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Masters Degrees (Music Cognition)

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This unique programme combines music psychology with neuroscience, focusing on both the biological and cognitive aspects of musical behaviour. Read more

This unique programme combines music psychology with neuroscience, focusing on both the biological and cognitive aspects of musical behaviour.

The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain (MMB) is highly interdisciplinary and draws on expertise from leading figures in the field, in areas ranging from music cognition, cognitive neuroscience, computational modelling, music education and music therapy.

As a student on the MSc, you will learn about topics in music psychology (from perception to cognition) and the cognitive neuroscience of music, and will acquire all the necessary skills to pursue your own high-quality research.

The programme benefits from good links with institutions such as the Institute of Education, the Royal College of Music, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.

Teaching staff

The Msc in Music, Mind and Brain was founded by Professor Lauren Stewart.

Current programme directors Dr Daniel Müllensiefen and Dr Maria Herrojo-Ruiz are joined by an expert teaching faculty, all of whom have international profiles within the fields of music psychology and/or the neuroscience of music.

Our Eminent Invited Speaker Series brings world-leading researchers to Goldsmiths to present their latest research to our students.

What kind of project can I do?

We offer a range of research projects, drawing on a variety of approaches: behavioural, computational, neuroscientific. Students are also invited to propose a project of their own choice, providing appropriate supervision can be offered.

If a student has a contact with an external supervisor, it may be possible to arrange for project supervision outside Goldsmiths with the involvement of a faculty member as co-supervisor. Examples of previous projects include:

  • Exploring Absolute Pitch in Children and Young People with Visual Impairment
  • An fMRI Study Investigating how Music Impacts on the Perception of Emotion
  • The Influence of Native Language on Rhythmic Grouping
  • Neural Correlates of Melodic Expectancy

Core courses

Assessment

Written examinations; written coursework (essays); oral presentations; research dissertation.

Careers

The programme will appeal to you if you are interested in pursuing doctoral research in this area or if you are already a music professional wishing to approach music scientifically. 

Graduates from the Music, Mind and Brain programme have gone on to work in one of the following areas:

  • Academia: Either pursuing a PhD, working in research position or engaged with university-level teaching
  • Music and media industry
  • Music practitioner or performer
  • Music teacher

Other careers that would be informed by this programme include music therapy, neuro-rehabilitation, music consultancy and music and adverstising.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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About the course. This course is the longest established masters in music psychology in the UK, and a collaboration with the Department of Psychology. Read more

About the course

This course is the longest established masters in music psychology in the UK, and a collaboration with the Department of Psychology. Our tutors – Nikki Dibben, Stephanie Pitts, Vicki Rowe, Renee Timmers and Victoria Williamson – have been published widely in music psychology and education.

This course allows you to use psychological methods and theory to interpret and understand musical behaviours, sounds and ideas. You will be introduced to a range of areas including music cognition and neuroscience, musical development, music in everyday life, and musical performance.

You may specialise within an area through a written dissertation, and the pursuit of original research, generally including experimental or observational empirical investigation. Students may also take cognitive neuroscience modules within the Department of Psychology.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

You’ll learn through seminars, laboratory-based demonstrations and individual tutorials. The taught programme is continuously assessed through a variety of forms such as reports and essays.

They are usually individual assessments, even if they concern the processes and outcomes of group work.



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Research profile. The Reid School of Music offers an exciting research environment that combines the theory, history, composition and practice of music with the scientific study of sound. Read more

Research profile

The Reid School of Music offers an exciting research environment that combines the theory, history, composition and practice of music with the scientific study of sound. We engage with a broad range of genres and traditions, including classical and popular music, Western and non-Western music, professional and amateur music making and music for screen. Our research is highly interdisciplinary, with centres and groups spanning other Colleges and Departments within the University of Edinburgh, from Physics and Neuroscience to Informatics, the Humanities, Divinity and the Social Sciences.

We have a large community of postgraduate students undertaking independent research in music.

If you are interested in undertaking a small independent research project in music, the 12-month MSc by Research is ideal. This programme is offered in any area served by the expertise of our music staff. In consultation with your supervisor you will develop an individual programme of coursework and research training over two semesters. You will submit a dissertation, or portfolio of projects equivalent to 30,000 words.

Candidates for larger-scale, doctoral research are normally admitted as probationary students for the first year of study, and on satisfactory completion of this first year are approved for registration for either MPhil (normally two years full-time, dissertation of 60,000 words) or PhD (maximum four years full-time, dissertation of 80,000–100,000 words).

All our research degrees may be studied part-time (for example, MSc by Research may be studied part-time over two years).

