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Masters Degrees (Music For The Moving Image)

We have 36 Masters Degrees (Music For The Moving Image)

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Writing music for the moving image requires a unique combination of technical and creative skills. You will gain a solid grounding in the theories, techniques and practices essential for contemporary film and television music production. Read more
Writing music for the moving image requires a unique combination of technical and creative skills. You will gain a solid grounding in the theories, techniques and practices essential for contemporary film and television music production.

You will work with award-winning composers from the film and television industry on real-life projects. After developing your composition skills in a range of genres, you will also have the chance to work with colleagues from other media courses to develop your portfolio of work.

You will have access to a suite of high-quality professional music studios approved by JAMES, the accrediting body of the Music Producers Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services.

We also have links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations as well as our very own Northern Film School, ensuring you have plenty of opportunities to sharpen your practical skills.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including in music, drama, dance and performing arts.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/musicmovingimage_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Your course will give you the skills you need to help you create high-quality music for the moving image, film, television and media industries.

- Television Music Composer
- Film Score Composer
- Music Technologist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will have access to a suite of high-quality, professional music studios, approved by JAMES, the accrediting body of the Music Producers Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services.

We have links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, as well as our very own Northern Film School, which ensures that you get the most from your course. We also provide regular visiting speakers from the music and film industries and a highly-skilled and experienced teaching team.

Core Modules

Collaborative Practice
Experience the collaborative working environment and develop your skills in fulfilling complex briefs.

Composing to Picture
Address the challenges of producing music for the moving image.

Film Music Analysis
Develop analysis techniques to enhance your understanding of historical, musical, stylistic and functional developments in film music.

Creative Sound Design
Gain the knowledge and skills you need to develop audio-based artefacts in the fields of electro-acoustic music, sonic art and sound design.

Research Practice
Examine the methods and skills which are required in order to carry out research into the ideas and practice of music technology.

Sound, Music & Image
Evaluate the relationships between sound, music and image, and devise and create examples of audio-visual media to a professional standard.

The Major Individual Project
This major project gives you the opportunity to engage in research and advanced practice in an area of your own choosing.

Negotiated Skills Development
Work closely with your tutors, researching and applying current theory and practice alongside a learning plan that meets your own aims and objectives.

Electro-acoustic Music
Explore the techniques and methods employed in electroacoustic composition and use those techniques and methods to create an original composition.

Orchestration Arrangement & Programming
Study contemporary approaches to orchestration and arrangement of music for the moving image and create scores and MIDI realisations to a professional standard.

Facilities

- Music Studios
"Being able to work in such good facilities gave me a buzz – I loved working in the studios." Piers Aggett of chart-topping, MOBO award-winning Rudimental

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in 100 acres of parkland with easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. Read more
The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. The moving image is explored in relation to the development of modern and contemporary culture, and to the history and theory of other media (literature, music, the visual arts, architecture, the digital). Students are immersed in a research environment that emphasises work on geopolitics, early cinema, art cinema and the avant garde, theory, aesthetics, and gender and sexuality. The programme consists of a core course, taken in the first term, which provides the foundation for further study; two optional modules, taken in the second term, which combine the analysis of film and screen media with the analysis of their social and cultural milieus, or else undertake the study of these forms in a comparative context; and a dissertation. Although not all students may wish to progress to higher research, this MPhil programme is designed to prepare for continuation to PhD work. This preparation includes the academic and research training provided by the course content itself but also advice and support with PhD applications, funding applications and the drafting of a research proposal.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmmmmpsmc

Course detail

By the end of the programme students will have:

1. developed a deeper knowledge of the history and theory of film and other screen media in cultural context;
2. developed an understanding of the debates which have shaped that field of study, and of current research methods;
3. acquired and consolidated intensive specialist knowledge of their chosen research areas and skills appropriate to advanced study in those areas;
4. demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research
5. participated effectively in seminar discussions and research events;
6. learnt how to plan independent research in order to produce written work of a high standard to a clearly defined deadline.

Format

The Screen Media MPhil is a nine-month course that runs from October to June of any given academic year. It is classified as a research Master's. Students are expected to submit coursework and a thesis during the year, as follows:

Michaelmas Term: Core Course

During the first term of study, students attend weekly seminars and film screenings designed to give them a broad insight into moving image theory and culture. Half of the Core Course focuses on combining the study of classical and contemporary film and visual theory; the other half hones in on specialized historiographic and theoretical problems in the study of moving image media. The Course is, thus, both intensively grounding and intellectually expansive. At the end of this term, students submit one 4,500-word essay. The essay focuses on a specific theoretical framework or critical approach. Two hours of individual supervision are provided.

Lent Term: Modules

Screen Media students can choose from a range of module options. Some focus on the moving image, others are shared with different MPhils (e.g. European Literature & Culture, or Criticism and Culture) and other departments and Faculties within the University, such as Architecture & History of Art, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, English, and Latin American Studies, among others. (The list of modules can change from year to year depending on the availability of academic staff.)

