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Masters Degrees (Ms In Computer Science)

We have 111 Masters Degrees (Ms In Computer Science)

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The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. Read more
The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. The program provides students with an understanding of the theory and practice of automating the representation, storage and processing of information, while emphasizing experimental research to design and engineer a wide variety of computer and information systems.

The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. If you have bachelor's degree in computer science or a related field, you're invited to apply for admission to our MSCS program.

The doctoral program leads to a PhD in Computer Science. Students admitted into the program typically have a master's degree in computer science or a closely related discipline. Students with a bachelor's degree and a strong academic record may also be directly admitted.

Recent doctoral graduates have gone on to careers in as software engineering at Intel, eBay, Cisco Systems, positions at Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, Twitter, Bloomberg, the Air Force Research Lab, and the U.S. Census. Academic placements include assistant professorships at California State University at Fullerton, Valdosta State University, and Harran University, Turkey.

The Master's program leads to a Master of Science in Computer Science. It is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. Holders of the baccalaureate degree in computer science or a related field are invited to apply for admission to the MSCS program. Students whose undergraduate degree is not in computer science may be required to complete some preparatory work in addition to fulfilling the requirements listed below.
Program requirements include four core courses taken over the first two semesters of study. These courses are Computer Organization and Architecture, Operating Systems, Programming Languages and Design & Analysis of Computer Algorithms. Three graduating options are offered: a thesis option, a project option and a comprehensive exam. Beyond the 4 core courses, these options require students to complete 4, 5 and 6 elective courses, respectively, chosen from a broad set of courses offered by the Department.

Applicant Qualifications

- Undergraduate major in computer science or related field desirable for admission
- Applicants are additionally expected to have completed coursework in the following areas:
*Algorithms and data structures
*Computer organization and architecture
*Operating systems
*Programming languages
*Discrete mathematics

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Two letters of recommendation (three letters of recommendation for PhD applicants)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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USF offers a three-year MS in Computer Science Bridge program that provides a unique opportunity for motivated students from a non-computer science background to pursue a Master's in Computer Science. Read more
USF offers a three-year MS in Computer Science Bridge program that provides a unique opportunity for motivated students from a non-computer science background to pursue a Master's in Computer Science. Students who successfully complete the first year of preparatory classes then continue in the standard two-year MS in Computer Science program.

Real-World Experience - By completing an internship at a technology company, working on a faculty research project, or contributing to an open-source project, the practicum course helps students gain real world experience.

San Francisco Advantage - Located in the heart of San Francisco and close to Silicon Valley, which boasts more tech companies than any other region in the US.

Faculty - Comprising of distinguished researchers and accomplished experts from the Bay Area’s tech companies, the MSCS faculty bring real world computing experience into the classroom.

Small Classes - Close interaction with full-time faculty is a hallmark of the program. Our cohort model enhances the experience during our students’ first year, allowing them to take core courses at the same time.

International Students - may be eligible to work for 36 months in the U.S. after completion of the MSCS program via the OPT program and STEM extension.

Who Can Apply?

Applicants with basic introductory programming background in variables, control structures, structured data types, and functions are eligible to apply. These prerequisites can be completed through introductory programming courses at a local community college, university, online, or through self-study.

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The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) program provides students with a broad background in software development and other core disciplines of computer science, ranging from systems, networking, and distributed programming to algorithms and theory. Read more
The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) program provides students with a broad background in software development and other core disciplines of computer science, ranging from systems, networking, and distributed programming to algorithms and theory.

Program Highlights

Real-world experience - By completing an internship at a technology company, working on a faculty research project, or contributing to an open-source project, the practicum course helps students gain real world experience.

San Francisco Advantage - Located in the heart of San Francisco and close to Silicon Valley, which boasts more tech companies than any other region in the US.

Faculty - Comprising of distinguished researchers and accomplished experts from the Bay Area’s tech companies, the our faculty bring real world computing experience into the classroom.

Small Classes - Close interaction with full-time faculty is a hallmark of the program. Our cohort model enhances the experience during our students’ first year, allowing them to take core courses at the same time.

International Students - may be eligible to work for 36 months in the U.S. after completion of the MSCS program via the OPT program and STEM extension.

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The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business. Read more

Program overview

The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business.

The degree is offered on a full- or part-time basis. Courses are generally offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate part-time students. Full-time students take three or four courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in three semesters. Full-time students who are required to take additional bridge courses may be able to complete the course work in four semesters. Part-time students take one or two courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in four to five semesters. The time required to complete a master's project is one semester, but can vary according to the student and the scope of the topic. Two semesters is typical.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes either a thesis or a project. Students complete one core course, three courses in a cluster, four electives, and a thesis. For those choosing to complete a project in place of a thesis, students complete one additional elective.

