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Masters Degrees (Music History)

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The Master of Music in Music History at West Chester University has been designed to serve a diverse student population, from those with specific research interests to those simply seeking greater exposure to music history and literature for educational purposes. Read more
The Master of Music in Music History at West Chester University has been designed to serve a diverse student population, from those with specific research interests to those simply seeking greater exposure to music history and literature for educational purposes. Music educators attempting to strengthen their own teaching curricula are especially encouraged to apply, as the program meets state requirements for an advanced degree for school teachers. Any undergraduate music degree (education, theory, history, performance) fulfills the prerequisite for the program.

Curriculum

The M.M. program is now more compact and easier to complete, as the previous 33 credit requirement has been reduced to 30. Degree requirements include:

• 15 credits in Music History (five courses, three from the sequence MHL 610-615)
• 6 Elective credits (two courses, may include Music History)
• 3 credits in Music Theory
• 6 credits directed toward thesis-related research (two courses, MHL 698 and MMU 699)
• Foreign Language requirement
• Thesis Defense

Students may complete the 6 elective credits in subjects of their own choosing, drawn from the full spectrum of offerings across the School of Music and university, including music education, music theory, and performance, and other fields. Students may satisfy the language requirement by exam or by applying elective credits to language study.

Recently the department's core offerings were revised to direct students better toward thesis work. Traditional survey courses have been replaced with "topics" courses in which fewer works are examined in greater depth. The masterworks of the past are studied in their political and cultural contexts to demonstrate the manifold interconnections of music, the other arts, and society. Sample topics (drawn from different courses in the curriculum) include:

"The Palestrina Style and the Counter-Reformation"
"Lully and Music for the Court of the 'Sun King' "
"Vivaldi's The Four Seasons and the Concerto"
"Mozart's Le Nozze de Figaro and the Enlightenment"
"Schubert's Songs and the Romantic Cult of Sensibility"
"The Influence of Ragtime and Jazz on European Art Music in the 1920s and 1930s"
"Music and Minimalism: Riley, Reich, and Glass"

All degree requirements must be completed within six years. A single one-year extension may be granted for cause.

Candidates must demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability, sight singing, and aural perception to meet demands of program.

Further Study and Careers

This degree program is intended for students who (1) wish to continue their formal education working toward a doctoral degree in musicology, (2) desire to prepare themselves for a college-level teaching career in the area of music history and music appreciation, (3) do not necessarily intend to continue graduate work in music history, but desire more exposure to the repertory and literature of music from various historical periods, or (4) intend to pursue careers in closely related musical disciplines such as music editorship and publishing, music librarianship, music journalism and criticism, and music merchandising and marketing.

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The MA in Music (Contemporary Music Studies) examines aspects of methodology, repertoire studies and cultural theory within a wide-ranging programme of investigation into the role of contemporary music in the society for which it is created. Read more

The MA in Music (Contemporary Music Studies) examines aspects of methodology, repertoire studies and cultural theory within a wide-ranging programme of investigation into the role of contemporary music in the society for which it is created.

You'll explore the key methodologies appropriate for scholarly study of the music of the present and recent past, such as oral history and contrasting approaches to musical ‘close reading’.

Musical repertoires, and notions of repertoire, are examined, and you are encouraged to ask such questions as whether the boundaries often considered to exist between, for example, ‘contemporary concert music’ and ‘popular music’ are still meaningful for practitioners, listeners and scholars today.

Various approaches to cultural theory are viewed in the light of what they might bring to the study of contemporary music of different kinds.

The understandings developed in your coursework culminate in the methods and approaches demonstrated in your dissertation.

This gives you the opportunity to address particular challenges of studying and writing about the music of our time arising from your own musical and theoretical enthusiasms.

The programme appeals to a wide range of students concerned to develop their understanding of today's music and keen to harness this to relevant intellectual skills.

While designed as an open-ended programme of study that can subsequently be applied in many ways within, and outside, the musical profession, it will be of special value to those preparing for further postgraduate research, and those considering careers in teaching, journalism, arts administration or the culture industries.