During Lent Term, students attend weekly group seminars led by the module covenor, lasting around 1.5 to 2 hours per week per module. In addition, two hours of individual supervision (per essay) will be provided as students draft their module essays. Essays are submitted at the end of Lent Term.

Lent term modules may include:

- Modern and Contemporary French and Francophone Culture: Articulations of the Real
- Avant Garde and Experimental Cinemas
- The Modern City
- New Commitments: Literature, Cinema and Culture in Italy, 1960 to present
- Urban Cinematics
- Deconstructing Film
- Online Video: Creation, Consumption, Revolution
- Surveillance
- Latin American Film and Visual Arts

Assessment - Easter Term

During this term, students write a thesis. Theses must, according to the criteria laid down by the Board of Graduate Studies, 'represent a contribution to learning'. Theses must be written in English. The arrangements for their preparation are similar to those for the essays. Titles are chosen by students, in consultation with module convenors and/or prospective supervisors, and then have to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee.

Topics and precise thesis titles must be submitted by a specific deadline in Lent Term. Up to this point the Course Director is the titular supervisor of MPhil students, but once the thesis topics are approved, a specialist supervisor is appointed for each student. Students are entitled to up to four hour-long sessions with their supervisor. (In the event that a thesis is co-supervised, a candidate may expect two hours of individual teaching from each supervisor. Only one supervisor should comment on the full draft of the thesis.)

Research Events

Students are expected to take part in fortnightly research events that take place across the Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Leading scholars in film and screen studies will deliver lectures and also meet with students in master class seminars. Students are asked to compile an (unassessed) dossier of critical responses to these events. Participation in these events allows students to engage intensely but also informally with innovative researchers.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).
Applications to the MPhil are automatically considered for AHRC funding, however you must apply by the relevant funding deadline.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This specialist programme will enable students to develop advanced knowledge and skills in film production, developing through the course a career specialism in directing, editing, production, camera or sound production. Read more

This specialist programme will enable students to develop advanced knowledge and skills in film production, developing through the course a career specialism in directing, editing, production, camera or sound production.

The programme is distinctive as students will learn and study within the complex and immersive environment of a conservatoire drama school, with substantial access to highly talented acting students and the industry-standard facilities required of this high level vocational training. The skills and experience gained in their chosen area of specialism will enable them to seek employment in the professional film, television and independent film production industry on successful completion of the course.

The course will run for 38 weeks and recruitment will be limited to five students. Each will develop their own distinct specialism within a production team (director, editor, producer, camera, sound production) and they will work together as a unit across four of the five core modules.

These modules are:

1. Moving Image Production

2. Drama Production for the Small Screen

3. Short Film Production (Client-led Film)

4. Short Film Production (Drama)

5. Preparation for Working in the Film Industry

The fifth module is taken individually through a specialist industry placement related to the student’s designated specialism.

The overall aims of the programme are:

• To enable students to develop specific technical and project management skills in film production, primarily drama;

• To enable students to learn skills in leadership and creative problem-solving;

• To enable students to develop a specialism within the key areas of film production (directing, editing, producing, camera, sound production)

• To develop a high level of personal, social and environmental responsibility in working to professional schedules, disciplines and practice, including risk assessment and carbon emission reduction.

• To provide experience and build confidence to engage with industry professionals and develop their career management skills;

A copy of the rules and regulations governing the course is available consult the BOVTS policies and procedures page.

Module map

This module map provides a list of the modules that make up your course.

Each module is worth a specified number of credits, enabling you to cover key subject knowledge while developing your own interests.

  • Module Number: UAMN96-30-M, Module Name: Moving Image Production
  • Module Number: UAMN97-45-M, Module Name: Drama Production for the Small Screen
  • Module Number: UAMN98-45-M, Module Name: Short Film Production – Client-led Film
  • Module Number: UAMN99-45-M, Module Name: Short Film Production – Drama
  • Module Number: UAMNA5-15-M, Module Name: Preparation for work in the Film Industry

Optional Modules: There are no optional modules for this award

Interim Awards: PG Cert Film Production (60 Credits), PG Dip Film Production (120 Credits)

Credit requirements: 180 credits from the above modules for MA Film Production

Award: MA Film Production

Teaching and Learning

Students learn within a conservatoire environment in which they are regarded as professionals in training. At this Masters level in Film Production, there is an expectation that they will develop a high level of problem solving skills, engage at an advanced level of critical evaluation of their practice and acquire the creative thinking required of film makers working in a practical, complex creative and employment-focused environment.

Students are immersed in this challenging environment, which demands great attention to detail, independent thinking, and collaborative working combined with diplomatic negotiating and leadership skills.

The programme is practical and career focused. It is integrated with the school’s other programmes during productions, as well as within the professional environment. The programme features a high level of one-to-one teaching by specialist professionals.

The learning is immersive and singular in its focus on high level specialist professional employability as a main learning outcome.

The learning is intensive with students taught and supervised by teaching staff at least 30 hours per week across the 38 weeks of the programme.

How to Apply

To apply for entry to the MA Film Production programme in October 2018, you will need to use the UCAS Conservatoires.

