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This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts. Read more
This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts.

It offers a discerning investigation into seemingly non­rational modes of knowing, exploring the cosmological sense of the sacred, the widespread practices of symbol interpretation and the cultural role of the creative imagination.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/myth-cosmology-and-the-sacred.aspx

Course detail

The overall aim of the course is to encourage critical, imaginative and creative ways of engaging reflexively with some of the most important questions of our time, such as the debate between science and religion, the nature of sacred reality, and the foundations of spiritual, religious and ritual experience. To do this we explore theories of knowledge and consciousness, oracular and divinatory practices (ancient and contemporary), and the cultural expression of myth in landscape, poetry, art and music.

The course has been highly praised as an outstanding example of transformative learning, as it brings personal reflection and creativity to bear on the study of spirituality in the broadest sense. It brings to the fore issues of connectivity, sustainability, ecological awareness, and the engagement of the imagination in the aid of individual, community and global understanding, wellbeing and harmony.

Canterbury is a perfect venue to study this course, with its ecclesiastical heritage, rich literary history, beauty of landscape and architecture, and easy access to both London and the continent.

Suitability

The course will appeal to all those seeking to develop and enrich their lives through the study of the history, philosophy and practices of Western sacred and esoteric traditions, and will be of particular interest to teachers, practitioners and therapists in the fields of contemporary spirituality and wellbeing who would like to engage more deeply with both the foundations of their work and their own self-knowledge.

There are many areas for potential further study, and we now have a thriving graduate environment with MPhil/PhD researchers pursing topics as diverse as the music of the spheres, Freemasonry, conflict resolution, alchemical symbolism, transformative learning and intuitive reading methods.

Content

The four taught modules, comprising seminars, learning journal groups and workshops take place at alternate weekends, in term time, from October to March, with optional workshops in the summer term.

The Creative Project assignment and dissertation module take place from April to September (for full-time students) and April to the following September (for part-time students). Each teaching weekend includes an open lecture by a visiting speaker. There are also optional sessions on Friday afternoons (compulsory for Tier 4 students).

The four taught modules will address the following topics:

• Theories and Methods
• Symbol and Imagination
• Oracular and Divinatory Traditions
• Spirit and Psyche
• Creative Project
• Learning Journal
• Dissertation

Format

Teaching methods include seminars, lectures and workshops. Students can expect eight hours of teaching each study weekend, plus two hours of learning journal groups. They also receive individual supervision for each taught and research assignment, and eight hours of research preparation seminars.

They will attend two days a year for creative project presentations and a variety of optional workshops will be offered. There will also be an open public lecture at each study weekend, on the Saturday evening, which they are encouraged to attend, and optional Friday afternoon seminars on a variety of themes.

Assessment

Four essays of 4,000 words (20 credits each), one creative project review of 4,000 words, one learning journal write-up of 4,000 words (20 credits each) and one dissertation of 12-15,000 words (60 credits).

What can I do next?

Most of the students on this course are mature adults with established careers. However, possible career opportunities might include teaching, counselling and mentoring, spiritual and wellbeing guidance, alternative healing and therapies, writing and media, the arts, and further research.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Read more
The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Research skills taught during the first semester will enable students to engage with a variety of interdisciplinary approaches and sources, ranging from theoretical, historical and cultural aspects of the Arthurian myth.

Background
Arthurian Literature is an established area of expertise in the School of English at Bangor University and has been taught here for over three decades. A long-standing record of teaching, research and publication attests to its vitality; the main specialists in the field are Dr Raluca Radulescu, whose work has focused on Malory, Arthurian romances and chronicles, especially through a cultural approach, and Professor PJC Field, currently President of the International Arthurian Society, and world-renowned for his work on the Arthurian legend through the centuries. However the course also draws upon the expertise available in other periods of literature within the School of English and other schools in the College of Arts and Humanities, ranging from post-medieval approaches in the School of English, or medieval Welsh, History and Archaeology, and Music. Staff in these areas contribute regularly to the teaching of Arthurian topics ranging from the medieval period to the present, including music and modern film adaptations.

