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The Master of Studies (MSt) in International Relations is a part-time course designed for mature students from, for example, industry, teaching, the civil service or the armed forces, but we also welcome recent graduates wishing to undertake postgraduate study. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in International Relations is a part-time course designed for mature students from, for example, industry, teaching, the civil service or the armed forces, but we also welcome recent graduates wishing to undertake postgraduate study.

Please note that as a part-time course, students are not eligible for a student visa and therefore those who are not eligible to remain in the UK, will require a student visitor visa which only entitles residency during the stipulated residential sessions of the course. Students wishing to study full-time are encouraged to consider the M.Phil in International Relations, details of which can be found on the website at http://www.polis.cam.ac.uk/study-at-polis/graduates/MPhilIRPOL

The course is distinctive in its multidisciplinary approach and breadth. Teaching takes the form of lectures and seminars in theory, politics, history, economics, law, security and various regional and area studies, as well as individual thesis supervision. The taught part of the course aims to familiarise you with the range and variety of disciplines required for a thorough critical understanding of the field in all its complexity and of the means and methods that have been devised to understand it better.

Who is the course designed for?

The programme is suitable both for students who have just completed their first degree, and for mature students from (for example) industry, teaching, the civil service, NGOs or the armed forces. A background in international relations, law, economics, history or politics is a definite asset, but we welcome applications from all disciplines.

Aims of the programme

By the end of the course students should have:

• Developed the ability to apply critically the main theories, models, and concepts used in the study of international politics
• Developed an understanding and substantive knowledge of international politics, history, economics, and security
• Extended and developed their analytical, evaluative and critical capacities
• Developed transferable skills, including the ability to take responsibility for their own learning, making oral and written presentations, planning and producing written assignments, working independently, and, where they have chosen to do so, using information technology
• Developed the ability to undertake independent research and writing

As well as progressing to success in PhD studies, former MSt students have used the skills and knowledge acquired on the course to develop their careers within NGOs, IGOs, major companies and organisations.

Read about the experiences of former MSt students - http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-ir-profiles

Teaching and learning

During the first year, all students will be required to undertake a core course in International Relations and also chose six modules from the following 12 options:

• International Political Economy
• International Relations of the Modern Middle East
• International Relations of Africa
• The Cold War
• China in the International System
• Gender, War and Security
• International Migration and Development
• Democratisation
• Introduction to International Law
• American Presidents and Foreign Policy
• The Geopolitics of Energy Security
• The Politics of the World Trade Organisation

Students completing the first year successfully will then spend their second year researching and writing a 25,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice, subject to the approval of the Graduate Education Committee (GEC) of the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS). Dissertation work will be individually supervised by an academic specialist.

Contact time -

• Lectures: each module has a minimum of 12 hours teaching, including on average 8 hours of lectures
• Seminars: provided for most modules, 6-8 hours per module
• Supervision: 10-15 hours (second year)

Assessment

Thesis -
• Dissertation: 25,000 words maximum (including tables, footnotes, and appendices, but excluding bibliography).

Essays -

Students must attend all sessions of their six option modules, but will assessed on three modules by either:

• Two essays not exceeding 2,000 words each; or
• One essay not exceeding 4,000 words; or

Written examination -

• Compulsory core course examination paper written under examination conditions of three hours' duration.

Feedback -

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews.

Students give presentations on their research during the two residential sessions in year 2.

Students are given formal feedback on their assignment and informal feedback throughout their course, including during supervisions. Supervisions also result in an annual progress report at the end of year 1 and termly reports during year 2.

How to apply

Read the MSt Application Guide (http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/courses/msts/application-guide) to find out more about the application process and what you need to do and consider as a potential applicant. See below for details of the supporting documents you will need to provide when applying for this course.

Apply online when you are ready to start the application process - http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/courses/msts/apply-for-an-mst

If you have any questions about the application process, contact our Admissions team: or +44 (0)1223 746262.

For all other enquiries, contact the Programme Manager, Linda Fisher: or +44 (0)1223 746218.

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Advanced Subject Teaching has been designed to help English and history teachers develop their subject knowledge and enhance their professional and academic standing. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Advanced Subject Teaching has been designed to help English and history teachers develop their subject knowledge and enhance their professional and academic standing. It provides a two-year, part-time route to a full University of Cambridge Master’s degree.

The MSt has been developed by the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education in association with the Faculties of Education, English and History, and with The Prince's Teaching Institute.

When you embark on this innovative programme, you will choose an aspect of your subject which you would like to explore further or perhaps tackle for the first time. You will then study it both academically and pedagogically, so that your new knowledge and skills can be put to effective use in the classroom.

One of the aims of the programme is to focus on areas of the curriculum that are under-represented in schools, not least because teachers themselves may be less familiar with them. We hope that successful graduates of this MSt will go on to make major contributions to syllabus development not only in their schools, but also at national and international level.

The course has been designed to be accessible to teachers both in the UK and world-wide. Teaching and supervision is offered through a combination of residential teaching in Cambridge and online tuition.

Visit the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-ast

Course detail

- To provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research.
- To extend and deepen students' subject knowledge and develop their understanding of specific ideas, pedagogical practices and learning theories.
- To encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based teaching informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge.
- To develop students' intellectual, practical and transferable skills related to subject specialist teaching.
- To help students to critique and evaluate current pedagogical practices in their subject area and to conduct systematic research relevant to their professional practice.
- To encourage critical thinking related to subject specialist knowledge, pedagogical practices and theories of learning.
- To encourage students to develop as reflective practitioners in terms of subject specialist knowledge, skills and pedagogical practices.

