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Masters Degrees (Museum Curation)

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This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. The programme looks at all types of museum, from art galleries to science museums, without concentrating on any particular kind.

Degree information

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-The Museum: Critical Perspectives
-Managing Museums
-Collections Management and Care
-Museum Communication

Optional modules - students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Collections Curatorship
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Cultural Memory
-Exhibition Project
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Oral History from Creation to Curation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, practical workshops, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement
Students are required to undertake a 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). This usually takes place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students write an assessed 2,500 word report at the end of the placement reflecting on their experience.

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, Croydon Museum, Event Communications, the Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, the Museum of London, RAF Museums, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Tate Britain, UCL Museums & Collections.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone to do complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Officer, Imperial War Museum
-Archivist, Madame Tussauds
-Assistant Curator, Victoria and Albert Museum
-Cataloguer, Historic Royal Palaces
-Museum Assistant, British Museum

Employability
The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Thansferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme coordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

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The contemporary art scene is evolving as artists respond to new disciplines and techniques and challenge the boundaries of their practice. Read more
The contemporary art scene is evolving as artists respond to new disciplines and techniques and challenge the boundaries of their practice. The place of art in society is changing as increasingly varied audiences interact with creativity in new ways. MA Curation at NUA is a pioneering course - the first to respond to this changing sector and to equip professionals with the broad skills and contextual understanding needed by the 21st century curator.

Focused above all on the public exhibition of contemporary art, MA Curation at NUA also recognises curation in its most enquiring sense as a way of bringing together and relating ideas, images, objects and texts for public exhibition. This intellectually stimulating course enables students to be creative and open to new ways of working as they begin to define your own specialism. Through practice and research, students are invited to experiment with curation for traditional and innovative public exhibition spheres, including;
• museums, galleries and public spaces
• digital arts, moving image and performance
• print, digital media and the internet

Through ‘hands-on’ practice throughout the course, students on MA Curation will develop key sector skills in the management of collaborative projects; the ability to lead and work within a team and an understanding of the importance and use of networks. The course will encourage students to question the ethical responsibilities of the curator and reflect on controversy within the arts.
MA Curation at NUA is distinguished by an emphasis on practical curatorial experience. Curation is understood in its broadest and most forward-thinking sense as a process of bringing together objects, still and moving image and/or texts into a coherent whole. The course appeals to a range of applicants, including graduates in Fine Art and Art History and those from non-art backgrounds with an interest in curatorial practices.

NUA has a strong reputation for high quality curatorial practice, having staged the prestigious Eastinternational between 1991-2009. The Gallery at NUA provides a showcase for exhibitions of international contemporary art and design and plays a central role in the MA Curation programme. Recently the Gallery at NUA has showcased work by artists including: Grayson Perry, Gilbert and George, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Damien Hirst, Jeremy Deller and Rachel Whiteread. MA Curation students have the opportunity to curate in the Gallery and encouraged and supported to engage in local and national opportunities.

The University has productive links with the Tate and Hayward Gallery as well as with galleries in the region. Tutors and industry guests encourage professional understanding as you develop your appreciation of location and audience and the communication of ideas, meaning and information. You will become accustomed to liaising between artists, dealers, galleries and agents as you progress on your curatorial career.

Taught by leading, established practitioners in the field and with a strong emphasis on industry lectures, workshops, visits and collaborations, the MA focuses heavily on the core professional skills needed to stand out in the competitive field of curation. Students are expected to develop a thorough understanding of current debates in contemporary art, design and media practice. Through expert tuition and regular interaction with students on other postgraduate courses at NUA, students will hone their research and critical interpretation skills.

Unit Tutor, Dr Krzysztof Fijalkowski contributes to the MA Curation and Postgraduate Research programmes at NUA. He is active as a researcher, writer, translator, curator and artist, with particular interests in the history and theory of Dada and Surrealism. Krzysztof also works on the BA Fine Art course, combining teaching in the studio and responsibility for many of the course’s Contextual Studies elements, with a special interest in the crossovers between writing, theory and practice.