Modules & structure

Core module

Option modules

You choose three modules from a selection that currently includes:

Dissertation

Skills

You'll develop:

  • investigation and evaluation skills
  • intellectual skills in music
  • specific research skills

Careers

The programme is designed with careful consideration of the opportunities, challenges and intellectual demands presented by careers in music, such as:

  • journalism
  • teaching
  • broadcasting
  • librarianship
  • historically informed performance
  • contemporary composition
  • arts administration

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Submission of an essay or college-level paper.
• A video of the candidate teaching a class or coordinating a rehearsal. Candidates may also submit a live or video audition on the candidate’s primary instrument.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Music in Education at the Crane School of Music is one of the largest music teacher preparation programs in the world. Crane-prepared music teachers are sought after by schools everywhere. For years, our students and faculty have held lead- ership positions in local school districts, as well as in state and national organizations that shape our nation’s musical future. The program strives to assist teachers to become reflective practitioners, lifelong learners, and persons able to integrate their knowledge of subject matter, pedagogy, students, the school and the larger community to maximize the education and welfare of students. Program start dates: Summer, Fall, Spring.

Required Program Courses

Option A: Minimum of 30 credit hours, with Thesis
MUCE 601, Philosophies and Issues in Music Education
MUCE 608, Curriculum Development in the School Music Program
MUCE 699, Thesis/Graduate Research Project in Music Education
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCH 611, Introduction to Graduate Studies
MUCH XXX, Music History/Literature Elective
MUCT XXX, Music Theory Elective
MUC XXX, Music Content Course (not Music Education)

Option B: Minimum of 30 credit hours, without Thesis
MUCE 601, Philosophies and Issues in Music Education
MUCE 608, Curriculum Development in the School Music Program
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCH 611, Introduction to Graduate Studies
MUCH XXX, Music History/Literature Elective
MUCT XXX, Music Theory Elective
MUC XXX, Music Content Course (not Music Education)
Two free electives: 6 credit hours

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Uniqueness of Program

Making music is at the heart of every Crane degree program. Our philosophy is that all our students are first and foremost musicians. The Crane School of Music was founded in 1886 and was one of the first institutions in the country to have program dedicated to preparing specialists in teaching music in the public schools. Crane is proud to have many of the finest music educators, scholars and performers in the United States as members of the faculty, all working to make Crane a vital, innovative and exciting place.

Testimonials

“The Crane School of Music is a unique community. It provides a focused and serious environment to grow as an artist while remaining extremely supportive. It was an ideal place for me to develop musically while forging lifelong professional relationships.” —Christopher Still ’93

“Crane provides the full package for students by offering degree programs in just about every area of the music world. There are ample opportunities to perform weekly in a great atmosphere. Performing is fully supported by a wonderful staff of teachers. Crane really prepares you to be successful.” —Mark Sophia ’12

“The degree programs at Crane provide a full and rich education in music and the liberal arts. I’m convinced this balanced and thorough curriculum laid the groundwork for the success I’m now enjoying in my life and career.” —Richard Regan ’91

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Are you fascinated in early music - not just the music of a particular period, but also the approach to performing and thinking about music?. Read more

Are you fascinated in early music - not just the music of a particular period, but also the approach to performing and thinking about music?

Are you interested in learning how the music performance of the past can be used to enhance our understanding today? 

The University’s £16m Bramall Music Building has a world-leading Centre for Early Music Performance and Research (CEMPR), with state-of-the-art facilities. Those wishing to write a dissertation on early music will benefit from access to these facilities, as well as the expertise of staff on a wide range of topics in early music, from the Middle Ages to c.1800.

You will receive specialist supervision as well as training in specific critical and analytical skills to equip you for further study. You will also have the opportunity to participate in one or more of our CEMPR ensembles and receive tuition from the professional performers on our staff, providing an invaluable context for your work.

Course details

Early Music studies have always been a centrepiece of Birmingham’s offerings, and the department includes two early music specialists:

Amy Brosius, specialist in seventeenth-century vocal music; and Andrew Kirkman, scholar of late medieval music and director of early music projects from the fifteenth to the early nineteenth century. In addition, CEMPR has some twenty professional early music performers of international standing on its staff who not only teach early vocal and instrumental techniques and repertoire, but also engage in practice-led research.