Staff have a wide range of research interests, engaging in research clustered around four main themes:

  • Music, Sound and Technology, including musical acoustics and organology
  • Musical Practice, including composition (electroacoustic, algorithmic, computer music and music for screen), and historical and contemporary performance research
  • Music and the Human Sciences, including music psychology and cognition, and music in the community
  • Music and Social Institutions, including 19th and 20th century musicology, popular music, and music sociology

Some of our current hubs of research activity include:

  • Acoustics and Audio Group
  • ECA Digitals
  • Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments
  • Institute for Music in Human and Social Development
  • Live Music Exchange

Please consult our staff profile pages to see our interests and availability; you may propose projects in any area for consideration.

Training and support

All of our research students benefit from ECA’s interdisciplinary approach and all are assigned two research supervisors. Your second supervisor may be from another discipline within ECA, or from somewhere else within the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences or elsewhere within the University, according to the expertise required. On occasion more than two supervisors will be assigned, particularly where the degree brings together multiple disciplines.



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Starting in the academic year 2012-13, the music department will be offering a one-year M.Phil. in Music Composition to cater for the growing demand for graduate studies of international standing in the area. Read more
Starting in the academic year 2012-13, the music department will be offering a one-year M.Phil. in Music Composition to cater for the growing demand for graduate studies of international standing in the area. Apart from one-on-one mentorship in composition itself, students will take courses in among others, music composition, experimental music theatre and opera, film music aesthetics, advanced orchestration (using technology as an assistant), and composition for mixed media. This proposed M.Phil. course will provide a backbone of activity for the new centre of Composition and Contemporary music, part of Trinity’s new initiative in Creative Arts, Technology and Culture. The course director is the composer Donnacha Dennehy, and the composer Dr. Evangelia Rigaki is the course coordinator. Course Content: The course consists of three elements:

4 compulsory taught modules spread across two semesters (40 ECTS). Each compulsory module is worth 10 ECTS. The compulsory modules are Advanced Orchestration, Contemporary Music Studies, Composition I and Composition II.
2 optional taught modules, selected from a choice of 4 (20 ECTS). Each optional module is worth 10 ECTS. The optional modules available are (i) Composition for Mixed Media, (ii) Music Cognition and Design, (iii) Experimental Music Theatre and Opera, and (iv)Theory, Aesthetics and Analysis.
Dissertation Module. The dissertation module consists of two components: (a) final portfolio of composition, and (b) an accompanying thesis of between 10,000 and 15,000 words. The final portfolio of compositions must have a performing duration of between 20-35 minutes. Portfolios with longer performance times will also be accepted, but these must be agreed in advance with the course director.

Students will work on developing their portfolio and accompanying thesis in conjunction with an assigned supervisor. The accompanying thesis should deal with the structure, aesthetics and methods used by the candidate in the act of composition. The thesis should demonstrate a good knowledge of the context surrounding the candidate’s work, and in doing so should engage with history, criticism

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more

Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.

At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.

Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.

At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:

- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly

Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:

- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction

- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry

- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions

- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones

- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays

- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Deepen your understanding of the theoretical and contextual issues related to music teaching and evaluate aspects of your practice . Read more
  • Deepen your understanding of the theoretical and contextual issues related to music teaching and evaluate aspects of your practice 
  • Benefit from a wide choice of modules that explore education, as well as specifically musical interests 
  • Modules include choral education, music technology and musical cognition 
  • Based in our purpose-built Music Education Department 
  • Designed to be flexible

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Values and practices in education
  • Investigating education
  • Musical development, appraisal and assessment
  • Musical leadership in school and community
  • Improving teaching and learning

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

In addition to the many masters' and PhD graduates, each year we have over 500 students become newly qualified teachers (NQTs). Our excellent links with local schools ensure that our employment rates are consistently high, with well over 90 per cent of our NQTs finding a teaching job last year.

With pay scales to match other industries, job security, an excellent pension and better work-life balance, teaching is becoming one of the most sought-after professions of today. Our masters' and professional courses have allowed many teachers to gain promotion within their institutions. A number of students also continue their studies onto EdD/PhD courses to develop a career in educational research.



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This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research. Read more

This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research.

You will study among one of the world’s largest and most vibrant postgraduate communities in philosophy, alongside internationally recognised leaders in the study of mind, of language, and of situated and embodied cognition. By choosing this programme, you will be entering an increasingly popular field in which many large unsolved problems remain.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation of 8,000 words written at the end of the second semester. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor with whom you meet to plan your reading and discuss your work.

Compulsory courses:

  • Introduction to Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
  • Advanced Topics in Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
  • Philosophical Method I (Online)

A wide range of optional courses is offered in the philosophy, psychology, language sciences, informatics and music subject areas. Options may include:

  • Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Foundations of Evolution
  • Mind and Body in Early Modern Philosophy
  • Origins and Evolution of Language
  • Philosophy of Psychology MSc
  • Psychology of Language Learning
  • Theories of Mind (Philosophy MSc)

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the training necessary to undertake research in philosophy of cognitive science, and ultimately to pursue a career in academic philosophy. You will also acquire an understanding of the central debates in the sciences of the mind today.

