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Masters Degrees (Museum Design)

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The School of Design offers a practice-based MRes pathway built on the wide range of our design research exploring the space between society and technology supported by expertise spanning Innovation Design Engineering, Global Innovation Design, Design Products, Healthcare Design, Service Design, Vehicle Design and Intelligent Mobility. Read more

The School of Design offers a practice-based MRes pathway built on the wide range of our design research exploring the space between society and technology supported by expertise spanning Innovation Design Engineering, Global Innovation Design, Design Products, Healthcare Design, Service Design, Vehicle Design and Intelligent Mobility.

The pathway welcomes a broad approach to design research and encourages experimentation in practice-based methods supported by experienced researchers. Approaches can range from User Centred Design, Ethnographic, Anthropological, Action Research, Participatory Design Research, Cybernetics, Grounded Theory, to Transformation Design, Speculative, and Critical Design. We encourage diverse candidates who want to focus on commercial research, to prepare for doctoral studies and a future career in academic research or use the programme for career change to develop new skills and identify new research interests. Students will be introduced to relevant design research tools, methods, methodologies, theories and epistemologies aimed at supporting the development of a personal research approach. Applicants to the MRes Design pathway will benefit from an advanced practice-based design research culture and enjoy the freedom and autonomy that a self-directed research journey allows.

The School of Design has a long history of design research that can be traced back to Bruce Archer and the NHS hospital bed design in the 1960s through to today’s researchers who are internationally engaged in a broad range of areas from intelligent mobility through to citizen science, the future of making, socio-cultural design, experimental design, design for safety, design policy, service design and artificial intelligence and robotics as well as providing strategic advice to government and agencies. Recent commercial research funding partners have included Huawei, Tata, Airbus, Microsoft, and Intel amongst others with grant-maintained funding from the AHRC, EPSRC and the Lloyds Register Foundation.

We also have an excellent set of visiting experts and a global network of research collaborators that we draw on in our integrated School-wide research culture. These also bring strong synergies with the other RCA Schools and expertise areas including the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design combined with a strong local set of collaborations with the Science Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Design Museum and Imperial College London with whom we share three of our master’s programmes.The pathway encourages experimentation in practice-based research, supported by experienced researchers working on both commercial and grant maintained projects across the School’s major research themes, in areas including mobility, healthcare and the future of making. The training we provide through designing research and researching through design will be suitable for both commercial and academic careers as a stand-alone qualification and act as an accelerator to prepare for doctoral studies.

The School has an excellent set of commercial partners and a global network of research collaborators that we draw on in our integrated School-wide research culture. These also bring strong synergies and collaborations with the other RCA Schools and expertise areas including the Helen Hamlyn Centre and Sustain. Commercial research projects include working with Huawei, Tata, Airbus, Microsoft and Intel amongst others. We also have a strong local network that includes collaborations with the Science Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Design Museum and Imperial College London, with whom we share two of our masters programmes. Applicants to the MRes Design pathway will benefit from an advanced practice-based design research culture and enjoy the freedom and autonomy of a self-directed research journey.



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St Andrews is Scotland’s leading centre for postgraduate research and training in the heritage sector and the MGS Postgraduate Diploma/MLitt provides Scotland’s pre-eminent museum studies programme. Read more
St Andrews is Scotland’s leading centre for postgraduate research and training in the heritage sector and the MGS Postgraduate Diploma/MLitt provides Scotland’s pre-eminent museum studies programme. The one-year Postgraduate Diploma is available as stand-alone vocational training or there is an option to present a dissertation on an approved topic for an MLitt degree. These programmes have attracted funding for students from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland and various English and Northern Irish Local Education Authorities as well as the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

The Museum and Gallery Studies programmes prepare you for employment in museums, principally as curators. We ensure that the training is broad, covering all types of museums, galleries and other heritage facilities. The main focus of the training is curatorial work, but curators also need a proper understanding of the work of all their colleagues since, especially in small museums, the ‘curator’ may have to tackle a very wide range of duties. Hence, the principles of conservation, museum education, exhibition planning and design, and various management topics are also included. Two taught modules on the theory and practice of museums provide knowledge of museum systems and practices and understanding of issues relevant to today’s museums. These are complemented by project work, including individual museum tasks and the preparation, in a team, of a public exhibition, which enables you to develop relevant practical skills.

The extensive University Museum Collections at St Andrews are particularly suitable for curatorial training and give the programme a unique character. The Collections include over 100,000 museum items in a wide range of subject areas, from art to zoology, and these collections and the staff who look after them are actively involved in the Museum and Gallery Studies teaching programme. Close to the School of Art History is the Museum of the University of St Andrews (MUSA), where most of the Museum and Galleries Studies teaching takes place. MUSA includes four display galleries on the ground floor, and on the first floor is a ‘Learning Loft’ for education and a Viewing Terrace. Students on the Museum and Gallery Studies Art History programme prepare an exhibition in the Gateway Galleries and the St Andrews Museum. Other facilities include extensive library holdings in museum studies, access to computers, and a dedicated work and study area with computers and other appropriate equipment.

