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Masters Degrees (Nanoelectronics)

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Nanoelectronics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Nanoelectronics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department welcomes applications from students wishing to pursue graduate level research in Nanoelectronics. Swansea University has an enviable reputation for research in Nanotechnology. Our world-class Systems and Process Engineering Centre brings together academic expertise from across the University, incorporating state-of-the-art facilities.

Emphasis is on the development of applications-driven research and the transfer of technology from the laboratory to the workplace or health centre. Interaction with industry is a key component of the centre’s strategy. Our courses equip students for this emerging technology that will significantly improve the way we live.



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The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. Read more
The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. This multidisciplinary programme complements backgrounds in electronics, materials science, or physics.

Why this programme

-◾The University of Glasgow is a recognised pioneer in many of the most exciting aspects of nanotechnology, with an international reputation in micro and nanofabrication for applications including nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and bioelectronics.
◾You will have access to the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) cleanrooms and the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre. The JWNC holds a number of world records in nanofabrication including records for the performance of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices.
◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾This MSc caters to a growing demand for scientists and engineers who can fabricate systems of sensors, actuators, functional materials and who can integrate electronics at the micro and nano scale. As a graduate you will also possess the necessary insights in nanoscience to develop new products using these skills.
◾You will be taught by experts in the field and have access to research seminars given by our international collaborators, many of whom are world leaders in nanoscience.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Electronic devices
◾Introduction to research in nanoscience and nanotechnology
◾Micro- and nano-technology
◾Nanofabrication
◾Research methods and techniques
◾MSc project.

Optional courses

◾Applied optics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Microwave electronic & optoelectronic devices
◾Microwave and mm wave circuit design
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nano and atomic scale imaging
◾Semiconductor physics.

Projects

◾The programme builds towards an extended project, which is an integral part of the MSc programme: many projects are linked to industry or related to research in the school. Our contacts with industry and our research collaborations will make this a meaningful and valuable experience, giving you the opportunity to apply your newly learnt skills.
◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits that will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers your ability to apply them in industrially relevant problems.
◾MSc projects are associated with Glasgow's James Watt Nanofabrication Centre, one of Europe's premier research cleanrooms. Projects range from basic research into nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation, to development of systems in optoelectronics, microbiology and electronic devices which require such fabrication.
◾You can choose from a list of approximately 30 projects published yearly in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾Over 250 international companies have undertaken commercial or collaborative work with the JWNC in the last 5 years and over 90 different universities from around the globe presently have collaborations with Glasgow in nanoscience and nanotechnology.
◾Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the nanofabrication industry.

Career prospects

Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.

Former Glasgow graduates in the subject area of nanoscience and nanotechnology are now working for companies including Intel, TSMC, IBM, ST Microelectronics, Freescale, Oxford Instruments Plama Technology, ASM, and Applied Materials.

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What’s the Erasmus Mundus Master of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology all about?. Within the Erasmus Mundus framework, four leading educational institutions in Europe offer a joint Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. Read more

What’s the Erasmus Mundus Master of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology all about?

Within the Erasmus Mundus framework, four leading educational institutions in Europe offer a joint Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. The partner institutions are:

  • KU Leuven, Belgium (Coordinator)
  • Chalmers, Tekniska Högskola, Sweden
  • Université Grenoble Alpes, France
  • Technische Universität Dresden, Germany

The word Nanoscience refers to the study, manipulation and engineering of matter, particles and structures on the nanometer scale (one millionth of a millimeter, the scale of atoms and molecules). Important properties of materials, such as the electrical, optical, thermal and mechanical properties, are determined by the way molecules and atoms assemble on the nanoscale into larger structures. Moreover, on a nanometer scale, structures’ properties are often different then on a macro scale because quantum mechanical effects become important.

Nanotechnology is the application of nanoscience leading to the use of new nanomaterials and nanosize components in useful products. Nanotechnology will eventually provide us with the ability to design custom-made materials and products with new enhanced properties, new nanoelectronic components, new types of ‘smart’ medicines and sensors, and even interfaces between electronics and biological systems.