If you do not intend to follow an academic route, the study of philosophy helps to develop general intellectual abilities and enhance analytical, critical, interpretive and problem-solving abilities.



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Music Technology.  is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities. Read more

Music Technology is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities.

The MSc in Audio Technology is designed to go beyond the simple provision of training, and to instead enable you to engage with current debates and actively participate in some of the most vibrant areas of contemporary research.

Throughout the course you will be encouraged to demonstrate self-direction and autonomy as you critically explore and define your position within the wider field. One overarching aim is that you should leave the course as not only an adept user of various hardware and software technologies, but as someone able to actively shape and develop their own, responding as necessary to future developments.

Thus, in addition to developing your theoretical and methodological understanding, the MSc in Audio Technology features a strong emphasis on practical work in a number of different (but related) areas. For example, you will study modules in Advanced Studio Practice, Sound on Screen, Music Computing and Musical Human-Computer Interaction. These are supported by a technology-orientated Research and Development module that provides robust foundation for the final Audio Technology Project.

Acting as summary of all that you have learned and a portfolio going forward, the Audio Technology Project provides an opportunity to plan and execute a substantial project in an area of personal specialism or interest. Innovative projects are encouraged, and there exists the potential for interdisciplinary and/or collaboration with practitioners in other fields.

What happens on the course?

Advanced Studio Practice

This module explores various methodologies employed in the planning, recording, editing, mix down and mastering stages of audio production. You will conduct research into genre and equipment-specific working practices, which will lead to the development of innovative engineering concepts and techniques. You will evaluate and use a variety of software and hardware tools and produce work in both stereo and surround sound.

Sound on Screen

The module aims to investigate the relationship between sound and the moving image in contexts such as film, television, advertising and video games. Throughout the module you will develop your understanding of theories, practices and techniques used in the production of music intended to be experienced in conjunction with other media. This will initially involve analysing and deconstructing a range of audio-visual media, examining their aims and how effectively these aims are met. You will then use your understanding of the work of others in the field to critically inform and evolve your own approaches. Using a variety of techniques and technologies, you will create a number of short practical pieces to accompany a variety of linear and non-linear media.

Music Computing

In this module you will explore the relationship between theories of music and computing and creative practice. More specifically, you will study perception and cognition of sound, the ways in which computers can analyse music and audio, generative musical structures, and how these compositional processes can be applied to the generation and transformation of audio. In carrying out the practical assignment, you will critically evaluate, understand the differences between, and demonstrate mastery of common musical programming languages in the realisation of your ideas.

Musical Human-Computer Interaction

Musical interaction is a vibrant area of contemporary research with considerable crossover into more established areas such as Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Physical/Ubiquitous Computing. In the first part of the module you will look at recent work by the New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) community, using these examples to examine and explore a range of pertinent design issues. These include: novice versus virtuoso users (i.e. ease of use versus the potential for mastery), single versus multi-user, discrete versus continuous data control, the provision of haptic feedback, and causality of sound. Using appropriate Physical Computing technologies (e.g. Arduino, Beagleboard, sensors, actuators, basic electronics), you will then design and implement a musical interface for a chosen real-time application (i.e. analysis, composition, or performance). Finally, you will consider how HCI-inspired evaluation methods may be applied to your work, and document your design (online) in such a way that it can be recreated and developed further by interested others.

Research and Development

The Research and Development module initially explores the nature of innovation, then moves on to examine research process including design and development, fundamentals of both quantitative and qualitative traditions, and HCI-inspired methodologies for the evaluation of audio software, musical interfaces and other technologies. Towards the end of the module the emphasis then shifts to the development of an individual research design/proposal that may form the basis of your final Audio Technology Project.

Audio Technology Project

The Audio Technology Project is an opportunity for students to pursue a substantial, self-directed project in a chosen area of audio or musical technology.

Career path

The course will actively equip both graduates and those already in industry with a diverse range of skills to enhance their career prospects. It will also develop a range of opportunities for experience and employment in areas such as studio recording, media production and content creation, video game and software development, education (FE/HE), research assistantships/studentships, and employment in HE institutions.

In addition to subject-specific practical skills, you will also acquire a range of transferable skills relevant for pursuing a research degree. These include critical, analytical, project management and research skills from the study of a broad spectrum of literature, research, and external projects.



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The Cognitive and Decision Sciences MSc at UCL studies the cognitive processes and representations underlying human thought, knowledge and decision-making. Read more

The Cognitive and Decision Sciences MSc at UCL studies the cognitive processes and representations underlying human thought, knowledge and decision-making. It integrates a wide range of disciplines and methodologies, with the core assumption that human cognition and choice are computational processes, implemented in neural hardware.