St Andrews museum training benefits enormously from the willing participation of the Scottish museum profession. Museums Galleries Scotland and its member museums of all shapes and sizes generously provide visiting lecturers and host class visits and individual student placements. In return, St Andrews has developed several initiatives to extend its training beyond the University and into the museum community.

A part-time version of the Postgraduate Diploma and MLitt, taught through residential schools and work-based projects, is aimed in particular at people already working in museums. Participants are welcomed from Scotland, the rest of the UK and EU. The Museum and Gallery Studies teaching staff are experienced museum curators who continue to be involved directly in museum work.

Teaching methods

Students take three compulsory 40-credit modules during the two semesters of coursework. The taught courses are delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, practical sessions and visits to museums and galleries. A programme of project work, based on the University Collections or with local museums and galleries, complements the taught element. This incorporates problem-based learning and enables students to develop relevant practical skills and to experience the dynamics of teamwork. There are short taught sessions related to the exhibition element of the project work and regular formal meetings. There is also a series of research methods classes to help prepare for the dissertation element.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework. Students complete three assignments per module in a variety of formats including an essay, a documentation and database project, an object study, an exhibition or website review, a lesson plan and a management report. The dissertation module during the summer semester provides the opportunity to undertake an independent research project under the supervision of an academic member of staff.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in Art History, History of Photography or Museum and Gallery Studies provides an excellent foundation for a career in the art or museum world.

The Museum and Gallery Studies course provides a theoretical foundation combined with hands-on, practical and transferable experience. Recent graduates have gone on to work for a range of institutions, from the Scottish Light House Museum to the National Museums of Scotland, the Victoria and Albert Museum to the Detroit Institute of Arts, the McManus Galleries in Dundee to Zhejiang University Museum of Art & Archaeology, and auctioneers Lyon and Turnbull, and Bonham’s, among many others. Two year-long traineeships within University Collections are open uniquely to Museum and Gallery Studies graduates, as is the four to five month David Nicholls Curatorial Internship at the South Georgia Museum in Antarctica.

Recent postgraduates in Art History and History of Photography are employed in universities and archives, museums and galleries, auction houses, radio stations, publishing houses and magazines and are also working in journalism, teaching, and retail.

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The Digital Design MA is concerned with the creation of any digital or computer related content or products. This includes digital media, digital products, digital interiors, digital exhibitions and installations, digital graphics, digital fashion and even digital branding and marketing. Read more
The Digital Design MA is concerned with the creation of any digital or computer related content or products. This includes digital media, digital products, digital interiors, digital exhibitions and installations, digital graphics, digital fashion and even digital branding and marketing. You can specialise in the following:

• Digital media design, including multimedia design, web design, 2D and 3D computer animation, visual and special effects for TV and film, mobile app design for tablets and smart phones, computer and video games, virtual and augmented reality and 2D and 3D visualisation

• Digital product design, including the design of any computer-based or screen-based product such as smartphones, smart TV’s, tablet devices, smart watches, games consoles, smart household appliances, information systems and 3D digital printing

• Digital interior design, including digital display and projection design, intelligent interiors, digital lighting design and digital furniture design

• Digital exhibition, museum and installation design, including digital heritage resources, digital archeology, interactive kiosk and installation design, virtual museums and exhibitions

• Digital graphic design, including the design of e-books, e-learning, interface design, interaction design and digital signage

• Digital fashion design, including the design of wearable computing, smart clothing design and digital fabrics

• Digital branding and marketing design, including digital corporate identity design, logo design, social media marketing, digital channel advertising and promotion

You will have access to industry standard software and hardware such as Adobe Creative Suite and Autodesk MAYA while working in a dynamic environment with ongoing multimedia research and commercial projects. There are also opportunities to work on digital design projects set by external companies and other organisations. You will develop the skills and ideas to go on to employment as a digital designer or to set up your own business as a freelancer after graduation.

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Explore and re-think the form and function of prevailing design practice and shape your ideas and concepts on this research led, critically informed course. Read more
Explore and re-think the form and function of prevailing design practice and shape your ideas and concepts on this research led, critically informed course.

The MA/MDes Exhibition Design brings together a range of design disciplines to explore the interpretation and presentation of images, objects, spaces and experiences, both virtual and physical, for a range of audiences and user groups.

You’ll undertake specialist modules in exhibition design, lighting design and design interpretation. You'll shape your own ideas, concepts and theories through a self-directed major project informed by design research and critical enquiry.

This course is well connected with the local exhibition design practices industry and Scotland’s vibrant museum, heritage, tourism and events sectors.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA--MDes-Exhibition-Design-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

Playing with facts, fictions and truths you’ll be encouraged to think that we need not confine ourselves to the world as it appears. Instead, the course stresses the capacity of texts, objects and spaces to playfully precipitate new ways of thinking about the social world.

In exhibition, design interpretation and lighting modules you'll develop specific design skills which will inform and enable highly developed outcomes in your self-directed major project. Collaboration with practitioners from other areas is encouraged.

You have the option of taking an MA or MDes award, depending on whether you complete a dissertation or design project report in your final trimester.