Format

The course starts in August with preliminary reading and formative assessment, and teaching is provided through a combination of residential teaching in Cambridge (three concentrated teaching blocks in the first year and one in the second year), online tuition and individual supervision.

- Lectures, seminars and classes: c.48 hours in Year 1, c.16 hours in Year 2
- Supervision: 4 x 1 hour in Year 2

Modules

- Module 1: The history and development of the subject (residential and online)
- Module 2: The development of new subject knowledge (residential and online)
- Module 3: From academic to classroom-based research (residential and online)

Assessment

- Dissertation: 15,000-18,000 words (including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography)
- Essay 1: 3,000 words
- Essay 2: 3,000 words
- Essay 3: 6,000 words

There is a formative preparatory assignment of between 1,500 and 2,000 words undertaken before the first module. There is also a formative assessment for module 4 of up to 3,000 words. This is an update on the research proposal submitted with the application.

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews. Students may be required to give individual presentations or contribute to group presentations, on which the students would receive constructive feedback.

Continuation

The MSt is a research degree, and successful completion of the MSt at a high grade may allow you to progress to a EdD or PhD either at the University of Cambridge or another institution.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

National Scholarship Fund for Teachers

In addition, English teachers working in England may have access to the National Scholarship Fund for Teachers. Please check the Department for Education’s website for the latest information: http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/careers/traininganddevelopment

Other sources of funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

You may be interested to know that from 2016/17, Student Finance England (SFE) is introducing a postgraduate loans scheme for full-time and part-time Master’s courses. Information on eligibility, the amount of the loan and the level of repayment can be found in SFE’s The Student Roomhttps://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

Please note that SFE is planning to take applications via its main Student finance website, from summer 2016: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance

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Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth. Read more
Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth.

The emphasis of this postgraduate creative writing course is cross-cultural and cross-genre, pointing up the needs and challenges of the contemporary writer who produces his or her creative work in the context of a global writerly and critical community. The master's degree in creative writing offers a clustered learning format of five Residences, two Guided Retreats and one Placement over two years. The research Placement, a distinguishing feature of the course, offers between one and two weeks' hands-on experience of writing in the real world. Students may undertake their placement in a literary agency, a publishing house, the offices of a literary periodical, a theatre company, a screen production company, or other relevant organization. Placement organisations have included Macmillan, Initialise Films, Random House, the BBC, the Literary Review, AM Heath, Pegasus Theatre, the Poetry Society, and Carcanet.

The virtual open event for this programme is available to watch at http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/cwopenday. The open event features acting Course Director Jane Draycott and course administrator Rebecca Rue, who discuss the programme, its requirements and the student experience. Participants' questions were texted in and answered during the event. A FAQ of all the questions and their answers is available at the top of this section.

The MSt has a blog, a resource for Oxford events, calls for submission, competitions, news, interviews and more, which is available at http://blogs.conted.ox.ac.uk/mstcw/.

"The Oxford MSt enables you to fast-track your career in writing."
- Fortuna Burke

"… the freedom to explore and experiment… has been fundamental to my development as a writer."
- Clare Tetley

"The range and variety of the group … offers truly exciting opportunities for the kind of exchanges that really accelerate your development as a writer."
- Michael Schuller

"What does the course offer? Self-discipline, professionalism and confidence."
- Abigail Green-Dove

"My life has been so enriched and expanded. My writing evolves daily through the tools that you gave me. Not to mention the wonderful friendships formed throughout our two years together."
- Lindsay Moore

"The Masters in Oxford, while encouraging creativity, raised the bar on the quality of the finished work and gave me the discipline to be a professional."
- Bette Adriaanse

"I doubt there’s a more suitable MSt in the United Kingdom for work which challenges boundaries and takes risks."
- Jennifer Thorp

Students and alumni have won a wide range of prizes. These successes include winning the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize, the Writers’ Village International Short Fiction Award 2014, the Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, the Martin Starkie Prize, the International Jane Martin Poetry Prize, the Heritage Arts Radio play competition, the Cascade Pictures Writer’s Couch pitching competition, first prize in the Poetry Book Society Student Poetry Competition, the Miracle Poetry Competition, Best Photography Book Award from POYi (Pictures of the Year international), and the Yeovil Literary Prize for Poetry. Two alumni have won the Oxford University’s DL Chapman Memorial Prize, another was a finalist in the 2013 Writers at Work Fellowship Competition, and another won the London Fringe Festival’s Short Fiction Award. Alumni have been awarded a Toshiba Studentship, a Hawthornden Fellowship, and funded residencies at the Banff Centre, Canada, and at the Expansionists Project, Whitstable.

Students and alumni have had their work shortlisted across the genres for, among others, the Asham Award, the Bridport Prize, the Bridport Prize for Flash Fiction, the Fish Flash Fiction prize, the Yeoville Literary Prize, the Oxonian poetry prize, the Fish Short Story Prize 2013, the Big Issue in the North’s New Writing Award, the Oxonian review, and the Aesthetica Creative Writing Competition. A 2010 graduate was short-listed for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award 2011. Two alumni were longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, and one was shortlisted. An alumnus’ debut novel also made the longlist for the Not the Booker Prize.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-creative-writing

Destinations

Many of our graduate students have signed with agents, and each year a number go on to undertake doctoral study in creative writing or English Literature. Our graduates have obtained positions in publishing, media and the creative arts industries, as well as teaching positions in tertiary education.