To apply for this course please click here: click here to apply via the UCAS website in a new tab

Applications open on the 1 September 2017 and close on 28th February 2018.

Please note that UCAS Conservatoires is a different application system to UCAS Undergraduate.

Applying Through UCAS Conservatoires

Although UCAS Conservatoires (previously CUKAS) offers many advantages, it was originally designed to handle applications for music programmes at UK conservatoires and is in the process of being adapted to meet the needs of drama applicants.

We are working with UCAS Conservatoires and other drama schools to ensure this happens as quickly as possible but, in the meantime, you may find the following notes helpful.

Additional Guidance on How to Apply

Registration and Audition Fees

There is a one-off registration fee of £25 to register (for entry 2018) to use the service. The Bristol Old Vic Theatre School also charges an audition administration fee of £35 to cover the cost involved in arranging and delivering auditions/interviews. Both fees are payable through UCAS Conservatoires.

Personal Statements

We recommend that you pay particular attention to the information you provide in your personal statement on your application form in order to give us as full a picture as possible of your relevant experience and reasons for applying.

Application Dates

You can apply through UCAS Conservatoires from the 1 September 2017. The equal consideration deadline for applications to the MA Film Production programme is 15 January 2018. However our applications for this course will close on 28th February 2018.

If you have any further queries please contact the Admissions Department to discuss: 

Deferred Entry

We are unable to consider applications for deferred entry.



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This MMus builds on our international reputation in the popular music field, as seen in the success of our BMus graduates. Read more

This MMus builds on our international reputation in the popular music field, as seen in the success of our BMus graduates.

The programme offers you the opportunity to reflect critically upon your own creative practice – whether that consists of performance, songwriting, arranging, production, or collaboration – and to integrate theoretical perspectives from contemporary popular music studies.

You’ll also be able to extend your own practice through options in sonic and studio art, advanced music technology, exploration in audiovisual media, and ethnomusicology.

The MMus in Popular Music is intended for music creators who integrate these elements in the compositional, recording and performance work.

You’ll acquire graduate-level training in creative practice and subject-specific skills that could set you up for a career as a composer-performer or studio practitioner/producer, as well as other employment within the popular music sector.

This programme is distinguished by:

  • Quality - We have an international reputation and proven leadership in the field, evidenced in the success of our BMus Popular Music alumni
  • Innovation - The unique combination of theory and practice allows for forward-thinking, innovative practice-as-research through popular music
  • Industry links - You can benefit from our proximity to central London, our links with music industry professionals, and our record label, NX Records, run in collaboration with Matthew Herbert and Accidental Records.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Elective modules

You choose two modules from a list that currently includes: 

Skills & careers

Employability and cultural entrepreneurship is in our DNA

Graduates may progress to be composer-performers, studio practitioners/producers and music industry employees within the popular music sector. Older students who have returned to advance their knowledge and practice base will be better positioned in the job market. 

We are also able to offer a series of employability/placement/internship style opportunities to include:

  • the Music Professional Practice scheme - a departmental scheme supporting final year undergraduate and MMus/MA students with employability concerns
  • Music Management Course - specifically assesses students on cultural entrepreneurship and their own real world music projects
  • NX records - the departmental record label in association with Matthew Herbert and Accidental Records
  • PureGold festival - the annual departmental festival launched at the Southbank centre
  • Simon Says - showcase events in collaboration with Goldsmiths Students' Union
  • Goldsmiths Vocal Ensemble - recent performances at Glastonbury, the Southbank Centre and Shepherds Bush Empire

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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With the MMus programme you can extend your existing knowledge and skills with advanced academic and/or professional training in performance, which is designed to help you reach a professional level of competence by the end of the course. Read more
With the MMus programme you can extend your existing knowledge and skills with advanced academic and/or professional training in performance, which is designed to help you reach a professional level of competence by the end of the course.

Through the modular structure of all Masters degrees at the University, we tailor our teaching to your needs and interests.

In addition to your performance study, you'll also take a package of Research and Practical Skills customised according to your interests or needs. Performance accounts for 120 of the 180 credits in the flexible modular scheme: 30 credits for the coursework in each of the two semesters and 60 for the final recital.

Please note that we also offer MRes Music options in Composition, Musicology, and Popular Music Studies.

Key Facts

REF 2014
In the latest Research Excellence Framework, we increased the proportion of 4* research from 10% (in the RAE 2008)to 32%, with 40% of impact rated 4* (outstanding) and 50% of environment rated 4* (world-leading).

Why School of Music?

Strong research culture

Across the School, our research activity has a strong interdisciplinary nature and is concentrated in three cross-cutting areas:-

Critical and Contextual Approaches
Creative Practice
Media and Industry Studies.

We're at the forefront of research and postgraduate teaching. Our Institute of Popular Music (IPM) was the first academic centre created specifically to study popular music – and where better than in the home of the Beatles? It also boasts an enviable archive of donated recorded material.