Working with specialist tutors, the major project allows you to create and develop design outcomes for exhibitions, museum and heritage interpretation and/or site specific installations.

We have a strong studio culture supported by our multidisciplinary staff team of academics and industry-based practitioners, allowing for cross-disciplinary critiques, collaborations and partnerships which may continue into professional life.

You’ll develop creative, professional, strategic and contextual knowledge and skills and apply design thinking to a range of creative outcomes and design interventions.

Modules

• Design Research Methods
• Spatial Lighting Design
• Exhibition Design
• Interpretative Design
• Major Design Project
• For MDes Degree - Design Project Report
• For MA Degree - Design Dissertation

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

With a physical and digital portfolio demonstrating industry-ready skills, graduates can apply for design jobs, freelance work or establish entrepreneurial ventures.

You may also wish to continue study to MPhil or PhD level.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Read more

What is this programme about?

MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Through the application of design theory and practice, incorporating new technologies into the discourse, students will be able to create or initiate solutions and experiences in the context of the cultural industries.

This MA programme provides its graduates with the advanced skills necessary to confront their professional challenges and move forward in this highly competitive industry. Integrating materiality and object interpretation through applied imagination, developing innovative creative-thinking, enterprise skills and research-led projects, the programme's multidisciplinary and critical approach gives students a distinctive insight into the collaborative nature of these industries.

The programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. With an international outlook, our graduates will be sought after across an array of arts, design, events, culture, entertainment, media and creative technology departments globally.

The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, policy making, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms. Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind OR http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries/

Who is this programme for?

This MA programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

How is the programme organised and what will I learn?

The programme is run in two modes: full-time over one year and part-time over two years, with the taught content made up of core and option courses totalling 180 credits.

Core courses
* Experience Design (XD) - 30 Credits
* Materiality & Interpretation - 30 Credits
* Design Management and Cultural Enterprise - 30 Credits
* MA Final Project - 60 Credits

Option courses (two to choose from):
* Curatorial practice - 15 Credits
* Coding in Creative Contexts- 15 Credits
* Sound Design- 15 Credits
* Social Media and SEO - 15 Credits

What do students do after this programme?

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing, policy making, and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms.

Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

How are we taught?

Typically, in full-time mode, you can expect 10 hours attendance per week over two days in a class of around 15-20 students. Teaching is a mixture of studio work, seminars, lectures and workshops. The full-time mode should only be considered by students who are able to dedicate at least 25 hours per week to the programme. The part-time mode is recommended for students in full-time employment.

How do I apply for this programme?

Apply directly on our website (link below). Selected applicants will be invited to attend a personal or skype interview. We recommend early applications, as the places are limited. Overseas applications for this course should be received no later than the end of July for entry in September to allow the sufficient time for visa applications.

Where can I find more information?

For more information, please see the course page at our online prospectus and take a look at the CPDA website.

MA Design for Cultural Industries Blog: http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries

MA Design for Cultural Industries Prospectus Page http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind

Department Website and Student Work http://cpda.gre.ac.uk

How to Apply: http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply/pg

For more information, you can also contact Programme Leader Dr. Isil Onol by email:

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The Design Innovation MA/MSc provides a framework for developing innovative design products in all areas of design, with a strategic understanding of marketing and business strategy. Read more
The Design Innovation MA/MSc provides a framework for developing innovative design products in all areas of design, with a strategic understanding of marketing and business strategy. It enables you to enter the creative industries at a high level of responsibility, ranging from establishing your own businesses to working in multinational corporations. You will complete an individual major project (either creative practice-based or research-focused) which runs throughout the course, supported by relevant taught modules. You will also be supported by specialist academic expertise across a range of design areas.

You can tailor the course to your career aspirations by selecting a specific pathway of study from a diverse range of options, which comprises: Footwear Design; Furniture Design; Interior Design; Digital Design; Museum and Exhibition Design; Product Design; Retail Design; or Visual Communication Design. Alternatively, you can elect to simply focus on Design Innovation in its own right. Students benefit from visiting lecturers who specialise in exhibition design, museum curation, retail design, sustainable design, business planning and creative digital design. At the same time, a range of industry, museum, charity, and arts organisation representatives regularly present and coordinate live projects.

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Our. MA Interior Design. course enables you to develop an individual approach to spatial design within a stimulating, creative and supportive environment. Read more

Our MA Interior Design course enables you to develop an individual approach to spatial design within a stimulating, creative and supportive environment.

This degree provides you with a launchpad to potential higher level interior design careers within a diverse range of subjects. These include museum and exhibition design, design for film, television and digital games and brand interpretation for retail, leisure or promotional events.

An emphasis on ecological issues and processes is also a prominent aspect of this course, and underpins all aspects of the course.

Explore your interests

You'll explore your area of interest to an advanced level, through establishing new spatial paradigms that build on your existing knowledge. Our course, at UCA Canterbury, combines theoretical and practical skills, and encourages engagement with industry at all levels.

In-depth research into design processes and technologies, along with related work placement opportunities, will prepare you for new career directions. Your project work will be supported by ongoing staff research into sustainability, architecture, design-related digital technologies, experiential environments and brand communication.

