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Applications are invited to complete a Masters by Research (MScR) with focus on Spinal Muscular Atrophy in the laboratory of Dr Lyndsay Murray. Read more
Applications are invited to complete a Masters by Research (MScR) with focus on Spinal Muscular Atrophy in the laboratory of Dr Lyndsay Murray. The MSc by Research is a full-time 1-year research project. This program has no taught component and is therefore only suitable for highly motivated students with a clear idea of their research interests and goals, with significant theoretical or practical knowledge of a chosen field. An MSc by full-time research provides an excellent training in laboratory research and a strong grounding for further study at the level of PhD.

The Murray lab is focused on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms which underlie the childhood motor neuron disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). SMA is a devastating disorder which affects around 1:6000 live births. Affected children have a very poor prognosis. In the most severe cases, this disease is fatal before two years of age. The Murray lab predominantly uses mouse models of this disease to investigate defects in motor neurons, and apply this information to develop potential treatments.

How to apply

Those interested should send a CV and covering letter to Lyndsay Murray at .

Funding

A scholarship is available to cover the fees associated with this degree, to the value of £6000.

Techniques

Muscle dissection and immunofluorescence
Confocal Microscopy and neuromuscular junction imaging
NMJ morphological analysis and whole motor unit reconstruction
Transgenic mouse maintenance, cross breeding, intramuscular injections and assessing outcome measures
PCR, q-RT-PCR, western blotting

References

Murray LM., Beauvais A., Bhanot K. and R., K. (2012) Defects in Neuromuscular Junction Remodelling in the Smn2B/- Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Neurobiology of disease, 49C: 57-67
Murray LM, Beauvais A, Gibeault S, Courtney NL, Kothary R. (2015) Transcriptional Profiling of Differentially Vulnerable Motor Neurons at Pre-symptomatic Stage in the Smn2B/- Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Acta Neuropathologica Communications. 3:55-72

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History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Read more
History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Postgraduate study in this area trains you at a high level in looking at, thinking about and researching art and its histories.

Birkbeck's MA History of Art offers the opportunity to study with internationally recognised experts. Our teaching staff are defining the field, conducting ground-breaking research in periods from medieval to contemporary, focusing on painting, sculpture, print culture, architecture, photography, digital art and museology.

The MA History of Art exposes you to key art historical approaches, and allows you to focus in depth on areas and periods of particular interest to you, in early and modern (including contemporary) periods, through taught options (see an indicative list of modules on the 'course structure' tab) and independent research. The course also offers opportunities for work placements with London museums, galleries and archives.

The course develops your visual acuity and your understanding of art's histories, while stimulating critical debate and stretching your research skills. In addition to independent written work, you will take part in group discussion, give oral presentations and engage with the Department of History of Art's research culture.

In all of this, you will work closely with our staff while also benefiting from our diverse and vibrant student body of all ages and backgrounds. The teaching programme is enriched by museum and site visits, visiting speakers, screenings and opportunities to get involved as volunteers in research and community outreach activities. The department also offers an exciting study trip every spring.

Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the Department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the postgraduate Research Seminar, which brings art historians from all over the UK and beyond to speak at Birkbeck; the biennial Murray Lecture; the Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for Humanities.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our history of art programmes throughout the year.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
You will work closely with leading international experts in the history of art.
You can choose to specialise in a wide range of periods and geographies, from medieval European architecture and cityscapes to contemporary global art practices.
You can study flexibly, full-time or part-time, with all teaching in the evenings.
On class visits and in your independent research you will have access to London's world-class art collections, museums and libraries.
Your fellow students are from a wide range of backgrounds and are often already working in the field, offering a high level of discussion and excellent networking opportunities.
You will have access to the Birkbeck Library and an in-house resources centre. In addition, our location in Bloomsbury offers excellent access to specialist libraries in the University of London. These include the University of London Library, Institute of Historical Research, Warburg Institute and School of Oriental and African Studies, together with the major national resource of the British Library.
You will also have easy access to specialist art libraries not far from Birkbeck, including the library of the Courtauld Institute of Art, the Royal Institute of British Architects library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), as well as the great visual resources of the British Museum, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Britain, Tate Modern and V&A, commercial galleries and salesrooms. Temporary exhibition galleries like the Barbican Gallery, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Hayward Gallery and Royal Academy also make London a particularly good place in which to undertake research.
You can participate in the rich research culture of the Department of History of Art.
Keep up-to-date with our research on the Birkbeck History of Art blog.

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The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. Read more

Introduction

The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Duration: Full time: MLitt-12 months; Diploma-9 months; Certificate-3 months Part time: MLitt-27 months; Diploma 21 months; Certificate-3 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor Kathleen Jamie

Course objectives

The course is designed to develop the talents of creative individuals, allowing them to focus in-depth on a project while offering them creative encounters with a range of genres and working practices, drawing on Stirling’s rich expertise in contemporary literature, publishing, film, media, and journalism.
 Students learn skills in listening and diplomacy, advocacy, and in producing fine, nuanced writing.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Assessment for the workshops will depend on the literary form chosen (prose or poetry) but will be based on reading journals and/or working notebooks, book reviews and in some cases completed pieces of creative work. Assessment for each option module will likewise vary but may include a critical essay, a journal, a creative project.
The most significant piece of work in the course is the creative dissertation, due at the end of the summer. This will be circa 15,000 words of prose or a collection of circa 15 poems. A dissertation may be a portfolio of shorter texts – stories, personal essays, poems – or part of a novel. It is expected to be revised and polished original work, written and presented to professional standards.
Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

From September 2013 this course will be taught by Stirling’s Creative Writing team: poet and essayist Kathleen Jamie, and fiction writers Meaghan Delahunt and Liam Murray Bell.
Kathleen Jamie is an internationally recognised poet, and winner of, amongst other awards, the Scottish Book of the Year Award, a Forward Prize, and the Costa Poetry Prize.
Meaghan Delahunt has published three novels, with Granta. Originally from Melbourne, her work has won The Commonwealth Prize for First Book, and been shortlisted for the Scottish Fiction Book of the Year.
Liam Murray Bell’s first novel ‘So It Is’ attracted Arts Council funding. Set in Belfast, it was hailed as ‘a beautifully written debut novel’ concerning the Troubles. His latest novel 'The Busker' is a Scottish Book Trust 'Pick' for 2014.
All three tutors also write non-fiction, reviews, essays etc and are popular figures at festivals, literary events, and residencies. We offer a dynamic mix of youth and experience, and encourage students in an atmosphere which is both rigorous and creative. Regular visits from other established writers, publishers, editors etc offer a wide view of the literary life.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Our Creative Writing students find a place for their creativity in many fields: teaching, broadcasting, publishing, community work. Many chose to become self-employed as writers and tutors. Some develop their interest further by studying for a PhD. Some actually publish books!