Structure

In the first stage of the programme all students study at the coordinating institution, where they take a set of fundamental courses (max 12 credits) to give them a common starting basis, general interest courses (6-9 credits), a compulsory common block of core courses (36 credits), and already a profiling block of elective courses (min 6 credits) which prepares them for their specialisation area. In the second stage the students take a compulsory set of specialising courses (15 credits), depending on their chosen specialisation area, combined with a set of elective broadening courses (15 credits), and do their Master’s thesis research project (30 credits). Chalmers offers the second year specialisation options of Nanophysics and Nanoelectronics. TU Dresden offers the options Biophysics and Nanoelectronics, and JFU Grenoble offers the options Nanophysics, Nanochemistry and Nanobiotechnology.

 The programme contains the following educational modules:

  1. The fundamental courses (max. 12 credits) introduce the students to relevant disciplines in which they have had no or little training during their Bachelor’s. If a student does not need any or all of the fundamental courses, he/she may use the remaining credits to take more elective courses from the broadening course modules.
  2.  The general interest courses (6-9 credits) are imparting non-technical skills to the students, in domains such as management, economics, languages, quality management, ethics, psychology, etc. A Dutch language and culture course is compulsory for all the students.
  3.  The core courses (36 credits) contain first of all five compulsory courses focusing on the thorough basic education within the main disciplines of the Master: nanophysics, nanochemistry, nanoelectronics and nanobiochemistry. All students also have to take one out of two available practical courses where they learn to carry out some practical experimental work, which takes places in small teams. Also part of the Core courses is the Lecture Series on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, which is a serie of seminars (14-18 per year) on various topics related to nanoscience and nanotechnology, given by national and international guest speakers.
  4. The specific courses (min. 21 credits) are courses of the specialising option aimed to deepen the student’s competences. The students can choose 6-18 credits elective profiling programme units in the first year at the KU Leuven from three course modules. Then in the second year university the students take 15 credits compulsory courses at their second year location on their selected specialisation. They can also choose to do an industrial internship on a nanoscience or nanotechnology related topic at a nanotechnology company or research institute.
  5. The broadening courses (15 credits) are courses from the other options of the Master’s programme, which allow the students to broaden their scope beyond the chosen specialisation. Students can choose from a large set of program units offered at the second year university.
  6. The Master’s thesis (30 credits) is intended to bring the students in close and active contact with a multidisciplinary research environment. The research project always takes place at the second year partner university and is finalised with a written thesis report and a public presentation. Each Master’s thesis has a promotor from the local university and a promotor from KU Leuven.

 The EMM-Nano programme is truly integrated, with a strong research backbone and an important international scope. The objective of the programme is to provide a top quality multidisciplinary education in nanoscience and nanotechnology. 

Career perspectives

In the coming decades, nanoscience and nanotechnology will undoubtedly become the driving force for a new set of products, systems, and applications. These disciplines are even expected to form the basis for a new industrial revolution.

Within a few years, nanoscience applications are expected to impact virtually every technological sector and ultimately many aspects of our daily life. In the coming five-to-ten years, many new products and companies will emerge based on nanotechnology and nanosciences. These new products will stem from the knowledge developed at the interface of the various scientific disciplines offered in the EMM-Nano programme.

Thus, EMM-Nano graduates will find a wealth of career opportunities in the sectors and industries developing these new technologies: electronics, new and smart materials, chemical technology, biotechnology, R&D, independent consultancies and more. Graduates have an ideal background to become the invaluable interface between these areas and will be able to apply their broad perspective on nanoscience and nanotechnology to the development and creation of new products and even new companies.



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The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology. Read more

The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials – such as graphene – and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised, practical skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Completion of the programme will provide you with the skills essential to furthering your career in this rapidly emerging field.

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Nanotechnology at Surrey

We are one of the leading institutions developing nanotechnology and the next generation of materials and nanoelectronic devices.

Taught by internationally-recognised experts within the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), on this programme you will discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of- the-art equipment and facilities.

The ATI is a £10 million investment in advanced research and is the flagship institute of the University of Surrey in the area of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. The ATI brings together under one roof the major research activities of the University from the Department of Electronic Engineering and the Department of Physics in the area of nanotechnology and electronic devices.

Technical characteristics of the pathway

The Programme in Nanotechnology and Nanoelectronic Devicesaims to provide a high-quality qualification in the most important aspects of the nanotechnologies, with a particular emphasis on nanoelectronics and nanoelectronic devices.