Professor of Curation and Art History, Lynda Morris supervises Phd Research students and is the Senior Tutor on the MA Curation course. Professor Morris is the Curator of EASTinternational - the international open submission exhibition - which has been realised in collaboration with a series of eminent invited selectors since 1991. Her activities as a curator and a writer have been concerned with issues of perception, conceptual art, and resistance in art and politics. She was responsible for the first UK exhibitions of several now well-recognised artists including Agnes Martin (1974), Bernd & Hilla Becher (1974-75) and Gerhard Richter (1977). Professor Morris is a Principal Investigator for the major AHRC funded research project 'Picasso; Peace and Freedom' with Tate Liverpool, the Albertina (Vienna) and the Louisiana (Copenhagen). Professor Morris is currently working on a book and recently curated the exhibition As It Was As It Is Now for the Herbert Foundation Ghent 2014 and The Life Room and the City: John Wonnacott & John Lessore at Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery.

MA Curation is relevant to applicants looking to achieve a high level of professional understanding and ability and applications are welcome from outstanding students from diverse disciplines including Fine Art, Design, Film and Moving Image, Art/Design History and those interested in communicating ideas across the arts and sciences to new and existing audiences.

Scholarship and funding information is available. Norwich will be taken over by a festival of contemporary art in key venues across the city in the summer of 2016, as one of four host cities for the 8th edition of the British Art Show. The biggest touring exhibition of contemporary art in the UK has selected Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) as its lead partner in Norwich. See NUA website for details: http://www.nua.ac.uk

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Our MBA Museum Management equips you with the skills to become a successful manager or entrepreneur within the museum and gallery sector. Read more
Our MBA Museum Management equips you with the skills to become a successful manager or entrepreneur within the museum and gallery sector. If you are self-funding your studies, our MBA scholarship could offer you a £5,000 fee discount.

You gain a solid grounding in the essentials of business management, from operations and human resources to business strategy. You also learn the specifics of managing galleries and exhibitions, curation and art history, so you graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to make a meaningful contribution as a leader within the arts sector.

This is a unique degree among Anglo-American universities, drawing on strengths from two of Essex’s world renowned Schools. Essex Business School is ranked in the UK’s top 20 (Association of Business Schools) and our Art History programme, home to the highly innovative Centre for Curatorial Studies, ranks 6th for research excellence.

With our MBA Museum Management, you benefit from a fully-rounded business education, centred on the themes of innovation, entrepreneurship, sustainability and international business, yet with the added benefit of acquiring expertise in the arts sector.

This course can also be studied part-time.

Our expert staff

Essex Business School is home to internationally respected academics and practitioners, who conduct world-class research in the areas of: business ethics and corporate social responsibility; organisation studies; leadership and strategy; finance and banking; risk management and international management. You are taught by staff from a wide range of nationalities, preparing you for an international career.

Our MBA Director, Nigel Pye, has academic and private sector experience, having held several senior positions at organisations such as Ernst and Young, KPMG, Warwick Business School and Cranfield University.

In Art History, our academic staff are experts in the history, theory and practice of curating art from the Renaissance to the present, as well as more unconventional forms of visual culture, such as protest placards and medical imagery. Here are a few examples of recent or current projects by staff members:
-Dr Gavin Grindon, Lecturer in Art History and co-director of our Centre for Curatorial Studies, recently curated The Museum of Cruel Designs and Guerilla Island at Banksy's Dismaland show. He also co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, one of the best attended shows in the museum’s history. He has also widely published on activist art in leading journals such as Art History
-Dr Adrian Locke, a Visiting Fellow in Art History and Senior Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, has curated a diverse range of exhibitions, including Mexico: A Revolution in Art, 1910–1940 (2013) and Radical Geometry: Modern Art of South American from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection (2014). He also co-curated the exhibition Ai Weiwei, which opens at the Royal Academy in September 2015
-Dr Matt Lodder, Lecturer in Art History with an emphasis on modern and contemporary visual culture, is co-curating the exhibition Tattoo: Ancient Myths, Modern Meanings, which opens next year in the U.S
-Dr Michael Tymkiw, co-director of the Centre for Curatorial Studies, has a book under contract entitled Nazi Exhibition Design and Modernism. He has also just launched an interdisciplinary research project that focuses on using digital technologies to expand disability access in museums—a project that involves collaborations with several museums in Colchester and London, including firstsite and the Victoria and Albert Museum