- Skills you can develop through this course
Graduates in Creative Writing will be highly literate self-managers capable of realising sustained projects using their own initiative and creativity. They will be emotionally intelligent and diplomatic and have skills in:
----Communication and presentation - being able to articulate complex ideas and information in imaginative, comprehensible and entertaining forms. They will be able to present ideas in verbal and written forms to audiences in a range of situations; and to encourage, evaluate and assist with the work of others.
----Self-management – students will have the ability to work independently, set goals and meet deadlines. They will be able to work with creativity and imagination to meet challenges, and to respond positively to change and uncertainty.
----Critical engagement – students will have the ability to formulate independent judgements, articulate arguments and research relevant material, presenting their findings in engaging and creative ways.

- Chances to expand your horizons
In any given year a number of course-specific talks and literary events are arranged for and by the students. These include but are not limited to:
----visits from literary agents and or publishers
----public events by poets and novelists (with students’ input and assistance)
----visits to research centres

- Where are our graduates now?
As well as becoming professional writers our students find employment in many sectors. Some students have gone on to further study, in particular the creative writing PhD. Others are teachers, editors, librarians, some work in publishing.
Our course is particularly attractive to students are already well established in careers, or even retired and who take our MLitt later in life to enhance their skills and develop new creative prospects.

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This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham is developing a strong emphasis on a renewed engagement with contemporary Catholicism, and now boasts a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology. Read more
This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham is developing a strong emphasis on a renewed engagement with contemporary Catholicism, and now boasts a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology. For more information, please contact Professor Paul Murray ()

Course Structure

Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Dissertation

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Patristic Exegesis
-Catholic Social Thought

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology &

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission details

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level.

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Read more
History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Postgraduate study in this area trains you at a high level in looking at, thinking about and researching art and its histories.

Birkbeck's MA History of Art offers the opportunity to study with internationally recognised experts. Our teaching staff are defining the field, conducting ground-breaking research in periods from medieval to contemporary, focusing on painting, sculpture, print culture, architecture, photography, digital art and museology.

The MA History of Art exposes you to key art historical approaches, and allows you to focus in depth on areas and periods of particular interest to you, in early and modern (including contemporary) periods, through taught options (see an indicative list of modules on the 'course structure' tab) and independent research. The course also offers opportunities for work placements with London museums, galleries and archives.

The course develops your visual acuity and your understanding of art's histories, while stimulating critical debate and stretching your research skills. In addition to independent written work, you will take part in group discussion, give oral presentations and engage with the Department of History of Art's research culture.

In all of this, you will work closely with our staff while also benefiting from our diverse and vibrant student body of all ages and backgrounds. The teaching programme is enriched by museum and site visits, visiting speakers, screenings and opportunities to get involved as volunteers in research and community outreach activities. The department also offers an exciting study trip every spring.

Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the Department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the postgraduate Research Seminar, which brings art historians from all over the UK and beyond to speak at Birkbeck; the biennial Murray Lecture; the Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for Humanities.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our history of art programmes throughout the year.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
You will work closely with leading international experts in the history of art.
You can choose to specialise in a wide range of periods and geographies, from medieval European architecture and cityscapes to contemporary global art practices.
You can study flexibly, full-time or part-time, with all teaching in the evenings.
On class visits and in your independent research you will have access to London's world-class art collections, museums and libraries.
Your fellow students are from a wide range of backgrounds and are often already working in the field, offering a high level of discussion and excellent networking opportunities.
You will have access to the Birkbeck Library and an in-house resources centre. In addition, our location in Bloomsbury offers excellent access to specialist libraries in the University of London. These include the University of London Library, Institute of Historical Research, Warburg Institute and School of Oriental and African Studies, together with the major national resource of the British Library.
You will also have easy access to specialist art libraries not far from Birkbeck, including the library of the Courtauld Institute of Art, the Royal Institute of British Architects library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), as well as the great visual resources of the British Museum, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Britain, Tate Modern and V&A, commercial galleries and salesrooms. Temporary exhibition galleries like the Barbican Gallery, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Hayward Gallery and Royal Academy also make London a particularly good place in which to undertake research.
You can participate in the rich research culture of the Department of History of Art.
Keep up-to-date with our research on the Birkbeck History of Art blog.

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Photography has become the major form of image-making and visual communication since its development in the nineteenth century. Its importance has been recognised in many areas of scholarship. Read more
Photography has become the major form of image-making and visual communication since its development in the nineteenth century. Its importance has been recognised in many areas of scholarship: history of art, media and cultural studies, literature, memory and memorialisation, gender and identity, philosophy and law. Its role in all fields of the arts and sciences, including those most personal, is being expanded, renewed and questioned by the mushrooming of digital culture.

This programme enables you to learn about - and to negotiate your individual path through - historical and contemporary photographic cultures, in order to develop your interests, whether your engagement with the medium is academic, artistic, personal or vocational.

After an initial introductory core module, and with tutorial guidance, the programme allows you to specialise through your selection of option modules and topics for your research project and dissertation. Options cover a wide range of photographic practices and cultures, past and present, and allow you to explore diverse methodologies and internationally 'local' practices. The course also offers opportunities for work placements with London museums, galleries and archives.