You will study two core modules:

  • Introduction to Musicology
  • Advanced Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Music

You will also choose two optional modules from a range which typically includes:

  • British Music Studies
  • Contemporary Music Studies
  • Special Study in Music
  • Studies in Performance Practice

Full descriptions are available below.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by written assignment, and some also require a presentation, examination or practical component. You will also complete a 15,000-word musicology dissertation.

Learning and teaching

Your learning will be enhanced by our extensive facilities, including the Bramall Music Building.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Music

Birmingham's Music postgraduates work in a wide range of careers within and beyond the music world. A postgraduate degree in Music develops a broad base of skills including general skills such as communication, problem solving and research, and also specific skills developed by practice and performance such as self-management, team work and presentation.

Over the past four years, 91% of Music postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Whilst some graduates pursue music-related careers, or go on to teaching and lecturing roles, others choose to use their transferable skills to follow career paths in fields including finance and the public sector.



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The Graduate Diploma programme combines modules from different levels of undergraduate study into a single year. Read more

The Graduate Diploma programme combines modules from different levels of undergraduate study into a single year.

If your first degree isn’t in Music but you have a high level of expertise, or if you’re an international student who isn’t confident in the English language or UK education system, this programme allows you to expand your knowledge of music and focus on the aspects that suit your own interests. It can bridge the gap between an undergraduate and Masters degree, but the GradDip is a respected qualification in its own right.

You’ll study core modules that build your research skills and give you a good grounding in music studies. Then you’ll also choose from optional modules in areas such as performance, composition, music technology, aesthetics, psychology of music or musicology.

This is a flexible programme, so contact us to find out about the level of knowledge and qualifications you may need for different module choices.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. The Special Collections housed in our beautiful Brotherton Library contain significant collections of music manuscripts, rare printed music and letters from composers and critics to help inform your work.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll take a variety of modules that both lay the foundations of musical study and allow you to specialise in the topics that interest you.

You’ll start with a core module that develops your research skills in music, preparing you for the rest of your studies, and choose from introductory modules at Level 1 that give you a background in musical interpretation and the role music continues to play in society.

From this starting point, you’ll build your knowledge with your choice of Level 3 modules – you can take specialist modules where you’ll study different aspects of music in line with the research interests of our staff. Alternatively, you could focus on performance, composition, music technology, editing and source studies or the psychology of music. If there’s a musical topic that particularly interests you, the dissertation will give you the chance to undertake independent research to explore the subject in depth.

If you still need to take further credits to complete the programme after these choices, you’ll then be able to select from Level 2 modules offered across the School of Music.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Music Research Skills 10 credits

Optional modules

  • Understanding Music 20 credits
  • Music in History and Culture 30 credits
  • Composition 20 credits
  • Performance 20 credits
  • Ensemble Performance 20 credits
  • Sound, Technology, and Music 20 credits
  • Introduction to the Psychology of Music 20 credits
  • Interpreting Music 20 credits
  • Composition 20 credits
  • Performance 20 credits
  • Ensemble Performance 20 credits
  • Notation and Editing 20 credits
  • Aesthetics and Criticism 20 credits
  • Music in Practice 20 credits
  • Music in Practice 20 credits
  • Music in Practice 20 credits
  • The Psychology of Listening and Performance 20 credits
  • Special Study in Musicology A 20 credits
  • Special Study in Musicology B 20 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Dissertation 40 credits
  • Composition 40 credits
  • Ensemble Performance 20 credits
  • Applied Project 20 credits
  • Performance 40 credits
  • Editing and Source Studies 40 credits
  • Contemporary Aesthetics 40 credits
  • Music Technology 40 credits
  • Music Psychology40 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Music GradDip in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Because this programme is so flexible, you’ll come across a range of teaching and learning methods depending on the modules you choose. These could include lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as vocal or instrumental lessons with our specialist teachers. Practical sessions and workshops may also be involved.

However, independent study is crucial to this degree, allowing you to build important skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed by diverse methods depending on your module choices. These may include essays, exams and presentations as well as compositions, performances, project work, critical editions and commentaries among others.

Career opportunities

This programme allows you to study undergraduate modules to develop your formal musical education. This means that it leaves you in a good position to progress to MA or MMus study in Music – and as a graduate of the University of Leeds, you will also be eligible for a 10% discount on postgraduate fees.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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British Music Studies is a fast-growing research field in today’s musicology. Read more

British Music Studies is a fast-growing research field in today’s musicology.