Specialist facilities

You benefit from state-of-the-art facilities, including the new Essex Business School building - the first zero-carbon business school building in the UK.

You can enjoy a stunning working environment, including:
-A beautiful winter garden, which gives the building its own micro-climate
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Financial Market Labs to practice trading stocks and securities
-Light and spacious teaching areas
-Study pods and innovation booths for group working
-A café with an adjacent sun terrace

Our art history facilities, where several modules are taught, also enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an ongoing programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate students, including those who pursue the MBA in Museum Management
Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our curatorial students
-Our Centre for Curatorial Studies is home to staff who specialise in the history and theory of exhibition design and who curate high-profile exhibitions

Your future

Our MBA Museum Management allows you to position yourself competitively for managerial positions in museum and gallery sectors, auction houses, art insurance and art law, or to begin your own entrepreneurial venture in the cultural industries. We equip you with subject-specific knowledge and encourage you to draw on your creativity, innovation and ethical awareness when solving business challenges.

You have access to Essex Business School’s employability team, as well as the University’s Employability and Careers Centre. Together, they can provide support when seeking additional work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Business Research Methods and Skills
-International Business Environment
-Business Strategy
-People and Organisations
-Managerial Economics
-Venture Academy: Creating and Growing a New Venture
-International Marketing Strategy
-Sustainable Operations
-Accounting and Finance for Managers
-Managing Galleries and Exhibition Projects
-Critique and Curating
-Exhibition (Joint Project)
-Dissertation: MBA Museum Management

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This MA at UCL Qatar equips students with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to assume a career as a leading museum professional within Qatar, the wider Gulf region or further afield. Read more
This MA at UCL Qatar equips students with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to assume a career as a leading museum professional within Qatar, the wider Gulf region or further afield. Through practical placements, students will gain a unique insight into the developing local and international museum sector.

Degree information

This programme introduces the theories and practices of museology, emphasising their significance and relevance in the Gulf region and beyond. Key areas of museum studies are taught, such as collections management, museum, gallery and site management, exhibition development, contemporary art debates, visual studies, education and emerging digital technologies.

This MA has a total value of 180 credits.

Students take five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Exhibition Project
-Interdisciplinary Methods for Heritage Research
-Museums Policies and Practices
-Principles of Museum and Gallery Practice
-Dissertation

Optional modules
-Museum Theory and Practice: Identities, Politics and Power
-Museum Learning, Outreach and Public Engagement
-Debates in Contemporary Art Curation
-The Digital Museum
-Placement I
-Placement II
-The Book in the World

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical sessions, and structured reading. Students undertake a 20-day professional placement. Assessment is through essays, presentations, portfolios, reports, oral examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will gain an in-depth historical and theoretical background in museums and cultural heritage as well as experience in a range of relevant technical skills. They will be trained in all aspects of museums work, including collections management, education and community outreach, emerging digital technologies, exhibition design and interpretation. Graduates will be familiar with regional and global cultural heritage practices.

Employability
There is an increasing need for qualified professionals with expertise in museums in the Gulf. We expect graduates to go on to assume leading roles within museums and galleries in Qatar and elsewhere in the region and internationally, including in management, collection building, curation and outreach.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Museums are flourishing in Qatar and the region, and this programme provides unmatched opportunities to network with leading local museums and heritage professionals.

UCL Qatar is based at Education City, Doha, alongside a number of the world's most prestigious institutions. International students benefit from the unique cultural experience of studying in Qatar, where the diverse range of cultural backgrounds ensures that unique perspectives are brought to classroom discussions.