You will develop subject-specific and transferable research, critical and writing skills that will enhance your career opportunities in the field and beyond, whether in academia or teaching, photography as a practice, galleries and museums, or in the media. The programme is also ideally suited to preparing students with a practice-based background considering a PhD, academic or practice-based.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our history of art programmes throughout the year.

As well as regular museum and gallery visits, the department offers an exciting study trip every spring.

Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the postgraduate Research Seminar, which brings art historians from all over the UK and beyond to speak at Birkbeck; the biennial Murray lecture; the Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.

Staff teaching on this programme

Dr Patrizia Di Bello (Course Director)
Dr Suzannah Biernoff
Dr Fiona Candlin
Professor Annie E Coombes
Professor Mark Crinson
Professor Steve Edwards
Dr Tag Gronberg
Dr Akane Kawakami
Dr Gabriel Koureas
Dr Luciana Martins
Professor Lynda Nead
Dr Leslie Topp

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Unique international coverage of photographic cultures, making use of modules offered across the School of Arts.
Taught by renowned research-active academics and writers from a variety of disciplines, including history of art, media and cultural studies, journalism, modern languages and the humanities.
Cross- and interdisciplinary approach to the study of photography in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
Research culture and networking opportunities offered by the Birkbeck History and Theory of Photography Research Centre.
You will have access to the Birkbeck Library and an in-house slide library and self-access centre (including the Vasari Digital Media Research Centre).
You will also have access to the Jo Spence Memorial Library and Terry Dennett Archive.
There are opportunities for you to become involved in curating and organising exhibitions in the Peltz Gallery in the School of Arts.
Our location in Bloomsbury offers excellent access to specialist libraries and archives in the University of London. These include the University of London Library, Institute of Historical Research, Warburg Institute and School of Oriental and African Studies, together with the major national resource of the British Library.
Exclusive visits to photographic archives, and group visits to exhibitions, talks and events.
You will also have easy access to specialist libraries and photographic archives, including the Courtauld Institute of Art, the National Art Library and the photographic collection in the Prints and Drawings Study Room at the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Museum of London, the National Portrait Gallery (Heinz Archives), the Photographers’ Gallery and the Tate Gallery. We are also near many commercial galleries, photography book specialist dealers and exhibition spaces such as the Barbican, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Hayward Gallery, INIVA and the many other places that exhibit photographs from time to time.

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Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher. Read more
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher.

Course overview

The MA Historical Research is for students who want to develop their understanding of history and of the nature of historical research. It is a flexible course that will encourage you to develop as an independent researcher. You will be able to pursue your interests in history while discovering the ways in which historians work. You will also engage with the intellectual, practical and social facets of the profession.

Core modules emphasise the nature of the discipline or historical research, its evolution (History in the Past or Historians on History) and the preparatory work for independent research (The Profession of the Historian or the Dissertation Feasibility Study). These modules will give you the grounding needed to engage with your own research project in the dissertation module.

Design your MA studies according to your preferred methods of learning. If you prefer to work independently you may choose to opt for the Extended History Dissertation, whereas if you prefer more taught elements you can opt for the History Dissertation. This will allow you to place more or less emphasis on independent work and research. The Extended History Dissertation is a great opportunity for those wanting to move on to further research or who want to develop a career in which research is a key element. In both cases, the project will be negotiated with the teaching team to reflect both you and your lecturers’ research interests.

The course is designed to implement the research-led curriculum of the university in which you become involved in research through the guidance of research-active members of staff - all staff members on the teaching team are research active.

You will graduate with a firm grounding in the way history evolves through an understanding of the nature of the discipline in all its diversity and of the challenges it faces. This, combined with an engagement with a specific subject area, will foster a critical understanding of history, necessary for a wide range of careers in research, academia, law, journalism and the cultural sector.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core module:
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-Dissertation Feasibility study (30 Credits)
-The profession of the historian (15 Credits)
-The Profession of the historian (Symposium/Webinar) (15 Credits)

Dissertation modules:
-History Dissertation (60 Credits)
-Extended History Dissertation (90 Credits)

Optional modules (for students choosing the Dissertation module HISM40) would typically include:
-Suicide Until the Reformation
-Suicide Since the Reformation
-Law, Family and Community Relations 1550-1800
-Law, Treason and Rebellion 1550-1800
-Britain Between the Wars: The Changing Party System
-Britain Between the Wars: The Challenges of the Inter War Years
-Foundations of Liberty - Obedience and Resistance
-Foundations of liberty - Religious toleration
-Human Rights in History: Ideas and Movements
-Human Rights in History: Organizations, Activists and Campaigns
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920

You will normally choose your options during the induction week when the full list of optional modules available that year will be presented to you. The number of optional modules offered will depend on the size of the cohort and the availability of staff. Not all options will be available every year. In any one academic year no more than three optional modules (3 x 15 credits) will be offered. Optional modules all run in Semester 2.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to history, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-House of Commons Parliamentary Papers including bills, registers and journals
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers, with full runs of 48 titles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database

Archives
The Murray Library at the University also contains the physical archive of the North East England Mining Archive and Resource Centre. This contains mining records, technical reports, trade union records and health & safety information.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of professions, highlighting as it does critical and analytical skills and an ability to develop and effectively advance an argument. A large number of transferable skills will be gained: research skills, writing skills, presentation skills, analytical and critical skills. These will be valuable in a huge range of careers and activities.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, with a focus on the way research skills can be transferred to the work place.

History by nature is a subject that includes a number of transferable skills such as critical thinking, collecting and analysing data critically, working independently and to a deadline, developing a coherent argument, writing, and oral skills. The QAA Subject Benchmark statement for History (December 2014) lists the some following (§3.3):
-Self discipline
-Independence of mind, and initiative
-A questioning disposition and the ability to formulate and pursue clearly defined questions and enquiries
-Ability to work with others, and to have respect for others' reasoned views
-Ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and familiarity with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information
-Analytical ability, and the capacity to consider and solve problems, including complex problems to which there is no single solution
-Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of both oral and written expression
-Imaginative insight and creativity
-Awareness of ethical issues and responsibilities that arise from research into the past and the reuse of the research and writing of others

These transferable skills will be fostered through each module and particularly emphasised in core modules. Furthermore, the research skills module The profession of the historian Symposium/Webinar will involve the organisation of a mini symposium. You will be expected to engage with some of the administrative and practical skills involved in organising an academic event.