Why Bangor for Arthurian Studies?
The attractiveness of the MA in Arthurian Literature at Bangor lies in its flexible, though comprehensive, approach to the study of this area. Students may choose to specialise in either the medieval or the post-medieval period but they will be required to take both modules with these titles in order to benefit from the wide coverage of the Arthurian legend they provide. At the same time they can enjoy all the benefits of one-to-one supervision in the Open Essay options, while also developing their research skills in the Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research Module (shared with the MA in English). Moreover, in-depth introductions to the study of medieval palaeography and codicology are available by collaboration with other relevant schools and disciplines, as a preparation to PhD level (see collaborative doctoral training scheme in palaeography and codicology organised by Dr Raluca Radulescu).

Students usually participate in the activities of the Centre for Medieval Studies, including the annual international postgraduate conference, ‘Medievalism Transformed’, the bi-weekly Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies seminar series (http://www.imems.ac.uk/) and the online postgraduate journal.

Structure
The MA in Arthurian Literature consists of two parts. Part One must be successfully completed before proceeding to the second part, the dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Compulsory Modules:

Part One

Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (30 credits), which develops knowledge of literary theory and research methods.
Medieval Arthur (30 credits), exploring the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to examining its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture.
Post-Medieval Arthur (30 credits), addressing the Arthurian myth and legends from the early modern period onwards, paying attention to the way the story was shaped in different centuries
Optional Modules:

Open Essay (30 credits): Supervised essays on topics of the student’s own choice.
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)
Manuscript and Printed Books (30 credits): An introduction to the study of medieval and early modern palaeography and codicology, in co-operation with the Bangor University Archives and Special Collections, which include the library of Bangor Cathedral
Subject to availability, students may choose relevant modules in medieval Welsh literature/Welsh Arthurian literature offered in the School of Welsh.
Part Two

Dissertation (60 credits): a substantial piece (20,000 words) of scholarly research, on a subject of your own choice and discussed in detail with a chosen supervisor. It will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.
Research Links with Industry
A collaboration with the tourist attraction ’King Arthur’s Labyrinth’ at Corris has led to fully funded Access to Masters MA places on this degree programme. The course also maintains links with people and organisations beyond Bangor: these might include guest speakers and visits to sites of literary interest.

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Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature. Read more
Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature.

We want you to join in the debates over the nature of literature, the future of English literature, and the past and new cultural experiences of writing and communication which are shaping our lives, with our team of active researchers and committed teachers.

We see research as a public activity, and the course offers ways in which to explore the research process as engagement in the cultural conversation.

Our modules offer the opportunity to research a diverse range of literary periods and forms – from the Early Modern to Contemporary fiction, engaging with genres including historical fiction, fantasy literature, modernism, e-writing, and film.

The MA also explores a wide range of critical and theoretical approaches, including historical and textual analysis, ethical reading, cognitive poetics, and critical theory.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00

Please take the time to look out for updates on our funding page: http://www.chi.ac.uk/study-us-0/fees-finance/funding-and-money-advice-0/funding-postgraduate-students

Our facilities
The Department of English and Creative Writing is a thriving and successful Department, with a staff of active researchers and committed teachers.

The Department hosts the Centre for Research in Folklore, Fairytales and Fantasy, the South Coast Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Research Group, which hold regular research events, alongside a full Departmental programme, including film showings, visiting speakers, and theatre talks.

Recent visiting speakers include Dame Gillian Beer, Professor Jacqueline Simpson, Dr Frances White, and Professor Jacqueline Labbe.

In collaboration with our colleagues in Creative Writing, we also have regular events with writers and poets Simon Brett, Matthew Sweeney, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Michele Roberts, and Jo Shapcott.

The Department has close contact with local cultural institutions: the Chichester Festival Theatre, Pallant House Gallery, the Chichester Public Records Office, and other local institutions.

These offer you further research opportunities. Chichester and the local area has a strong literary history, attracting writers from the eighteenth-century radicals William Blake and Charlotte Smith, to H. G. Wells and Mervyn Peake.

Learning Resource Centre

The Learning Resource is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished.

On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

The Bishop Otter LRC also offers:

130 open access PC workstations
45 Apple iMacs
Ample printing facilities
Netbooks available on loan
Professional editing suites
Media loans counter
Wi-Fi and plug points throughout
Where this can take you
Our MA is designed to transform you into an active and confident researcher in the broad field of English Literature.

The course is a gateway to PhD research, providing an opportunity to focus your research, develop your independence in a supportive environment, and refine your research skills.

The MA is also for anyone who wants to develop their skills, subject knowledge, and confidence in research and the presentation of research.

It is particularly relevant for careers in research-related fields, from librarianship to arts management, for teachers in English Literature and related subjects, and for careers requiring high-level abilities in writing, presentation, and critical analysis.