Staff and students contribute fully to our research areas, which are informed by the broadly defined fields of:

Critical theory
Musicology
Music Analysis
Music and the moving image (including new media)
Ethnomusicology
Composition
Music industries
Media and cultural studies.

Research students participate fully in our research activity. They present papers at the School’s research seminars, work as Teaching Assistants within the School (with pedagogical training and support provided). There are also weekly research, career, and teaching seminars for all postgrads.

As a postgraduate student you'll be able to attend research seminars involving guest speakers from many disciplines and subdisciplines. You'll also be closely involved in classical, traditional and popular music concerts performed by professional musicians and students.

Composer Kenneth Hesketh and conductor Vasily Petrenko from the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic - neighbours with whom we have launched a partnership - have recently been made honorary professors of Music at Liverpool.

Career prospects

Students from the taught postgraduate programmes in the School of Music have gone on to a wide range of careers, including various positions in the music industries, museums, arts administration, journalism, publishing, and teaching. PhDs from the School of Music are in full-time lectureships around the world (e.g. Canada, Sweden). The MMus and MA in Popular Music and Music Industry Studies have been recognised by the AHRC as appropriate training for advanced research and all three pathways prepare students for a level of further training equivalent to doctoral study.

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The Masters of Design (M.Des) in Sound for the Moving Image offers the opportunity for postgraduate students to engage with the craft and creative practice of sound production applied to film, animation, television, new media, electronic games and visual art, as well as equipping students with the tools required to develop a research project within this field. Read more
The Masters of Design (M.Des) in Sound for the Moving Image offers the opportunity for postgraduate students to engage with the craft and creative practice of sound production applied to film, animation, television, new media, electronic games and visual art, as well as equipping students with the tools required to develop a research project within this field. The programme promotes production of original work, through individual or group-based research, that is conceptually-driven, aesthetically challenging and wide-ranging in its use of sound design and music production/compostion.

The programme is delivered via a series of taught workshops, set and elective projects, lecture and seminar based sessions, and self-directed learning. The emphasis of the programme rationale is the interplay between creative practices underpinned by theoretical research, mediated through the craft elements of sound production within a visual environment. Students will be expected to engage in a high level of self-directed learning, research and independent critical reflection, as well as participating in the taught elements of study.

The programme prepares students for entry into a professional sound production environment, to enhance their creative practice with sound and sonic art, or for further academic study by research. Opportunities for further research can be accessed within The Glasgow School of Art or in the wider academic community, and will be driven by the ethos of research underpinning the programme. Current trends and emerging methodologies in professional practice will be defined by a visiting lecturer timetable bringing students into contact with established practitioners within the field of sound for the moving image.

Past students have won a range of awards including recent wins for Scottish BAFTA New Talent, and Sound Design work on award winning films.

Part time study is also available. Please see the Part Time Study Guide for more information.

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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more

This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

About this degree

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement.

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to 5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Internet Technologies
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

Optional modules

Students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following: 

  • Affective Interaction
  • Computer Music
  • Cultural Heritage and Development
  • Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Fundamentals of Information Science
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Interaction Design
  • Systems Management
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Research Skills for Spatial Analysis
  • Systems Management
  • The Anthropology of Social Media
  • User-centred Evaluation Methods

Optional modules are offered subject to availability, and students may be required to fulfil specific prerequisites.

Dissertation/report

All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercises, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement

Students undertake a 4-6 week work placement as part of their programme of study. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Humanities MA/MSc

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, UNESCO, International Red Cross, Knowledge 4 All Foundation, and the British Medical Journal, in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Employability

The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lectures given by experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Come and study with the pioneer of Music Industry Studies at MA level within the UK. This MA will give you an advanced and discerning knowledge of music industry practices, drawing on our international research and the experience of our tutors. Read more
Come and study with the pioneer of Music Industry Studies at MA level within the UK.

This MA will give you an advanced and discerning knowledge of music industry practices, drawing on our international research and the experience of our tutors. On it you'll investigate current music industry practices in-depth.

The programme is taught alongside the Masters programme in Popular Music Studies, which will broaden your theoretical understanding and opportunities for research. We anticipate class sizes to be between 15 and 20 students.

All postgraduates also have access to the department's programme of research seminars and performances.

Key Facts

REF 2014
In the latest Research Excellence Framework, we increased the proportion of 4* research from 10% (in the RAE 2008)to 32%, with 40% of impact rated 4* (outstanding) and 50% of environment rated 4* (world-leading).

Why School of Music?

Strong research culture

Across the School, our research activity has a strong interdisciplinary nature and is concentrated in three cross-cutting areas:-

Critical and Contextual Approaches
Creative Practice
Media and Industry Studies.

We're at the forefront of research and postgraduate teaching. Our Institute of Popular Music (IPM) was the first academic centre created specifically to study popular music – and where better than in the home of the Beatles? It also boasts an enviable archive of donated recorded material.

Staff and students contribute fully to our research areas, which are informed by the broadly defined fields of:

Critical theory
Musicology
Music Analysis
Music and the moving image (including new media)
Ethnomusicology
Composition
Music industries
Media and cultural studies.