After an introduction to the basic aspects of quantum physics and nano-engineering relevant to modern nanoelectronics, students can tailor their specific learning experience through study of device-oriented elective modules, as suits their career aspirations.

Key to the Programme is the cross-linking of current research themes in interdisciplinary areas such as photonics and biology, through the use of nanoelectronic devices as the interface at the nanoscale level.

The Programme has strong links to current research in the University's Advanced Technology Institute; this Institute includes academic staff from both the EE and the Physics Departments.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. Read more
Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. The aim of the MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) programme is to provide advanced coursework with options for a research element or industrial element, and additional professional development coursework. Students choose from a range of courses in Analogue, Mixed Signal, and RF Integrated Circuit Design, VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. A range of electives for the coursework-only stream includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr47/

Course Details

The MEngSc (EEE) has three Streams which include coursework only, coursework with a research project, or coursework with an industrial placement. Students following Stream 1 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out a Minor Research Project to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 2 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out an Industrial Placement to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 3 take course modules to the value of 90 credits, up to 20 credits of which can be in topics such as business, law, and innovation.

Format

In all Streams, students take five core modules from the following range of courses: Advanced Analogue and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced RF Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, and Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. In addition, students following Stream 1 (Research Project) and Stream 2 (Industry Placement) carry out a Research Report. Following successful completion of the coursework and Research Report, students in Streams 1 and 2 carry out a research project or industry placement over the summer months.

Students who choose the coursework-only option, Stream 3, take additional courses in lieu of the project or placement. These can be chosen from a range of electives that includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship.

Assessment

Part I consists of coursework modules and mini-project to the value of 60 credits. These are assessed using a combination of written examinations and continuous assessment. Successful completion of the initial tranche of coursework modules qualifies the student to progress to Part II, the research project, industrial placement, or additional coursework to the value of 30 credits in the cases of Streams 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

Placement and Study Abroad Information

For students following Streams 1 and 2, research projects and industrial placements are normally in Ireland. Where the opportunity arises, a research project or work placement may be carried out outside Ireland.

Careers

MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) graduates will have a competitive advantage in the jobs market by virtue of having completed advanced coursework in Electrical and Electronic Engineering and, in the case of Streams 1 and 2, having completed a significant research project or work placement.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Bristol, and the surrounding area, hosts a thriving and world-leading semiconductor design industry. Read more
Bristol, and the surrounding area, hosts a thriving and world-leading semiconductor design industry. The Microelectronics group at the University of Bristol has many collaborative links with multinational companies in the microelectronics industry that have identified a shortfall in graduates with the necessary qualifications and professional skills to work in the sector. This programme has been designed to meet this need.

A range of taught subjects cover core topics such as advanced architectures and system design using FPGA and DSP platforms, before progressing into more specialised areas such as digital and analogue ASIC design, integrated sensors and actuators and mixed-signal design. Changes are made periodically to reflect important emerging disciplines, such as electronics for internet of things, bio-medical applications and neuromorphic computing.

The programme offers you the opportunity to learn from experts in micro- and nanoelectronics and computer science, to allow you to start working straight after your degree or continue your studies via a PhD. Special emphasis is put on providing you with a range of contemporary design skills to supplement theoretical knowledge. Lectures are accompanied by lab exercises in state-of-the-art industrial EDA software to give you experience of a professional environment.

Programme structure

The course consists of 120 credits of taught units and an individual research project worth 60 credits. The following core subjects, each worth 10 credit points (100 learning hours), are taken over autumn and spring:
-Design Verification
-Analogue Integrated Circuit Design
-Integrated Circuit Electronics
-Digital Filters and Spectral Analysis (M)
-Advanced DSP & FPGA Implementation
-VLSI Design M
-Embedded and Real-Time Systems
-Wireless Networking and Sensing in e-Healthcare

Additionally students are able to choose any two out of the following four 10-credit units (some combinations may not be possible due to timetabling constraints).

-Device Interconnect - Principles and Practice
-Advanced Computer Architecture
-Sustainability, Technology and Business
-Computational Neuroscience
-Bio Sensors

In the spring term, students also take Engineering Research Skills, a 20-credit unit designed to introduce the fundamental skills necessary to carry out the MSc project.