Indicative modules
Literature in the Present Moment

What is literature and how do we think literature today? The concept of ‘literature’ is crucial and elusive, expanding under the impact of digitalisation and new forms of creative and critical writing. In this course students will explore new techniques in archival research, issues in intellectual history, theoretical developments, and the transformations of the very concept of ‘literature’, past and present.

Theatres of Pain and Pleasure, 1400-1700

Focusing on the Renaissance stage this course explores the theatre as a site of bodies engaged with forms of pain and pleasure: crime, sexuality, war and religion. Ranging across Shakespeare, Jacobean Tragedy, and Restoration Comedy, you will explore the space of the city and a rich diversity of sites, local and national, of theatrical representation.

Visions of the Real: Literature, Myth, and Science, 1800-Present

Fiction has always has a tense relationship with reality. Is fiction more real than reality, as literary characters come to ‘life’, or is fiction a betrayal of reality? In this course you will engage with the blurred lines between literature, science and myth. From the moment of the Enlightenment and Romanticism, in tension between the ‘clear’ vision of reality and the power of myth, the course traces out the crisis of realism, from fantasy literature to modernism to the avant-garde.

Activating Research

How do you become a researcher? Exploring the research process as one that involves integrating a range of ‘voices’, from primary texts, archives, peers, critical and theoretical work, and audience, this course gives you the capacity to engage with this diversity. While research is often presented as an intensely private and personal activity, this course will help you develop your research project as a public process, giving you the tools to find your own critical voice and the confidence to engage with peers, the academic community, and the public.

Teaching and Assessment
You will be assessed over four modules, three with an assessment of an essay of 5,000 words.

The module on ‘activating research’ will be assessed by a presentation (25%) and a written submission (3000 words).

The Dissertation will be a 15,000 assessment.

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How can Jungian psychology explain historical events, culture and society? What are the possibilities and limitations of applying analytical psychology to various socio-cultural fields or topics?. Read more
How can Jungian psychology explain historical events, culture and society? What are the possibilities and limitations of applying analytical psychology to various socio-cultural fields or topics?

Whether you are looking to train as a Jungian analyst or psychotherapist, or learn the skills to carry out research in a related area of analytical psychology, our unique and internationally acclaimed MA Jungian and Post-Jungian Studies will give you a deep academic grounding in Jungian and post-Jungian theory and practice.

Our course takes an informative, critical and reflective stance in relation to the key texts of Jung, the diverse contexts from which analytical psychology emerged, and the core concepts developed by Jung, post-Jungian scholars and clinicians. You explore clinical theory and applications in areas such as culture and gender studies, social and political theory, philosophy, myth and religion.

Our course is offered one year full-time or two years part-time, with modules specifically timetabled to enable those not local to the university to attend. Please note there is no distance-learning option.

Whether you continue to study for a PhD or go into work in a clinical or non-clinical setting, you will graduate from our leading Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies having been taught by a team of leading academics and analysts from across the spectrum of Jungian theory and practice.

Key texts of Jung

What do you know about Jung’s theories on myth? How do you position this writing within his work as a whole? And how did Jung deploy his psychological theories to critique science, religion and society? You examine key Jungian texts in depth, critically exploring and analysing his work and its application.

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Why study at Roehampton. Approved by the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification as a dramatherapist. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Approved by the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification as a dramatherapist.
  • The programme is based upon the Ritual Theatre process of dramatherapy. It draws heavily on the theatrical observations of Peter Brook and the experiments of Jerzy Grotowski, as well as anthropological notions of ‘rites of passage’ and the importance of ‘myth’.
  • The opportunity to undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice.
  • Taught by experienced clinical practitioners and authors of dramatherapy publications, including the editor of The Dramatherapy Journal.
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact. 

Course summary

Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama.

The MA Dramatherapy programme at Roehampton offers unique training within the Ritual Theatre process of dramatherapy. Drawing heavily on the theatrical observations of Peter Brook and the experiments of Jerzy Grotowski, as well as anthropological notions of “rites of passage” and the importance of “myth”, the programmes offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy at various levels. 

On this course, you will learn to facilitate an in-depth therapeutic process for a range of client groups, and devise therapeutic performances and workshops. You will also undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice. The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally-recognised professional qualification.