The programme suits students with a genuine interest and curiosity about museums and heritage in the Arab and Islamic world.

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This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis. Read more
This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis.

Degree information

Students are introduced to the skills of finds specialists, practical issues of artefact study, and debates about the collection, interpretation, reporting and curation of archaeological materials. They develop the ability to evaluate different approaches to artefact studies and undertake the cataloguing and analysis of an artefact assemblage.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Working with artefacts and assemblages
-Technology within Society

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree, some of the most popular choices include:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy I: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy II: Metallic Artefacts
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Experimental Archaeology
-Funerary Archaeology
-Geoarchaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Interpreting Pottery
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis

Dissertation/report
The 15,000–word dissertation normally combines a professional standard finds report with an academic overview.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions. It can include a placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit where students gain experience in the practical study and the recording of an artefact assemblage. Assessment is through an essay, a portfolio, a project proposal and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued a very wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. The main career path is working as assistants, museum curators or working in the antiquities service recording finds.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Project Team Officer, English Heritage
-Archaeologist, Museum of London Archaeology
-Museum Building Manager, Hainan and Haopioen Arts Museum
-Artefacts Assistant, Maidstone Council
-Freelance Numismatist, Self-Employed Numismatist

Employability
The degree is tailored to give graduates a solid grounding in systematically recording and documenting artefacts as well as analysing artefact assemblage. They will also have a basic understanding of creating graphs and diagrams, and analysing and assembling finds-catalogues. Without concentrating on any specific epoch, we give students the tools for understanding and systematically analysing any artefact assemblages.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Whether you plan a career as finds assistant, museum curator or plan a materials based PhD, this course provides you with the skills you need to successfully identify, describe and document artefacts and analyse assemblages. The emphasis of the course is very much on practical application, so there will be numerous handling sessions and praxis-related tasks.

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries. UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library.

UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research. Students will work on material from the institute's collection as part of their assessment. Past students on this programme have made effective use of the resources at the British Museum, the Museum of London and the Museum of London archives, the Petrie Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and other British and international museums. The Wolfson Labs provide a unique facility for scientific analyses of materials and have been used by numerous artefact students for their dissertations after the required training.

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A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations. Read more

Introduction

A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations.

Content

MA Fashion Curation is a unique opportunity to investigate the ways in which fashion and dress can be collected and displayed, and offers the opportunity to engage with theoretical discussions and debates that underpin this exciting and growing discipline. Fashion exhibitions are a key part of the national and international landscape of contemporary society, attracting some of the largest audiences to major museums. Fashion exhibitions have also become increasingly visible in department stores, galleries and the wider community. This shift represents the growing status of the curator as a central cultural mediator.

MA Fashion Curation will equip you with the skills to enter this fast paced and growing field. A key aspect of this course is the practical skills and experience gained in staging a live fashion-related exhibition. This group project presents students with an exciting collaborative opportunity to explore a range of approaches, mediums and practices that constitute the roles required in realising a curatorial project.

The changing possibilities of curating and the curator are introduced and examined through seminars, workshops, and lectures, given by LCF researchers and lecturers and key industry professionals. Students are encouraged to undertake internships whilst on the course and past placements have been at Victoria and Albert Museum, Museum of London, Kerry Taylor Auctions, Alexander McQueen Archives, Rambert Dance Company Archives, Museum of the City of New York and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Taught by a team of internationally renowned curators, including Professor Amy de la Haye and Professor Judith Clark, this course makes full use of fashion-related collections and archives both within and outside London to explore the issues and concerns that consume today's fashion curators. Areas that are explored with the MA include: displaying dress; creating 'stories' from objects; writing texts to target audiences; model-making; collecting, handling and archiving garments.

Our growing number of alumni can now be found in a perse range of organisations, including museums, galleries, universities, as well as developing freelance careers as consultants, archivists and curators.