About this degree

Key topics include the nature of computational explanation; the general principles of cognition; the scope of rational choice explanation; probabilistic models of the mind; learning and memory; and applications to economics and business. The programme involves training in experimental design and methodology, building computational models and undertaking original research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to Cognitive Science
  • Principles of Cognition
  • Research Statistics
  • Research Skills and Programming for Cognitive Science
  • Judgement and Decision Making
  • Knowledge, Learning and Inference

Optional modules

  • Applied Decision-making
  • Human Learning and Memory
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Social Cognition: Research Methods
  • The Brain in Action
  • Neural Computation: Models of Brain Function
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Understanding Individuals and Groups
  • Social Neuroscience
  • Social Cognition, Affect and Motivation
  • Current Issues in Attitude Research
  • Talent Management
  • Business Psychology Seminars
  • Interpretation of Forensic Evidence
  • Consulting Psychology
  • Neuroscience of emotion and decision-making
  • Evolution and Social Behaviour

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, class presentations, and practical, statistical, computational and experimental class work. Student performance is assessed through online tests, coursework, essays, practical experimental and computational mini-projects, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Cognitive and Decision Sciences MSc

Careers

Students have gone on to find employment in the following areas: research, teaching, lecturing, consultancy, finance, and marketing. 

For more detailed careers information please visit the department website.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Change Management Consultant, HCL AXON
  • Project Research Officer, Government Office for Science
  • Research Assistant, Imperial College London / University of Oxford
  • PhD in Financial Computing
  • Assistant Policy Adviser, Cabinet Office Behavioural Insights Team

Employability

On completion of the programme, students will have acquired theoretical and empirical knowledge in cognition science and decision-making, and a broad range of practical research skills. They will have made original contributions to this field in their research projects, and will understand how to apply their knowledge to real-world decision problems. They will also have developed various analytical and logical reasoning skills which can be applied to many domains of research and non-academic work. They will, in addition, have an understanding of the philosophical issues underlying cognitive science and neuroscience.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme draws on an outstanding academic staff, ranging across many disciplines, including internationally renowned researchers in psychology, computational modelling, neuroscience and economics.

London is one of the global hotspots for research in cognition, decision-making, and neuroscience; and it is an intellectual hub with a high density of research seminars and scientific meetings that attract leading international researchers.

London is also one of the world's foremost commercial and political centres, with consequent opportunities for high-level applied research; and it is a vibrant, culturally diverse and international city, with world-class music, theatre and galleries.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This programme aims at training those who would like to pursue a career in the booming field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). It uniquely covers all five of the hottest AI topics – games, robotics, vision, music, and language – each backed up by a respective research group at QMUL that is world-leading. Read more

This programme aims at training those who would like to pursue a career in the booming field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). It uniquely covers all five of the hottest AI topics – games, robotics, vision, music, and language – each backed up by a respective research group at QMUL that is world-leading. Practical machine-learning skill development is at the core of this programme, which is specifically designed to maximise employment potential across a wide spectrum of industrial and academic posts related to AI.

Artificial Intelligence is rapidly changing the way we live, work and learn. Both governments and industries have recognised the need for strategic development of AI -- technology giants such as Google, Microsoft and Facebook have each established their own AI research institutes, and the UK government recently announced its £75 million investment in the November 2017 Budget.

There is however a real shortage of AI talents worldwide, both to serve the industry and drive future research. Artificial Intelligence jobs are amongst the best paid in industry nowadays – an AI Specialist typically earns among the highest salaries (New York Times, 22nd Oct 2017), while having a solid AI background is strongly desired in multiple research disciplines.

MSc Artificial Intelligence importantly recognises such need for training cutting-edge AI talents, and is specifically designed to maximise student employability on AI-specific jobs.

This programme is:

• comprehensive: covering all five of the most popular AI topics

• up-to-date: each topic backed up by a world-leading group with cutting edge research

 unique: offering Game AI that represents some of the most advanced AI to date (e.g., AlphaGo)

• practical: focusing on developing practical machine-learning skills across all five AI topics

The programme brings together our teaching, research and industrial contacts to allow students to mix the different AI topics that best suits their personal requirements and future plans. Students will be offered lectures that explain the fundamental AI concepts, universal machine-learning tools essential for any AI job profile, and specific practical and research skills on all five of the AI topics. Students will gain experience with cutting-edge tools such as Deep Neural Networks (DNN), Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN), and Deep Reinforcement Learning (Deep RL) via regular exercises and practical labs. Students will be taught by world-renowned academics in their specific subject areas, and have regular contacts with them throughout the duration of the programme.

Structure

MSc Artificial Intelligence is currently available for one year full-time study or two years part-time study.

