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Masters Degrees (Nanofabrication)

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The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. Read more
The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. This multidisciplinary programme complements backgrounds in electronics, materials science, or physics.

Why this programme

-◾The University of Glasgow is a recognised pioneer in many of the most exciting aspects of nanotechnology, with an international reputation in micro and nanofabrication for applications including nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and bioelectronics.
◾You will have access to the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) cleanrooms and the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre. The JWNC holds a number of world records in nanofabrication including records for the performance of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices.
◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾This MSc caters to a growing demand for scientists and engineers who can fabricate systems of sensors, actuators, functional materials and who can integrate electronics at the micro and nano scale. As a graduate you will also possess the necessary insights in nanoscience to develop new products using these skills.
◾You will be taught by experts in the field and have access to research seminars given by our international collaborators, many of whom are world leaders in nanoscience.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Electronic devices
◾Introduction to research in nanoscience and nanotechnology
◾Micro- and nano-technology
◾Nanofabrication
◾Research methods and techniques
◾MSc project.

Optional courses

◾Applied optics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Microwave electronic & optoelectronic devices
◾Microwave and mm wave circuit design
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nano and atomic scale imaging
◾Semiconductor physics.

Projects

◾The programme builds towards an extended project, which is an integral part of the MSc programme: many projects are linked to industry or related to research in the school. Our contacts with industry and our research collaborations will make this a meaningful and valuable experience, giving you the opportunity to apply your newly learnt skills.
◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits that will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers your ability to apply them in industrially relevant problems.
◾MSc projects are associated with Glasgow's James Watt Nanofabrication Centre, one of Europe's premier research cleanrooms. Projects range from basic research into nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation, to development of systems in optoelectronics, microbiology and electronic devices which require such fabrication.
◾You can choose from a list of approximately 30 projects published yearly in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾Over 250 international companies have undertaken commercial or collaborative work with the JWNC in the last 5 years and over 90 different universities from around the globe presently have collaborations with Glasgow in nanoscience and nanotechnology.
◾Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the nanofabrication industry.

Career prospects

Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.

Former Glasgow graduates in the subject area of nanoscience and nanotechnology are now working for companies including Intel, TSMC, IBM, ST Microelectronics, Freescale, Oxford Instruments Plama Technology, ASM, and Applied Materials.

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This Masters in Electronics & Electrical Engineering is designed for both new graduates and more established engineers. It covers a broad spectrum of specialist topics with immediate application to industrial problems, from electrical supply through systems control to high-speed electronics. Read more
This Masters in Electronics & Electrical Engineering is designed for both new graduates and more established engineers. It covers a broad spectrum of specialist topics with immediate application to industrial problems, from electrical supply through systems control to high-speed electronics.

Why this programme

◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾If you are an electronics and electrical engineering graduate wanting to improve your skills and knowledge; a graduate of another engineering discipline or physical science and you want to change field; looking for a well rounded postgraduate qualification in electronics and electrical engineering to enhance your career prospects, this programme is designed for you.
◾The MSc in Electronics and Electrical Engineering includes lectures on "Nanofabrication", "Micro- and Nanotechnology", "Optical Communications" and "Microwave and Millimetre Wave Circuit Design", "Analogue CMOS circuit design", VLSI Design and CAD", all research areas undertaken in the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Electronics and Electrical Engineering include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

You will undertake a project where you will apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting-edge projects relevant to the industry.

Courses include

(six normally chosen)
◾Bioelectronics
◾Computer communications
◾Control
◾Digital signal processing
◾Electrical energy systems
◾Energy conversion systems
◾Micro- and nano-technology
◾Microwave electronic and optoelectronic devices
◾Microwave and millimetre wave circuit design
◾Optical communications
◾Power electronics and drives
◾Real-time embedded programming
◾VLSI design
◾MSc project.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits.
◾The project will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Electronics and Electrical Engineering. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾This programme is aimed at training new graduates as well as more established engineers , covering a broad spectrum of specialist topics with immediate application to industrial problems.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributions in Electronics and Electrical Engineering include: Freescale.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the electronic and electrical engineering industry.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include chip design, embedded system design, telecommunications, video systems, automation and control, aerospace, software development, development of PC peripherals and FPGA programming, defence, services for the heavy industries, for example electricity generation equipment and renewables plant, etc.