You'll be taught through tutorials, seminars, self-directed study in relation to your project proposal, work-in-progress reviews and visits or references to sites of local and international interest.

Part-time students are normally taught on a Tuesday but sometimes field trips, study visits or other events take place on other days of the week. You should check before enrolling if you have concerns about the days your course will be taught on.

Industry Partners

We've got extensive contacts across the range of interior design disciplines. Live projects, research analysis and feasibility studies will draw on our wide range of contacts and associations.

Connections include specialists in the related fields of audio-visual technologies, lighting design and interactive design.

Recent guest lecturers have included:

-David Callcott, CADA Design, retail and leisure design consultants (London and Hyderabad, India)

-Emma Vane, Production Designer for Atonement, the Harry Potter series, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and Captain America: The First Avenger

-Finlay White, ModCell, sustainable construction

-Mick Pearce, award-winning international architect (Title: Bio-mimicry and the 3rd industrial revolution)

-Phil Hughes, Ralph Appelbaum Associates, museum and exhibition designers (London, New York, Beijing)

-Uwe R. Brückner, Atelier Brückner, exhibition design (Stuttgart, Germany).

Careers

Career opportunities exist within design or architectural consultancies in retail, leisure, exhibition, office, hotel, residential and cruise ship design, as well as in the fields of design management, interior or film-set design.

Our course has a strong ecological focus with opportunities for engaging with both the theoretical and practical aspects of real-world sustainability.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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The two-year MA in Design – Interior Design provides graduates in architecture and design with the opportunity to explore the world of contemporary interior design. Read more

Overview

The two-year MA in Design – Interior Design provides graduates in architecture and design with the opportunity to explore the world of contemporary interior design. The MA in Design – Specialization in Interior Design analyses indepth the main subjects of the industry through lectures, workshops and project labs and provides the students with the opportunity to investigate future housing, exhibiting and living scenarios.

Students are trained to be professionals with the flexibility and ability to foresee the transformations and challenges of the near future, to design complex projects and to access high level positions in the architecture, interior design, light and exhibition design industries.

Language: English
Credits: 120 CF
Placement rate: 81%

Audience

Candidates holding a first-level academic diploma or BA degree, or about to graduate and with a knowledge of the English language
(according to the medium of instruction of the program) equal to a B2 Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
The program is open to young designers coming from architecture, interior design, and engineering faculties or professionals willing to explore the boundaries and constraints of the world of interior design, acquiring and widening their knowledge, critical awareness, original thinking.

Career

The two-year MA in Interior Design equips students with the necessary fundamentals to continue their studies or to enter the world of professional design and creative industries.
Design studios and companies employ MA in Interior Design graduates to manage the design of spaces in home environments, commercial settings, manufacturing sites, and cultural venues, including museum, trade fair, and retail spaces. They may also design public spaces for important functions (such as offices, hospitals, schools, and universities), in addition to hotel spaces in an era of mass tourism.

Companies

NABA has developed strong relationships with leading companies which provide internships for NABA students. Among them are: Aldo Cibic – Cibicworkshop, Azimut-Benetti, Bonetto Design International, Festina Italia, Giochi Preziosi, Giorgio Armani, Intégral Ruedi Baur et Associés, Luxottica, Pininfarina Extra, Studio Italo Rota & Partners, Tagua, The Swatch Group, Zanotta.

Admission

Discover how to apply: http://www.naba.it/admission-postgraduate-programs/processo-di-ammissione/?lang=en

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The MA Museum Cultures offers you the opportunity to study this expanding and dynamic field at close proximity to the most world-distinguished museums and galleries. Read more
The MA Museum Cultures offers you the opportunity to study this expanding and dynamic field at close proximity to the most world-distinguished museums and galleries. If you are contemplating a career in the museum and gallery sector and if you are interested in developing an in-depth understanding of contemporary debates about museums and their cultural significance, then this is the course for you. Our MA gives you the chance to develop a range of key skills, from critical thinking and writing to practical experience through a work placement in a museum, gallery or archive. Museums have been of enormous importance in shaping empires, nations and cities, and their collections are connected to wider histories of conflict and social change. To study museums is to study the development and fierce contestation of our collective cultural imagination and memory.

You begin with a core course that introduces interdisciplinary perspectives on the study of museums and a research skills module where you work collaboratively with your classmates. You then take 2 options in areas of specialist interest and either an independent research project or a work placement in a museum, gallery or archive. Finally, you will be individually counselled in your choice of dissertation topic.

The Department of History of Art at Birkbeck has an international reputation for its innovative approaches to the history of art, visual culture and museum studies. Our expertise extends into areas such as postcolonial museums, museums in Latin America, Africa and the Middle East, the senses and museums, architecture and museums, museums and art, museums and memory, museums and conflict, museums and gender, small museums, and museums, politics and heritage. As well as regular gallery and museum visits, we offer an exciting study trip abroad every spring. Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the Department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the department’s postgraduate events; the annual Murray lecture where speakers have included Penelope Curtis, director of Tate Britain and Neil McGregor, director of the British Museum; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.