Research students participate fully in our research activity. They present papers at the School’s research seminars, work as Teaching Assistants within the School (with pedagogical training and support provided). There are also weekly research, career, and teaching seminars for all postgrads.

As a postgraduate student you'll be able to attend research seminars involving guest speakers from many disciplines and subdisciplines. You'll also be closely involved in classical, traditional and popular music concerts performed by professional musicians and students.

Composer Kenneth Hesketh and conductor Vasily Petrenko from the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic - neighbours with whom we have launched a partnership - have recently been made honorary professors of Music at Liverpool.

Career prospects

Students from the taught postgraduate programmes in the School of Music have gone on to a wide range of careers, including various positions in the music industries, museums, arts administration, journalism, publishing, and teaching. PhDs from the School of Music are in full-time lectureships around the world (e.g. Canada, Sweden). The MMus and MA in Popular Music and Music Industry Studies have been recognised by the AHRC as appropriate training for advanced research and all three pathways prepare students for a level of further training equivalent to doctoral study.

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In the MA for Sound Arts you will explore sound as a creative medium at an advanced level, and focus on the areas that interest you most. Read more

In the MA for Sound Arts you will explore sound as a creative medium at an advanced level, and focus on the areas that interest you most. We’ll help you develop the technical skills you need, but the course is about sound more than technology, and values lo-tech and no-tech as much as the latest technological developments.

You can work in any music genre, and/or cover areas such as soundscape recording and sound design, interactive audio (for applications such as live performance, gaming, VR, immersive environments and installations), spatial audio, hardware/software (instrument) design and interdisciplinary practice incorporating other media.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The course caters for those working in a wide variety of music genres, and at the same time also covers areas of practice such as soundscape recording and sound design, interactive audio, spatial audio, hardware/software design and interdisciplinary practice incorporating other media. Most students won’t cover all of these areas, but will use the course to develop an individually-tailored portfolio of skills, experience and top-level work across them.

Most students won’t cover all of these areas, but will use the course to develop an individually-tailored portfolio of skills, experience and top-level work across them. We believe this to be appropriate to the current employment landscape where many combine traditional roles in music with broader practice in sound and other media. The course also provides the breadth necessary for FE and HE teaching in this field, and provides a basis where required for PhD research and beyond.

MODULES

In trimester one, you'll gain the skills you’ll need to fulfil the rest of the course. The Skills Portfolio module is built on the idea that you’ll already have technical skills in this area. It therefore allows you to choose a handful of skills projects from a large number of options – these cover skills right across the Sound Arts, Sound Design and Sound Production pathways and include (optional) elements of multimedia.

The Research Methodology and Context module develops skills in postgraduate-level research and writing.

In trimester two, you'll study the Sonic Architecture module. This is intended as an expansion of traditional music composition teaching, where the aesthetic aspects of individual work will be examined and developed.

Alongside this core module, you’ll be offered a wide range of options.The Visual Music module explores the idea that musical thinking can be extended to the visual. Intertextuality in Sound Production, from the Sound Production pathway, explores the overlap between Urban Music production. Post Production, from the Sound Design pathway, explores an industry-level workflow for Audio Post for picture.

There are also choices in Composition, Performance, Musicology and Professional Practice.

In trimester three, you'll complete the course with a independent research project, compromising of a large-scale practical project. Allowing you to develop your own individual and original research area.

For detailed information on modules, please visit the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-arts/

TEACHING METHODS

Most modules are taught through small-group seminars and workshops, where you’ll benefit from close interaction with tutors and peers. The Major Project and parts of the other modules are taught through individual tutorials where the focus will be entirely on your own practice.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

You’ll be assessed entirely on coursework. The majority of this will be practical and creative work, including the dissertation-equivalent Major Project. Some practical projects are accompanied by short informal written assignments, and for the Research Methodology and Context module you’ll produce a more substantial paper.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Our graduates have range of successful careers in production, composition, music for film and TV, sound design for moving image and games, sound art, software development, engineering, further education, higher education and research.

MA Sound is a new course – this is based on MMus Creative Sound and Media Technology, which is its predecessor.

For information on facilities and resources, please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-arts/



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*New for 2017, subject to final approval. The MA in Sound Design is a forward thinking course, which invites you to explore the creative use of sound within film and other visual media at an advanced level. Read more

*New for 2017, subject to final approval.

The MA in Sound Design is a forward thinking course, which invites you to explore the creative use of sound within film and other visual media at an advanced level. The course focuses on the more creative aspects of sound design and post-production while providing you with the necessary technical skills.