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Electronic technologies are now being applied to bio-molecular and biomedical research and the electronics industry is moving towards healthcare applications, e.g. Read more

Course Summary

Electronic technologies are now being applied to bio-molecular and biomedical research and the electronics industry is moving towards healthcare applications, e.g. Google Life Sciences and Panasonic Healthcare. Examples include microfluidic units mounted on mobile phones for point-of-care medical diagnostics. Learn how modern micro- and nanofabrication methods can be used to develop these biodevices and position yourself at this exciting new interface between electronic engineering and the life sciences.

Modules

Semester one: Microfabrication; Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip; Bionanotechnology; Nanoelectronic Devices; Introduction to MEMS
Semester two: Nanofabrication and Microscopy; Biosensors; Biotechnology and Therapeutics; Molecular Recognition; Green Electronics; MEMS Sensors and Actuators; Practical Application of MEMS; Medical Electrical and Electronic Technologies; Photonics
Plus three-month independent research project culminating in a dissertation

Visit our website for further information...



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The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

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This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities. Read more
This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities: University of Kent, Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London, University of Southampton, University of Surrey, and University of Sussex. This consortium consists of around 160 academics, with an exceptionally wide range of expertise.

The first year consists mainly of taught courses in the University of London; the second research year can be at Royal Holloway or one of the other consortium members. This is a unique opportunity to collaborate with physics research groups and partner institutions in both the UK and Europe. You will benefit from consortium led events as well as state of the art video conferencing.

With some of the leading physics departments in the world, all the universities have their own accolades in both urban and countryside locations, with a wide choice of accommodation options, sporting facilities, international student organisations and careers services. South East England, with its close connections to continental Europe by air, Eurotunnel, and cross channel ferries, is an ideal environment for international students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/physics/coursefinder/mscphysics(euromasters).aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught in collaboration with other University of London Colleges and the Universities of Kent, Southampton, Surrey and Sussex, providing an incomparably wide range of options.

- The Department of Physics at Royal Holloway is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, and Biophysics, as well as other areas.

- We offer exceptional teaching quality and are consistently near the top of the league tables.

- The Department has strong links with leading international facilities, including CERN, ISIS and Diamond.

- We hold a regular series of colloquia and seminars on important research topics and host a number of guest lectures from external organisations.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Physics Department is one of the major centres for Physics research within the University of London.

- We have excellent clean rooms for the nanofabrication and testing of devices within the centre for nanophysics and nanotechnology.

- The London Low Temperature Laboratory is a centre for fundamental research in the mK and μK temperature regime and the development of new instrumentation and thermometry.

- The Hubbard Theory Institute combines theoretical studies of strongly correlated matter with experimental activities on the Harwell Campus.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of the discipline

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

- originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and

- enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different physics-related areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics, and many of our graduates have gone on to study for a PhD.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Electronic technologies have evolved enabling many new device concepts, fabrication methods and characterisation techniques. This has led to the simultaneous fabrication of micro scale mechanical structures with integrated electronics to form MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Read more

Course Summary

Electronic technologies have evolved enabling many new device concepts, fabrication methods and characterisation techniques. This has led to the simultaneous fabrication of micro scale mechanical structures with integrated electronics to form MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). MEMS technology is becoming ubiquitous; it is the key enabling technology that will underpin the internet of things and the proliferation of smart technology in the world around us. You will gain an understanding of the techniques developed by the microelectronics industry to produce micron-scale mechanical devices such as accelerometers and micropumps on silicon wafers. You will work in research laboratories and in the cleanroom.

Modules

Semester one: Microfabrication; Introduction to MEMS; Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip; Nanoelectronic Devices; Advanced Memory and Storage; Bionanotechnology

Semester two: MEMS Sensors and Actuators; Practical Application of MEMS; Green Electronics; Nanofabrication and Microscopy; Quantum Devices and Technology; Biosensors; Medical Electrical and Electronic Technologies

Visit our website for further information...



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The field of microelectronics systems design embodies many of the key skills relating to integrated circuit design and electronic systems engineering. Read more

Course Summary

The field of microelectronics systems design embodies many of the key skills relating to integrated circuit design and electronic systems engineering. This cutting-edge programme examines aspects of system integration and discrete device properties, and is an excellent platform for further research in the Nano group and the Electronics and Electrical Engineering group.