Our flexible approach to full-time and part-time evening study is ideal if you are thinking about undertaking paid or voluntary work experience in London’s museums and galleries during the daytime, while studying for a postgraduate degree that can give you a head start in a competitive jobs market.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our MA Museum Cultures programme throughout the year.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Taught by scholars across Birkbeck, including our Department of History of Art, Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies and Department of History, Classics and Archaeology. This programme offers an interdisciplinary perspective on contemporary debates within museum studies and encompasses museums in Africa, Asia and the Americas as well as in Europe.
We provide students with supervised work placements in museums, galleries and archives including Tate, the British Museum, the Whitechapel Gallery and the Horniman Museum. Past students have helped design and run schools programmes, documented collections that were previously uncatalogued, conducted visitor research and assisted curators in producing exhibitions.
This course of study offers you access to cutting-edge research by some of Britain’s foremost scholars and all the flexibility of evening study at Birkbeck. Whether you have a busy job, have other commitments or want to maximise library time during the day, evening study makes MA study work better.
You can choose option modules from postgraduate courses including History of Art and Arts Policy and Management.
Students studying Museum Cultures are invited to attend postgraduate events in the Department of History of Art and across the School of Arts. Guest speakers include international curators, museum directors, art historians and artists.
The department attracts a rich programme of visiting scholars and practitioners. Our History and Theory of Photography Research Centre and the newly established Architecture, Space and Society Centre offer students the opportunity to develop their knowledge of those areas, as does the Centre for Film and Visual Media which is based in the Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies.
The Department of History of Art has an outstanding reputation for offering critical and creative programmes designed and taught by leading academics and practitioners in the field, within a learning environment that is supportive of the needs of students from a wide range of educational backgrounds.
With our location in Bloomsbury in central London, you can explore some of the world's best architecture, galleries and museums, collections and arts spaces - many of which are on our doorstep or a short distance away. The British Library is within close proximity as is the British Museum, Sir John Soane's Museum, Foundling Museum, Wellcome Gallery, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Britain, Tate Modern and V&A.
We have a state-of-the art cinema and exhibition spaces, all housed in a historic building that was a former home to key members of the Bloomsbury Group, including the author Virginia Woolf and the artist Vanessa Bell.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive collection of books and journals in art history and museum studies. You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including Senate House Library, the British Library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A).

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Why you should choose this course. -You want to explore emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice and theory. -You would like to undertake a work placement in a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in or around Manchester. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You want to explore emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice and theory
-You would like to undertake a work placement in a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in or around Manchester
-You are interested in the rich museum and cultural scene of Manchester and the opportunities for case studies, fieldwork and networking on offer

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Course unit details

The AGMS MA is a modular degree with core and optional elements totalling to 180 credits. Core and options courses combine to make 120 credits with the remaining 60 credits allocated to the dissertation.

Semester one
Full-time students take two core course units: 'Introduction to Museum Studies' and 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' (each 30 credits). Part-time students take 'Introduction to Museum Studies' in Year 1 and 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' in Year 2. These core units are designed to introduce you to key issues and ideas in museum practice, and also to different approaches to the study and analysis of museums. All elements in Semester One are compulsory. Unit details are below.

Semester two
Semester two option courses build on the knowledge and understanding you have gained in semester one, and enable you to develop expertise in a particular disciplinary area of curating (e.g. art or archaeology) or sphere of museum practice (e.g. museum learning or exhibition development). Full-time students take 60 credits of option course units (option courses are offered as 15 or 30 credits). Part-time students take 30 credits of option course units each year. Unit details are below. Please note that not all option courses may be available every year. Students may choose to take one option course in a related subject area, e.g. Archaeology, History, or Social Anthropology.

Dissertation (Semester 2 and summer)
On successful completion of the coursework, you proceed to write a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic of your choice, agreed in conjunction with your dissertation supervisor. Dissertations, like articles (depending on the journal), may be strongly based on original primary source research, they might aim to re-interpret an already well-trawled area of the subject, or they might take up an approach somewhere between these two extremes. In all cases, however, the authors will have chosen and elaborated a body of relevant material which they bring to bear on a clearly defined issue. Dissertation planning and supervision takes place in Semester 2 (February - end of June) and you continue with your independent writing in July and August. You can either undertake a standard dissertation or a practice-based dissertation:
-Standard : 12-15,000 words
-Practice-based A : Exhibition. An exhibition, show or plan thereof. Outcome - exhibition and/or plan plus 8-10,000 words reflection
-Practice-based B : Policy. Student to develop a piece of museum policy. Outcome - policy or report plus max 8-10,000 words reflection.
-Practice-based C : Digital/Online (building on skills developed in Digital Curating). Outcome - digital media application plus max 8-10,000 words reflection.

Career opportunities

How will the AGMS support my career goals?
The AGMS is an important entry-level qualification for anyone seeking to pursue a career in museums or galleries. It is also a valuable resource for continuing professional development for mid-career professionals. In addition, the MA provides a thorough training in the skills needed to do further postgraduate research. These skills in research design and planning are transferable to jobs in the museum sector, as well as being a vital first step to PhD research.