This pathway takes the broadest perspective on modern British art music, offering case studies in the work of the ‘great composers’ of the tonal idiom such as Elgar, Vaughan Williams and Britten, evaluation of the Anglican choral tradition and the British symphonic tradition, examination of the problematic status of modernism in British music before 1960, and criticism of modernist and postmodernist composition since World War II. Approaches are critical, analytical and sociological, with some reception history as well.

Course details

British Music Studies is a fast-growing research field in today’s musicology.

This pathway takes the broadest perspective on modern British art music, offering case studies in the work of the ‘great composers’ of the tonal idiom such as Elgar, Vaughan Williams and Britten, evaluation of the Anglican choral tradition and the British symphonic tradition, examination of the problematic status of modernism in British music before 1960, and criticism of modernist and postmodernist composition since World War II. Approaches are critical, analytical and sociological, with some reception history as well.

You will study two core modules:

  • British Music Studies
  • Introduction to Musicology

You will also choose two optional modules from a range which typically includes:

  • Advanced Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Music
  • Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art
  • Contemporary Music Studies
  • Electronic Music Studies
  • Fieldwork Methods
  • Introduction to Global Popular Music Studies
  • Special Study in Music

Full descriptions are available below.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by written assignment, and some also require a presentation or examination. You will also complete a 15,000-word musicology dissertation.

Learning and teaching

Your learning will be enhanced by our facilities and music-making opportunities, including the Bramall Music Building and the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Music

Birmingham's Music postgraduates work in a wide range of careers within and beyond the music world. A postgraduate degree in Music develops a broad base of skills including general skills such as communication, problem solving and research, and also specific skills developed by practice and performance such as self-management, team work and presentation.

Over the past four years, 91% of Music postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Whilst some graduates pursue music-related careers, or go on to teaching and lecturing roles, others choose to use their transferable skills to follow career paths in fields including finance and the public sector.



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The Department of Music offers graduate studies leading to the master of music degree. Students may specialize in composition, music history or performance (instrumental, vocal, opera, conducting). Read more
The Department of Music offers graduate studies leading to the master of music degree. Students may specialize in composition, music history or performance (instrumental, vocal, opera, conducting).

The graduate music program is small, and students receive personal attention from faculty, as well as quality performance opportunities.

Our opera program boasts a professional affiliation with the Tri-Cities Opera (TCO). Opera students are members of the TCO Resident Artist Training Program, where they gain professional experience while completing their studies. Our graduates have gone on to perform in major opera houses around the world.

Graduate Degrees Offered

*MM with track in Opera (associated with the Tri-Cities Opera Company)
* MM with emphasis in one of the following:
- Composition
- Conducting
- History and Literature
- Instrumental performance
- Vocal performance

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Two letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae detailing educational and professional experience
- The GRE is only required for applicants pursuing Music History and Literature emphasis.
- A live audition/interview is also required. For international applicants, the department will consider online audition/interviews via SKYPE or similar technology (contact the graduate director for details).

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

Depending on your desired track or emphasis, you must also submit the following:
- Composition applicants:
*Minimum of two manuscripts and/or recordings of compositions, preferably for differing performing genres. Electronic scores prepared with Finale or Sibelius preferred; hard copies accepted
*Recorded sample of compositions (if possible); live performance recordings preferred

- Conducting applicants:
*Preliminary screening DVD of rehearsal and/or performance conducting an instrumental or vocal ensemble (10-30 minutes)
*A (recent) recording sample, highlighting either:
*the candidate's major instrument
*voice; including a minimum of two composition(s) in contrasting styles

- History and Literature applicants:
*Minimum one writing sample (a research paper in music); two (or more) desirable

- Instrumental Performance applicants:
*Preliminary screening CD or DVD, including a minimum of two compositions in contrasting styles

- Opera and Vocal Performance applicants:
*Preliminary screening CD or DVD, including a minimum of four compositions in contrasting styles (one each in English, French, German and Italian)
*Opera/oratorio and song literature should be included

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This programme builds on one of the department’s newest areas for research and teaching. Uniquely, it focuses on popular music in global, diasporic, transnational, and linguistically diverse forms, reflecting emerging trends in popular music scholarship. Read more

This programme builds on one of the department’s newest areas for research and teaching.