The MSt has enjoyed a very strong application field since its inception, attracting record interest in recent years from a global constituency of writers. The course`s emphasis on critical analysis as well as on writerly and creative excellence attracts students of commensurately strong academic potential as well as of significant creative promise. This combination of academic rigour and creativity is a central distinctive feature of the course. The resulting emphasis on exploration and the development of an individual writerly voice serve to attract particularly talented students from around the world as well as a strongly diverse group of UK students of varied backgrounds and ethnicity.

Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Please consult http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/.

Who should apply?

We are looking for writers with a proven record of commitment to their craft. You should be a keen reader, and bring an open-minded, questioning approach to both reading and writing. You will not necessarily have yet achieved publication, but you will have written regularly and read widely over a sustained period. You will be keen to dedicate time and energy and staying-power to harnessing your talent, enlarging your skills, and aiming your writerly production at consistently professional standards. It is likely you will have a first degree, or equivalent, although in some cases other evidence of suitability may be acceptable.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA we normally seek is 3.6 out of 4.0. We do not seek a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT score. Although a GRE or GMAT score is not a formal requirement, if one is available it should be supplied.

The high number of contact hours are concentrated into Residences and Retreats. Students should be at a stage in their writing where, with appropriate guidance, they can undertake agreed assignments, projects and essays between meetings. There is a dedicated Course Website for provision of up-to-date information; contact and exchange between students; and contact between students and tutors. The course, however, is not a ‘distance-learning’ course, and tutors, while being happy to help with questions or problems, do not offer regular weekly ‘office hours’.

The M.St is unlikely to be suitable for those who are just starting out on their writerly and critical development.

If you have any doubts about whether the M.St is right for your stage of development, please consult the website for information on our Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/dipcw

What does the course cover?

The first year concentrates equally on prose (fiction and narrative non-fiction), poetry and drama. There is a significant critical reading and analysis component, which is linked to the writerly considerations explored in each of the three genres. Students are expected to engage fully with all three genres, in a spirit of exploration and with the aim of discovering what impact and relevance unaccustomed genres have for the development of their individual writerly voice. This necessarily involves undertaking assignments and exercises in areas that are new to students, and do not relate directly to any work they may have in progress. Students may be able to continue with their own longer term pieces-in-progress but the concentration of year 1 teaching is on producing new work, and the exercises and assignments, which should take priority, reflect this emphasis.

The second year offers specialisation in a single genre, again accompanied by a significant critical element focused around issues of interest to the individual student and related to the genre of choice.

Your specialisation choices are as follows:

- The novel
- Short fiction
- Radio drama
- TV drama
- Screenwriting
- Stage drama
- Poetry
- Narrative non-fiction

In year 2, the specialisation in the genre of students’ choice provides an opportunity for significant concentration on either new work, or, subject to consultation with supervisor, on existing work-in-progress.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks. It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

You will be guided in the production of creative work in a range of genres and styles, and also in critical reflection on your own work and that of other writers. The course tutors and guest speakers are all established literary professionals.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-creative-writing

Who is the course designed for?

The MSt aims to facilitate students' creative practice, whether for their own personal creative development as writers or because their professional work impinges on these areas.

Examples could include teachers of English at secondary level for whom the teaching of creative writing is increasingly necessary for GCSE and A-level English Language and English Literature. It is also designed to be of professional value to those working in areas such as journalism, broadcasting, publishing and editing.

Aims of the programme

By the end of the course students should have:

- Developed their own writing and self-editing skills in a range of fiction and non-fiction genres
- Developed a solid and substantial understanding of the history (in terms of innovative developments) of fiction and non-fiction writing and of critical, analytical and narrative theory

Format

The MSt is structured around four modules, each of which includes a residential block at Madingley Hall that students must attend. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities, and followed by two writing assignments: one critical and one creative.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules to build a virtual community of practice.

Lectures, seminars and classes: 4 x 4-day residential sessions in Year 1; a 2-day residential session in Year 2.

Supervisions and tutorials: each student has their own tutor to whom they will have several one-to-one sessions during the first year. During the second year students have 5 x 1-hour sessions with their supervisor.

Year 1

The first year is characterised by variety. Students will engage and experiment with a wide variety of genres, building on existing strengths and exploring unfamiliar territories.

Module 1: Writing for readers: the art of poetry and the craft of criticism (17-20 October 2016)
This module will combine close critical reading of selected example of poetry and autobiographical prose with the writing of both by students.

Module 2: Writing for readers: imagined worlds - fiction, long and short (12-15 December 2016)
This module focuses on prose fiction, examining the relationship between memory, imagination and research and exploring the essential concerns of the fiction-writer, including plot and narrative, voice and character and the importance of place.

Module 3: Writing for performance: monologue and polyphonic scripts (13-16 February 2017)
This module explores various forms of writing for an audience, encompassing writing for radio, theatre, television, cinema and other forms of scripted public address and performance.

Module 4: Writing life: creative non-fiction (15-18 May 2017)
This module explores the concept of creative non-fiction and examines examples drawn from a range of sub-genres. These are likely to include biography, memoir, travel-writing and writing about the environment. Sessions on study and research skills will prepare students for Year 2. Visiting speakers for this module will include those from the world of publishing.