The programme consists of three stages, which offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy. In Stage One, you will be introduced to basic theatre skills and use these creatively to work with established stories and characters. This progresses into an exploration of the personal identifications that we have with stories and myths, and an understanding of the deep foundations within many cultural traditions of using ritual, drama and performance for the enhancement of health. In Stage Two, the focus moves on to employing drama and theatre processes as vehicles for exploring our own inter-personal and internal ‘dramas’. 

Stage Three is where you will conduct your own piece of practical investigation or research into the literature and theory-base of dramatherapy practice. The Dramatherapy programme will provide you with a broad range of skills enabling you to pursue your own research interests across a wide spectrum of dramatherapy practice and theory.

Content

You will study a range of topics including how to crafting therapeutic drama stories, understanding the individual and group process, Ritual Theatre, working with myths, paratheatrical explorations and the art of structure when working in dramatherapy.

Our research areas include individual dramatherapy in schizophrenia; perception and evaluation of therapeutic outcomes from therapist and client perspectives; the role of race, culture and gender; dramatherapy and “mentalisation” with borderline personality disorder and complex trauma; therapeutic scenarios and resistance; creativity and destructiveness; the dramatherapist; and the multidisciplinary team.

Alongside the experiential focus of the training, the programme also aims to develop the necessary understanding and reflective capacity required to practice as a professional dramatherapist. This is achieved through workshops, lecture series and clinical application seminars, as well as through assessed clinical placements.

Modueles

Here are examples of the modules:

Year One:

  • Human Development and Growth
  • Process Group
  • Research Methods
  • Dramatherapy Practice & Supervision

Year Two:

  • Process Group
  • Research Portfolio
  • The Ritual of Creative Expression
  • The Ritual of Exploration
  • The Ritual of Transformation

Career options

Dramatherapists are employed across the spectrum of health and social care, education and forensic services. Dramatherapists may also operate in private therapy, training and consultancy practice.

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The MA Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Students have the opportunity to study some historical subjects if they so wish. Read more
The MA Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Students have the opportunity to study some historical subjects if they so wish. The study of ancient languages is an essential part of this degree, but no existing knowledge of either Greek or Latin is required for admission.

Course Overview

A degree in Classical Studies gives you the opportunity to study a wide range of modules from mythology to religion and all genres of ancient literature, such as epic, tragedy. As understanding texts in their original language is an essential part of further studies, the study of an ancient language is compulsory.

Modules

-Women in Ancient Myth
-Medicine in the Ancient World
-Erotic Poetry in the Ancient World
-Stories, Histories, and Ticket-Sales: Greeks and Romans on the Silver Screen
-Myth in Greek and Roman Epic

Key Features

The MA in Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study the ancient world with a focus on language and literature, and the interpretation of ancient texts. Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are better able to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Classical Studies with us here at University of Wales Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MA degree in Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint-based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in a clear, professional and lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

The assessment is on the student’s own subject of choice in relation to each module, always in consultation with the relevant tutor. Most modules are assessed by long essays, but some modules are assessed by alternative means, such as conference-style presentations.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The MRes Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist research-intensive degree tailored to those interests and to pursue their own independent research to a further extent than in an MA. Read more
The MRes Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist research-intensive degree tailored to those interests and to pursue their own independent research to a further extent than in an MA.

Course Overview

The MRes is a degree best suited to students with a proven penchant for independent research. The MRes includes 60 credits (3 modules) of taught modules, but the main focus of the degree is on a longer piece of individual research (30,000 words). Applicants are required to discuss their proposed research with the School before application, and the proposed research must be in one of the areas of supervision offered by the School of Classics.

The MRes in Ancient History begins with a specialist Research Methodology module introducing students to the multiple sources, materials, theories and methodologies for the study of ancient Greek and Roman civilisations. Students then have the opportunity to choose two modules according to their own interests in the ancient world, with the option to specialise in a particular aspect of ancient history, whether in chronological terms, such as Greek or Roman history, or in terms of themes, such as the ancient economy. The choice of taught modules gives students not only the opportunity to explore areas that they might not have had the opportunity to study before, but also to specialise in a specific aspect of the ancient world in preparation for the MRes dissertation.

The dissertation is the greater part of the MRes in Ancient History, as students have the opportunity to conceive and research a topic of their own design of greater length and depth than the MA dissertation.

This will enable those students with a greater preference for independent research, and perhaps with a clearer sense at the start of the programme of what they would like to base their research upon, to undertake in-depth research within a structured programme of study. It will also provide students with an excellent introductory pathway into further study at MPhil or PhD level.