After completing the taught units satisfactorily, all students undertake a final project which involves researching, planning and implementing a major piece of work relating to microelectronics systems design. The project must have a significant scientific or technical component and may involve on-site collaboration with an industrial partner. The thesis is normally submitted by the end of September.

The programme structure is under continual discussion with the National Microelectronics Institute and our industrial advisory board in order that it remains at the cutting edge of the semiconductor industry. It is therefore subject to small changes on an ongoing basis to generally improve the programme and recognise important emerging disciplines.

Careers

This course gives graduating students the background to go on to a career in a variety of disciplines in the IT sector, due to the core and specialist units that cover key foundational concepts as well as advanced topics related to hardware design, programming and embedded systems and system-level integration.

Typical careers are in soft fabrication facilities and design houses in the semiconductor industry, electronic-design automation tool vendors, embedded systems specialists and software houses. The course also covers concepts and technologies related to emerging paradigms such as neuromorphic computing and the Internet of Things and prepares you for a career in academic research.

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This programme provides a practical understanding in a number of key areas of Electronic Engineering. You will work with current and familiar technology, such as Wi-Fi, and will discover what the future holds for silicon technology by studying sensory equipment, energy generation and interaction with surroundings. Read more

This programme provides a practical understanding in a number of key areas of Electronic Engineering. You will work with current and familiar technology, such as Wi-Fi, and will discover what the future holds for silicon technology by studying sensory equipment, energy generation and interaction with surroundings. The technical element of the degree includes system-on-chip, microengineering, RF engineering, control, communications and embedded systems, whilst the practical element features digital design and the design of microstructures for switching and biomedical applications, in addition to the programming of embedded microcontrollers, RF circuits and methods of building control loops and associated software.

To meet the demands of emerging markets such as Health, Security, Energy and the Environment, the programme will explore advanced sensors for chips and assemblies, and will cover actuators, display technologies and microwave and millimetre wave electronic systems. You will enhance your skills in MEMS design, microfluidics, high-frequency technologies and control solutions, in addition to advanced nanoelectronics.

The electronics industry is expanding rapidly with the UK alone aiming to increase the sector’s economic contribution from £80bn to £120bn by 2020 and creating 150,000 highly-skilled jobs in the process. Smart Grid, Health Care and Medicine, and Energy and Environment are set to join established industrial sectors including Security, Transport and Aerospace as key employment sectors for electronic engineers. We therefore equip our students with the skills and knowledge needed to further their career in these industries; a major part of which is linked into the opportunity to participate in existing projects that are both challenging and linked into real industrial need. In the past, these projects have helped to establish student-industry connections that can often lead to employment. Previous project topics have included:

  • Detection of living cells in a microfluidic system using electrochemical and RF technologies
  • Self-repairable electronics through unification of self-test and calibration technology
  • Solution-processed electronics over a large area: Design and realisation of a fully computerised XY(Z) spray coater employing multiple pneumatic and/or ultrasonic airbrushes
  • Higher-order mode couplers in semiconducting RF cavities
  • Monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) design for wireless networks
  • Vision and robotic control interface system.


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What's the Master of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering all about? . Nanoscience is the study of phenomena and manipulation on the atomic and molecular scales (nanometers. Read more

What's the Master of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering all about? 

Nanoscience is the study of phenomena and manipulation on the atomic and molecular scales (nanometers: i.e., one billionth of a meter). Important material properties such as the electrical, optical and mechanical are determined by the way molecules and atoms assemble into larger structures on the nanoscale. Nanotechnology is the application of this science in new nanomaterials and nano-concepts to create new components, systems and products. Nanotechnology is the key to unlocking the ability to design custom-made materials which possess any property we require. These newborn scientific disciplines are situated at the interface of physics, chemistry, material science, microelectronics, biochemistry and biotechnology. Consequently, control of the discipline requires an academic and multidisciplinary scientific education.

In the Master of Science in Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering, you will learn the basics of physics, biology and chemistry on the nanometer scale; these courses will be complemented by courses in technology and engineering to ensure practical know-how. The programme is strongly research oriented, and is largely based on the research of centres like imec (Interuniversity Microelectronics Center), the Leuven Nanocenter and INPAC (Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry) at the Faculty of Science, all global research leaders in nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoengineering. In your Master’s thesis, you will have the opportunity to work in the exciting research programmes of these institutes.