During the dissertation feasibility study, you will be expected to deliver papers to an audience of staff and peers, allowing you to practice your oral and presentational skills.

MA Historical Research graduates can expect to be employed in:
-Teaching
-Archives
-Libraries
-Museums
-Journalism
-Law

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Recent data and predictions on the forthcoming rate of urbanisation make cities the most common living environment of the future. Read more

Why this course?

Recent data and predictions on the forthcoming rate of urbanisation make cities the most common living environment of the future.

What kind of life will it be for the seven billion people who will live in existing or developing cities? Cities hold tremendous potential, but at the same time are sources of stress, inequalities and pollution. We're working to improve cities to better support fulfilling and diverse lifestyles.

Urban design has an important role in determining both the current and future form of cities. The responsibility for the development and management of cities is becoming increasingly shared.

This course is designed for practitioners and students to enhance their understanding of the city as a complex and dynamic system.

While your focus will be on physical planning and the design of urban spaces and buildings, the various influencing factors that affect form will also be considered.

The major topic is the European metropolis, or city region, within the context of globalisation. You’ll learn to develop appropriate strategies for sustainable urban development. This will encompass social, political, economic, environmental, architectural, aesthetic and psychological aspects.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/urbandesign/

You’ll study

Your course is delivered through studio work, lectures, seminars and a research project.

The studio involves work on the design of a complex urban area. This includes the levels of the entire city, the neighbourhood and the individual public space defined by urban architecture.

The course is strongly linked to the Urban Design Studies Unit's research agenda. All that is taught in both classes and studio is based on our excellent research record and helps advance it.

The department is in a partnership board with the department of Urban Studies at Glasgow University. Its renowned teachers and researchers contribute a real estate and policy and practice overview to the course.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).
We offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

This MSc course has recently gained accreditation from the Royal Town Planning Institute as a specialist course.

Student competitions

Students have previously won:
- The Urban Design Group Award
- The RTPI Scotland Chapter Award
- The Urbanpromo International Jury Design 1st Prize

If you come from a non-design based discipline, please explain in your Statement of Purpose where your interest in urbanism comes from, and try and give us an overview of your knowledge in the area. We would be delighted to review a portfolio, if you have one, of any work you might have collected relevant to the subject of the course.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Courses are taught through lectures, seminars and studio work as well as a piece of research (MSc students only).

Lectures and seminars are delivered through a variety of modes including short intensive sessions to allow for flexible booking by CPD and part-time students. There's also occasional site visits.

The taught element of the course starts from a solid grounding in urban design history and theory. It then concentrates on current urban challenges, from climate change to the pressures for development in both developed and developing countries. It culminates with the research work carried out in the Urban Design Studies Unit and teaches you the unit’s ethos and approach to urbanism.

- Guest lectures
We regularly organise a guest lecture series linked to the taught and design element of the course. The Urban Design Studies Unit also organise specialist events. In the coming session students of the course will be involved in a week-long seminar/event with the famous advocate-urbanist and writer Chuck Wolfe.

Recent speakers include:
- Joan Callis, Benedetta Tagliabue EMBT, Architects to the Scottish Parliament
- Prof Neil Spiller, Professor of Architecture and Digital Theory, Rachel Armstrong Senior Lecturer in Research and Enterprise, University of Greenwich
- Andres Duany, Principal Duany Plater Zyberk and Company
- Andy Cameron, Author of Manual for Streets, Director WSP
- Murray Grigor, Photographer and Film Maker
- Prof Ian Borden, Author and Professor of Architecture, Bartlett, UCL
- Richard Murphy OBE, Architect
- Gordon Benson, Benson and Forsyth. Museum of Scotland, National Museum of Ireland
- Professor C J Lim, Vice-Dean at The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. Has 4 RIBA President’s Medals International Teaching Awards
- Chris McAvoy, Steven Holl Architects, Glasgow School of Art Reid Building.

Assessment

Assessment criteria are linked to the learning outcomes set for each individual class and these are published in the modules descriptors which are available to students. The criteria is also explained by staff at the start of each class, to make sure that you're comfortable and clear with what is expected of you.

The assessment of studio work is developed collaboratively between staff and students. Learning outcomes are linked to criteria and performances. This increases your sense of ownership of the learning process and is integral to the course.

On successful completion of studio and classes you’ll be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. If you complete an additional research element you’ll receive an MSc in Urban Design.

Careers

Graduates leave us with a detailed knowledge and innovative skills in an area now in great demand. Past graduates are now working in:
- large practices (i.e. Rogers and Associates, Llewelyn & Davies)
- government
- academia, as teachers and researchers
- local non-governmental organisations
- local authorities
- their own practices

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

Read less
Sunderland Business School is ranked Best in the North East for Course Satisfaction by The Guardian University Guide 2015. This course is particularly aimed at graduates who do not have the work experience needed to undertake an MBA. Read more
Sunderland Business School is ranked Best in the North East for Course Satisfaction by The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Course overview

This course is particularly aimed at graduates who do not have the work experience needed to undertake an MBA. We welcome applications from graduates of any discipline.

You will develop a wide range of competencies that are essential for a successful managerial career. Modules include ‘Developing Skills for Business Leadership’, ‘Managing and Leading People’ and ‘Global Corporate Strategy’. You will also study marketing, operations and financial management. The course culminates in a major project with hands-on application of your new skills and knowledge.

Our teaching is informed by the latest academic research, including research by Sunderland Business School. We link your learning to real-world workplaces by organising visits to external organisations and by inviting guest speakers to share their practical business experience.