Full-time (programme organised into three semesters)

Semester 1: Four modules that operate on a 3+1 scheme

3 core modules that cover the foundational machine learning techniques and introduction of Artificial Intelligence for Games (e.g., AlphaGo); and 1 optional module to select from three other AI topics (vision, music and language).

Semester 2: Four modules themed around all five AI topics offered

The module selection allows students to focus on topic-specific research or industry applications for AI. More importantly, these module options allow students to gain advanced and up-to-date knowledge on selected AI topics.

Semester 3:

Students carry out a large project on the AI topic that they want to specialise in, after agreeing on a specific topic with an academic supervisor in the first semester, and completing the preparation phase over the second semester.

Undertaking a masters programme is a serious commitment, with weekly contact hours in addition to numerous hours of independent learning and research needed to progress at the required level. When coursework or examination deadlines are approaching, independent learning hours may need to increase significantly. Please contact the course convenor for precise information on the number of contact hours per week for this programme.

Part-time

Part-time study options often mean that the number of modules taken is reduced per semester, with the full modules required to complete the programme spread over two academic years. Teaching is generally done during the day and part-time students should contact the course convenor to get an idea of when these teaching hours are likely to take place. Timetables are likely to be finalised in September but you may be able to gain an expectation of what will be required.

Important note regarding Part Time Study

We regret that due to complex timetabling constraints, we are not able to guarantee that lectures and labs for part time students will be limited to two days per week, neither do we currently support any evening classes. If you have specific enquiries about the timetabling of part time courses, please contact the MSc Administrator

Core modules:

·       Computational Intelligence and Games

·       Machine Learning

·       Data Mining

·       MSc Project module

Option modules:

·       Introduction to Computer Vision

·       Machine Learning for Visual Data Analysis

·       Deep Learning and Computer Vision

·       Music Perception and Cognition

·       Music and Speech Modelling

·       Music Analysis and Synthesis

·       Natural Language Processing

·       Advanced Natural Language Processing

·       Artificial Intelligence

·       Information Retrieval

·       Advanced Robotics Systems

·       Multi-platform Game Development

*All new courses are required to undergo a two-stage internal review and approval process before being advertised to students. Courses that are marked "subject to approval" have successfully completed the first stage of this process. Applications are welcome but we will not make formal offers for this course until it has passed this second (and final) stage.



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This programme aims at training those who would like to pursue a career in the booming field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). It uniquely covers all five of the hottest AI topics – games, robotics, vision, music, and language – each backed up by a respective research group at QMUL that is world-leading. Read more

This programme aims at training those who would like to pursue a career in the booming field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). It uniquely covers all five of the hottest AI topics – games, robotics, vision, music, and language – each backed up by a respective research group at QMUL that is world-leading. Practical machine learning skill development is at the core of this programme, which is specifically designed to maximise employment potential across a wide spectrum of industrial and academic posts related to AI.

AI is rapidly changing the way we live, work and learn. Both governments and industry have recognised the need for strategic development of AI -- technology giants such as Google, Microsoft and Facebook have each established their own AI research institutes, and the UK government recently announced its £75 million investment in the November 2017 Budget.

There is however a real shortage of AI talents worldwide, both to serve the industry and drive future research. AI jobs are amongst the best paid in industry nowadays – an AI Specialist typically earns among the highest salaries (New York Times, 22nd Oct 2017), while having a solid AI background is strongly desired in multiple research disciplines.

MSc Artificial Intelligence importantly recognises such need for training cutting-edge AI talents, and is specifically designed to maximise student employability on AI-specific jobs.

This programme is:

  • comprehensive: covering all five of the most popular AI topics
  • up-to-date: each topic backed up by a world-leading group with cutting edge research
  • unique: offering Game AI that represents some of the most advanced AI to date (e.g., AlphaGo)
  • practical: focusing on developing practical machine learning skills across all five AI topics.

The programme brings together our teaching, research and industrial contacts to allow students to mix the different AI topics that best suits their personal requirements and future plans. Students will be offered lectures that explain the fundamental AI concepts, universal machine learning tools essential for any AI job profile, and specific practical and research skills on all five of the AI topics. Students will gain experience with cutting-edge tools such as Deep Neural Networks (DNN), Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN), and Deep Reinforcement Learning (Deep RL) via regular exercises and practical labs. Students will be taught by world-renowned academics in their specific subject areas, and have regular contacts with them throughout the duration of the programme.

Industrial Experience

The industrial placement takes place from the September following the taught part of the MSc for a maximum of 12 months. It is a student's responsibility to secure their own placement, but the EECS Placement Team will provide support. The Placement Team source and promote suitable opportunities, assist with applications, and with interview preparation.

The industrial placement consists of 8-12 months spent working with an appropriate employer in a role that relates directly to your field of study. The placement is currently undertaken after you have completed, passed the taught component of the degree and submitted your MSc project. The placement will provide the opportunity to apply key technical knowledge and skills gained from your taught modules and will enable you to gain a better understanding of your own abilities, aptitudes, attitudes and employment potential. The module is only open to students enrolled on a programme of study with integrated placement.