The objective of the Master of Science in Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Nano engineering is to provide top quality multidisciplinary tertiary education in nanoscience as well as in the use of nanotechnologies for systems and sensors on the macro-scale.

Structure

Students follow a set of introductory courses to give them a common starting basis, a compulsory common block of core programme courses to give them the necessary multidisciplinary background of nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoengineering, and a selection of programme courses to provide some non-technical skills. The students also select their specialisation option for which they choose a set of compulsory specific programme courses, a number of elective broadening programme courses and do their Master’s thesis research project.

  1. The fundamental courses (max 15 credits, 6 courses) introduce the students to relevant disciplines in which they have had no or little training during their Bachelor’s education. These are necessary in order to prepare students from different backgrounds for the core programme courses and the specialisation programme courses of the Master’s.
  2. The general interest courses (9-12 credits) are imparting non-technical skills to the students in domains such as management, economics, languages, quality management, ethics, psychology, etc.
  3. The core courses (39 credits, 8 courses) contain first of all 6 compulsory courses focusing on the thorough basic education within the main disciplines of the Master’s: nanophysics, nanochemistry, nanoelectronics and nanobiochemistry. These core programme courses deliver the basic competences (knowledge, skills and attitudes) to prepare the students for their specialisation in one of the subdisciplines of the Master. Next all students also have to follow one out of two available practical courses where they learn to carry out some practical experimental work, which takes place in small teams. Also part of the core courses is the Lecture Series on Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering, which is a series of seminars (14-18 per year) on various topics related to nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoengineering, given by national and international guest speakers.
  4. The specific courses (21 credits) are compulsory programme courses of the specialisation option. These programme courses are deepening the student’s competences in one of the specialising disciplines of the Master’s programme and prepare them also for the thesis work.
  5. The broadening courses (9-27 credits) allow the students to choose additional progamme courses, either from their own or from the other options of the Master’s, which allow them to broaden their scope beyond the chosen specialisation. They can also choose to do an industrial internship on a nanoscience, nanotechnology or nanoengineering related topic at a nanotechnology company or research institute.
  6. The Master’s thesis (24 credits) is intended to bring the students in close and active contact with a multidisciplinary research environment. The student is assigned a relevant research project and work in close collaboration with PhD students, postdocs and professors. The research project is spread over the two semesters of the second Master’s year, and is finalised with a written Master’s thesis report, a publishable summary paper and a public presentation.

 You can also follow a similar programme in the frame of an interuniversity programme, the Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Career perspectives

In the coming decades, nanoscience and nanotechnology will undoubtedly become the driving force for a new set of products, systems, and applications. These disciplines are even expected to form the basis for a new industrial revolution.

Within a few years, nanoscience applications are expected to impact virtually every technological sector and ultimately many aspects of our daily life. In the coming five-to-ten years, many new products and companies will emerge based on nanotechnology and nanosciences. These new products will stem from the knowledge developed at the interface of the various scientific disciplines offered in this Master's programme.

Thus, graduates will find a wealth of career opportunities in the sectors and industries developing these new technologies: electronics, new and smart materials, chemical technology, biotechnology, R&D, independent consultancies and more. Graduates have an ideal background to become the invaluable interface between these areas and will be able to apply their broad perspective on nanoscience and nanotechnology to the development and creation of new products and even new companies.



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The progress made in telecommunications and information technology allows you to benefit from greater access to entertainment, health, and commerce. Read more
The progress made in telecommunications and information technology allows you to benefit from greater access to entertainment, health, and commerce. A range of multimedia services underpins the growth in these areas. This programme focuses on practical and theoretical aspects of electronics and provides a solid foundation for engineering a wide range of electrical systems, such as embedded microcontrollers, renewable energy, power converters and high frequency communications.