Uniquely, it focuses on popular music in global, diasporic, transnational, and linguistically diverse forms, reflecting emerging trends in popular music scholarship. It moves beyond the traditional focus on album recordings and stage performances to include significant forms of ‘ubiquitous music’, including music in film/TV/advertising/video games. For those wishing to study Anglophone popular music, this approach will enhance the cultural relevance of your work.

Course details

This programme uniquely focuses on popular music in global, diasporic, transnational, and linguistically diverse forms, reflecting emerging trends in popular music scholarship.

It moves beyond the traditional focus on album recordings and stage performances to include significant forms of ‘ubiquitous music’, including music in film/TV/advertising/video games. For those wishing to study Anglophone popular music, this approach will enhance the cultural relevance of your work.

You will study three core modules:

  • Introduction to Global Popular Music Studies
  • Introduction to Musicology
  • Fieldwork Methods

You will also choose one optional module from a range which typically includes:

  • Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art
  • British Music Studies
  • Contemporary Music Studies
  • Electronic Music Studies
  • Special Study in Music

Full descriptions are available below.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by written assignment, and some also require a presentation. You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a subject of your choice.

Learning and teaching

Your learning will be enhanced by our facilities and music-making opportunities, including the Bramall Music Building and the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Music

Birmingham's Music postgraduates work in a wide range of careers within and beyond the music world. A postgraduate degree in Music develops a broad base of skills including general skills such as communication, problem solving and research, and also specific skills developed by practice and performance such as self-management, team work and presentation.

Over the past four years, 91% of Music postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Whilst some graduates pursue music-related careers, or go on to teaching and lecturing roles, others choose to use their transferable skills to follow career paths in fields including finance and the public sector.



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We offer a broad-based MMus programme with three pathways. musicology, performance and composition. All three pathways can be used as professional training for themselves, or as preparation for PhD study. Read more

We offer a broad-based MMus programme with three pathways: musicology, performance and composition. All three pathways can be used as professional training for themselves, or as preparation for PhD study. Students in our MMus programme benefit from intensive one-to-one instruction with world-leading experts in music history, cultural studies of music, performance studies and analysis; internationally noted performers with active solo and ensemble careers; and prominent composers of contemporary art music, electronic music, media music (including film, television and video game music) and jazz.

Introducing your course

Do you want to know how great film scores were composed? Are you interested in the ideas behind musical performances? Expand your knowledge of the components and aspects of music with the MMus Music (Performance, Composition and Musicology) at the University of Southampton and enhance your musical talents. This broad MMus programme will teach you the elements of musical performance, as well as the different genres of music. Gaining this experience across a variety of categories will prepare you for a successful career in the music industry.

Overview

The MMus programme in music provides a flexible course of study. Its goal is a professional research project, recital or composition portfolio. Tutors work with each student from the outset of the course to form a portfolio relevant to the student's specific professional aims, whether further research at doctoral level, a career in the music industry or the wider cultural sector, or work as a teacher or free-lance musician. We recognise that music has increasingly become a 'portfolio career' and aim to provide our MMus students with a platform for success in whatever area of music their aspirations lie. Thus the broad modular structure of our programme allows for cross-over between the pathways.

View the programme specification document for this course



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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• All Performance applicants must audition. For details, please go the auditions area of the Crane School of Music website (http://www.potsdam.edu/academics/Crane/admissions).

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Music in Performance is designed to develop student musicianship and technical expertise through individual study, and through solo, ensemble, and chamber performance opportunities, all under the direction of faculty artists. Music Perfor- mance students can complete their program in three or more semesters during the academic year. Majors include voice, harp, and guitar, along with traditional instruments in the brass, woodwind, string and percussion families. Program start dates: Summer, Fall, Spring.

