced spectroscopy and microscopy, as applied to proteins, enzymes, DNA, membranes and biosensors.

Experimental & Theoretical Chemical Physics

This is the fundamental study of molecular properties and processes. Areas of expertise include probing molecular structure in the gas phase, clusters and nanoparticles, the development and application of physicochemical techniques such as mass spectoscropy to molecular systems and the EaStCHEM surface science group, who study complex molecules on surfaces, probing the structure property-relationships employed in heterogeneous catalysis. A major feature is in Silico Scotland, a world-class research computing facility.

Synthesis

This research area encompasses the synthesis and characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds, including those with application in homogeneous catalysis, nanotechnology, coordination chemistry, ligand design and supramolecular chemistry, asymmetric catalysis, heterocyclic chemistry and the development of synthetic methods and strategies leading to the synthesis of biologically important molecules (including drug discovery). The development of innovative synthetic and characterisation methodologies (particularly in structural chemistry) is a key feature, and we specialise in structural chemistry at extremely high pressures.

Materials Chemistry

The EaStCHEM Materials group is one of the largest in the UK. Areas of strength include the design, synthesis and characterisation of functional (for example magnetic, superconducting and electronic) materials; strongly correlated electronic materials, battery and fuel cell materials and devices, porous solids, fundamental and applied electrochemistry polymer microarray technologies and technique development for materials and nanomaterials analysis.

Training and support

Students attend regular research talks, visiting speaker symposia, an annual residential meeting in the Scottish Highlands, and lecture courses on specialised techniques and safety. Students are encouraged to participate in transferable skills and computing courses, public awareness of science activities, undergraduate teaching and to represent the School at national and international conferences.

Facilities

Our facilities are among the best in the world, offering an outstanding range of capabilities. You’ll be working in recently refurbished laboratories that meet the highest possible standards, packed with state-of-the-art equipment for both analysis and synthesis.

For NMR in the solution and solid state, we have 10 spectrometers at field strengths from 200-800 MHz; mass spectrometry utilises EI, ESI, APCI, MALDI and FAB instrumentation, including LC and GC interfaces. New combinatorial chemistry laboratories, equipped with a modern fermentation unit, are available. We have excellent facilities for the synthesis and characterisation of bio-molecules, including advanced mass spectrometry and NMR stopped-flow spectrometers, EPR, HPLC, FPLC, AA.

World-class facilities are available for small molecule and macromolecular X-ray diffraction, utilising both single crystal and powder methods. Application of diffraction methods at high pressures is a particular strength, and we enjoy strong links to central facilities for neutron, muon and synchrotron science in the UK and further afield. We are one of the world's leading centres for gas-phase electron diffraction.

Also available are instruments for magnetic and electronic characterisation of materials (SQUID), electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), force-probe microscopy, high-resolution FTRaman and FT-IR, XPS and thermal analysis. We have also recently installed a new 1,000- tonne pressure chamber, to be used for the synthesis of materials at high pressures and temperatures. Fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy instruments are available within the COSMIC Centre. Dedicated computational infrastructure is available, and we benefit from close links with the Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre.



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The MRes in Animal and Plant Science is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Read more
The MRes in Animal and Plant Science is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Applications will be accepted for a start date in October or January. The programme consists of (a) a major research thesis and (b) taught modules on generic and transferable skills, with an emphasis on scientific writing, oral presentations, and general research skills. Part-time study for this programme is not available.

Prospective students must talk to their proposed supervisor about possible project areas (see below) and have a project approved by interview with the supervisor and Head of Discipline prior to application via http://www.pac.ie (PAC code: CKS81).

Visit the website: https://www.ucc.ie/en/bees/courses/postgrad/

Course detail

Students undertake a total workload equivalent to 90 credits over the 12 month programme, the principal element of which is the completion of a major research thesis of approximately 25,000 words. In parallel, students must take and pass taught modules to the value of 20 credits.