Structure

15 months level 7 180 credits

Term One

The Past and Future of Fashion Curation (40 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)

Term Two

Collect/Recollect (40 units)
Collaborative Unit (20 credits)

Term Three

Masters Project (60 credits)

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The MSc in Film Curation offers you the opportunity to explore film programming in a variety of theoretical, historical and practical contexts. Read more
The MSc in Film Curation offers you the opportunity to explore film programming in a variety of theoretical, historical and practical contexts. It investigates the material qualities of audio-visual media and explores the history and contemporary practice of projection and exhibition in cinemas, galleries, festivals and online. Throughout the programme you’ll get to work alongside industry-leading experts in film curation through guest lectures and placements, and you’ll be encouraged to respond creatively in both academic and practical exercises.

Why this programme

◾Industry experts offering work placements and seminars represent organisations such as the National Library of Scotland’s Moving Image Archive, LUX Scotland, and Gallery of Modern Art, as well as film festivals including Africa in Motion and Glasgow Short Film Festival.
◾You will have access to the learning and archive facilities at the newly refurbished Kelvin Hall.
◾You will be studying in Glasgow, one of the leading media cities in the UK and home to an extraordinary wealth of film festivals.
◾You will be based at our Gilmorehill Centre which has its own cinema as well as extensive collection of video, DVD and digital resources.
◾The Gilmorehill Centre is home to the international journal 'Screen' and hosts the annual Screen conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world.

Programme structure

‌Students will take:
◾2 core courses (30 credits each)
◾1 work placement/creative practice course (20 credits)
◾2 optional academic courses (20 credits each)
◾Dissertation or audiovisual essay (60 credits)

Teaching methods will include lectures and seminars, workshops led by visiting professionals, and field trips organised to archives and festivals. You will be assessed through a variety of methods including practice-based activities, oral presentations, as well as different written assignments.

A number of industry experts are contributing to the programme through a variety of exciting activities and workshops. In 2016-2017, these include:
◾Tour with artist Chris Leslie of the ‘Disappearing Glasgow’ exhibition at Glasgow School of Art
◾Guide to the projection box at Gilmorehill Centre cinema
◾Visit to the Moving Image Museum archives at Kelvin Hall
◾Workshop led by the National Railway Museum’s film curator
◾Silent film screening with live musical accompaniment
◾35mm screening of Singin’ in the Rain
◾Lectures and workshops led by guests from Document Film Festival, Hippodrome Silent Film Festival, Park Circus, Glasgow Film Theatre, among others, on audiences, funding and exhibition space

Career prospects

The MSc is designed for those with some background in film, television, media or communication studies (or related fields, such as art history) who are contemplating, or developing, a career in curation, community and educational projects, events, research or criticism.

The programme is designed to provide you with a range of skills that will enable you to develop as:
◾a creative and cultural entrepreneur
◾an outreach officer in a museum, archive or gallery
◾a curator or programmer at film festivals
◾a researcher for the film and television industries
◾a creative practitioner
◾an academic researcher

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Our Cities and Cultures MA programme combines the study of cultural geography with a specific focus on urban cultures, both past and present. Read more

Overview

Our Cities and Cultures MA programme combines the study of cultural geography with a specific focus on urban cultures, both past and present. It draws upon the latest developments in cultural geography and urban studies to provide advanced and critical understandings of how cities are socially produced, imagined, represented and contested. Modules examine the relationships between urban space and power through themes that include empire, migration and postcolonialism. They also explore the meanings and politics of spaces in diverse cities by engaging with original texts as well as the built environment, art practices, literature, performance, film, exhibitions and museum curation. Core research training in geographical thought and practice equips you to undertake your own research in this field. MRes version of this course is also available.

This programme:

- takes your knowledge, understanding and skills to an advanced level through a research-led programme that provides flexibility for you to pursue your own interests
- introduces innovative approaches to cities and urban life that make the most of Queen Mary's location in London, and that draw upon the School's strong connections with museums and artists
- provides a unique basis for careers in the cultural and urban sectors, as well as for further research through its distinctive emphasis on urban practices and on creative collaborations between geographers, artists and curators.