Required Program Courses

Minimum of 30 credit hours
MUCH 611, Introduction to Graduate Studies
MUCP 640, Literature and Pedagogy
MUCP 681, Chamber Music or MUCP 618, Vocal Coaching
MUCS 630, Performance Concentration
MUCP XXX, Performance Elective
MUCX XXX, Non-Performance Elective

Music Theory and Music History/Literature Electives: 9 credits

Testimonials

“The Crane School of Music is a unique community. It provides a focused and serious environment to grow as an artist while remaining extremely supportive. It was an ideal place for me to develop musically while forging lifelong professional relationships.” —Christopher Still ’93

“Crane provides the full package for students by offering degree programs in just about every area of the music world. There are ample opportunities to perform weekly in a great atmosphere. Performing is fully supported by a wonderful staff of teachers. Crane really prepares you to be successful.” —Mark Sophia ’12

“The degree programs at Crane provide a full and rich education in music and the liberal arts. I’m convinced this balanced and thorough curriculum laid the groundwork for the success I’m now enjoying in my life and career.” —Richard Regan ’91

Uniqueness of Program

Making music is at the heart of every Crane degree program. Our philosophy is that all our students are first and foremost musicians. The Crane School of Music was founded in 1886 and was one of the first institutions in the country to have program dedicated to preparing specialists in teaching music in the public schools. Crane is proud to have many of the finest music educators, scholars and performers in the United States as members of the faculty, all working to make Crane a vital, innovative and exciting place.

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Providing a balance of broad-based study and specialist training, this masters course is designed to meet your needs whether you wish to specialise as preparation for future research or take a more varied set of options as a stand along qualification. Read more

Providing a balance of broad-based study and specialist training, this masters course is designed to meet your needs whether you wish to specialise as preparation for future research or take a more varied set of options as a stand along qualification.

Offering four distinct pathways in CompositionEthnomusicologyMusicology, or Performance, the course allows you to take the initiative in constructing your own study programme with options in areas such as multimedia and film music, performance studies, historical musicology, and acoustic and electronic composition.

You will come away well-versed and well-practised in whatever discipline you choose, verbally and technically fluent, fully conversant with a broad range of issues of concern in current musical and musicological endeavour and able to present your ideas orally, in writing, and through performance and composition.

  • Join one of the largest postgraduate Music communities in the UK (with more than 50 research students and 20 MA students each year)
  • We are ranked third in the UK for research quality (REF 2014) and the only music department in the country to hold a prestigious Regius Professorship.
  • You will have access to well-equipped studios and recording facilities, including a Disklavier, as well as incredible performance spaces including the Windsor Auditorium, Boilerhouse Theatre, Victorian Picture Gallery and College Chapel.
  • Be a part of our creative campus. Choose from a wide range of performance opportunities including a wide range of orchestras and choirs, including the Royal Holloway Symphony Orchestra and Chapel Choir of Royal Holloway, as well as ensembles, music groups and student led music societies.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Skills in Advanced Musical Studies

If taking the Composition Pathway then you will take:

  • Special Study - Composition

If taking the Ethnolomusicology or Musicology Pathway then you will take:

  • Special Study - Dissertation

If taking the Performance Pathway then you will take:

  • Special Study - Performance

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

You will choose four from the following, at least one of which must be related to your chosen pathway:

  • Historical Musicology 1
  • Historical Musicology 2
  • Topics in Multimedia and Film Music
  • Topics in World Music
  • Techniques in Ethnomusicology
  • Documenting Performance
  • Music of the Americas - Politics, Indigeneity and Performance
  • Issues in Popular Music
  • Studies in Musical Sources, 850 to 1450
  • Techniques in Theory and Analysis
  • Short Recital
  • Techniques of Performance Studies
  • Aesthetics of Music
  • Fusion, Electronics, and Sonic Art
  • Media and Commercial Composition
  • Practical Composition Projects
  • Composing for Ensemble

Teaching & assessment

Elective courses are typically assessed by essay (3,000–5,000 words, or two shorter essays), composition portfolio, or performance. At least one of the electives you choose from this list must be in the same area as your Special Study (i.e. in the broad area of ethnomusicology, music history, etc.). Up to two electives may be substituted for course units taken in other departments at Royal Holloway (such as languages or history).

In addition to the Special Study and the four electives, all students take the core 'Skills in Advanced Musical Studies', which consists of five lectures in the first term (leading to a 2,500-word essay) plus a second component chosen from a wide range of different research training options (including seminars at the Institute for Musical Research or Visiting Lecturer series). This component is assessed mostly by essay but there is scope for other kinds of assignment by agreement.