If you have previously studied business, the rigorous postgraduate training offers greater insights into effective management. If you have not previously studied business, the course equips you to pursue business opportunities related to your first degree; for example arts graduates can find the course particularly useful.

By the end of the course you will have an edge in applying for well-paid managerial roles. As a result, you can achieve your personal goals and gain a rapid return on your investment in higher education.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. You can negotiate the topic of the project to fit both your personal interests and the supervisory expertise of Sunderland's tutors. Modules on this course include:
-Developing Skills for Business Leadership (15 Credits)
-Understanding Organisational Performance (15 Credits)
-Operations Management (15 Credits)
-International Business Environment (15 Credits)
-Accounting and Financial Management (15 Credits)
-Managing and Leading People (15 Credits)
-Marketing Management (15 Credits)
-Global Corporate Strategy (15 Credits)
-Management Futures Project (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars and interactive sessions where you will work in groups on concepts and practical tasks.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working.
Assessment methods include assignments, reports, presentations, and peer- and self-assessment.

Facilities & location

This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at The Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. Recently we’ve developed a Student Learning Space that is specifically designed to facilitate collaboration and team-based projects. It includes a board room as well as bookable areas to hold meetings and to meet with staff and visitors from outside the University.

University Library Services
The St Peter’s Library contains over 31,000 books related to business, economics, management, human resources, marketing, strategy and tourism. Added to this, you’ll benefit from a wide range of journals and periodicals in the St Peter’s library, many of them in online format. To help you make the most of the wealth of resources there’s a full-time librarian who is dedicated to the Business and Tourism sections. Further resources are available at the main Murray Library, which has a total of over 430,000 books with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The University spends around £1 million every year on new books and resources.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from over a hundred PCs in the St Peter’s Library, three computer laboratories, and wireless access zones. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Learning environment
The University of Sunderland is a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. At the same time, the University is fully plugged into the world of business as a result of strong links with industry organisations.

Employment & careers

This course equips you with skills and knowledge in all areas of business, from managing people to strategic direction. Employers of previous graduates from this course include:
-Lenovo
-CEVA
-NHS
-Local Authorities

A Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

Read less
An MBA is widely seen as a passport to a successful career. Our course builds on your previous business experience and enhances your real-world management capabilities. Read more
An MBA is widely seen as a passport to a successful career. Our course builds on your previous business experience and enhances your real-world management capabilities.

Course overview

The Sunderland MBA is designed to accelerate your promotion to well-paid positions of leadership. It prepares you for new opportunities in any organisation, in any country.

You will develop your strategic knowledge, functional competence and problem-solving ability. You will also learn how to re-apply the best of international management practices and how to implement approaches that deliver outstanding results.

At Sunderland, we focus on problem-solving ability and linking theory to real-world challenges. As part of this, you will visit UK companies, and also learn from guest speakers who share their practical business experiences.

Sunderland Business School has partnered together with the Chartered Management Institute, to offer you dual accreditation with your MBA to enhance your professional profile and add to your achievements. On successful completion of your MBA, you will be eligible for the Chartered Management Institute Level 7 Extended Diploma in Management and Leadership. During your study period, you will also become an Affiliate Member of CMI, which gives you access to CMI’s knowledge resources.

At the end of your studies, graduates with 3 or more years management experience will be entitled to apply for full membership of the CMI or Chartered status.

We understand that your MBA is part of an onward journey. We offer extensive career support to help you gain a rapid return on your investment in yourself – and achieve your personal goals.

You will study core modules that include ‘Managing and Leading People’, ‘Global Corporate Strategy’ and ‘International Business Environment’. There is flexibility to choose a dissertation topic and an additional module that reflects your particular interests.
This course is the broadest of our MBA courses. If you prefer, you can pursue a more specialist MBA course that gives a specific reference in the award title to Finance, Marketing, HRM, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Hospitality Management or Supply Chain Management.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. You can negotiate the topic of the dissertation to reflect your personal interests and career aspirations.

Modules on this course include:
-Financial Management and Control (15 Credits)
-Managing and Leading People (15 Credits)
-Operations Management (15 Credits)
-Marketing Management (15 Credits)
-International Business Environment (15 Credits)
-Global Corporate Strategy (15 Credits)
-Managing Innovation and Technology Transfer (15 Credits)
-MBA Dissertation (60 Credits)

Plus choose one optional module from a list that may include the following:
-International HRM (15 Credits)
-e-marketing (15 Credits)
-Project Management (15 Credits)
-Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management (15 Credits)
-Management Accounting and Control (15 Credits)
-International Marketing (15 Credits)
-OD and Change (15 Credits)
-Enterprise and Entrepreneurship (15 Credits)
-Innovation and Growth (15 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, class discussions, case studies, group work, presentations and applied study.

Assessment is mainly through the dissertation and assignments, as well as exams in some subjects.

Facilities & location

This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at The Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. Recently we’ve developed a Student Learning Space that is specifically designed to facilitate collaboration and team-based projects. It includes a board room as well as bookable areas to hold meetings and to meet with staff and visitors from outside the University.

University Library Services
The St Peter’s Library contains over 31,000 books related to business, economics, management, human resources, marketing, strategy and tourism.

Added to this, you’ll benefit from a wide range of journals and periodicals in the St Peter’s Library, many of them in online format. To help you make the most of the wealth of resources, there’s a full-time librarian who is dedicated to the Business and Tourism sections.
Further resources are available at the main Murray Library, which has a total of over 430,000 books with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The University spends around £1 million every year on new books and resources.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from over a hundred PCs in the St Peter’s Library, three computer laboratories, and wireless access zones. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Learning environment
The University of Sunderland is a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. At the same time, the University is fully plugged into the world of business as a result of strong links with industry organisations.