Modules

Semester one: Digital Integrated Circuit Design; Digital System Design; Nanoelectronic Devices; VLSI Systems Design

Semester two: VLSI Design Project; Analogue and Mixed Signal CMOS Design; Automated Software Verification; Nanofabrication and Microscopy; Advanced Wireless Communication Networks and Systems; Medical Electrical and Electronic Technologies; Cryptography; Digital Systems Synthesis; Embedded Processors

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Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology includes scaling of commercially available logic and memory devices such as MOSFETs; SRAM; FLASH and hard disks drives… Read more

Course Summary

Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology includes scaling of commercially available logic and memory devices such as MOSFETs; SRAM; FLASH and hard disks drives into the future in which these devices are only a few tens of nanometers long; the course includes the development of new materials and effects that exploit the inherent quantum mechanical nature of devices at that scale; students will learn about device operation, and also get a grounding in how to make and characterise these devices.

Modules

Semester one: Nanoelectronic Devices; Microfabrication; Advanced Memory and Storage; Introduction to MEMS; Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip; Bionanotechnology

Semester two: Green Electronics; Nanofabrication and Microscopy; Quantum Devices and Technology; MEMS Sensors and Actuators; Practical Application of MEMS; Biosensors

Visit our website for further information...



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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Every day we are hearing of ground breaking advances in the field of tissue engineering which offer tremendous potential for the future of regenerative medicine and health care. Staff at Swansea University are active in many aspects of tissue engineering.

Key Features of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

We are actively researching many aspects of tissue engineering including the following areas:

- Characterisation and control of the stem cell niche
- Mechanical characterisation of stem cells and tissues
- Production of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering
- Electrospinning of scaffold materials
- Cartilage repair and replacement
- Bone repair and replacement
- The application of nanotechnology to regenerative medicine
- Wound healing engineering
- Reproductive Immunobiology
- Bioreactor design

As an MSc By Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine student, you will join one of the teams at Swansea University working in tissue engineering and use state of the art research equipment within the Centre for NanoHealth, a collaborative initiative between the College of Engineering and Swansea University Medical School.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Aim of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine programme

The aim of this MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine is to provide you with a solid grounding within the field of tissue engineering and its application within regenerative medicine.

This will be achieved through a year of research in a relevant area of tissue engineering identified after discussion with Swansea academic staff. Working with two academic supervisors you will undertake a comprehensive literature survey which will enable the formulation of an experimental research programme.

As a student on the MSc by Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine course, you will be given the relevant laboratory training to undertake the research program. The research will be written up as a thesis that is examined. You will also be encouraged to present your work in the form of scientific communications such as journals and conference poster presentation.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine will equip you with a wealth of research experience and knowledge that will benefit your future career in academia or the health care industries.

Recent MSc by Research theses supervised in the area of Tissue Engineering at Swansea University include:

- Quality assurance of human stem cell/primary cell bank
- The development of electrospinning techniques for the production of novel tissue engineering scaffolds.
- The incorporation of pulsed electromagnetic fields into wound dressings.
- The application of pulsed electromagnetic fields for improved wound healing.
- The use of nanoparticles in the control of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds.
- The control of bacterial adhesion at surfaces relevant to regenerative medicine.
- The production of micro-porous particles for bone repair

Facilities

The £22 million Centre for Nanohealth is a unique facility linking engineering and medicine, and will house a unique micro-nanofabrication clean room embedded within a biological research laboratory and with immediate access to clinical research facilities run by local NHS clinicians.

Links with industry

The academic staff of the Medical Engineering discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London also offers the opportunity for collaborative research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK
Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK
Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK

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The Masters in Biomedical Engineering is an interdisciplinary programme that will equip you for employment within the biomedical engineering sector. Read more
The Masters in Biomedical Engineering is an interdisciplinary programme that will equip you for employment within the biomedical engineering sector. This programme addresses all the key aspects of biomedical engineering.

Why this programme

◾The University of Glasgow’s School of Engineering has been delivering engineering education and research for more than 150 years and is the oldest School of Engineering in the UK.
◾Biomedical Engineering is the newest division of the School, bringing together our long standing expertise. Research covers four themes, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Bionanotechnology, Rehabilitation Engineering, Biosensors and Diagnostics.
◾The course is based on in-depth modules and individual projects, which are designed to give graduates an opportunity to specialise in specific areas of Biomedical Engineering or to cover a more general Biomedical Engineering syllabus.
◾This taught MSc/PG Dip offers a wide exposure to the philosophy and practice of Biomedical Engineering whilst simultaneously enabling the students to deepen their knowledge of specific areas of biomedical engineering disciplines, which have been chosen on the basis of the research strengths of the Discipline. The choice includes Biomaterials and Biomechanics including their application in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Rehabilitation Engineering includes applied within Glasgow hospital and bioelectronics and diagnostic systems, designed to be applied from advanced hospitals to out-in-the-field situations.
◾The compulsory part provides the basic underlying knowledge need throughout biomedical engineering these core courses are taken in both semesters to allow a wide range of optional subjects to be available.
◾You will broaden and/or deepen your knowledge of biomedical engineering disciplines.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Biomedical Engineering include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, team work and study trips in the UK. You will undertake an MSc project working on a specific research area with one of the academics.