Your future career

Our recent graduates have gone into careers as music teachers, composers and musicians. Others have gone into PhD studies at Royal Holloway or other leading universities, and then into academic careers, with some working in the highest-rated research departments in the country.

Composers at Royal Holloway have their music played and recorded regularly by resident and visiting professional musicians, the Royal Holloway Sinfonietta and, of course, by fellow students. Our award-winning Ensemble-in-Residence CHROMA gives you unrivalled workshop and performance opportunities.

Many Royal Holloway graduates are now making careers as professional composers, including:

  • Tansy Davies
  • Richard Baker
  • KT Tunstall
  • Joby Talbot
  • Michael Zev Gordon
  • Deirdre Gribbin
  • Jonathan Cole
  • Paul Newland


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Research profile. The Reid School of Music offers an exciting research environment that combines the theory, history, composition and practice of music with the scientific study of sound. Read more

Research profile

The Reid School of Music offers an exciting research environment that combines the theory, history, composition and practice of music with the scientific study of sound. We engage with a broad range of genres and traditions, including classical and popular music, Western and non-Western music, professional and amateur music making and music for screen. Our research is highly interdisciplinary, with centres and groups spanning other Colleges and Departments within the University of Edinburgh, from Physics and Neuroscience to Informatics, the Humanities, Divinity and the Social Sciences.

We have a large community of postgraduate students undertaking independent research in music.

If you are interested in undertaking a small independent research project in music, the 12-month MSc by Research is ideal. This programme is offered in any area served by the expertise of our music staff. In consultation with your supervisor you will develop an individual programme of coursework and research training over two semesters. You will submit a dissertation, or portfolio of projects equivalent to 30,000 words.

Candidates for larger-scale, doctoral research are normally admitted as probationary students for the first year of study, and on satisfactory completion of this first year are approved for registration for either MPhil (normally two years full-time, dissertation of 60,000 words) or PhD (maximum four years full-time, dissertation of 80,000–100,000 words).

All our research degrees may be studied part-time (for example, MSc by Research may be studied part-time over two years).

Staff have a wide range of research interests, engaging in research clustered around four main themes:

  • Music, Sound and Technology, including musical acoustics and organology
  • Musical Practice, including composition (electroacoustic, algorithmic, computer music and music for screen), and historical and contemporary performance research
  • Music and the Human Sciences, including music psychology and cognition, and music in the community
  • Music and Social Institutions, including 19th and 20th century musicology, popular music, and music sociology

Some of our current hubs of research activity include:

  • Acoustics and Audio Group
  • ECA Digitals
  • Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments
  • Institute for Music in Human and Social Development
  • Live Music Exchange

Please consult our staff profile pages to see our interests and availability; you may propose projects in any area for consideration.

Training and support

All of our research students benefit from ECA’s interdisciplinary approach and all are assigned two research supervisors. Your second supervisor may be from another discipline within ECA, or from somewhere else within the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences or elsewhere within the University, according to the expertise required. On occasion more than two supervisors will be assigned, particularly where the degree brings together multiple disciplines.



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The Master of Music in Theory is a 30 credit master’s degree preparing the student for a career in the field of music theory and for further graduate studies at the doctoral level. Read more
The Master of Music in Theory is a 30 credit master’s degree preparing the student for a career in the field of music theory and for further graduate studies at the doctoral level.

Learning Outcomes

Composition technique: students will compose music that is expressive, demonstrating the proper techniques in, and related to, the production of a professional-level composition.

Presentation of live compositions: students will present new works for live performers that are well-prepared, demonstrating a high level of individual preparation through engaging in proper rehearsal and performance techniques with collaborating performers.

Electro-acoustic composition technique: students will create new electro-acoustic works that demonstrate skill at executing works that rely on technology.

Score preparation: students will produce musical scores that are professionally notated, and should in all cases be clear, complete, free of errors, and should show attention to detail, including an informative program note for the audience.

Writing about music: students will write analytic papers that are clear and compelling, with proper use of terminology and conventions of musical writing; analysis will display critical listening and thinking skills, and demonstrate knowledge of diverse approaches to music theory and analysis.