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on a specialist genre. Students will work independently to explore further and develop their own literary and critical skills, resulting in an extended piece or portfolio of writing. They will work under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact.

Students will have five supervisions in the second year. The first will take place in October 2017, ideally at Madingley Hall, but Skype can also be used. The dates of this and the next three supervisions will be arranged between you and your supervisor (these can also be face-to-face or via Skype). The fifth and final supervision will usually take place at Madingley Hall at the time of the only residency in the second year, the Presentation and Discussion of Portfolios, on 16-17 April 2018.

Assessment

- Year 1 -

Following the first residency students will produce 750 words of poetry and a critical commentary of 3,000 words. Following the other three residencies students will produce 4,000 words of creative prose and a critical commentary of 3,000 words.

- Year 2 -

Students will produce a portfolio consisting of 15,000 words of creative prose (or 5,000 words of poetry) and a 3,000-word critical commentary.

- Feedback -

Students are given formal written feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course, including during tutorials and supervisions. Tutors produce a report for each student at the end of Year 1 and supervisors produce termly reports for each student during Year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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The MSt is part of the Clinical Medicine Programme, a suite of part-time courses designed to enhance the specialist skills of senior healthcare professionals in training and broaden their understanding in healthcare education, research, leadership and management. Read more
The MSt is part of the Clinical Medicine Programme, a suite of part-time courses designed to enhance the specialist skills of senior healthcare professionals in training and broaden their understanding in healthcare education, research, leadership and management.

The programme has been developed by Cambridge University Health Partners, the academic health sciences centre, in conjunction with the School of Clinical Medicine and the Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge.

The Intensive Care pathway will be offered for the first time in October 2016. It is expected that further subspecialties will be available in future and will form a broad panel of routes for training in subspecialty clinical medicine.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-clinical-medicine

Course detail

Aims of the programme:

- Create an international cohort of consultants able to pursue and develop their roles in a rapidly-changing and challenging environment of clinical medicine

- Develop the confidence within these consultants to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care, with the required knowledge, skills and capability to have a positive personal impact on the work of others in their clinical team and wider service

- Develop consultants with an understanding of teaching, professional development and assessment in the field of clinical medicine

- Develop consultants with an understanding of research methodologies and ethical considerations relevant to clinical medicine

- Encourage participants to develop as reflective practitioners with the emotional intelligence, resilience and astuteness required to be effective clinical leaders

- Encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based clinical practice informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge of medical education, research methods, ethics and clinical leadership and governance

Format

It is expected that students will be admitted for the MSt degree from the outset and study part-time over two years. You will complete the Postgraduate Certificate modules in year one and the intensive care taught modules in years one and two, with a clinical research project and associated dissertation in year two.

Students will also study the Helmsmanship programme in parallel with the MSt.

Modules

Year 1: Postgraduate Certificate modules:

Module 1: Clinical Research
Teaching dates: 12 – 15 September 2016; 28 November 2016

Module 2: Clinical Education
Teaching dates: 23 – 26 January 2017; 9 February 2017

Module 3: Clinical Leadership
Teaching dates: 25 – 28 April 2017; 8 June 2017

Years 1 and 2: Intensive care modules:

Module 1: Sub-specialty Intensive Care Medicine
Dates to be confirmed.

Module 2: Intensive Care Medicine at Cambridge
Dates to be confirmed.

Module 3: Research in Intensive Care Medicine
Dates to be confirmed.

Helmsmanship

Helmsmanship is a unique, two year, non-award bearing course which will help you to develop the non-clinical skills required for consultant-level appointments at tertiary centres. The course is designed to provide personalised comprehensive training in the attributes required to be an effective senior clinician.

It is delivered by Cambridge University Health Partners together with the Judge Business School. The faculty includes clinicians, senior NHS managers, organisational development consultants, Judge Business School academics, and experts from the wider Cambridge community.

The course is practically focussed, developing advanced skills in education, teamworking, leadership and management in an environment which encourages personal development, organisational intelligence, iconoclasm, and resilience. It is delivered in a variety of formats, using innovative tools to engender skills such as consultant level responsibility, development and improvement of clinical and non-clinical services, change management, and the effective supervision of teams and engagement with colleagues.

Helmsmanship is not delivered in any other environment and is designed to fit within the Clinical Medicine Programme at Cambridge.

Assessment

Students are assessed throughout the taught modules of the programme using a variety of techniques and interrelated strategies including evidence of regular reflection. Demonstration of active participation in the programme will be required. There may also be a requirement for the students to take part in peer review of other students.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

You may be interested to know that from 2016/17, Student Finance England (SFE) is introducing a postgraduate loans scheme for full-time and part-time Master’s courses. Information on eligibility, the amount of the loan and the level of repayment can be found in SFE’s The Student Room: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=5659-Student-Finance

Please note that SFE is planning to take applications via its main Student finance website, from summer 2016: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Interdisciplinary Design for the Built Environment (IDBE) is a transformative part-time Master's course at the University of Cambridge, for global practitioners working in the built environment. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Interdisciplinary Design for the Built Environment (IDBE) is a transformative part-time Master's course at the University of Cambridge, for global practitioners working in the built environment.

Intensive, themed residential weeks deliver a bespoke learning experience, which develops individual and professional skills in multidisciplinary teamwork, the design process and individual research. For 20 years the course has been equipping our graduates with enhanced skills, knowledge and professional networks to solve the challenges facing our industry by becoming innovative, dynamic and successful leaders.