Core courses
◾Applications of biomedical engineering
◾Biological fluid mechanics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Energy in biological systems
◾Medical imaging
◾Statistics for biomedical engineering
◾MSc project.

Optional courses
◾Advanced imaging and therapy
◾Applied engineering mechanics
◾Bioinformatics and systems biology
◾Biomechanics
◾Biosensors and diagnostics
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nanofabrication
◾Rehabilitation engineering
◾Scaffolds and tissues
◾Signal processing of bio-signatures
◾Tissue and cell engineering.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits.
◾The project will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Biomedical Engineering. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics.

Example projects
Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

[[Accreditation ]]
The MSc Biomedical Engineering is accredited in the “Further Learning” category accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).

This means that a student with an accredited BEng undergraduate degree can take the accredited "Further Learning" MSc to top-up their academic qualifications in order to meet the full academic requirements for conferral of the title of Chartered Engineer. This is an alternative route to the 5-year undergraduate MEng route.

Industry links and employability

◾The MSc in Biomedical Engineering has been developed for students with different backgrounds in engineering who wish to enter the field of Biomedical Engineering; and it is particularly suitable if you intend to work in Biomedical Engineering industries.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in a wide range of industries.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in rehabilitation engineering, biomaterials for reconstructive surgery, biosensors, device and implant design and development, and biosignal processing.

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This Masters in Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) focuses on the technologies and techniques that underpin a vast range of societal, research and industrial needs. Read more
This Masters in Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) focuses on the technologies and techniques that underpin a vast range of societal, research and industrial needs. It is delivered and awarded jointly by the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. Sensing and sensor systems are essential for advances in research across all fields of physics, engineering and chemistry and are enhanced when multiple sensing functions are combined into arrays to enable imaging. Industrial applications of sensor systems are ubiquitous: from mass-produced sensors found in modern smart phones and every modern car to the state-of-the-art, specialist high-value sensors routinely used in oil and gas recovery, scientific equipment, machine tools, medical equipment and environmental monitoring. This is an industry-focused programme, designed for people looking to develop skills that will open up opportunities in a host of end applications.

Why this programme

-This is a jointly taught and awarded degree from the University of Glasgow and the University of Edinburgh, developed in with conjunction with CENSIS.
-CENSIS is a centre of excellence for Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) technologies, CENSIS enables industry innovators and university researchers to collaborate at the forefront of market-focused SIS innovation, developing products and services for global markets.
-CENSIS, the Innovation Centre for Sensor and Imaging Systems, is one of eight Innovation Centres that are transforming the way universities and business work together to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship across Scotland’s key economic sectors, create jobs and grow the economy. CENSIS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (£10m) and supported by Scottish Enterprise, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and the Scottish Government.
-CENSIS has now launched its collaborative MSc in Sensor and Imaging Systems, designed to train the next generation of sensor system experts.
-This programme will allow you to benefit from the commercial focus of CENSIS along with the combined resources and complementary expertise of staff from two top ranking Russell Group universities, working together to offer you a curriculum relevant to the needs of industry.
-The Colleges of Science and Engineering at the University of Glasgow and the University of Edinburgh delivered power and impact in the 2014 Research Excellent Framework. Overall, 94% of Edinburgh’s and 90% of Glasgow’s research activity is world leading or internationally excellent, rising in Glasgow’s case to 95% for its impact.

Programme structure

The programme comprises a mix of core and optional courses. The curriculum you undertake is flexible and tailored to your prior experience and expertise, your particular research interests, and the specific nature of the extended research project topic provisionally identified at the beginning of the MSc programme.