In the event that you are unable to secure a placement, we will transfer you onto the 1 year FT taught programme without the Industrial Experience. This change will also apply to any student visa you hold at the time.

Structure

MSc Artificial Intelligence is currently available for one year full-time study or two years part-time study.

Full-time (The programme is organised in three semesters)

Semester 1: Four modules that operate on a 3+1 scheme

3 core modules that cover the foundational machine learning techniques and introduction of Artificial Intelligence for Games (e.g., AlphaGo); and 1 optional module to select from three other AI topics (vision, music and language).

Semester 2: Four modules themed around all five AI topics offered

The module selection allows students to focus on topic-specific research or industry applications for AI. More importantly, these module options allow students to gain advanced and up-to-date knowledge on selected AI topics.

Semester 3:

Students carry out a large project on the AI topic that they want to specialise in, after agreeing on a specific topic with an academic supervisor in the first semester, and completing the preparation phase over the second semester.

Undertaking a masters programme is a serious commitment, with weekly contact hours being in addition to numerous hours of independent learning and research needed to progress at the required level. When coursework or examination deadlines are approaching independent learning hours may need to increase significantly. Please contact the course convenor for precise information on the number of contact hours per week for this programme.

Part-time

Part-time study options often mean that the number of modules taken is reduced per semester, with the full modules required to complete the programme spread over two academic years. Teaching is generally done during the day and part-time students should contact the course convenor to get an idea of when these teaching hours are likely to take place. Timetables are likely to be finalised in September but you may be able to gain an expectation of what will be required.

Core modules:

·       Computational Intelligence and Games

·       Machine Learning

·       Data Mining

·       MSc Project module

Option modules:

·       Introduction to Computer Vision

·       Machine Learning for Visual Data Analysis

·       Deep Learning and Computer Vision

·       Music Perception and Cognition

·       Music and Speech Modelling

·       Music Analysis and Synthesis

·       Natural Language Processing

·       Advanced Natural Language Processing

·       Artificial Intelligence

·       Information Retrieval

·       Advanced Robotics Systems

·       Multi-platform Game Development



*All new courses are required to undergo a two-stage internal review and approval process before being advertised to students. Courses that are marked "subject to approval" have successfully completed the first stage of this process. Applications are welcome but we will not make formal offers for this course until it has passed this second (and final) stage.



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Master's specialisation in Plasticity and Memory. - The connection between the brain and cognition. Read more

Master's specialisation in Plasticity and Memory

- The connection between the brain and cognition

How does your brain enable you to remember a certain event? What happens in your brain when you listen to music? How does your brain adapt itself to certain changes, such as a haemorrhage or other form of damage? How do you distinguish between important and relatively unimportant information in the world around you? How do you focus your attention on a playing child? How does our consciousness work? These are just a few of the questions that neurocognitive scientists would like to see answered.

- Neurocognition in Nijmegen: the cutting edge

The Radboud University has an outstanding reputation in the field of neurocognition. In 2002, the ultramodern Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (DCCN) was officially opened on campus. This centre draws many young researchers from all over the world and to a large extent determines the nature of the Plasticity and Memory specialisation. In 2008 the DCCN formed together with the Donders Centre for Cognition (formerly NICI) and the Donders Centre for Neuroscience the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour.

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree

The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills

The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics

Students who did not follow physics in their highschool curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

If you have successfully completed the Master’s programme in Plasticity and Memory, you will be able to conduct neuroimaging and neurobiological research. You will have ample knowledge of the anatomical and neurophysiological aspects of the human brain and theoretical cognition/neurocognition models. This will enable you to conduct independent research into the neurofunctional architecture of cognitive key functions, such as perception, attention, memory, language, planning and targeted actions. With this educational background you should be able to find a position with one of the research institutes in the Netherlands or abroad, government institutions or specialised companies (e.g. in the pharmaceutical industry).

Our approach to this field

Research in the field of cognitive neuroscience is one of the spearheads in the research policy of Radboud University. Here, in Nijmegen, hundreds of scientists from various faculties and top institutes have joined forces to unravel the workings of the human brain, step by step and bit by bit. They thereby work together very closely, exchange expertise and share state-of-the-art research equipment.