Key features

-Gain hands-on experience in signal processing and embedded systems programming.
-Benefit from the industrial collaboration with British Telecommunications plc (BT) and Bombardier Transportation. Strong collaboration with BT's Goonhilly Satellite Earth Station and other companies such as Orange (France Telecom).
-Progress in a school that has gained national and international recognition for its research in satellite communications, data storage, and digital signal processing (Research Assessment Exercise RAE 2008).
-Develop research skills in leading edge technology. and advance with the support of our Centre for Security, Communications and Network Research.
-Develop your knowledge in our Digital Signal Processing [DSP] laboratory, a new networks laboratory funded in part by CISCO, a separate postgraduate study room with full internet and specialist software, and a dedicated communications laboratory.
-Explore the option of completing the programme over two years with an integral work placement year.
-Draw on the expertise of our lecturers who are nationally and internationally recognised leading researchers. Professor Martin Tomlinson is internationally recognised for the invention of the Tomlinson-Harashima precoder – a key component of any telecommunications modem.
-Benefit from Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) accreditation. The MSc is a significant step towards the status of Chartered Engineer (CEng) which is highly sought after in industry.
-You are eligible to apply for an IET postgraduate scholarship. Amounts can vary between £2,500 and £10,000, tenable for one year, which are intended to reward excellence rather than alleviate financial hardship. For more information on the different scholarships available, details on how to apply and confirmed closing dates for applications, please visit the IET Awards and Scholarships.
-Stand out from the crowd by completing an integrated placement as part of your masters degree.

Course details

The MSc Electrical and Electronic Engineering will appeal to you if you are a design engineer. The programme provides an in-depth knowledge of specialist areas in electrical and electronic engineering underpinned by the theory and practice of modern electronics and renewable energy systems, together with the associated signal processing and embedded programming techniques. The modules have been selected to give you an even balance of essential modern areas of electrical and electronic engineering. The communications content will give you a broad grounding in communication theory and systems while the signal processing content is generally biased toward applications in communications engineering. From our experience of intensive courses, and our work with partner companies, this programme meets the current needs of electrical and electronics industry. The programme is taught in autumn and spring blocks and includes a project.

Core modules
-ROCO503 Sensors and Actuators
-BPIE500 Masters Stage 1 Placement Preparation
-PROJ509 MSc Project
-ELEC512 Nanotechnology and Nanoelectronics
-ELEC518 Digital and Wireless Communications
-SOFT561 Robot Software Engineering
-ELEC517 Integrated Power Systems
-ELEC516 Advanced Signal Processing

Optional placement year
-BPIE502 Electrical/Robotics Masters Industrial Placement

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Telecommunication Systems at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Telecommunication Systems at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

From Power Electronics to NanoElectronics shaping our future, Electronic and Electrical Engineering is amongst the most exciting degree subjects available to a university student.

Our internationally-renowned research in power electronics, telecommunications, nanotechnology and biometrics feeds back into our electrical engineering degree courses to keep them up-to-date and relevant to industry.

The Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) is known for its ground-breaking research into Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics. The Centre is also a world-leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.



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The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

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Do you want to lead society towards a more energy-efficient future, enhance your business acumen, and further develop your technical and design ability? The MEng course develops your communication and entrepreneurial skills, and prepares you for a range of high-end careers in electrical and electronic engineering. Read more
Do you want to lead society towards a more energy-efficient future, enhance your business acumen, and further develop your technical and design ability? The MEng course develops your communication and entrepreneurial skills, and prepares you for a range of high-end careers in electrical and electronic engineering. This course, which meets the full academic requirements for Chartered Engineer status, is accredited by The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

You will develop highly practical skills and learn through doing. You'll access one of the largest undergraduate laboratory spaces in the country, which you can use to further your own understanding of communications, electronics and renewable energy technologies. You will benefit from free IET membership (whilst at University) as the University is an IET Academic Partner. You will further your knowledge with a placement after successfully completing year two.

Key features

-Benefit from outstanding teaching: in the 2016 National Student Survey 91 per cent of our final year students said that “The course is intellectually stimulating”.*
-Draw on our strong industry links and benefit from industry participation in course development, delivery and project sponsorship.
-Take part in our final year student project open day showcasing the excellence of the engineering skills development and the high levels of achievement of our undergraduates, with many industrially sponsored prizes awarded.
-Develop highly practical skills and learn through doing.
-Take advantage of our flexible course, allowing you to switch between electronics and robotics until your final year, as your interests develop.
-Immerse yourself in a degree accredited by the Institution for Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).
-Benefit from free IET membership (whilst at University) as the University is an IET Academic Partner.
-Joining our MEng course means working towards an honours degree that provides the shortest route to professional and chartered status.
-Challenge yourself. Final year MEng students work in groups to undertake a major design project that will give them the opportunity to experience a broad selection of strategic, ethical, environmental, management, operational, logistical, technical, financial, contractual and team-working challenges.
-Further your knowledge with a placement after successfully completing stage 2 or between the final two years of the MEng course.
-Receive an Apple iPad along with your core e-text books to support your learning.
-Access one of the largest undergraduate laboratory spaces in the country, which you can use to further your own understanding of communications, electronics and renewable energy technologies.