Graduates receive a joint degree from the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Programme timetable
-Semester 1: University of Glasgow
-Semester 2: University of Edinburgh
-Semester 3: MSc project, including the possibility of an industry placement

Core courses
-Circuits and systems
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Fundamentals of sensing and imaging
-Imaging and detectors
-Technology and innovation management
-Research project preparation

Optional courses
-Biomedical imaging techniques
-Biophysical chemistry
-Biosensors and instrumentation
-Chemical biology
-Digital signal processing
-Electronic product design and manufacture
-Electronic system design
-Entrepreneurship
-Lab-on-chip technologies
-Lasers and electro-optic systems
-Microelectronics in consumer products
-Microfabrication techniques
-Nanofabrication
-Physical techniques in action
-Waves and diffraction

Industry links and employability

-This is an industry-focused programme, developed in conjunction with CENSIS, an Innovation Centre established to maximise the growth potential of Scottish companies operating in the sensor systems market. It will appeal to graduates seeking to develop sensor and imaging systems (SIS) skills that can be used in a range of end markets and applications.
-SIS is key enabling technology to achieve quality, efficiency and performance across all key markets – from transport, security and oil and gas, through to agriculture, the built environment and life sciences. The underlying requirement across of these sectors is the same: to sense, measure, process, communicate and visualise in a way that provides valuable and actionable information based on data.
-Sensing is essential for advances in research across all fields of physics, engineering and chemistry, and is enhanced when multiple sensing functions are combined into arrays to enable imaging. Industrial applications of SIS are ubiquitous: from mass-produced sensors found in smart phones and cars, to the state-of-the-art, specialist high-value sensors routinely used in oil and gas recovery, scientific equipment, machine tools, medical equipment and environmental monitoring.
-Increasingly, sensor systems – along with their underpinning device, signal processing, networking, information dissemination and diagnostics technologies - are being tightly integrated within the products and services of a wide range of Scottish businesses. There are endless opportunities within this emerging global market (worth £500Bn) to develop fundamental changes to benefit society and commercialise sensor lead products over wide market areas.
-Markets that need graduates with SIS skills include include defence and security, renewables, aerospace, subsea, intelligent transport, environmental science, built environment, energy and the smart grid, healthcare and drug discovery, medical diagnostics, and food and drink.

Career prospects

You will gain an understanding of sensor-based systems applicable to a whole host of markets supported by CENSIS.

Career opportunities are extensive. Sensor systems are spearheading the next wave of connectivity and intelligence for internet connected devices, underpinning all of the new ‘smart markets’, e.g., grid, cities, transport and mobility, digital healthcare and big data.

You will graduate with domain-appropriate skills suitable for a range of careers in areas including renewable energy, subsea and marine technologies, defence, automotive engineering, intelligent transport, healthcare, aerospace, manufacturing and process control, consumer electronics, and environmental monitoring.

Globally, the market for sensor systems is valued at £500Bn with an annual growth rate of 10%. The Scottish sensor systems market is worth £2.6Bn pa. There are over 170 sensor systems companies based in Scotland (SMEs and large companies), employing 16,000 people in high-value jobs including product R&D, design, engineering, manufacturing and field services.

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This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry. Read more
This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry.

The optional professional placement component gives you the opportunity to gain experience from working in industry, which cannot normally be offered by the standard technically-focused one-year Masters programme.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Electronic Engineering Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering graduates and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies. Current pathways offered include:
-Communications Networks and Software
-RF and Microwave Engineering
-Mobile Communications Systems
-Mobile and Satellite Communications
-Mobile Media Communications
-Computer Vision, Robotics and Machine Learning
-Satellite Communications Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Space Engineering
-Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy
-Medical Imaging

Please note that at applicant stage, it is necessary to apply for the Electronic Engineering (Euromasters). If you wish to specialise in one of the other pathways mentioned above, you can adjust your Euromaster programme accordingly on starting the course.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 24 months and part-time over 60 months. It consists of ten taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VHDL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering Optional
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-Engineering Professional Studies 1 (with industrial Placement)
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

PARTNERS

The MSc Euromasters complies with the structure defined by the Bologna Agreement, and thus it is in harmony with the Masters programme formats adhered to in European universities. Consequently, it facilitates student exchanges with our partner universities in the Erasmus Exchange programme.