Why study at QMUL Geography?

- Professional and friendly environment: We are recognised as an international centre for excellence in teaching and research. Our work is at the forefront of human geography, shaping debates and providing significant new insight and understanding. We are also known for our friendly, collegial and welcoming ethos and are home to many of contemporary human geography's best known scholars.
- Research excellence: Almost 80 per cent of our research outputs (books and articles) are rated as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*) placing us 5th in the UK for this measure. Our research scores increased across all areas in the latest UK score of research excellence (REF 2014) and we're ranked joint 11th for geography in the UK overall. We're also proud to feature in the top 100 departments in the world to study geography (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016).
- Employability: 94% of respondents from our postgraduates were in work or further study six month after graduation; 91% at graduate level (DLHE 2015).
- Capital location: We're a School that cares about the world beyond the university, working with a range of community groups, artists, cultural and heritage institutions and policy makers, particularly here in east London. Our passion is to demonstrate through research and teaching the intellectual and political significance of geographical research and understanding. We encourage our students to become part of this vibrant intellectual culture.

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The Design Innovation MA/MSc provides a framework for developing innovative design products in all areas of design, with a strategic understanding of marketing and business strategy. Read more
The Design Innovation MA/MSc provides a framework for developing innovative design products in all areas of design, with a strategic understanding of marketing and business strategy. It enables you to enter the creative industries at a high level of responsibility, ranging from establishing your own businesses to working in multinational corporations. You will complete an individual major project (either creative practice-based or research-focused) which runs throughout the course, supported by relevant taught modules. You will also be supported by specialist academic expertise across a range of design areas.

You can tailor the course to your career aspirations by selecting a specific pathway of study from a diverse range of options, which comprises: Footwear Design; Furniture Design; Interior Design; Digital Design; Museum and Exhibition Design; Product Design; Retail Design; or Visual Communication Design. Alternatively, you can elect to simply focus on Design Innovation in its own right. Students benefit from visiting lecturers who specialise in exhibition design, museum curation, retail design, sustainable design, business planning and creative digital design. At the same time, a range of industry, museum, charity, and arts organisation representatives regularly present and coordinate live projects.

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On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession. Read more
On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession.

Based within a thriving art college environment at the university's central Brighton Grand Parade campus, you will learn from experienced professionals in a welcoming atmosphere that allows craftspeople to discuss and develop their ideas as a community.

You will develop both your creative skills and your ways of thinking. You will work with people who understand craft both as a profession and as a personal expression. Your options within this specialist course can include extensive work with a wide range of materials and professions, with expert provision across metal, ceramics, polymers, wood and more.

Throughout the course you'll be doing research and experimentation using innovative thinking and approaches to craft practice. To get your masters degree, you'll demonstrate both how you work and how you think as a craftsperson, with an extended essay and craft-in-context modules allowing you to develop your ideas around your own practice and the wider context of your craft.

Our MA strives to help you towards exemplary creative output. Through exploration of the traditional discipline categories to the evolution of future interpretations and directions, you will be encouraged to fully engage with what the craft scene is today.

Why study with us?

• Professional opportunities across the craft industry, with options in business and entrepreneurial practice, community outreach and work placements

• Lecturers who are dynamic and active researchers, creative designers, craft practitioners and leaders in their fields – both nationally and internationally

• Departmental expertise in a range of materials and professions, including furniture, ceramics, jewellery, product, polymers and metals

• Cross-disciplinary exploration of sustainability, craft heritage, material experimentation, and environmental, medical and digital technologies

• Fully equipped workshops in wood, metal, ceramics, polymers and composites, with digital technologies supported by a highly skilled team of technical demonstrators

• Department that recognises, nurtures and demonstrates craft's role in and capacity for cultural, social, economic and environmental benefit

Syllabus

While focusing on the physical act of making, the Craft MA also covers the theory of craft, allowing practitioners to conceptualise and contextualise their practice with deeper insight. The history, theory and traditions of craft form a core component in every module, and are delivered through lectures, presentations and studio discussion groups.