Nijmegen is one of the foremost centres of cognitive neuroscience in the world. We have deliberately created a high admission threshold to ensure that all our students are highly motivated and have the ability to work at an advanced level. Top scientists screen all applications to make sure the new students meet our stringent entry criteria and help maintain the current standards of excellence. Once admitted to the programme you can expect to be trained as a multidisciplinary scientist in the following two years. The research of which you will become a part addresses crossdisciplinary challenges. The teachers and supervisors you will meet are all experts in their own disciplines. We hope that with this programme you will outperform your teachers by being able to combine knowledge from different domains. Alongside language processing and perceptuomotor systems, you may also help improve brain/computer interfaces, a hot topic with applications in medicine and information technology. Apart from being very exciting, it is also logical that various disciplines are merging. After all, everything that happens in the brain is interconnected. In Nijmegen we develop sophisticated cognitive models which we test by means of state-of-the-art imaging techniques, thanks to which you can participate in cutting-edge research that will hopefully lead to new insights into the way the human brain and mind work. Finally, we offer our best CNS students excellent career opportunities in challenging PhD projects.

- Unique multi-disciplinary Master’s programme

Are you also interested in the human brain? Would you like to conduct research into the workings of the brain and join an enthusiastic, international group of top researchers? The Radboud University Nijmegen offers a multi-faculty Master’s programme in Cognitive Neuroscience. The programme takes two years and is of course of a scientific orientation. There is a strong emphasis on experimental research. After all, what counts is hands-on research experience. This Master’s programme is unique in Europe.

The Master’s programme in Cognitive Neuroscience is primarily focussed on training you as a researcher and if possible, a top researcher, because research institutes and businesses around the world desperately need highly qualified and motivated young researchers. Moreover, since cognitive neuroscience is a rather young discipline, much in this field has not yet been explored. There are many challenging questions that need to be answered. So there is plenty of room for new discoveries!

This competitive programme provides a sound balance of theory and practice. We enrol about 50 students per year. Our selective approach guarantees excellence, especially during the research training period.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Course Details. Read more

Course Details

This MA has been designed to provide students with a general and specialist knowledge of the principles and methods of Anthropology.  Anthropology is the study of human similarity and human difference, it looks at the building blocks of human society and culture, studying the value and meaning of human life from the grassroots up on a local and global platform.

The discipline focuses on the study of human similarity and difference and explores athe value and meaning of human life from the grassroots up.  Students can choose to specialise in different strands, including Ethnomusicology (the anthropology of music) and cognition and Culture.  Masters students will be supervised by an individual member of staff and they will conduct research on a topic of their own choice and write a dissertation.

There are five MA strands as listed below and each consists of six taught modules and a dissertation (which is double-weighted):

  • MA Anthropology (Anthropology of Conflict)
  • MA Anthropology (Anthropology of Ireland)
  • MA Anthropology (Cognition and Culture)
  • MA Anthropology (Ethnomusicology)
  • MA Anthropology (Social Anthropology)

 Depending on the specialism chosen, students take a combination of compulsory and optional modules.

You will also participate in the weekly Anthropology Postgraduate Seminar were Diploma/MA/PhD students present their on-going research and in addition attend the weekly Anthropology Research Seminar where established academics discuss their work. Students also have the option to audit an undergraduate module and participate in various music ensembles.

Assessment and Feedback

Assessed essays and dissertation.

Learning and Teaching

Teaching times will be a combination of both morning and afternoon with the opportunity for occasional weekend training sessions.

Careers Prospects

Graduates have pursued careers in a wide range of fields, such as research (academic and non-academic), teaching, music therapy, consultancy, development and charity work, museum and heritage posts, journalism and radio broadcasting. Among those who have pursued academic careers, not all have done so within anthropology - several have taken posts in related disciplines. Others have found positions within governmental and non-governmental organisations abroad.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

How to apply

Applicants for Postgraduate programmes are strongly advised to carefully read the important information and follow the steps set out here before submitting their application via the Postgraduate Direct Applications Portal.



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The MSc in Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics and Creativity is the first postgraduate programme in the world for the scientific study of aesthetics and creativity. Read more

The MSc in Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics and Creativity is the first postgraduate programme in the world for the scientific study of aesthetics and creativity.

At the intersection of the arts and the sciences, the programme introduces you to the psychology and the cognitive neuroscience of how humans generate new ideas, how we appreciate beauty, and how we form preferences.

Aesthetic and creative decisions are relevant in the visual and the performing arts, and in many applied and commercial contexts, ranging from clinical interventions to curating exhibitions, from dance choreography to marketing and advertising. Based in the Department of Psychology, in collaboration with Computing, Media and Communications and the Institute of Management Studies, the course builds critical knowledge, research and communication skills across the arts and the sciences, centred around two key topics: the psychological and brain mechanisms of making (Creativitiy) and appreciating (Neuroaesthetics) art. Conducting a research project with an interdisciplinary focus will prepare you for a research career in aesthetic or creative science, working in the creative industry, or to develop your artistic practice.