A number of bilateral partnerships exist with partner institutions at which students can undertake their project. Current partnerships held by the Department include the following:
-Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
-University of Prague, Czech Republic
-Universität di Bologna, Italy
-Universität Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
-Universita' degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in electronic engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, computing and communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Enhanced capabilities of MSc (Euromasters) graduates:
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Use of quantitative methods for problem solving. Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The Physics Department at Binghamton University offers a two-year master's (MS) degree and a PhD in physics. The MS program is for students seeking careers in applied physics or in research and development in industrial laboratories. Read more
The Physics Department at Binghamton University offers a two-year master's (MS) degree and a PhD in physics. The MS program is for students seeking careers in applied physics or in research and development in industrial laboratories. It is also intended for technical personnel in industry who wish to attain a higher level of understanding of the physical principles on which modern technology is based.

Upon completion of the PhD program, graduates will be able to lead efforts in acedeme and industry in the areas of condensed matter physics, applied physics and materials science. Graduates receive their degree having made significant contributions to advance knowledge in their particular area of research. Courses and seminars provide necessary background in the basic principles, methods and theories of physics.

As as young and vibrant program, faculty are currently engaged in various collaborative research projects, such as Physics of Metal Oxides through Piper Laboratory, Levy Studies of DNA, and Nanoelectronic Physics and Materials Science for Energy Generation and Information Processing. Research activities emphasize energy sciences, biophysics, and information sciences, with the intent to leverage significant research infrastructure investment under the Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center at Binghamton University.

The Physics Department also has a major focus on materials physics and condensed matter physics with strong interactions with Materials Engineering and industry. The Nanofabrication Laboratory at Binghamton University provides state-of-the-art resources pivotal to conducting cutting-edge nano-scale research.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended. Undergraduate degree in physics or related field desirable for admission.
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE general test scores
- Official GRE subject test in physics scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores
----Physics applicant minimum TOEFL scores:
*80 on the Internet-based exam
*550 on the paper exam
----Physics applicant minimum IELTS score:
*6.5, with no band below 5.0
----Physics applicant minimum PTE Academic score:
*53

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Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage. Read more
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials – such as graphene – and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised, practical skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Completion of the programme will provide you with the skills essential to furthering your career in this rapidly emerging field.

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Energy Economics and Technology
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Renewable Energy Technology
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

NANOTECHNOLOGY AT SURREY

We are one of the leading institutions developing nanotechnology and the next generation of materials and nanoelectronic devices.

Taught by internationally-recognised experts within the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), on this programme you will discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of- the-art equipment and facilities.

The ATI is a £10 million investment in advanced research and is the flagship institute of the University of Surrey in the area of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. The ATI brings together under one roof the major research activities of the University from the Department of Electronic Engineering and the Department of Physics in the area of nanotechnology and electronic devices.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning – know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin Nanoscience and nanotechnology for renewable systems
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within Nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoelectronics for renewable energy
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research and development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability.
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The backbone of modern telecom infrastructure consists of optical fibre-based systems in combination with wireless technologies. Medical applications of photonics and microwaves are numerous, and sensing applications include radar, environmental monitoring and radio astronomy. Read more
The backbone of modern telecom infrastructure consists of optical fibre-based systems in combination with wireless technologies. Medical applications of photonics and microwaves are numerous, and sensing applications include radar, environmental monitoring and radio astronomy. Satellite based microwave systems aid our everyday life, e.g. television broadcasting, navigation and weather forecasts, and are used in remote sensing of the Earth and space geodesy.

Programme description

Over the past decades, photonics and wireless technology have grown at an exceptional rate and investments in future telecom systems will have a profound impact on social and economic development, but everything wireless needs hardware.

This programme offers a unique opportunity to study a combination of subjects for which Chalmers has world-class facilities: Onsala Space Observatory with radio telescopes and equipment to study the Earth and its atmosphere, the Nanofabrication Laboratory with a clean-room for research and fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices and integrated circuits, and research laboratories with state-of-the-art photonics and microwave measurement equipment.

We focus on applied science and engineering, where we combine theory with hands-on practise, labs and projects. We are involved in cutting edge research and the manufacturing of components for e.g. microwave and millimetre wave electronics, instruments for radio astronomy and remote sensing, optical fibres, lasers, and microwave antennas.

As a student of this programme, you will gain solid knowledge in wireless, photonics and space engineering as well as specialised skills in a chosen sub-field. You will be prepared for a career in the field through studies of wireless and optical communication components and systems, RF and microwave engineering, photonics, and space science and techniques.

Roughly 50% of the students are international students with a bachelor degree from different countries across the world, whereas the remaining 50% has a bachelor from Chalmers.

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