The MSt in IDBE is accredited as a Master's for further learning by:
- The Joint Board of Moderators (Institution of Civil Engineers, Institution of Structural Engineers, Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation, Institute of Highway Engineers)
- The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
- The Chartered Insitution of Building Services Engineers
- The Royal Institute of British Architects Advanced CPD

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-idbe

Who is the course designed for?

The course is aimed at practising professionals with at least three years' work experience in the built environment. It is open to architects, engineers, and all those involved in commissioning, design, construction and management. It is offered jointly by the Departments of Architecture and Engineering.

Aims of the programme

- To equip professionals for strategic decision making, inventive problem solving and team leadership
- To develop skills in effective collaboration and communication, particularly between clients, consultants, contractors, specialists and occupiers
- To provide a strategic overview of the production of the built environment including current challenges faced by the construction industry such as technological innovation, global climate change, resilience and sustainability.

Teaching and learning

The course is part-time and lasts for two years. During that time, students spend seven separate residential weeks studying in Cambridge at 3-4 month intervals.

Teaching blocks
Each of the residential weeks is based around a theme, such as:
- Interdisciplinarity
- The client, the user, and the design team
- Sustainable construction and climate change
- Personal development, teamwork, and leadership
- Conservation, retrofit, and adaptation
- Innovation, new technologies, and materials
- Urbanism, change, and future communities

Teaching on the course is delivered though a mix of lectures, workshops and seminars during the residential weeks. Each residential week comprises an intensive programme of formal lectures (from leading practitioners and university academics) workshops and seminars.

A design project relating to the theme of the week is undertaken in small interdisciplinary teams, which present their design proposals to reviewers at the end of each of the weeks. Through the design project students apply and implement what they have been taught, as well as benefitting from the knowledge and expertise of their team members; in this, the design projects support experiential learning.

Supervision and learning support

In preparing the four individual written assignments, students are supported by academic supervisors whom they meet on an individual basis. The assignments are progressive in that they help to build the capacity to write clearly and concisely, to reflect on experience, to undertake a formal literature review on a given topic, to frame research questions, to conduct an investigation involving the collection and analysis of data, and to draw evidence-based conclusions.

Contact time

- Lectures: 42 hours per year
- Seminars and classes: 15 hours per year
- Practicals: 45 hours per year
- Supervision: 8 hours per year

Assessment

- Thesis
Dissertation: 15,000 words maximum (including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography).

- Essays, projects and written papers
A reflective project study: 5,000 words maximum.
Two essays: 3,000 words maximum each, designed to support students' developing research and writing skills. The first focuses on conducting a literature review using academic references, and the second requires you to design and structure a ‘mini thesis’ involving some small individual research project.

- Practical
In six of the seven weeks students are asked to work in small multi-disciplinary groups to think, discuss, draw, write and persuade in order to come to a unified solution to the set problem over the course of a few half days. At the end of each week all teams present their solutions to their fellow students and a review panel of studio leaders and stakeholders.

- Other
Each student does a presentation on their case study (the first written assignment) to their fellow students and the Course Directors.
Feedback
Students are given formal feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout their course, including during supervisions. Supervisions also result in an annual progress report at the end of year 1 and termly reports during year 2.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-idbe

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Building History is an academically rigorous yet practical course aiming to equip students for careers in historic building investigation, research, recording, assessment, management and interpretation. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Building History is an academically rigorous yet practical course aiming to equip students for careers in historic building investigation, research, recording, assessment, management and interpretation. The MSt in Building History draws on expertise in both the academic and the professional sphere.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-building-history

Course detail

The course, devised in collaboration with English Heritage, is unique in combining British architectural history with practical tuition in interpreting building fabric.

It provides an overview of architectural evolution and an awareness of the principal approaches to the exploration of architectural evidence. It also sets out to train students in the rigorous and effective use of primary sources, preparing them for careers in historic building research, recording, assessment and curation, or in suitable cases for progression to doctoral-level research

Format

The course is heavily taught in the first year by invited speakers from a mixture of academic and professional backgrounds. Lectures are matched to field trips. The emphasis is on learning to evaluate architectural and documentary evidence and to formulate informed and accurate assessments.

The second year is divided between a professional placement and a personal research project which constitutes the dissertation.

- Lectures: c.100 hours (first year)
- Seminars and classes: c.60 hours (guided site visits; first year)
- Practicals: c.40 hours (first year)
- Supervision: 3 hours per year

Assessment

- Dissertation: 20,000-25,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography and appendices).
- Two essays: 3,500 words maximum each.
- One recording project: 3,000-5,000 words, plus drawings and photographs.
- One research proposal: 2,000-3,000 words.
- Log-book/portfolio and report (3,000 words maximum) from professional placement.
- Field test of one hour's duration.
- A non-assessed (formative) essay is required during the first term of Year 1.

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews. Students are expected to undertake 'Crit' sessions on the recording project and dissertation proposals. Feedback is given in supervisions, supervisors' reports and throughout the course on request.

Continuation

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired the type of research training required to carry on to the PhD, or if conceived as a standalone degree, will have acquired the skills to specialise and enhance their professional prospects.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

- The Building History Bursary fund -

Candidates who anticipate difficulty in funding their studies are invited to apply for a bursary. Applications are assessed competitively and it is expected that the bursaries offered will not normally exceed £2,000 per year, with a minimum value of £500 per year.