What are the career destinations of AGMS graduates?
Of course, job destinations vary according to the interests, ambitions and skills of each individual, but most of our students are successful in obtaining professional posts in collections, exhibitions, education, interpretation, or some aspect of museum/arts management soon after completing the MA.

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Programme description. Design Informatics combines Data Science with Design Thinking in a context of critical enquiry and speculation. Read more

Programme description

Design Informatics combines Data Science with Design Thinking in a context of critical enquiry and speculation. We build a value-aware, reflective practice at the interface between data and society by combining theory and research with an open-ended process of making and hacking.

Human activity is being constantly shaped by the flow of data and the intelligences that process it, moving towards an algorithmically mediated society. Design Informatics asks how we can create products and services within this world, that learn and evolve, that are contextualised and humane. Beyond that, it asks questions about what things we should create, speculating about the different futures we might be building and the values behind them.

The central premise is that data is a medium for design: by shaping data, we shape the world around us. Data Science provides the groundwork for this, with Design Thinking underpinning reflective research through design. You will use this in working with the internet of things and physical computing, machine learning, speech and language technology, usable privacy and security, data ethics, blockchain technologies. You will connect technology with society, health, architecture, fashion, bio-design, craft, finance, tourism, and a host of other real world contexts, through case studies, individual, and collaborative projects. You will understand user experience in the wider socio-cultural context, through an agile programme of hacking, making and materialising new products and services.

Programme structure

Please be aware that the structure of the programme may change.

Throughout the programme, you will be working both individually and in teams of designers and computer scientists. Everyone will have to write code during the course, and everyone will have to make physical objects. Several courses, including the dissertation, will involve presenting the artefact, product, service, or interactive experience that you have created to the general public in a show.

In the first year, you will study:

  • Design Informatics: Histories and Futures
  • Data Science for Design (compulsory for MA/MFA, strongly recommended for MSc/ Advanced MSc)
  • Case Studies in Design Informatics 1
  • Design with Data
  • Design Informatics Project
  • 20 credits of elective courses

In Design with Data and Design Informatics Project, you are likely to work with an external partner, such as the Royal Bank of Scotland, Amazon, Edinburgh City Council, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh or the National Museum of Scotland.

MSc and MA students then undertake a dissertation in the summer before graduation.

MFA and Advanced MSc students take a summer placement with a relevant digital organisation then return for a second year of study, comprising:

  • Case Studies in Design Informatics 2
  • 60 credits of elective courses
  • A dissertation

Elective courses are drawn from the Masters Programmes of the School of Informatics, Edinburgh College of Art, and Philosophy, Psychology, and Language Sciences. Courses are typically 10 or 20 credits.

Career opportunities

This degree will put you at the cutting edge of the intersection between data science, design, and information technology, opening a host of opportunities in working with companies, charities, and the public sector. We encourage entrepreneurship. For those who wish to stay in academia, the course provides a solid foundation for a PhD in related areas.



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The PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design is for UK/EU architecture graduates seeking Part 2 professional qualification. International students should apply for the MArch Architectural Design (International). Read more

Why this course?

The PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design is for UK/EU architecture graduates seeking Part 2 professional qualification. International students should apply for the MArch Architectural Design (International).

This two year course gives you the opportunity to explore architecture in a broad-based manner through theoretical and practical work. It demands a high level of design ability and self-motivation while giving you the chance to explore and develop projects related to your own interests.

You’ll appraise current theoretical approaches to architecture and urban design then assess and show their relevance in existing and proposed contexts. You’ll also develop and demonstrate formal and technical architectural ability.

If you complete all diploma work to a satisfactory standard you may have the opportunity to convert your diploma into a MArch. This requires an extra three months of study.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/advancedarchitecturaldesign/

What you'll study

As well as the areas of study you'll:
- complete comprehensive building design projects
- write a dissertation
- demonstrate awareness of management procedures relevant to design practice
- carry out a detailed examination of an issue or issues of particular architectural significance

Year 1

This year is centred on consolidating your architectural design skills. You’ll also be introduced to the idea of architecture as a responsive solution to fundamental social issues. You’ll choose an area of personal interest that you’ll research for your dissertation.

Year 2

You’ll undertake an architectural project. This requires you to take a viewpoint on contemporary architectural issues and choose a theme that reflects your own interests and creative ambitions. As well as studio-based activities you’ll follow your chosen theme through project work and optional classes. You’ll also attend a taught course in professional studies and a series of guest lectures.

Study trips provide opportunities for intensive examinations of the culture and built fabric in a variety of urban and rural locations both in the UK and overseas. Recent trips include Barcelona, Rome, Paris and Venice and the less familiar Gdansk, Toledo and Monte Caruso.

Study abroad

You’ll have the opportunity to study abroad (subject to academic performance). The department has the most expansive international exchange programme in the UK. We have agreements with 22 institutions across Europe, Canada, the Far East and South America.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).
We offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

Validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) (Part 2).
Accredited by the Architect’s Registration Board (ARB) for the purpose of eligibility for registration with that body.