Employment & careers

The applied nature of our MBA course will build on your previous managerial experience while moving you forward on a journey of practical professional development. The course is an investment in yourself that can lead to:
-Higher salary
-Promotion opportunities
-Greater employability
-Flexibility in an evolving job market

The most common reason for undertaking an MBA is to improve job opportunities. Previous Sunderland MBA graduates now work in roles such as:
-Financial Analyst for ultra-high net worth investors
-Operations Director in an oil company
-Management Consultant with an international consultancy group
-General Manager in Eastern Europe
-Financial Controller in the Gulf region
-Division Chief in China
-Business Development Manager for an automotive supplier
-Vice President of a Canadian corporation

Read less
Sunderland Business School is ranked Best in the North East for Course Satisfaction by The Guardian University Guide 2015. This course is particularly aimed at graduates in business or management who do not have the work experience needed to undertake an MBA. Read more
Sunderland Business School is ranked Best in the North East for Course Satisfaction by The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Course overview

This course is particularly aimed at graduates in business or management who do not have the work experience needed to undertake an MBA. It will equip students with the skills to operate in an international environment, manage across time zones, cultures and languages. These skills are in great demand by employers who need world-class managers who can operate successfully in global markets.

Students will develop an understanding of business in a global context, including practical knowledge and understanding of the way that business is undertaken in different countries and by different cultures. Students are drawn from a wide range of cultures and nationalities which add a richness to this programme which is not experienced in many other places. Sunderland’s culturally diverse learning community will further enhance the international student experience.

Core modules include ‘International Business Environment’, ‘Global Corporate Strategy’, ‘Cross Cultural Management’, and ‘International Trade’. The Masters dissertation will focus on a topic that is individually negotiated with a tutor. This could be based on personal interests and as well as career aspirations.

The University will ensure that the student’s learning is rooted in a real-world context by inviting guest speakers to share their practical business experience together with arranging an external organisational visit.

By the end of the course students will have an edge in applying for roles in international business that can provide a rapid return on their investment in higher education.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. You can negotiate the topic of the dissertation to fit both your personal interests and the supervisory expertise of Sunderland's tutors.

Modules on this course include:
-Developing Skills for Business Leadership (15 Credits)
-International Trade (15 Credits)
-Global Integrated Marketing Communications (15 Credits)
-International Business Environment (15 Credits)
-Global Corporate Strategy (15 Credits)
-International HRM (15 Credits)
-Cross Cultural Management (15 Credits)
-Applied Research Methods for Business and Management (15 Credits)
-Dissertation (45 Credits)

Plus choose one optional module from the following list:
-Managing Diversity (15 Credits)
-Project Management (15 Credits)
-Innovation and Growth (15 Credits)
-Enterprise and Entrepreneurship (15 Credits)
-Service Operations Management (15 Credits)
-Consumer Research (15 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

The Faculty of Business and Law use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include workshops, seminars, simulations, project work, experiential learning, open learning and case study activities.

Compared to an undergraduate course, students will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working.

Facilities & location

This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at The Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. Recently the University developed a Student Learning Space that is specifically designed to facilitate collaboration and team-based projects. It includes a board room as well as bookable areas to hold meetings and to meet with staff and visitors from outside the University.

University Library Services
The St Peter’s Library contains over 31,000 books related to business, economics, management, human resources, marketing, strategy and tourism. Added to this, students will benefit from a wide range of journals and periodicals in the St Peter’s Library, many of them in an online format. To help students make the most of the wealth of resources, there’s a full-time librarian who is dedicated to the Business and Tourism sections. Further resources are available at the main Murray Library, which has a total of over 430,000 books with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The University spends around £1 million every year on new books and resources.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision students can choose from over a hundred PCs in the St Peter’s Library, three computer laboratories, and wireless access zones. If there are any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team who will be happy to offer advice and support.

Learning environment
The University of Sunderland is a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. At the same time, the University is fully plugged into the world of business as a result of strong links with industry organisations.

Employment & careers

The Masters qualification will open opportunities in business and management within a global context. The course is an investment which can lead to roles with higher salaries and greater potential to be a leader of change.

Almost all sectors of the economy require management professionals. For example, there are opportunities in:
-Financial services
-Manufacturing
-Retail
-Hospitality and leisure
-Media and telecommunications
-Healthcare
-Public sector

A Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

Read less
This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. Read more
This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. It is unique in combining creative and life writing in a stimulating and enriching programme- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-creative-life-writing/

We examine relevant literary and cultural theory as well as the politics and practicalities of language and writing from the point of view of the writer.

Practitioner-led, the programme offers you the opportunity to work with a range of published writers who visit the College to give readings and lead workshops.

Visiting writers have included William Fiennes, Jackie Kay and Aminatta Forna.

Poetry Masterclasses have been led by Sharon Olds, Les Murray, Derek Walcott and C K Williams

We also expect to draw fully upon London’s rich tradition as a converging point for culturally diverse literary practices.

Our graduates have gone on to have successful careers as writers and have won awards including the Guardian First Book Award, the Eric Gregory Award, the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, and the Dylan Thomas Prize. Two of our graduates (Ross Raisin and Evie Wyld) were recognised in Granta's Best of Young British Novelists 2013 list.

Explore the work of students currently enrolled on the programme in the Goldfish online journal.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

There are three main components of the Masters:

Creative and life writing workshops
Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing
One-to-one tutorials
There will be two core modules: a two-term workshop in creative and life writing, and a one-term Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing seminar module.

Workshop in Creative and Life Writing

All students attend this two and-a-half-hour compulsory workshop – part-time students attend in their first year. In the first term you will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of genres in creative and life writing, and then in the second term to develop your individual interests in poetry, fiction, autobiography and biography, or perhaps a fusion of those genres.

Each term you submit a piece of your own writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed it. Presentations of your work to other students with an account of your aims and approaches form an additional important element.

Some workshops will be taken by visiting writers, introducing you to a range of practices, concerns and techniques. The workshop also enables you to debate issues raised in the Contemporary Contexts module in relation to your own practice.

Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing

This is a two-hour seminar module, made up of informal talks by visiting speakers, followed by a seminar. These talks might be by practising writers, biographers, critics or philosophers (from both outside and inside Goldsmiths).