To be eligible to apply for a bursary you must already have submitted an application to study on the course, and be a citizen of the EU.

Find out more: http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/courses/mst-building-history-1/Bursary

- Other sources of funding -

Sources of government funding and financial support including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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This two-year, part-time Master’s programme is designed for those who wish to study at postgraduate level and are keen to develop high-level skills in historical research. Read more
This two-year, part-time Master’s programme is designed for those who wish to study at postgraduate level and are keen to develop high-level skills in historical research.

The course offers two thematic strands in which students specialise. The first, British local and regional history, is constant throughout all intakes. The second, which changes for each intake, is Politics and religion in Tudor and Stuart England for the 2016-2018 course. You will specialise in one of these two themes, studying taught modules and undertaking original research, culminating in a dissertation of 16,000 to 20,000 words.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-history

Course detail

The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks, and begins in October 2016 (Michaelmas Term). It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

Successful applicants will become members of a Cambridge college and will join the wider graduate community, with full access to the facilities of the University.

By the end of the course students should have:

- developed an understanding of, and ability to apply critically, the main academic theories and concepts underpinning the study of history;
- extended and developed their analytical, evaluative and critical capacities;
- developed the ability to form independent judgements based on their reading, research and writing;
- demonstrable specific subject knowledge and analysis relevant to their dissertation;
- developed research skills required for further postgraduate research.

Format

The MSt is structured around four residential modules that students must attend. All students take modules 1 and 3 together; modules 2 and 4 are subject pathway modules. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules, to build a virtual community of practice. Students are expected to have sufficient IT skills to engage with the VLE and all assignments are uploaded to the VLE for assessment.

Lectures, seminars and classes: c.75 hours in Year 1 (including some reading/prep time), c.18 hours in Year 2.

Supervision: 5 x 1-hour sessions in Year 2.

Year 1

The taught elements of the syllabus are offered during Year 1 in four intensive study blocks, usually scheduled inside Full Term, each of which is examined by an assessed essay. Sessions are offered in research training, and essay and dissertation writing.

Module 1: Theory, concepts and historiography (3 - 6 October 2016)*
Induction Day: Introduction to the course, tours of the University and Seeley History libraries, talk on Cambridge colleges.

The Annales School, international history, gender, feudalism, race, class and social status, nations and states, religion, essay workshop.

Module 2: (30 November – 2 December 2016)*
a) British local and regional history
Approaches to local history, manors and tour of medieval Cambridge, the parish, early modern culture, religion and belief, urban history, consumption, family and household, essay workshop.

OR

b) Politics and Religion in Tudor and Stuart England 1520 - 1625
Parliamentary history, Reformation history, politics, religion and memory.

Module 3: Sources, methods and research skills (22 - 24 February 2017 )*
Using library resources and archives, the census, global and transnational history, micro-history, sources for early modern history, IT for historians, Excel for historians, practical, quantitative and economic history, oral history and its discontents, anthropology and history, essay workshop.

Module 4: (19 – 21 May 2017)*
a) British local and regional history
Disease, death and doctors, plague and venereal disease, why were towns the principal determinant of mortality change from 1600 to 1900?, the old Poor Law and charity, the new Poor Law, charity and the state, workhouse medicine and mortality, smallpox, childbirth, midwifery and the man-midwife, mutual aid and self-help, the ‘professionalisation’ of medicine, essay workshop.

OR

b) Politics and Religion in Tudor and Stuart England 1625 - 1715
Sources for Tudor and Stuart political history, sources for Tudor and Stuart religious history.

* module content subject to change

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on the dissertation. Students will work independently on their chosen topic under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact. Students will be required to attend five supervisions between May 2017 and May 2018, at least three of which must be face-to-face and two of which can be online.

There will also be three day-schools at Madingley Hall, at which students provide short presentations on their research to date and at which there is some research training:

- Saturday 21 October 2017
- Saturday 2 December 2017
- Saturday 14 April 2018

Assessment

- A dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words (including footnotes and appendices, but excluding bibliography)
- Four essay assignments, each of 4,000 words maximum.

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

You may be interested to know that from 2016/17, Student Finance England (SFE) is introducing a postgraduate loans scheme for full-time and part-time Master’s courses. Information on eligibility, the amount of the loan and the level of repayment can be found in SFE’s The Student Room: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=5659-Student-Finance

Please note that SFE is planning to take applications via its main Student finance website, from summer 2016: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Sustainability Leadership is an interdisciplinary postgraduate degree that explores leadership responses to sustainability challenges and opportunities. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Sustainability Leadership is an interdisciplinary postgraduate degree that explores leadership responses to sustainability challenges and opportunities. This programme is accredited by the University of Cambridge and delivered by the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL).

The MSt is offered in association with the Departments of Architecture, Engineering, Geography, Land Economy and the Judge Business School. Both academic excellence and leadership on sustainability are prioritised in the competitive selection process, and in the design and delivery of the programme.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-sustainability-leadership

Aims of the programme

- To develop leaders who have a wide awareness and deep understanding of the social, environmental, ethical and economic challenges facing the world, and equip them to respond more effectively in their executive roles.
- To expose leaders and future leaders to a range of best-practice cases of how business, government and civil society are responding to these challenges.
- To help leaders to make a compelling ‘business case’ for sustainability in their sector and/or institutional context, and understand how best to put sustainability policies into practice.
- To give leaders insights into the academic debate on sustainability, including some of the key scientific and technological issues, and equip them with research skills relevant to sustainability.