Modules

-Julius Caesar and his Times:
-Pagans, Jews, and Christians in Late Antiquity
-History and Historians in the Ancient World
-Power and Culture in the Hellenistic East
-Ancient Medicine: Myth and Practice
-Women in ancient Myth and Society

Key Features

The MRes in Ancient History is designed to provide students with a penchant for independent research the opportunity to pursue research into a subject of their own choice. The subject of the dissertation is discussed and agreed in advance, and it is expected that the choice of taught modules will relate to the research subject chosen.

The main general areas of research supervision in the School are:
-Greek and Roman epic
-Latin poetry of the late Republican and Imperial periods
-Literary uses of mythology
-Greek and Roman Africa
-Hellenistic Asia Minor and the Near East
-Identity, ethnicity and ethnogenesis in the Roman empire
-Roman religion
-Ancient Economy, particularly of the Greek Classical period and of the Roman empire
-Greek and Roman historiography
-Sex and Gender in the ancient world
-Health and healing in the ancient world
-Graeco-Roman relations with India

The above are general subject areas. Please contact us to discuss your specific ideas and interests.

Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries, whilst our independent study modules allow you to explore your passion in its entirety.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are able better to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Ancient History with us here at Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MRes degree in Ancient History involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and powerpoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

This breadth of assessment type creates variety in the student experience, allowing you to explore the subject in different ways, and also embeds within the Ancient History programme the specific employability skills desired, indeed required, by employers today.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The MRes Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. The programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. The programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total.

Course Overview

An MRes in Classical Studies gives you the opportunity to study a range of modules on classical literature, and aspects of everyday life in the ancient world. Students study what amounts to 3 taught modules chosen from the collection of modules on the programme, with a requirement that one of the choices be a Research Methods module. The dissertation of between 25000 to 30000 words forms the heart of this programme and allows the student to investigate in depth a topic or area of particular interest to them.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Women in Ancient Myth
-Medicine in the Ancient World
-Erotic Poetry in the Ancient World
-Stories, Histories, and Ticket-Sales: Greeks and Romans on the Silver Screen
-Myth in Epic

Key Features

The MRes in Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study the ancient world with a focus on language and literature, and the interpretation of ancient texts. Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics.

All our modules, including our Dissertation supervision, are delivered by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are able better to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Classical Studies with us here at Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MRes degree in Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and powerpoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. The Dissertation is between 25,000 and 30,000 words.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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The MA Drama and Movement Therapy is an intensive course providing professional and vocational training in drama and movement therapy and the Sesame approach, and is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more

ABOUT MA DRAMA AND MOVEMENT THERAPY (SESAME)

The MA Drama and Movement Therapy is an intensive course providing professional and vocational training in drama and movement therapy and the Sesame approach, and is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

The course offers a particular pedagogic approach to learning the craft of dramatherapy, which is underpinned by Jungian psychology and the importance of practice-based learning. The combination of intensive movement-based studio practice, collaborative facilitations, seminars, and a shared research unit with other MA students creates a learning environment that encourages personal exploration, collaboration and critical reflection. Particularly in the first term, there is the opportunity for immersive practice in the key subject areas of Laban movement, myth, movement with touch and sound and drama. This is allied by study into key psychological concepts, which can inform the theories and practices of dramatherapy. The group process is central to the student experience and supported by a weekly session across the first three terms that explores interpersonal dynamics between members and draws from group analytic theory.

PLACEMENTS

The placements are at the heart of the training and begin in the second term with the hallmark apprenticeship model. This offers well-supported early clinical practice with a specialist and qualified supervisor working alongside groups of two or three Students in different placement settings. All apprenticeship placements are arranged by Central and will normally include working with adults with mental health problems, elderly clients with dementia, people with learning disabilities, children
with challenging behaviour and people on the autistic spectrum. The apprenticeship model is used for placements in the spring and summer terms. In the extended fourth term, students will work more autonomously and have the opportunity to specialise
their clinical practice. All placement work is closely supported throughout the course through group and individual supervision.

All graduates are eligible to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council for membership as an arts therapist (drama).

ASSESSMENT

By a range of methods which include viva voce exams, written assignments and assessment of clinical practice and ongoing group work. There is ongoing tutor, peer and self-assessment.