Our notable visitors have included Ali Smith, A L Kennedy, Daljit Nagra and Jon McGregor. Wide-ranging topics have included: the role of the writer and politics; writing the self; the relationship between contemporary fiction and biography; the relationship between fictional and non-fictional autobiography; writers and their readers; the publishing world; contemporary ideas about language; gender and writing.

In both the Contemporary Contexts module and the workshops you will be asked to consider works by significant contemporary writers in relation to your own writing practice. Assessment is by a critical essay on a writer or literary issue. Full-time students take the Contemporary Contexts module in their first term and part-time students in their second year.

Tutorials will be offered at regular intervals during the year (12 in all).

Options

You also choose an option module lasting one term. Full-time students take the module in the second term, while part-time students take it in the second year (second term). You can choose from a specialist workshop in fiction, poetry or life writing, or an option from the list of MA options offered by ECL including topics such as European Avant-Garde, Postmodernist Fiction or Re-writing Sexualities.

Assessment

Assessment is by the submission of four pieces of writing of 5,000 words each – either an essay, or, for workshops, a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing – plus a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. You will also be assessed on a portfolio (maximum of 20,000 words) containing a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. In all cases, the number of words applies to prose.

Careers

Graduates of this programme include Tom Lee, Lucy Caldwell, Ross Raisin, Amy Sackville, Rohan Kriwaczek, Evie Wyld, Sara Grant, Naomi Foyle, Bronia Kita, Lijia Zhang, Ashley Dartnell and Suzanne Joinson and the poets Emily Berry, Andy Spragg, Kate Potts, Jack Underwood, Abigail Parry, Anthony Joseph, Katrina Naomi and Matthew Gregory.

Among them they've won or been shortlisted for awards including The Sunday Times/EFG Private Bank Short Story Award 2012, the Rooney Prize for Literature 2011, the 2008 and 2011 Dylan Thomas Prize, several Eric Gregory Awards, The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award 2009, the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize 2009 and 2010, the Guardian First Book Award, the New Writing Ventures Prize, and several Betty Trask Awards.

Other graduates have gone on to work in publishing (for example, as senior commissioning editors), journalism, public relations, teaching, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, and the media.

Skills

The MA will enable you to develop transferable skills, including: enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course is highly relevant to the workplace and it is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). Read more
This course is highly relevant to the workplace and it is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

Course overview

Are you looking to make a difference to the way that organisations improve motivation, foster career development and treat people well? This course provides specialist postgraduate training in Human Resource Management (HRM).

This Human Resource Management degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) and the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). These accreditations show that our postgraduate HRM courses fully align with the latest academic and professional advancements, both within the UK and internationally.

Successful completion* of the course fulfils part of the requirements for professional membership of the CIPD. Membership of a professional body such as this, will further boost individual employability and help students progress towards senior managerial roles.
The course explores the Human Resource Management in areas such as leadership, employment relations, recruitment, selection, training, development and managing. The teaching is informed by current academic debates and the latest research. Core modules include ‘Managing, Leading and Developing People’, ‘Investigating a Business Issue from an HR Perspective’, ‘Developing Skills for Business and Leadership’ and ‘Learning and Talent Development’. The Human Resource Reflective Project will focus on a strategic HRM issue within an organisation which students identify themselves with the support of an academic tutor.

The University will ensure that the student’s learning is rooted in a real-world context by inviting guest speakers to share their practical HRM business experience together with arranging an external organisational visit.

Sunderland Business School is ranked Best in the Noth East for Course Satisfaction, according to The Guardian University Guide 2015. Our teaching is informed by the latest research and up-to-date approaches and in the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF) research in the business area was rated 'world-leading'.

* Please note that students must achieve a 50% pass mark in all CIPD related areas to gain Associate Membership of the CIPD.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. You can negotiate the topic of the project to fit both your personal interests and the supervisory expertise of Sunderland's tutors. Modules on this course include:
-Developing Skills for Business and Leadership (15 Credits)
-Human Resource Management in Context (15 Credits)
-Managing, Leading and Developing People (15 Credits)
-Learning and Talent Development (15 Credits)
-Leadership and Management Development (15 Credits)
-Resourcing and Talent Management (15 Credits)
-Investigating a Business Issues from a Human Resource Management Perspective (30 Credits)
-Human Resource Reflective Project (30 Credits)

Plus choose one module from the following list of three modules:
-Employee Relations (15 Credits)
-Employment Law (15 Credits)
-Organisational Development and Change (15 Credits)

Plus choose one further module from the following list of five modules:
-International HRM (15 Credits)
-Managing Diversity (15 Credits)
-Employee Relations (15 Credits)
-Employment Law (15 Credits)
-Organisational Development and Change (15 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

The University uses a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, case studies and workshops all of which are supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, Sunspace.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent reading and research.

Assessment methods include individual and group assignments, business reports, presentations, case study analysis, portfolios of work and time-constrained activities as well as the Masters Reflective Project.

Facilities & location

This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at The Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. Recently the University developed a Student Learning Space that is specifically designed to facilitate collaboration and team-based projects. It includes a board room as well as bookable areas to hold meetings and to meet with staff and visitors from outside the University.

University Library Services
The St Peter’s Library contains over 31,000 books related to business, economics, management, human resources, marketing, strategy and tourism.

Added to this, students benefit from a wide range of journals and periodicals in the St Peter’s library, many of them in online format. To help you make the most of the wealth of resources there’s a full-time librarian who is dedicated to the Business and Tourism sections.

Further resources are available at the main Murray Library, which has a total of over 430,000 books with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The University spends around £1 million every year on new books and resources.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision students can choose from over a hundred PCs in the St Peter’s Library, three computer laboratories, and wireless access zones. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Learning environment
The University of Sunderland is a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. At the same time, the University is fully plugged into the world of business as a result of strong links with industry organisations.

Employment & careers

This Masters course equips students with advanced skills and knowledge that will help you progress rapidly to more senior roles in Human Resource Management. It is accredited by the CIPD and SHRM, which means that students have access to additional HR research, conferences, training and development.