Format

The primary approaches to teaching and learning are:

- taught sessions by academics and practitioners, who are thought-leaders and/or case study illustrators
- group work, involving dialogue, debate and presentations throughout the taught modules, as well as a group research assignment
- individual work, involving research and written presentation of findings on selected topics
- support and facilitation by a CISL-led team of faculty, tutors and supervisors from within the University
- intensive and collaborative e-learning programmes, including e-modules, online webinars and content-based discussions to maximize knowledge sharing.

Contact time

- Lectures: 35 hours per year
- Seminars and classes: 50 hours per year
- Small group teaching: 26 hours per year
- Supervision: 7 hours per year

Assessment

- Dissertation: 15,000 words maximum (including footnotes, tables and graphs but excluding appendices and bibliography).
- An analysis paper of 3,000 words maximum
- A strategy paper of 3,000 words maximum
- A group project of 5,000-7,000 words

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews. The dissertation also involves an oral presentation.

Students are given formal feedback on their assignment and informal feedback throughout their course, including during supervisions. First year tutors give an annual progress report at the end of year 1 and dissertation supervisors provide termly reports during year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

A limited number of small grants may be available from the alumni bursary fund to support eligible research activities.

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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The Real Estate Masters Programme is a Master of Studies (MSt) course offered by The Department of Land Economy drawing on the multi-disciplinary strength of the Department and the University. Read more
The Real Estate Masters Programme is a Master of Studies (MSt) course offered by The Department of Land Economy drawing on the multi-disciplinary strength of the Department and the University. It is aimed at experienced professionals and those identified as future leaders in the real estate industry and combines academic rigour with significant industry input.

The course aims to equip participants with a broader knowledge of all aspects of the real estate industry, insight into a range of long-term themes and strategic issues in the market as well as developing a range of research and other skills.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-real-estate

Who is the course designed for?

This is a two-year part-time Master's course designed for those who have several years of professional experience in real estate or associated business, have attained a leadership role, are identified as a potential leader or are seeking to take up a leadership role. The format permits students to continue with their professional career whilst studying. The course will enhance students’ technical skills and develop a range of other skills to enable them to be agents of change in the real estate industry and beyond.

Aims of the programme

- To enable students to build their knowledge across a range of disciplines around real estate including finance, investment, economics, environmental policy, planning and law.
- To enable students to build on previous study and work experience across real estate and related disciplines.
- To equip students to take leadership positions in the industry and develop their understanding of key skills in management, innovation, strategy, negotiation, partnering and risk management.
- To provide opportunities to learn from colleagues from different cultures, work backgrounds and with experience from different countries with different social, economic and legal systems.
- To provide students with the skills to manage information and resources effectively and to be able to manage their own research.
- To build a passion for research and strategic thinking.

The programme aims to ensure that students have a solid understanding of the end-to-end processes in real estate investment and finance whilst promoting innovation in real estate through highlighting some of the trends influencing the industry and the opportunities that this will bring. The course breadth is reflected in the topics it addresses, from looking at the high-level drivers of capital flows in real estate and changes in the urban environment, through to asset management of individual buildings and optimising their performance

Format

The course has a number of themes running through it that reflect some of the key trends shaping the industry:

- The interaction between the economy and real estate markets
- Globalisation and its influence on the market
- Risk management and mitigation
- The impact of technological change on real estate
- Sustainable buildings and cities

The programme is of a modular design and delivered through a combination of distance learning, with course materials, in various mediums, released through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and attendance at five intensive residential blocks in Cambridge (3 x 2 weeks and 2 x 1 week), over the two years.

The course is taught through a combination of:

- Taught sessions by academics and practitioners
- Individual work including: working through course materials on the VLE, course reading, preparation of written work (primarily between the residential sessions).
- Group work including: working through case studies, dialogue, debate and presentations throughout the taught modules.
- Supervisions and support from the Land Economy faculty, tutors and supervisors from within the university.

Residential sessions focus on taught sessions, practical applications, case studies and collaborative working, including presentation of project work and case studies, as well as individual supervisions. The residential sessions enable students to learn from one another as well as from the academic faculty staff and external speakers.

Support and facilitation for students is provided by team of faculty, tutors and supervisors from within the University.

Contact time

- Lectures: c.160 hours of lectures over the two-year course*
- Seminars and classes: 20 hours of managed discussions, debates and group exercises/workshops over the two-year course
- Practicals: 8 site and property visits over the two-year course, equating to c.40 hrs
- Supervision: up to 7 hours per year

* The number of hours may vary slightly as the course is constantly evolving in order to meet developments in the sector and in response to student and industry feedback. The lectures are intended to be interactive discussions with the lecturer.

Assessment

- Dissertation: 12,000 words maximum (including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography), to be completed during the second year of the course.
- Three short case study assessment exercises, each of 2,500 words maximum.
- Three essays, each of 3,000 words maximum.
- Full and active participation in all elements of the course is compulsory.

Students receive regular feedback throughout the course, formal and informal, individual and group, during face to face supervisions and through written exchanges with their supervisors and the Director of Studies.