Course details

Year 1
In the first year you'll use our well-equipped laboratories to develop your knowledge and practical problem solving skills. From the start of your studies you'll find that there is an emphasis on learning by doing, and group project work will enable you to develop your problem solving and communication skills. An integrating project will encompass business and technical skills, and focus on activities that are typical of a start-up company.

Core modules
-ELEC143 Embedded Software in Context
-BPIE112 Stage 1 Electrical/Robotics Placement Preparation
-ELEC141 Analogue Electronics
-ELEC142 Digital Electronics
-ELEC144 Electrical Principles and Machines
-MATH187 Engineering Mathematics

Optional modules
-ELEC137PP Electronic Design and Build
-ROCO103PP Robot Design and Build

Year 2
You'll develop a greater understanding of underlying engineering principles and circuit design methods in the second year. Again, we place an emphasis on team work and you'll have the opportunity to do both group and individual presentations of your projects. You'll use industrial standard software tools for design and simulation in preparation for your final year individual project or for your optional placement year.

Core modules
-MATH237 Engineering Mathematics and Statistics
-BPIE212 Stage 2 Electrical/Robotics Placement Preparation
-ELEC239 Communication Systems
-ROCO218 Control Engineering
-ELEC237 Power Electronics and Generation
-ELEC240 Embedded Systems
-ELEC241 Real Time Systems

Optional placement year
You can enhance your studies with relevant experience by taking an optional placement year in the UK, France, Germany and Japan. Placements give you the opportunity to put theory into practice, and are excellent opportunity to seek final year sponsorship. Many of our graduates have been offered permanent jobs with their placement company.

Core modules
-BPIE332 Electrical Industrial Placement

Year 4
Year 3 (or Year 4 if you took an optional placement year) is an exciting opportunity to develop an individual project. You'll consolidate your knowledge, explore and evaluate new technologies, and demonstrate your communication skills in the oral and written presentation of your project. Previous project have included a landmine detection system, CreatoBot (a modular robotic system) and DishDynamics (Global Ordinance And Targeting System [GOATS]).

Core modules
-ELEC345 High Speed Communications
-ELEC347 Information and Communication Signal Processing
-ELEC349 Design and Control of Renewable Energy Technology
-PROJ324 Individual Project
-ELEC351 Advanced Embedded Programming

Final year
Your final year includes additional technical modules and a large interdisciplinary design project. Past projects have included designing a product that involved a local company and a central government department, the challenge was to build a prototype system, which was showcased at the Project Open Day. This project will most likely result in the formation of a real company (later in the year). You also have the possibility of continuing your studies to MSc level in the same academic year.

Core modules
-PROJ515 MEng Project
-ELEC512 Nanotechnology and Nanoelectronics
-ELEC518 Digital and Wireless Communications
-ELEC514 Advanced Power Systems

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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This programme addresses the great shortage of skilled radio frequency (RF) and microwave engineers, and the growing demand for conceptually new wireless systems. Read more

This programme addresses the great shortage of skilled radio frequency (RF) and microwave engineers, and the growing demand for conceptually new wireless systems.

You will learn about a range of modern theories and techniques, accompanied by topics on wireless frequencies and sizes of RF and microwave devices.

This ranges from the lowest frequencies used in radio frequency identification (RFID) systems through to systems used at mm wave frequencies that can have applications in satellite communication systems and fifth generation wireless communication systems.

Theoretical concepts established in lectures are complemented by practical implementation in laboratory sessions, with direct experience of industry-standard computer-aided design (CAD) software.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Uche Chukwumerije.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Academic support

We provide solid academic support through the taught modules and into the project period. You will be assigned a personal tutor with whom you can discuss both academic and general issues related to the programme.

When you move into the project phase of the programme, you will be assigned a project supervisor who you will meet, usually on a weekly basis, to discuss the progress of your project.