You’ll develop your work within your areas of interest without stylistic boundaries. The content areas include:

• Sound editing (production audio, dialogue/ADR, SFX, music)

• The language and aesthetics of sound design (narrative, dramaturgy)

• Foley

• Field recording

• Sound sculpting and processing

• Working with directors

• Post-production workflows

• Dubbing

• Surround sound

• VR audio

• Industry deliverables

COURSE STRUCTURE

The course delivers a mixture of advanced technical skills related to sound design and audio post production for film and other visual media. It also provides creatively-oriented insights into contemporary sound design practice and encourages students to push the boundaries of the field. Subject areas include:

• Sound sculpting, processing and synthesis

• The language and aesthetics of sound design

• Storytelling and dramaturgy

MA Sound Design is part of a suite of postgraduate courses available across music and sound, operating alongside ‘sister’ pathways in Sound Production and Sound Arts, which allow further specialism in these areas.

For more information on the course structure, please go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-design/

MODULES

In trimester one, you'll gain the skills you’ll need to fulfil the rest of the course. The Skills Portfolio module is built on the idea that you’ll already have technical skills in this area. It therefore allows you to choose a handful of skills projects from a large number of options – these cover skills right across the Sound Arts, Sound Design and Sound Production pathways and include (optional) elements of multimedia.

The Research Methodology and Context module develops skills in postgraduate-level research and writing.

In trimester two, the core module is the Sound Design Practice module. It explores the creative and practical application of Sound Design within a visual narrative and storytelling context.

Alongside this core module, you’ll be offered a wide range of options. The Post Production module explores an industry-level workflow for Audio Post within film and visual media and covers a wide range of associated skillsets. Intertextuality in Sound Production, from the Sound Production pathway, explores the overlap between Urban Music production and what are considered more experimental genres. The Visual Music module, from the Sound Arts pathway, explores the idea that musical thinking can be extended to the visual, and encourages students to develop multimedia projects that explore this idea.

There are also choices in Composition, Performance, Musicology and Professional Practice.

In trimester three, you'll complete the course with a independent research project, compromising of a large-scale practical project, supported by a reflective account.

For more information on modules please visit the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-design/

TEACHING METHODS

The delivery of the course involves a mixture of teaching and learning activities, including lectures, workshops, seminars, online study materials and guest speaker sessions.

The workshop / seminar sessions will include ongoing peer review and tutor support opportunities. Some parts of the course are delivered using a ‘flipped classroom’ model, where students independently work through online study materials and tasks, which are followed up by practical support workshops.

ASSESSMENT

The assessment is majorly based around practical coursework, with the aim to build an extensive portfolio of sound design and post production work. Practical coursework is typically supported by a written commentary or evaluation. The Research Methodology and Context module is assessed through a more substantial written paper.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

You can use the course to develop an individually-tailored portfolio of skills. This will equip you for the current employment landscape, where a combination of traditional audio post production roles are required alongside broader practice in sound, music and other media.

Our graduates have range of successful careers in production, composition, music for film and TV, sound design for moving image and games, sound art, software development, engineering, further education, higher education and research.



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This course is designed for composers aspiring to work in the media industry and wanting to learn more about techniques for composing and producing music for film and TV. Read more
This course is designed for composers aspiring to work in the media industry and wanting to learn more about techniques for composing and producing music for film and TV. Taught by experienced professional film/TV composers, it provides an opportunity to collaborate with filmmakers and animators, as well as the chance to write for ensembles.

Key features
-The curriculum is enriched by a broad view of musical styles and genres, exploiting the diversity of a repertoire that encompasses Western classical music, popular and world musics.
-The wide selection of option modules (see the course webpage) allows you to tailor the course to your interests. The major project also enables you to compose an extensive piece of music to picture and work with filmmakers, enhancing your research and project development skills.
-There is a wide range of music groups at Kingston University, ranging from a chamber choir to Javanese gamelan, and you will have the chance to write for a range of ensembles, including the professional ensemble in residence.
-There are many possibilities for collaboration with filmmaking and animation students.

What will you study?

You will compose music for moving image and work with filmmakers, screen designers and animators. You will analyse film and TV scores, exploring how music is used to create atmosphere, convey mood and depict setting, character and action. In addition, you will explore the relationships between composer and producer, directors and music editors. You will also study and practise the use of main themes, underscoring and the harmonic languages of soundtracks. There will be an opportunity to have your compositions performed by a professional ensemble, conducted to picture in a professional recording environment. You will also learn about the technology used to produce high-quality soundtracks for the music industry, as well as business and copyright issues.

Assessment

Compositions, soundtracks, essays, presentations, research projects, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Major Project
-Professional and Live Aspects of Composing for Film and Television
-Researching Music
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television

Optional modules
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-Performance Studies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

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This course develops skills in computer animation, computer games technology, film and television, or music technology. It is driven by the design and application of the latest hardware, software and techniques to produce creative and innovative media artefacts. Read more

Why take this course?

This course develops skills in computer animation, computer games technology, film and television, or music technology. It is driven by the design and application of the latest hardware, software and techniques to produce creative and innovative media artefacts. These could be focused on industry-related developments but equally you could test an idea or propose a new idea to address novel research problems.

MSc Creative Technologies is centred on a bespoke project chosen by you. This allows you to define the focus of your work and gain the hands-on experience of designing, creating and managing your media development or research programme.