First year tutors/supervisors complete an annual progress report at the end of Year 1. Dissertation supervisors provide termly reports in Year 2. Students are also given feedback on presentation of their projects and case studies during the residential sessions.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in English is designed to meet the teacher education regulations of the New York State Education Department, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) stan- dards, the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), as well as Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. The program leads to Initial/Professional Adolescence Education, English (Grades 7-12) certification. This program is nationally recognized by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 47 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 549, Adol Lit and Teaching of Reading/Literacy .............3 credits
GRED 550, Intro to Teaching ELA, Grades 7-12 ....................3 credits
GRED 555, Classroom Mgmt/Leadership, Middle/Sec Schools .....3 credits
GRED 582, Teaching Writing/Lang/Comm, Grades 7-12 ..........3 credits
GRED 584, Teaching Literature and Literacy, Grades 7-12 ........3 credits
GRED 588, Practicum I, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools..............2 credits
GRED 589, Practicum II, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools ............2 credits
GRED 600, Philosophical Foundations of Education ................3 credits
GRED 671, Dev Prof Portfolio: Culminating Experience ...........3 credits
GRED 677, Development and Learning in Adolescence .............3 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

Education elective ........................................................3 credits

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 692, Student Teaching in Jr High School (7-9) ..............6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

GRED 677 is required if the candidate’s undergraduate work does not include a course in developmental, adolescent, or educational psychology. If the psychology requirement is fulfilled through un- dergraduate course work, a second education elective shall be taken.

Full or conditional admission is available.

Testimonial

“I made the tough decision to apply for graduate school after a fruitful career in social work because I desperately needed a change. After this epiphany, I resigned from my position, and soon after applied to the MST program at SUNY Potsdam. As it turned out, it was a decision that not only changed my life, but altered the course of my family’s as well. The MST program prepared me for teaching in ways that I couldn't have imagined, and continues to mold me into the teacher I am well on my way to becoming.” —Johnny Dundon

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the Mathematics major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the Mathematics major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science for Teachers Adolescence Education program for teaching mathematics (with Middle Childhood extension) is designed to meet current regulations of the New York State Education Department and standards of the National Council of Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), while also incorporating Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. The MST Mathematics Education program is nationally recognized by the NCTM and leads to Initial / Professional Certification in Adolescence Education, Mathematics (Grades 7-12) with an extension certification for grades 5-6. Program studies begin in the Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 48 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 556, Reading in Middle/Secondary Schools ...................3 credits
GRED 557, Writing in Middle/Secondary Schools ...................3 credits
GRED 568, Teaching Mathematics in Middle Schools ..............3 credits
GRED 569, Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools ...........3 credits
GRED 578, Practicum in Middle School Mathematics..............2 credits
GRED 579, Practicum in Secondary School Mathematics ..........2 credits
GRED 600, Philosophical Foundations of Education ................3 credits
GRED 667, Topics and Research in Mathematics Education .......3 credits
GRED 670A, Culminating Experience Portfolio .....................3 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

Technology elective ......................................................3 credits
Education elective ........................................................3 credits

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 694, Student Teaching in Middle School (Grades 5-9) .....6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Senior High (Grades 10-12) ....6 credits

GRED 677 is required if the candidate’s undergraduate work does not include a course in developmental, adolescent, or educational psychology. This course may count as the education elective, with permission of the advisor.

Full or conditional admission is available.

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Uniqueness of Program

The MST Adolescence Education program in Mathematics Education is both NCATE accredited and nationally recognized by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

One Couple’s Testimonial . . .

“Our experience at SUNY Potsdam was life changing. Not only did we get the preparation we needed for our careers as math teachers, we met many amazing people, including professors, friends, and each other. SUNY Potsdam gave us the confidence and courage to move out of our comfort zone, and start careers together in southwest Arizona.” —Travis and Amanda (Hunkins) Bogart
Math Education, SUNY Potsdam Class of 2012

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the science major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the science major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in Science is designed in accordance with the New York State Education Department’s certification regulations, the National Council of Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE) standards, and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) standards, along with Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. This program leads to Initial/Professional certification in Adolescence Education, Science (biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics). Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 47 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 501, Seminar: Teaching Science in the Sec School ...........3 credits
GRED 502, Issues in Science, Technology, and Society ...............3 credits
GRED 555, Classroom Mgmt/Leadership, Middle/Sec Schools .....3 credits
GRED 556, Reading in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 557, Writing in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 571, Science Education Instruction in Sec Schools ...........3 credits
GRED 670, Culminating Experience ...................................3 credits
GRED 672, Science, Curricula, Programs and Standards ...........3 credits
GRED 673, Secondary Science Field Work ............................3 credits
GRED 675, Secondary Science Teaching Research ....................3 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 692, Student Teaching in Jr High School (7-9) ..............6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

GRED 677 is required if the candidate’s undergraduate work does not include a course in developmental, adolescent, or educational psychology. This course may count as the education elective, with permission of the advisor.

Full or conditional admission is available.

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Testimonials

“I chose to enroll in SUNY Potsdam in 2007 because I wanted to become a high school Physics teacher. Potsdam’s MST program meant that I could get my Master’s degree in record time, while I was still in school and not working full-time. To top it off, the teaching principles I learned in the program have shaped me into the educator I am today.” —Brendan Burkhart

“The MST program allowed me to achieve my Bachelor’s degree in Biology, as well as my Master’s in Secondary Science Education, in 5 years. The program not only saved time, but money as well! The classes gave me practical knowledge that allowed me to be more successful in the classroom after graduation in 2012. I am now in my third year of teaching biology full-time!” —Jennifer Shimaitis

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