Goldsmiths is uniquely placed to offer this programme, with an internationally renowned reputation in the arts and the sciences. Existing courses combining art and psychology often have a largely therapeutic focus and rarely cover the psychology of aesthetic appreciation or creative cognition, in a broader profile. In contrast, business-oriented courses in marketing, advertising and consumer psychology often lack adequate scientific training in experimental psychology or cognitive neuroscience methods, which is required for a scientific approach to aesthetics and creativity. Optional modules based in the departments Media & Communications, Computing, and the Institute of Management Studies will complement and challenge the scientific perspective, acknowledging the richly diverse, unique and culturally-specific nature of human aesthetic and creative practice.

Modules & structure

On this programme you will study the following modules:

Neuroaesthetics (15 Credits): This module provides an in-depth introduction into the cognitive neuroscience of art appreciation, aesthetic perception and judgement from a basic science and an applied perspective. Topics include: psychological theories of aesthetic appreciation, aesthetic evolution, brain mechanisms of pleasure and reward, face and body attractiveness, and aesthetic science across the visual and performing arts, in laboratory and real-world settings.

Creativity (15 credits): This module provides a comprehensive introduction to the science of creative cognition. Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, this module covers latest research findings from various disciplines within cognitive psychology, social psychology, comparative and developmental psychology, creative arts and media, and neuroscience

Foundations of Neuroscience (15 credits): This module covers brain anatomy and function as well as an introduction to the available techniques to study the neural basis of behaviour. Topics range from single neuron architecture to the functional organization of brain systems. Neuroimaging methods covered include: fMRI, EEG, MEG and TMS.

Statistical Methods and Experimental Design (30 credits): This module covers experimental design and the theory and practice of quantitative data analysis. You will cover statistical techniques in the lectures, and learn to implement these techniques using statistical software in computer-based tutorials and workshops.

Research Skills/ Invited Speaker Series (15 credits): This module covers fundamental research skills: seminars on bibliographic searching, essay writing, research report writing, oral presentation skills, career planning and lab sessions. The second strand exposes students to cutting edge research in the field of aesthetic and creative cognition by means of an invited speaker series from a variety of academic disciplines, the creative industry and arts organizations. This module will be shared with students on the MSc in Music, Mind and Brain.

Research Project with an interdisciplinary focus (60 credits): You will conduct a quantitative research project in relation to aesthetics or creativity. The course encourages interdisciplinary and collaborative projects with other departments at Goldsmiths, or with external partners such as arts organizations or the creative industry.

Optional Modules (2 x 15 credits): You will choose two optional modules from within the Psychology Department (Advanced Quantitative Methods, Magic and the Mind) or collaborating Departments including Computing (Physical Computing and Workshops in Creative Coding), Media and Communications (Embodiment and Experience, Politics of the Audio-visual) and the Institute of Management Studies (Psychology of Marketing and Advertising, Consumer Behaviour). Optional modules will complement the scientific perspective with alternative views, approaches and extend your knowledge and skill base.

Please note that not all modules will be available and may change subject to approval



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What is intelligent behaviour? How can robots communicate with each other? In this programme you will learn how to design and implement intelligent systems. Read more
What is intelligent behaviour? How can robots communicate with each other? In this programme you will learn how to design and implement intelligent systems.

The core topics in The Master's programme Artificial Intelligence are: autonomous perceptive systems, cognitive robotics and multi-agent systems.

- Autonomous Systems
A robot taking samples and collecting information on the moon is an example of an autonomous system. It operates and carries out missions independently. Regardless of their surroundings, it responds with a certain intelligence. While traditional AI focuses on cognition and reasoning as isolated abilities, we strongly believe in perception as an active behavior, which is integrated into general cognition.

- Cognitive Robotics
The courses taught in the area of cognitive robotics are related to research in social robotics, to the origin of robotic communication and to the way in which robots recognize movement. Research is conducted at the Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Engineeringinstitute.

- Multi-agent Systems
When a team of robots play footbal they have to communicate and cooperate with each other. This is an example of a multi-agent system. When designing these systems, techniques from computing science and logic are combined with knowledge about the interaction amongst humans and animals.

Why in Groningen?

- Be part of a Programme with excellent reviews
- Challenging graduation projects

Job perspectives

Once you have obtained your Master's degree in Artificial Intelligence, you can apply your skills in research & development, for instance air traffic and space labs, where you make sure that intelligent and innovative technologies are used during the design process. You could also choose to get a job at a research institute where you work as a researcher. This can be done at a university (PhD) or at a research institute like TNO. About 50% of our students chooses a career as a scientist.

Where do graduated master AI students work at the moment? Maarten van Grachten and Mathijs Homminga did the AI master in the old doctoral program and they specialized in very different directions. Mathijs works as a software engineer at the IT-company Evermind. He programs and implements innovative IT-projects for shops. Maarten is doing a PhD in Barcelona where he investigates how a computer can compose jazz music.

Job examples

- Industrial Research & Development
- PhD research position
- Software engineer

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