You will be equipped with the technical, academic and professional skills required to pursue a career in your chosen industry. Your project will lead to an exit award of either:

MSc Computer Animation
MSc Computer Games Technology
MSc Film and Television
MSc Music Technology

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Focus on a problem to develop excellent portfolio work
Design and develop software, systems, 2D/3D assets, and innovative solutions
Use our sound/music studios and multimedia labs, accessing high-spec computing facilities
Utilise our industry-standard game content creation software, VR hardware, motion capture facilities and console development kits
Access the latest digital film equipment through our loan store, including the C300, EX3 and Canon 7D cameras and the Mix Pre-D portable sound mixer
Have the opportunity to engage in client-based research

What opportunities might it lead to?

Our course specialises in developing a wide range of analytical and problem-solving skills to support you in becoming a critically-reflective practitioner in a range of technology-related careers. In an age where media content providers are looking for cross-platform solutions to moving image digital design and production, the specialist knowledge our graduates attain leave them in a particularly strong position.

Depending on your project choice, you’ll be prepared to find employment internationally within the computer games industry, Virtual Reality, film or broadcast industries, training, healthcare and simulation or music industries. In addition, previous graduates have started their careers as freelancers, independent developers or continued onto PhD study.

Our students have pursued a wide range of project topics, including:

Computer games programming and technical design
Virtual Reality for healthcare
Education, training and simulation
3D modelling
Sound Design
Animation design
Motion capture
Cross platform film production
Online audio visual archiving

Module Details

Promoting careful planning, implementation and reflection on subject-related issues, this course will encourage you to build on your previous creative and technical expertise.

You will have the opportunity to research, design and develop a major artefact, prototype or study. In addition to one-to-one academic guidance from two project supervisors, the lifecycle of your project is also supported by self-directed taught units that take a project from start to finish:

Context and Definition: Identifying the background, scope and context of your project, and formulating a project plan.
Professional, Academic and Research Development: Identifying your own strengths, areas for development and refined career goals.
Project Design and Development: Shaping the project as it comes together and responding proactively to development issues.
Project Evaluation and Resolution: Acting upon feedback from the project to refine the outcome, before reflecting upon and evaluating your success.

Programme Assessment

This course encourages individual exploration and research along with opportunities to demonstrate this knowledge within your specialist area of interest. Particular emphasis is placed on your ability to define, implement, evaluate and reflect on subject related issues.

Formal assessment will include written materials, such as project proposals, research or development papers and reflective reports. This, along with completed artefacts, will form the assessment. In addition, presentations during the programme will allow the development of your ability to contextually justify your work.

Student Destinations

The rapid growth of the media industries, along with the advancing nature of technology, means that the demand for specialist skills in creative technologies is on the rise.

Depending on the focus of your self-directed project and your specific career plans, you can develop skills to work in the film and broadcast industries, games design, programming, art production and virtual reality development. The leisure and entertainment sector has an increasing number of opportunities in the field of music technology.

Other areas where you may find employment include education, health and business, which rely on audio specialists for the development of audio systems, software and interfaces, installation and monitoring, through to contextual acoustic research.

In addition, there is a growing demand for delivering cross-platform content as part of regional and international convergence projects, such as cross media solutions on TV, the web and social media, or across social venues, mobile phone devices and the home.

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Do you have aspirations of becoming a writer, director or producer? We’ll help you develop the skills necessary for a career working in the film industry. Read more

Do you have aspirations of becoming a writer, director or producer? We’ll help you develop the skills necessary for a career working in the film industry.

Delivered at our Production Hub at Paintworks in Bristol and our Newton Park Campus, we provide an environment which nurtures and inspires creative vision, including storytelling. You’ll also have access to the University’s postgraduate campus at Corsham Court.

Oscar winning producer, Lord David Puttnam, contributes to the teaching of the programme in the form of a customised module.

COURSE STRUCTURE

We teach you how modern filmmakers work, alongside offering practical experience. You should graduate with:

• A range of professional contacts.

• A showreel.

• The knowledge to get ahead in the film business.

You’ll create a portfolio detailing your preparations for the delivery of a short moving image production. This project could take the form of a short narrative film, documentary, animation, music video or digital marketing strategy.

We’ll encourage you to make your proposed project, however, your success in academic terms doesn’t depend on you completing your project during the course. Research based practice is an equally valid form of study.

For more information on the course structure please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-independent-filmmaking/

MODULES

This course consists of five modules:

In Development, you will be introduced to experienced filmmaker teams who give case studies on how they developed and produced their films. You'll attend workshops and lectures with guest speakers from across the industry.

In The Philosophy of Film David Puttnam will draw upon his own distinguished career as a filmmaker to discuss the philosophy of film, the grammar and the language of film through critical and practical analysis.

In Pre-Production, you'll attend workshops on script development, casting, budgeting/scheduling, relevant software, locations and contracts/legals. You'll also develop your pre-production folder.

In Film Lab (an optional module), space is created for students to develop and workshop their work for TV or film based work around cold reading of their respective scripts within the group.

In Transnational Cinema (an optional module), you'll explore films in theory and practice.