Modules

Students take 20 credits from the following available modules:

BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL6012 Marine Megafauna (10 credits)
BL6016 Marine Ecology and Conservation (10 credits)
BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems (5 credits)
BL6020 Genetics and the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL4004 Frontiers in Biology (5 credits)
BL4005 Research Skills in Biology (5 credits)
BL4006 Food Production (5 credits)
PS6001 Plant Genetic Engineering (5 credits)
PS4024 Crop Physiology and Climate Change (5 credits)
PS4021 Environmentally Protective Management of Plant Pests and Pathogens (5 credits)
ZY4021 Evolutionary Ecology (5 credits)

Students may elect to take other, relevant modules (subject to availability) that are offered by the University that are not listed above to fulfil the elective requirement with approval from the MRes coordinator, research supervisor and Head of School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science.

Students will also undertake independent research towards completion of a research thesis to a student workload equivalent of 70 credits on a selected topic in Animal or Plant Science.

Current projects:

- The effect of lactation housing on the behaviour and welfare of pigs
- Understanding viral pathways in marine environments
- Distribution and diet of otters in a rural/urban streamscape
- Novel approaches in the use of freshwater macroinvertebrates for biomonitoring
- The ecology of Sika/Red/Fallow deer in Ireland
- Catching prey; the role of Ultraviolet radiation in attracting insects by carnivorous plants
- Birds as dispersers of plant propagules
- Does the phytotoxicity of nanoparticles depend on environmental parameters?
- The role of biochar as a sustainable soil amendment
- Effects of Eutrophication in shallow subtidal marine systems
- Use of Brachypodium sylvaticum as a model for growth regulation in perennial forage grasses
- Effect of temperature on spring growth of perennial ryegrass cultivars

Programme Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

- Carry out an independent and original research project to address an emerging question in Animal or Plant Science.
- Prepare and write a dissertation of their research project in a critical, logical and systematic manner, in keeping with the standards of postgraduate research.
- Display advanced theoretical knowledge and practical understanding within a research area of Animal or Plant Science.
- Understand the basis and application of field and laboratory methods used in Animal and Plant Science and a knowledge of their limitations
- Avail of relevant workshops or modules to increase scientific technical skills (e. g. biostatistics).
- Source, review, critically assess and evaluate relevant primary literature and summarize material for presentation to peers and for inclusion within the research dissertation.
- Design, write and defend a scientific research proposal based on their current research topic or a proposed topic.
- Evaluate their skill set and identify skills that should be acquired.
- Develop professional practice skills including team-work, negotiation, time-management, scientific writing and oral communication

How to apply

Students should consult the MRes Animal and Plant Science Brochure: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinAnimalandPlantScience.pdf

Prospective students should also consult the following guide to procedures realting to applying for the MRes Animal and Plant Science: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinANimalandplantscience-Studentguidetoproceduresbeforeandafterentrytotheprogramme24March2016.pdf

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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this course is designed to give a comprehensive training in the research and analytical skills in cell and molecular biology. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, this course is designed to give a comprehensive training in the research and analytical skills in cell and molecular biology.

This MRes has been designed to enhance knowledge of recent advancements in cellular and molecular biology, as well as to develop subject-specific practical and analytical skills. In addition, you will gain experience of undertaking an extended period of research (6-7 months), which will aid your career progression as a molecular bio-scientist.

The programme will involve undertaking two core 20 credit taught modules, followed by an extended period of laboratory research, and submission of a Research report and review, 140 credits.

Why Study Cell and Molecular Biology Pathway with us?

Our lecturers range from enthusiastic early career academics through to internationally acknowledged senior researchers. We are actively involved in undertaking innovative research projects using ‘cutting-edge’ approaches, within the field of molecular and cellular life sciences.

Some of our current projects are listed below:
- Environmental toxicology
- Protection against the ageing
- Calcium signalling
- Biochemistry & pharmacology of intracellular Ca2+ transporters
- Stem cells
- Tissue regeneration
- Pathology of bone disease
- Progression of kidney and bladder cancers
- Novel drug delivery systems via nanoparticles and cell penetrating peptides
- Molecular basis of cancer development
- Novel approaches to cancer therapies
- Molecular immunology
- Development of analytical approaches to detect biomarkers of disease

What will I learn?