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English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is. Read more
English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is:

• Inclusive. We teach across the whole chronological span of English Literature, from Middle English to literature of the twenty-first century. We offer modules in a range of critical approaches, from bibliography and textual studies to contemporary women’s writing, and from Barthesian semiotics and postcolonial ways of reading, to theories of gender and queer studies. We are intrigued by the connections between literature and popular culture and literature and theory, and our teaching reflects these interests.

• Challenging. Staff offer modules on their research areas of expertise. This means that students engage with new, up-to-date ideas that are helping to shape and define the future of the discipline.

• Diverse. There are no compulsory modules. You have the freedom to use any critical, theoretical perspective to analyse any type of (aesthetic, cultural, historical) material.

• Engaged. The MA in English Literature is a successful programme of study that has a strong reputation for offering a comprehensive range of modules from all periods and genres that bring the latest developments in literary and critical theory to bear upon the reading of literary and cultural texts.

Distinctive features

• A wide-ranging programme of research-led modules taught by specialists in the field
• A series of dedicated research pathways, including Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory
• Access to skills training and various research activities
• The freedom to assemble a programme of study tailored to personal and professional interests
• High-level training in the latest research methods, critical theory and scholarly writing and presentation skills in a non-assessed core module
• Popular two-day residential conference and workshop at Gregynog Hall, where you will present short 15-minute papers in a supportive and lively atmosphere
• One-day symposium dedicated to increasing your employability skills
• Opportunities to take part in a series of dynamic research seminar series
• Access to specialist library collections

Structure

Our flexible structure allows you to assemble programmes of study tailored to your personal and professional interests. You can opt for the open pathway, or choose one of our specialist pathways: Medieval and Renaissance; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory, which groups together groups of taught modules with related research activities and skills training available in the School.

The degree is structured in two parts.

• Part one

You choose four modules from a range of specialist options. You take two modules per semester (one module per semester for part-time study)

All teaching is by seminars and workshops structured around student participation, featuring opportunities to present your work. Each module consists of a two-hour seminar per week and is assessed by a 4,000-word essay (or equivalent).

In addition to the taught modules, you attend weekly workshops on research methods and scholarly presentation.

• Part Two

You undertake a dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words on a subject of your choice, developed in consultation with a supervisor in the field. You begin to plan and research your dissertation in the second semester for submission in September.

Core module:

English Literature Ma Dissertation

Optional modules:

The Myth of King Arthur in The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Violent Death in Renaissance Drama
Reading/Theory
Constructing Shakespeare
Neo-Victorian Metatextualities
Writing and Experimentation
Heroes and Villains from Chaucer to Shakespeare
Spectral Femininities
Writing Victorian Science
Children's Fantasy Fiction Since 1900
Before Homosexuality? Representing Same Sex Desire from Smollett to Sexology
Romantic Poetry and Place
Project Management and Advanced Research Skills
Narrative and Nation: Romantic Prose 1980-1830
White
Virginia Woolf's Modernism
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in seminar groups for all modules. The teaching for each module is text-based and revolves around the exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of literary, historical, and theoretical perspectives within the broad field of English Literature.

The learning activities vary from module to module as appropriate, but will include such as activities as interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Each module on Part One is assessed by a 4,000-word essay or equivalent (which can include up to 10% of the module being assessed by oral presentation).

Part Two is examined by a 16,000-20,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia.

Many of our alumni enter (or return to) various professions including academia, primary and secondary education, journalism, publishing, archival and library work, the Civil Service, arts administration and the creative industries.

In addition to taught modules and academic workshops, we also offer dedicated sessions to increase your transferable skills and employability prospects. We also encourage all students on the programme to work closely with the University’s Careers and Employability office.

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Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. Read more
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. You explore literature across time, geography, and genre, combining scholarly research with innovative, practical ways of engaging with texts.

You grapple with the challenges of conducting research into Shakespeare and other early modern literature, acquiring specialist skills in archival research, palaeography, and the study of rare and antiquated books. You study materials on 18th century drama and literature, visiting the UK’s only surviving Regency Theatre to investigate how architecture affected the content of drama, and how drama reflected Georgian society. You have the opportunity to explore the history of genres such as the novel and lyric poetry, and study a truly extensive range of work; your reading takes you from African American literature, through Caribbean literatures, to the literature and performance of New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow and London.

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have been Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Our Department is a vibrant conservatoire of scholars and practitioners who are committed to unlocking creative personal responses to literature. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning novelists, poets and playwrights, as well as leading literature specialists.