Modules:

Craft Practice
Craft in Context
Research Skills and Training
Creative Enquiry
Masters project

Options:

You will be able to choose from a range of modules from across our arts and humanities courses. Options include:

Sustainable Design Presents
Political Economy of Globalisation
Professional Entreprenurial Development
Fine Art: Mentoring
Historical and Critical Studies Dissertation
Professional Entreprenurial Development
Professional Experience with Industrial Placement

Careers and employability

After completing the course successfully, you will be able – as a master of your craft – to take opportunities across the craft professions, either in your own practice as an entrepreneur or in the use of craft for social and community engagement. Craftspeople find these opportunities in a range of fields including fine arts, design, museum curation, teaching, prop making and interior design. The course also provides a route into academia, teaching and research.

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Taking heritage management into the 21st century. Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education. Read more
Taking heritage management into the 21st century

Why choose this course?

Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education.

It draws on the Archaeology department’s strengths in both Archaeological Information Sciences and Cultural Heritage Management – offering a unique qualification that combines the theoretical and ground-level study of heritage management with practical training in new technologies, from database systems and virtual-reality modelling to social media platforms.

You will be working with a team of technology pioneers and computing scholars, who lead the field in researching and developing interpretative content and digital applications for the heritage sector worldwide.
• Gain practical experience in new and mobile technologies used to publish, archive, analyse, visualise and interpret archaeological information.
• Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
• Develop essential IT knowledge and skills required in heritage-sector careers.
• Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The course draws on the skills and expertise of leading scholars in heritage management, interpretation and digital media, alongside staff from the Archaeology Data Service, which has been the UK digital archive for heritage data since 1997. It also has strong links with museums and other cultural heritage institutions in York, and work placements are a key feature of the programme.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Explore how digital technologies are used to present and curate heritage information.
• Gain experience of using the digital and internet technologies in disseminating, publishing and archiving heritage information.
• Develop your practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other heritage analysis and visualisation technologies.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Digital Heritage course is designed for people seeking professional training in digital archiving, visualisation, museums and heritage sector curation, interpretation, and education. It is ideally suited for graduates of Archaeology, History, Art History, Museum Studies, Education, Anthropology, Cultural Studies and related fields, and for candidates with proven IT experience.

What can it lead to?

The skills developed on this course lead graduates into careers in archaeological computing, archive management, education, marketing and IT services for commercial organisations, museums and the public sector. Equally, the course can be a stepping stone to further research at doctoral level.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, offering you the chance to apply your digital skillset in a professional or academic setting.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the heritage sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the heritage sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual-reality modelling).

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other work providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

Graduates of the MSc in Digital Heritage will be well equipped to work in IT-related roles in heritage management or presentation, in museums and education, and with a range of other heritage organisations.

By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research in the field of digital heritage;
-Critically evaluate claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem;
-Locate and use relevant information on the internet and add materials to it;
-Create an electronic text;
-Design and implement a simple relational database;
-Create effective applications in CAD and VR;
-Evaluate the cultural significance of sites, places and artefacts;
-Recognise areas of potential conflict in heritage management and museum practice;
-Evaluate the implications of stakeholder values and interests for heritage management and heritage interpretation/education;
-Appraise the utility of interpretative and educational media both on site and in museums.

The course opens the door to a wide range of careers in heritage-related organisations and in many other sectors, including:
-Archive management
-Museum curation
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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The Faculty of Information combines strengths in the stewardship and curation of cultural heritage (libraries, archives, and museums) with leadership in the future of information practice as society is transformed by the rise of digital technologies. Read more
The Faculty of Information combines strengths in the stewardship and curation of cultural heritage (libraries, archives, and museums) with leadership in the future of information practice as society is transformed by the rise of digital technologies.