In Creative Project, you'll complete a moving image related project e.g. short film or animation, with the option of completing a written practice-focused dissertation, discussing context, audience, avenues for distribution or other relevant subjects.

TEACHING METHODS

You’ll be taught through a combination of intensive workshops and seminars. The programme is designed to build on your previous filmmaking experience and current professional practice.

ASSESSMENT

You’ll be assessed in a variety of ways, including scriptwriting, production folders and either a written practice based dissertation or film project.

To receive a Master’s degree in Independent Filmmaking you’ll need to demonstrate via coursework a detailed understanding of the process by which moving image productions are made and have a portfolio of project work that shows a creative mastery which matches your grasp of Independent Filmmaking. Your final mark for the production module will depend on the creativity and originality of your work, as well as your demonstrated ability in your role.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

We’ll equip you with skills across a number of technical and craft areas – lens, digital, sound, and lighting. You’ll graduate in a suitable position for further postgraduate study, such as a Bath Spa PhD programme, or portfolio careers in the media and digital production sectors of the economy.

For more information on competitions, facilities and resources please go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-independent-filmmaking/



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The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production. This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. Read more
The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production.

Course overview

This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. For a stronger emphasis on theory, please see MA Media and Cultural Studies.

If you want to improve your knowledge, build your resume and be involved in high-quality media content, with technical skills that are in demand across the TV and Film industries, then this Masters will give you an edge over people with an honours degree. You will cover areas of 360 commissioning, workflow, moving camera, advanced editing techniques and production management.

If your first degree is not directly related to media production, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course. This ensures that everyone on the course can fully participate in group projects.

‌‌‌‌Media Production (Film and Television) MA has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry.‌

‌Sunderland’s Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research. The University hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS). Our research expertise includes multi-platform production, music and moving image collaborations, independent production, and television aesthetics.

‌‌‌‌Students on this course are elgible to apply for a BAFTA scholarship. Find out more on the BAFTA website.

Sunderland is an accredited training provider for AVID software, which is the industry-leading editing system. We are also part of Avid’s worldwide network of Learning Partners, and as an MA student you will have an option to take an AVID certification that boosts your employability. ‌

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/media-production-television-video-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Media Production 1 (60 Credits)
-Media Craft Skills – these include elements of scriptwriting, editing, camera and lighting and sound techniques
-Deconstruction and reconstruction of advertisements and music videos

Media Production 2 (60 Credits)
-Production Management
-Video for New Media
-Mini Practical Project

Media Production 3 (60 Credits)
-Major Media Project

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

You will work on group production projects which will be supported by workshops, studio sessions, tutorials and seminars, as well as master classes led by industry professionals.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is a centre for excellence in training students, with continual investment in industry-standard equipment.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes multiple Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Blackmagic, Sony EX1 and EX3, with associated location DIT kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations Edit systems, including Avid Media Composer, Protools, Adobe Master Collection, four Colour Grading rooms running DaVinci Resolve. There is also a digital audio postproduction area running the Avid S6 desk with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Other media facilities
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Useful resources for your studies include:
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles in production, media management, marketing, legal and media business.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas. Read more
The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas: Architecture, Communications and Media, English, Music and Philosophy. You will receive training in research skills and supervision from one or more academic specialists in their subject area(s).

The programme provides excellent preparation for you if you’re intending to undertake a PhD in the Arts and Humanities, but is also a good choice if you wish to pursue a research project for purposes of professional development or personal interest. You will become part of a community of active researchers and will be encouraged to pursue your own research interests in collaboration with an academic supervisor.

Key Facts

REF 2014
In the latest Research Excellence Framework, we increased the proportion of 4* research from 10% (in the RAE 2008)to 32%, with 40% of impact rated 4* (outstanding) and 50% of environment rated 4* (world-leading).

Why School of Music?

Strong research culture

Across the School, our research activity has a strong interdisciplinary nature and is concentrated in three cross-cutting areas:-

Critical and Contextual Approaches
Creative Practice
Media and Industry Studies.

We're at the forefront of research and postgraduate teaching. Our Institute of Popular Music (IPM) was the first academic centre created specifically to study popular music – and where better than in the home of the Beatles? It also boasts an enviable archive of donated recorded material.

Staff and students contribute fully to our research areas, which are informed by the broadly defined fields of:

Critical theory
Musicology
Music Analysis
Music and the moving image (including new media)
Ethnomusicology
Composition
Music industries
Media and cultural studies.

Research students participate fully in our research activity. They present papers at the School’s research seminars, work as Teaching Assistants within the School (with pedagogical training and support provided). There are also weekly research, career, and teaching seminars for all postgrads.

As a postgraduate student you'll be able to attend research seminars involving guest speakers from many disciplines and subdisciplines. You'll also be closely involved in classical, traditional and popular music concerts performed by professional musicians and students.

Composer Kenneth Hesketh and conductor Vasily Petrenko from the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic - neighbours with whom we have launched a partnership - have recently been made honorary professors of Music at Liverpool.

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