Curriculum

Master of Music in Music Theory/Composition students are required to take:

• Composition
• Computer Music
• Form
• Orchestration
• Counterpoint
• Electives in Music History and Music Theory/Composition

Depending on their area of concentration, MM students prepare either a masters thesis (advanced research paper) or a large-scale composition under the supervision of their advisor. Recent MM thesis papers have studied the works of Stravinsky and Bernstein. Recent MM thesis compositions have been written and given their world premieres at WCU, scored for large percussion ensemble, orchestra, and concert band. Graduates from the MM in Theory/Composition program have gone on for more advanced study in composition and/or theory at the doctoral level. Most students from these programs aspire to become college-level instructors, while others have gone on to become freelance composers and arrangers.

All degree requirements must be completed within six years. A single one-year extension may be granted for cause.

Candidates must demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability, sight singing, and aural perception to meet demands of program.

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The post-baccalaureate teacher certification in music education provides a pathway to Pennsylvania Level I Teacher Certification in Music K-12 for candidates who hold a baccalaureate degree in a music field (performance, music theory and composition, or music history and literature). Read more
The post-baccalaureate teacher certification in music education provides a pathway to Pennsylvania Level I Teacher Certification in Music K-12 for candidates who hold a baccalaureate degree in a music field (performance, music theory and composition, or music history and literature). Students who do not hold a baccalaureate degree in music and do not have a significant number of earned credits in music, such as a minor in music, are better served through enrollment in a second baccalaureate degree program with a major in music education. Each student's program will be unique as applications and transcripts are examined on an individual basis and an appropriate course of study designed. Completion of this program usually takes from five to eight semesters of full-time study.

Learning Outcomes

• Content and Pedagogical Specialist: Knows learners, subject matter, and curriculum.
• Assessment and Instructional Designer: Constructs effective learning experiences/outcomes assessments.
• Classroom Community Builder and Diversity Advocate: Values diversity and community in the classroom through practice.
• School and Community Professional: Applies knowledge of the context of education and engages in collaborative activities, partnerships, service, and advocacy.
• Self-Directed Practitioner: Directs personal growth, professional practice, and reflective practice.

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The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. Read more

The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. London College of Music (LCM) at the University of West London is at the forefront of the academic study of music technology in general - and popular electronic music composition in particular.

Course detail

The course encompasses a broad range of electronic music, from popular electronic dance music styles to art forms such as electroacoustic music. It assumes you have a level of competence in composition or music sequencing and production. Composition studies include one-to-one tutorials in an area of electronic music that you will negotiate with your lecturer.

You will also examine the history and concepts of electronic music, the creation of sound installations and live performances, together with options that include the theory and practice of sequencing, sound synthesis, sampling, production techniques and the use of Max/MSP.

This course helps you build a wide range of skills, knowledge and creative strategies essential for a successful career in the contemporary, fast-changing music industry - or as a springboard to further postgraduate study at PhD level.

Modules

Core modules:

  • Electronic Music Composition 1 
  • Developing Your Career 
  • Electronic Music Composition 2 
  • Interactive Music Technology 
  • Research Methods 
  • Dissertation or Project.

Plus one option from:

  • Digital Audio Interface Design for Music 
  • Advanced Recording Techniques 
  • Performance in the Studio.

…and one option from:

  • Advanced Non-Linear Recording 
  • Combining Sounds 
  • The Development of Audio Technology 
  • Manipulating Sounds 
  • Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround.

Format

The department's extensive research in this subject area means our teaching is informed directly by the world's most up-to-date ideas on the academic study of record production. Also, our teaching staff are renowned for their professional expertise.

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, practical workshops, seminars and tutorial discussions. Our teaching rooms are equipped with ProTools HD systems, Audient mixing consoles and C24 control surfaces, and lectures involve frequent practical demonstrations and examples.

The contact hours for the course are concentrated into two days for full-time and one day for part-time students. For the rest of week you will book your own studio and computer time to complete your assignments and develop your composing skills, network, create music with other LCM students and engage in self-directed study. The course runs for a complete year - normally September to September - in full-time mode and two years for part-time.

Career and study progression

This course will equip you with an enviable set of skills that will enable you to succeed in the fast-changing music industry.

Some examples of the professional roles graduates have progressed to after completing the course include:

• Composer

• Sound Designer

• Remixer.

After completing the course you can continue your studies with either a PhD or DMus at the University of West London.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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