Student competitions

We’ve an extensive programme of student awards provided by professional bodies, including:
- The RIAS Silver Medal: the premier Scottish award for student achievement
- The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) President's Medals
- The City of Glasgow- Eimear Kelt- Silver Medal: awarded annually by a panel of professional judges on behalf of Glasgow City Council.

Our students have been successful in many prestigious competitions including:
- ARCHIPRIX
- Building Design ‘Top 6’ UK
- APS
- RSA Awards
- A+DS and RIAS
- SEDA

Guest lectures

We run an exciting programme of guest lectures and recent speakers include:
- Joan Callis, Benedetta Tagliabue EMBT, Architects to the Scottish Parliament
- Prof Neil Spiller, Professor of Architecture and Digital Theory,
- Gordon Benson, Benson and Forsyth, Museum of Scotland, National Museum of Ireland

Learning & teaching

Each part of the course allows you to explore and develop projects related to your own interests in contemporary architecture.
The course is made up of studio design work, lectures, special projects and workshops.
The focus of study is on design project work including the analysis, synthesis and appraisal of design ideas. You’ll show your understanding of these ideas through drawings, physical and digital models, written and graphic work.

Assessment

The MArch degree normally requires further assessment over the summer semester. This will be on an aspect of the diploma project that is explored to a greater level of detail.
You’ll have exams in semesters 1 and 2 on all aspects of the course and are expected to present a complete academic portfolio based on advanced design study.

Careers

Career opportunities for Architecture graduates range from working in large multidisciplinary practices to smaller specialist firms.
Many of our graduates are employed by highly respected practices throughout the world, while others have set up their own businesses.
The Department has a growing reputation for developing entrepreneurial graduates who go on to make their mark in the sector independently in practices such as Page and Park, Tog Studio and Lateral North.

How much will I earn?

If you become an architect you can expect a starting salary of £15,000 to £20,000 after Part 1 (first degree qualification).*
Typical salaries after Part 2 (second degree or diploma) range from £20,000 to £26,000.*
The range of typical salaries after Part 3 (final exam leading to registration as an architect) or for those with experience rises to £26,000 to £35,000.*

*Information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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Recent data and predictions on the forthcoming rate of urbanisation make cities the most common living environment of the future. Read more

Why this course?

Recent data and predictions on the forthcoming rate of urbanisation make cities the most common living environment of the future.

What kind of life will it be for the seven billion people who will live in existing or developing cities? Cities hold tremendous potential, but at the same time are sources of stress, inequalities and pollution. We're working to improve cities to better support fulfilling and diverse lifestyles.

Urban design has an important role in determining both the current and future form of cities. The responsibility for the development and management of cities is becoming increasingly shared.

This course is designed for practitioners and students to enhance their understanding of the city as a complex and dynamic system.

While your focus will be on physical planning and the design of urban spaces and buildings, the various influencing factors that affect form will also be considered.

The major topic is the European metropolis, or city region, within the context of globalisation. You’ll learn to develop appropriate strategies for sustainable urban development. This will encompass social, political, economic, environmental, architectural, aesthetic and psychological aspects.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/urbandesign/

You’ll study

Your course is delivered through studio work, lectures, seminars and a research project.

The studio involves work on the design of a complex urban area. This includes the levels of the entire city, the neighbourhood and the individual public space defined by urban architecture.

The course is strongly linked to the Urban Design Studies Unit's research agenda. All that is taught in both classes and studio is based on our excellent research record and helps advance it.

The department is in a partnership board with the department of Urban Studies at Glasgow University. Its renowned teachers and researchers contribute a real estate and policy and practice overview to the course.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).
We offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

This MSc course has recently gained accreditation from the Royal Town Planning Institute as a specialist course.

Student competitions

Students have previously won:
- The Urban Design Group Award
- The RTPI Scotland Chapter Award
- The Urbanpromo International Jury Design 1st Prize

If you come from a non-design based discipline, please explain in your Statement of Purpose where your interest in urbanism comes from, and try and give us an overview of your knowledge in the area. We would be delighted to review a portfolio, if you have one, of any work you might have collected relevant to the subject of the course.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Courses are taught through lectures, seminars and studio work as well as a piece of research (MSc students only).

Lectures and seminars are delivered through a variety of modes including short intensive sessions to allow for flexible booking by CPD and part-time students. There's also occasional site visits.

The taught element of the course starts from a solid grounding in urban design history and theory. It then concentrates on current urban challenges, from climate change to the pressures for development in both developed and developing countries. It culminates with the research work carried out in the Urban Design Studies Unit and teaches you the unit’s ethos and approach to urbanism.

- Guest lectures
We regularly organise a guest lecture series linked to the taught and design element of the course. The Urban Design Studies Unit also organise specialist events. In the coming session students of the course will be involved in a week-long seminar/event with the famous advocate-urbanist and writer Chuck Wolfe.