The average salary of a HR officer is £25,000 and HR directors typically earn between £75,000 and £100,000 (source: Hudson 2013 Salary & Employment Insights). CIPD-accredited qualifications can significantly enhance your career opportunities.

Previous Sunderland graduates are now working at senior and strategic levels in HRM in a wide range of industries including Caterpillar, BT and Nissan.

Your Masters degree will also enhance opportunities for academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

Read less
Sunderland Business School is ranked Best in the North East for Course Satisfaction by The Guardian University Guide 2015. This specialist postgraduate degree offers a fast track into exciting and higher level roles in marketing management. Read more
Sunderland Business School is ranked Best in the North East for Course Satisfaction by The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Course overview

This specialist postgraduate degree offers a fast track into exciting and higher level roles in marketing management. It is designed to meet the needs of marketing professionals who are looking for a Masters qualification that is directly relevant to their career progression.

You will cover the latest thinking on strategic marketing management, drawing on up-to-date research and case studies. You will also choose from modules in the areas of e-marketing, consumer research, international marketing and global integrated marketing communications.

We ensure that your learning is rooted in a real-world context by organising visits to external organisations and by inviting guest speakers to share their practical business experience.

The final phase of the course is a dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with your tutors. It will form a valuable demonstration of applied knowledge and rigorous marketing expertise that you can present to potential employers.

By the end of the course, you will have an edge in applying for well-paid roles that meet your personal aspirations and provide a rapid return on your investment in higher education.

We welcome applications from graduates of any discipline and there is no requirement for previous experience of marketing.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. You can negotiate the topic of the dissertation to fit both your personal interests and the supervisory expertise of Sunderland's tutors.

Modules on this course include:
-Strategic Marketing Management 1: Context (30 Credits)
-Strategic Marketing Management 2: Application (30 Credits)
-Developing Skills for Business Leadership linked in with PALS (15 Credits)
-Option One, e.g. Consumer Research (15 Credits)
-Option Two, e.g. E-Marketing (15 Credits)
-Option Three, e.g. International Marketing (15 Credits)
-Applied Research Methods for Business Management (15 Credits)
-Masters Dissertation (45 Credits)

Options for the MA Marketing Programme are likely to be (subject to student demand and resource availability in any year): 'International Marketing'; 'E-Marketing'; 'Consumer Research'; 'Marketing Intelligence'; 'Global Integrated Marketing Communications'; 'Innovation and Growth'.

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, class discussions and case study exercises. You will be placed in a Peer Learning Support Group (PLSG) to encourage mutual study support with your fellow students.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working.

Facilities & location

This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at The Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. Recently we’ve developed a Student Learning Space that is specifically designed to facilitate collaboration and team-based projects. It includes a board room as well as bookable areas to hold meetings and to meet with staff and visitors from outside the University.

University Library Services
The St Peter’s Library contains over 31,000 books related to business, economics, management, human resources, marketing, strategy and tourism.

Added to this, you’ll benefit from a wide range of journals and periodicals in the St Peter’s Library, many of them in online format. To help you make the most of the wealth of resources there’s a full-time librarian who is dedicated to the Business and Tourism sections.

Further resources are available at the main Murray Library, which has a total of over 430,000 books with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The University spends around £1 million every year on new books and resources.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from over a hundred PCs in the St Peter’s Library, three computer laboratories, and wireless access zones. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Learning environment
The University of Sunderland is a vibrant learning environment with an international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world. At the same time, the University is fully plugged into the world of business as a result of strong links with industry organisations.

Employment & careers

On completing this course you will be equipped to take on a range of marketing roles. These are becoming increasingly strategic to organisations given the rise of online marketing and social media.

Opportunities include:
-Consumer marketing
-Business-to-business marketing
-Financial services marketing
-Marketing for charities and not-for-profit organisations

The average salary of a marketing manager is £37,000 with marketing directors earning an average of around £77,000 (source: Marketing Week/Ball & Hoolahan Salary Survey 2012).

A Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

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This programme welcomes students to a lively intellectual and cultural scene. You will study with a group of world-class Victorianists whose expertise ranges across many aspects of literature and culture, and you’ll be able to draw on the extraordinary resources of Glasgow’s museums and libraries. Read more
This programme welcomes students to a lively intellectual and cultural scene. You will study with a group of world-class Victorianists whose expertise ranges across many aspects of literature and culture, and you’ll be able to draw on the extraordinary resources of Glasgow’s museums and libraries.

Why this programme

◾Our library has outstanding holdings in Victorian primary and critical sources, and Glasgow has a wonderful Victorian heritage: this makes the city a fantastic place to be studying the period’s literature and culture.
◾We have an international reputation for research and teaching in Victorian literature.

Programme structure

The programme involves taught sessions over two ten-week teaching periods, plus a period of research and writing over the summer. You will study core and optional courses, and undertake supervised study of a specialised topic of your choice, researching and writing a 15,000 word dissertation.

You can choose optional courses from the range of Victorianist subjects; or, with the convenors’ permission, you may select from any MLitt course offered in the College of Arts.

Alongside the core and optional courses, you will take a research training course which will prepare you to work on your dissertation and to prepare a proposal and funding application for PhD work, should you choose to pursue doctoral research.

In conjunction with the core courses we also offer an exciting series of workshops tailored to research on Victorian topics, including tours of Glasgow University’s Special Collections, workshops on electronic resources, and field trips to sites of special interest such as the Murray Collection in the National Library of Scotland, Robert Owens’ New Lanark, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.

You will have the opportunity to meet and learn from visiting scholars from the UK, Europe and the United States. In recent years, Victorianist visitors have included John Bowen, Matthew Campbell, Kate Flint, Ann Heilmann, Antonija Primorac, Herbert Tucker and Julian Wolfreys.

The programme is made up of three components:
• Core courses: taught over two ten-week teaching periods, from October to December and January to March.
• Optional courses: also taught in ten-week blocks. Full-time students usually study one topic course in each semester.
• A dissertation: written during the final phase of the course, from April to September.

Career prospects

You may develop skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking. The programme also provides an excellent platform for PhD studies.

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