Our academic staff specialise in a range of areas including modernism, comparative and world literature, Shakespeare, the Renaissance, modernism, travel writing, nature writing, translated literature, cultural geography, Irish and Scottish writing, U.S. and Caribbean literatures, and the history of reading.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City (optional)
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean (optional)
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

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The MA Classics concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world in the original language. If you wish to develop both of your of Classical languages then an MA in Classics is the degree for you. Read more
The MA Classics concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world in the original language.

Course Overview

If you wish to develop both of your of Classical languages then an MA in Classics is the degree for you. Classics degrees concentrate on the Greek and Latin languages at advanced level, as well as the literature of the ancient world. Existing knowledge of either Greek or Latin at advanced level is an entrance requirement for all Classics degrees. It is expected that candidates would have good knowledge of both languages to study for the MA in Classics. Some students progress from the PGDip in Greek, and the PGDip in Latin, to the MA in Classics.

Modules

-Advanced Greek Prose
-Advanced Greek Verse
-Advanced Latin Prose
-Advanced Latin Verse
-Myth in Greek and Roman Epic
-Erotic Poetry in the Ancient World

Key Features

The MA in Classics will have a special appeal to those students who wish to continue the study of Latin and Greek at advanced levels. Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are able better to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Classics with us here at University of Wales Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MA degree in Classics involves a range of assessment methods. All language modules are assessed by both coursework and examinations. Students in advanced languages have the opportunity to explore texts in detail, both in literary and in linguistic terms, through assessed critical commentaries and essays. Additionally, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular emphasis on the languages, methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Provides in-depth knowledge of approaches to, and the history of, children’s literature. Oldest accredited master’s degree in the world on children’s literature from literary perspectives. Read more
  • Provides in-depth knowledge of approaches to, and the history of, children’s literature
  • Oldest accredited master’s degree in the world on children’s literature from literary perspectives
  • Small seminar group teaching by renowned specialists
  • Interdisciplinary degree, engaging with Childhood Studies and Children’s Media
  • Outstanding preparation for PhD and various careers in cultural, educational and media industries

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Theory of children’s literature criticism
  • Twentieth and twenty-first century children’s literature
  • Nineteenth century children’s literature
  • Myth and folktale in children’s literature
  • Children’s radio, film, television

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our students continue on to, or return to, careers in teaching, publishing, the media, the civil service, the charity sector and advertising, as well as going on to do PhD research.

Students report that their careers are supported by the skills they have acquired not only in terms of subject expertise, but also critical thinking, advanced understanding and writing. 



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You will take two core courses and 6 option courses.You will be assessed through coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation. The compulsory courses are. Read more

You will take two core courses and 6 option courses.You will be assessed through coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

The compulsory courses are:

  • Historical Methodology;
  • Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Option courses previously available include:

  • Epicurus and Epicureanism
  • Myth and the History of Scholarship in Early Modern Europe
  • Theories of Empire in the Early Modern Period
  • Intellectual History of the American Revolution
  • Religion and the Enlightenment: the Birth of the Modern
  • Athens of the North: the Origins and Ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment;
  • Mind and Body in Early Modern Philosophy;
  • Seeking Japan in a Westernising World, 1868–1945;
  • Thinking the Twentieth Century;
  • Citizens and Subjects: Concepts of Citizenship in Modern African Intellectual History.

Learning outcomes

Students are expected to achieve several aims, which will be assessed primarily by essays and a dissertation, such as:

  • knowledge of the chief methods of practising intellectual history
  • a detailed understanding of certain major episodes in intellectual history
  • an appreciation of the interdependence of text and context, and of the importance of ideas in past and present

A wide variety of intellectual skills are promoted through seminars, discussions and advanced study, encouraging the development of the:

  • ability to develop tight and coherent arguments both orally and on the page
  • capacity to read texts critically and sensitively, evaluating their arguments as well as situating them in their practical and intellectual contexts
  • appreciation of a variety of approaches to intellectual history
  • ability to cross-disciplinary boundaries, for example, between philosophy, science and history

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those students interested in long-term academic careers consider the programme as preparation for a PhD.

The combination of specialised skills training courses and seminars, and the opportunity for independent research provides you with transferable skills that will be beneficial whatever path you choose. Graduates pursue work in related areas such as museums, policy think-tanks, national and international civil services, non-governmental organisations, galleries, libraries and historic trusts whilst others build on the transferable skills gained and enter areas as diverse as business, media, public administration and marketing.



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