Recent speakers include:
- Joan Callis, Benedetta Tagliabue EMBT, Architects to the Scottish Parliament
- Prof Neil Spiller, Professor of Architecture and Digital Theory, Rachel Armstrong Senior Lecturer in Research and Enterprise, University of Greenwich
- Andres Duany, Principal Duany Plater Zyberk and Company
- Andy Cameron, Author of Manual for Streets, Director WSP
- Murray Grigor, Photographer and Film Maker
- Prof Ian Borden, Author and Professor of Architecture, Bartlett, UCL
- Richard Murphy OBE, Architect
- Gordon Benson, Benson and Forsyth. Museum of Scotland, National Museum of Ireland
- Professor C J Lim, Vice-Dean at The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. Has 4 RIBA President’s Medals International Teaching Awards
- Chris McAvoy, Steven Holl Architects, Glasgow School of Art Reid Building.

Assessment

Assessment criteria are linked to the learning outcomes set for each individual class and these are published in the modules descriptors which are available to students. The criteria is also explained by staff at the start of each class, to make sure that you're comfortable and clear with what is expected of you.

The assessment of studio work is developed collaboratively between staff and students. Learning outcomes are linked to criteria and performances. This increases your sense of ownership of the learning process and is integral to the course.

On successful completion of studio and classes you’ll be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. If you complete an additional research element you’ll receive an MSc in Urban Design.

Careers

Graduates leave us with a detailed knowledge and innovative skills in an area now in great demand. Past graduates are now working in:
- large practices (i.e. Rogers and Associates, Llewelyn & Davies)
- government
- academia, as teachers and researchers
- local non-governmental organisations
- local authorities
- their own practices

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis. Read more
The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis.

The course allies theory and practice in seminar-based discussions that embrace various methodological issues and perspectives, including Marxism, discourse theory, phenomenology, semiology, museology, gender, race, class, memory and oral testimony. Depending on the material you analyse in your essays and seminars, as well as the dissertation topic you choose, you can also emphasise your own intellectual and subject-specific interests.

Since its inception in the late 1990s, the MA has garnered a national and international reputation as one of the pioneering and most successful programmes of its kind. As a research-led course, it harnesses the academic expertise of staff with a recognised wealth of teaching and research excellence in subject areas such as fashion and dress history, the history and theory of advertising, photography and the mass-reproduced image, and heritage and museum studies.

Under guidance, you will be encouraged to explore the relationship between theory and practice and to develop your own skills as an independent researcher, thinker and writer.

Course structure

The History of Design and Material Culture MA draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history.

It stimulates innovative and interdisciplinary study in the history of design and material culture in both their western and non-western contexts, considering the relationship between local, national and international patterns of production, circulation, consumption and use.

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, study visits and tutorials. Considerable emphasis is placed on student involvement in the weekly seminar readings and discussions within the two thematic core modules, Exploring Objects and Mediating Objects.

Based at Pavilion Parade, a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion, teaching takes place close to the seafront and city centre amenities.

Syllabus

• Exploring Objects

The Exploring Objects module introduces you to a series of different research methods and historiographical approaches, as you interrogate and make sense of designed objects in terms of how they are designed, produced, circulated, consumed and used in everyday life. It covers the period from the late eighteenth century to the present time and typically involves discussion and debate on the following themes, theories and methods: Marxist and post-Marxist historiography; production and consumption; gender and taste; phenomenology; object-based analysis; the use of archives; and 'good writing/bad writing'. It also introduces you to the academic rigour of postgraduate dissertation research.

• Mediating Objects

This module complements Exploring Objects by focusing on the mediation between 'this one' (the object itself) and 'that one' (the object as represented in word and image). On one level, it examines how objects are translated in various texts and contexts, from museum and private collections to photographs, advertisements, film and fiction. On another level, it examines how objects are transformed through the embodied processes of everyday rituals such as gift-giving and personal oral and collective memories. The module therefore deals with the idea of intertexualities and how the identities of things and people are phenomenologically bound up with each other. By extension, you examine objects in relation to ideas concerning sex, gender, class, generation, race and ethnicity.

• Dissertation

The centrepiece of your MA studies, the dissertation is a piece of original writing between 18,000 and 20,000 words on a research topic of your own choosing. It allows you to pursue a specific research topic related to your own academic and intellectual interests in a given area of the history of design and material culture, for example fashion and dress, textiles, ceramics and glass, product design, interior design and architecture, graphic communications, advertising and photography, film, museums, collecting and curating, and design pedagogy. The dissertation is largely based on primary research, often using specialist archives and surviving historical material.

Facilities

This course makes use of the University of Brighton Design Archives, which include the archives of the Design Council, Alison Settle, FHK Henrion and the South of England Film and Video Archive.

Close professional contact with national institutions such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, as well as with local collections and centres of historical interest (such as Brighton’s unique Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, with its internationally famous collection of decorative art from the 1890s onwards), present research opportunities for students registered on the course.

The course is closely linked to our arts and humanities research division through a joint research lecture series, and we have successfully encouraged high achievers to register for the MPhil/PhD programme.

The student environment also includes the thriving postgraduate Design History Society as well as opportunities for conference presentation, professional contact and career development in the field.

Careers and employability

The course has an extremely healthy track record in helping students to take up careers in related areas of employment and further study. Many of our postgraduates have succeeded in finding work as lecturers, curators, journalists, designers and design consultants, while many others have pursued doctoral research, most often also securing prestigious funding from the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council).

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