The Master of Museum Studies program prepares students for future involvement in museums and related cultural agencies. The program examines the theoretical body of knowledge of museology as a necessary context for professional practice. The Faculty of Information also provides a Concurrent Registration Option whereby students may register concurrently in the Master of Information and Master of Museum Studies programs.

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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more
This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

Degree information

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (15 credits each), three optional modules (15 credits each), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement. A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), nine months full-time or flexible study up to 5 years is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years is offered.

Core modules
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Internet Technologies
-Introduction to Programming and Scripting
-Server Programming and Structured Data
-XML

Optional modules - students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following:
-Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
-Affective Interaction
-Computer Music
-Design Practice
-Electronic Publishing
-Fundamentals of Information Science
-Geographical Information Systems
-Historical Bibliography
-Interaction Design
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Introduction to Digitisation
-Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
-Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
-Manuscript Studies
-Multimedia Computing
-User-Centred Evaluation Methods

Dissertation/report
All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercices, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement
Students undertake a work placement. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum, National Theatre, British Library, Marx Memorial Library, Islington Museum, Ubiquity Press, UCL Communications, and UCL Art Museum.

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, Knowledge 4 All Foundation; in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Digital Producer, Kaldor Group
-Software Engineer, Semcat
-Librarian, University of Crete
-Digital Project Manager, Knowledge 4 All Foundation (K4A)
-Technical Operations Manger, Kaldor

Employability
The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lecturers drawn from experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum, National Theatre, British Library, Marx Memorial Library, Islington Museum, Ubiquity Press, UCL Communications, and UCL Art Museum.

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The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. Read more
The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. This programme also enables international collaborations to take place across the academic and professional field of museum studies.

Degree information

The programme enables students to carry out a practical and theoretical study on education in museums and galleries. University-based sessions are supplemented by teaching sessions at national, regional and university collections. Additionally students gain flexible access to historic and contemporary sites and full-time students have a 20-day research-based placement in a museum, gallery or heritage site.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation and portfolio (60 credits).

Core modules
-Issues in Museum Studies
-Responsive Museums: Inclusion and Outreach in Practice

Optional modules
-Alternative Models for Art Education
-Constructing and Interpreting Heritage Culture
-Contemporary Art and Artists in Education
-Material and Virtual Cultures: Transforming the Museum and Gallery Experience

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 14,000 words with a portfolio equivalent to 6,000 words for full-time students and a 10,000-word report for flexible students.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is undertaken by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) staff and visiting lecturers in a variety of forms including lectures, seminars, workshops, visual presentations with a substantial part of the programme involving off-site teaching in museums, galleries and heritage sites. Assessment includes 5,000-word assignments and electronic media.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as: education officers at historical sites, digital programme managers in national art and design museums, heads of learning, heads of interpretation and curation in museums and galleries, and heads of research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Learning Manager (Audience Development), Design Museum
-Programme Manager, Dulwich Picture Gallery
-Heritage Intern, South Somerset District Council
-Science Educator, Natural History Museum

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Museums and Galleries in Education MA has a long and distinguished history for both those wishing to learn about the educational potential of the cultural sector and those wishing to expand their existing careers.

UCL Institute of Education is ideally situated for students to make excellent use of an extraordinary range of institutions, many within walking distance of the Art, Design and Museology studios.

Moreover the MA works in close collaboration with the Art and Design in Education MA tutors and together they have created an international research-active environment in which to share knowledge and professional expertise.

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Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential. Read more
Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include Early Modern art and architecture; the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

To supplement what you learn in the classroom, frequent staff-led visits to London museums and galleries will expose you to the some of the world’s best museums and galleries, and you will be strongly encouraged to apply for a placement in order to gain experience in the museum and gallery world. On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. Our Art History programme is 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

This course is available on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example Structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Art History and Theory - MA
-Dissertation - MA Schemes
-Researching Art History
-Art, Science, Knowledge (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Critique and Curating (optional)
-Curating Inside Out (optional)
-Exhibition (Joint Project) (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Topics in Art History (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)

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