The MRes will involve undertaking two core 20 credit taught modules which consists of a mixture of lectures, workshops and practical classes in:
- Advances in Cell and Molecular Biology (BI7144)
- Skills for Molecular and Cellular Bioscientists (BI7145)

Followed by an extended period of laboratory research (140 credits) in an area that allies with the interests of our academic staff.

How will I be taught?

The two taught modules will each comprise of a series of lectures, small group discussion sessions, workshops and practical classes. Nominally each taught module has about 30-40 of contact hours associated with them. The rest of the time allocated for these modules will be for further reading, coursework preparation and revision.

The remainder of the programme will comprise of the 6 to 7 month research project which will involve regular meetings and guidance with your research supervisor. This is followed by the preparation of two reports.

How will I be assessed?

The research dissertation will be assessed by the production of a research report in the format of a scientific paper and a research review (80%).

The taught modules will be assessed by the production of practical and theoretical reports and class tests (20%).

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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Apply your knowledge to real-world issues. You will gain skills in dealing with often-complex Earth systems, evaluate current research and and apply your knowledge to real-world issues, as well as get to work in some really amazing places around the world!. Read more

Apply your knowledge to real-world issues

You will gain skills in dealing with often-complex Earth systems, evaluate current research and and apply your knowledge to real-world issues, as well as get to work in some really amazing places around the world!

Find out more about the Master of Science parent structure.

The Master of Science (Earth Science) at Massey University will develop your skills in a field and laboratory environment that is focussed on solutions to Earth science-based issues facing society.

Explore the world around you

Field work could find you on a volcano top in Vanuatu, exploring ancient volcanoes on Chatham Island or assessing real-time hazards from an erupting volcano. You might find yourself exploring the back country of the Wanganui Basin or its marine terraces, sampling rivers and aquifers to determine groundwater recharge/discharge, or investigating erosion and land use employing both field and remote sensing techniques. 

You will also gain transferable skills that will be useful in many different careers. These include observation skills, advanced ability in data collection, analysis and interpretation, problem-solving and lateral thinking skills, self-motivation and resilience, teamwork as well as developing high-level written and verbal communication skills.

Let our expertise become yours

Massey University Earth science staff are actively researching and are members of internationally-relevant related groups. Many also have extensive industry experience, through either employment or consultancy. They bring this expertise to your teaching.

Examine the environmental impact

Massey’s expertise in environmental geochemistry includes remediation of contaminated sites, phytomining, mine site and land reclamation.

You can learn from – and build on – our expertise in the societal impacts of Earth events, such as volcanic activity. These include social, economic, infrastructure and the impact on local communities including iwi.

Specialised equipment

We have a range of specialised equipment which is available to you for your research and study. This includes:

  • A microprobe for spatial geochemical analysis of geological materials. Able to focus down to two microns, it allows measurement of changes in composition across crystals (which record pre-eruption processes in magmas)
  • Laser particle size analyser for measuring grain-size distributions of materials such as tephra
  • FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-red) microscope. This measures water and CO2 contents in volcanic materials (related to eruption dynamics), but has also been used for analysing compositional differences in horse bones and carbon nanoparticles
  • Pyroclastic Flow simulator
  • Hyperspectral analyser for remote sensing soil,rock and plant materials (an example of use includes detecting mineralised ground by remote sensing)
  • FLYSPEC analyser for measuring SO2 in volcanic eruption plumes
  • XRD analyser for determining mineralogical compositions of a wide range of materials, especially clay minerals
  • TGA/DSC (Thermogravimetric Analyser/Differential Scanning Calorimeter) for uses such as thermal behaviour in volcanic glasses to characterise biochar
  • OEM (Optical Emission Analyser) for geochemical analysis with particular application to environmental geochemistry

In-depth research

This master’s includes an in-depth research project, where you will be able to explore an aspect of Earth science that interests you.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but very rewarding and empowering. The Master of Science (Earth Science) will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles. Our experts are there to guide but you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.



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