The individual taught modules also feature strong academic support, usually through a tutorial programme. All of the RF and microwave modules have tutorial sheets to support the lectures.

Although completing the tutorials is not part of the formal assessment, you have the option of using the tutorials to receive individual feedback on your progress in the modules.

Facilities and equipment

The combined facilities of the RF teaching laboratories and the Advanced Technology Institute provide MSc students with an exceptionally wide range of modern fabrication and measurement equipment.

Furthermore a wide variety of RF test and measurement facilities are available through Surrey Space Centre and the 5G Innovation Centre, which also involve work in the RF and microwave engineering domain.

Equipment includes access to CAD design tools, anechoic chamber, spectrum analysers, network analysers, wideband channel sounder, circuit etching and circuit testing.

Industrial and overseas links

The 5G Innovation Centre and Advanced Technology Institute within the Department have a range of active links with industry, both in the UK and overseas. During the past few years we have had students taking the MSc through the part-time route and completing their projects in industry.

Examples of industrial projects range from looking at new microwave measurement techniques at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), to antenna design and construction at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl).

We have also sent students overseas to complete their projects, funded through the Erasmus scheme, which is a European programme that provides full financial support for students completing their project work at one of our partner universities in mainland Europe.

Students taking advantage of this opportunity not only enhance their CVs with a European perspective, but also produce excellent project dissertations.

Technical characteristics of the pathway

This programme in Microwave Engineering and Wireless Subsystem Designrf and microwavengineering provides detailed in-depth knowledge of theory and techniques applicable to radio frequency (RF) and microwave engineering.

The programme includes core modules in both RF and microwave covering all ranges of wireless frequencies and a number of application devices including radio frequency identification (RFID), broadcasting, satellite links, microwave ovens, printed and integrated microwave circuits.

Additional optional modules enable the student to apply the use of RF and microwave in subsystem design for either mobile communications, satellite communications, nanotechnology or for integration with optical communications.

The teaching material and projects are closely related to the research being carried out in the Department’s Advanced Technology Institute and the Institute for Communication Systems.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Summary. Electronic engineering achievements have transformed our daily lives. Use your knowledge and skills to realise exciting future developments. Read more

Summary

Electronic engineering achievements have transformed our daily lives. Use your knowledge and skills to realise exciting future developments. This one year MSc Electronic Engineering degree allows you to choose modules from specialist fields – such as micro and nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, micro and nanotechnology, photonic technologies, and wireless communications – and will enable you to deepen your understanding of one or more of these areas.

Modules

Semester one: Digital System Design; Digital IC and Systems Design; Secure Hardware Design; Nanoelectronic Devices; Microfabrication; Microsensor Technologies; Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip; Bionanotechnology; Radio Communications Engineering; Digital Coding and Transmission; Signal Processing; Introduction to Silicon Photonics; Optical Fibre Technology.

Semester two: Digital Systems Synthesis; Embedded Processors; Green Electronics; Bio/Micro/Nano Systems; Wireless and Mobile Networks; Advanced Systems and Signal Processing; Photonic Materials; Optical Fibre Sensors.

Plus three-month independent research project culminating in a dissertation.

Visit our website for more information



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Summary. This programme outlines the micro and nanotechnology aspects of electronic engineering, with a focus on microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectronics. Read more

Summary

This programme outlines the micro and nanotechnology aspects of electronic engineering, with a focus on microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectronics. These technologies underpin research and development of miniaturised sensors, for example mobile phone motion and position detectors, and of nanoscale logic and memory devices for next-generation consumer electronics and future quantum devices. The programme also addresses microfluidic technology for biodevices such as point-of-care diagnostics, and covers the fundamentals of photonic circuits and devices. The modules cover state-of-the-art design, fabrication and characterisation methodologies, utilising industry-standard tools and involve our extensive cleanroom complex.

Modules

Semester one: Microfabrication; Microsensor Technologies; Nanoelectronic Devices; Advanced Memory and Storage; Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip; Bionanotechnology; Introduction to Silicon Photonics.

Semester two: Bio/Micro/Nano Systems; Green Electronics; Nanofabrication and Microscopy; Quantum Devices and Technology; Medical and Electrical Technologies; Photonic Materials.

Plus three-month independent research project culminating in a dissertation.

Visit our website for more information.



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