Clusters

Students select three cluster courses from the following areas (see website for individual area information):
-Computer graphics and visualization
-Data management
-Distributed systems
-Intelligent systems
-Languages and tools
-Security
-Theory

Electives

Electives provide breadth of experience in computer science and applications areas. Students who wish to include courses from departments outside of computer science need prior approval from the graduate program director. Refer to the course descriptions in the departments of computer science, engineering, mathematical sciences, and imaging science for possible elective courses.

Master's thesis/project

Students may choose the thesis or project option as the capstone to the program. Students who choose the project option must register for the Project course (CSCI-788). Students participate in required in-class presentations that are critiqued. A summary project report and public presentation of the student's project (in poster form) occurs at the end of the semester.

Curriculum

Thesis/project options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular option's modules and a particular cluster's modules.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam.
-Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants, whose native language is not English, must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, discrete mathematics, and computer science theory) and computing (experience with a modern high-level language [e.g., C++, Java], data structures, software design methodology, introductory computer architecture, operating systems, and programming language concepts).

Additional information

Bridge courses:
If an applicant lacks any prerequisites, bridge courses may be recommended to provide students with the required knowledge and skills needed for the program. If any bridge courses are indicated in a student's plan of study, the student may be admitted to the program on the condition that they successfully complete the recommended bridge courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better (courses with lower grades must be repeated). Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress in this additional course work. Bridge program courses are not counted as part of the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. During orientation, bridge exams are conducted. These exams are the equivalent to the finals of the bridge courses. Bridge courses will be waived if the exams are passed.

Faculty:
Faculty members in the department are actively engaged in research in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer networking, pattern recognition, computer vision, graphics, visualization, data management, theory, and distributed computing systems. There are many opportunities for graduate students to participate in these activities toward thesis or project work and independent study.

Facilities:
The computer science department provides extensive facilities that represent current technology, including:
-A graduate lab with more than 15 Mac’s and a graduate library.
-Specialized labs in graphics, computer vision, pattern recognition, security, database, and robotics.
-Six general purpose computing labs with more than 100 workstations running Linux, Windows, and OS X; plus campus-wide wireless access.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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Walden’s online master’s in information technology program is designed to help you progressively build a 21st-century IT career—from the foundational skills required to enter the field to the specialized expertise needed for senior-level IT positions. Read more

Walden’s online master’s in information technology program is designed to help you progressively build a 21st-century IT career—from the foundational skills required to enter the field to the specialized expertise needed for senior-level IT positions.

Designed with input from IT industry leaders and employers, the online master’s in IT program offers core courses to help you develop essential programming, networking, and database management and development skills. After completing these core courses, you can then pursue one of five specializations that provide the advanced training required for senior positions in the in-demand fields of health informatics, cyber security, big data analytics, information systems, or software engineering.

Throughout the IT master’s program, virtual labs, hands-on applications, and the use of real-time analytics and business intelligence platforms help you gain the practical, real-world skills demanded by today’s employers.

Recently redesigned to help you gain highly marketable skills more quickly and affordably, the online master’s in information technology program enables you to earn a Graduate Certificate in Information Systems upon completing your first four courses.*

Center of Excellence

 Walden has been recognized as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of this program will be prepared to:

  1. Apply core information technology principles and practices.
  2. Apply best software engineering principles and practices to develop and maintain stable, secure, scalable, and maintainable software.
  3. Work in geographically dispersed teams to produce effective solutions to complex information technology problems.
  4. Recommend appropriate information technology solutions based on organizational needs and an evaluation of alternatives.
  5. Identify and discuss professional, individual, organizational, societal, and regulatory implications of information systems and technology.
  6. Select technologies, policies, and procedures to assure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information and IT systems.

*To receive the Graduate Certificate in Information Systems, you must satisfactorily complete ITEC 6111, ITEC 6115, ITEC 6145, and ITEC 6030 and apply for the certificate, which is awarded at no additional cost.

Find detailed information for this program, including possible occupations, completion rate, program costs, and median student loan debt.

MS in Information Technology Degree Specializations

Walden’s MS in Information Technology program offers a variety of specializations to help you meet your personal and professional goals.

Career options

Rapid advancements in technologies, new business opportunities for leveraging technology applications, and the anticipated retirement of many senior-level information technology professionals are factors contributing to the growing demand for technology talent. Employment of computer and system administrators, computer system analysts, and computer information systems managers is expected to grow by 25% from 2008 to 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The MS in Information Technology can help you prepare for senior-level or leadership positions in big data analytics, engineering, programming, security, and systems architecture, including positions in:

Big data analytics

  • Business analytics specialist
  • Data analyst
  • Data scientist
  • Data visualization developer
  • Information security analyst
  • IT analyst
  • IT manager
  • Network administrator
  • Project manager
  • Software developer
  • System architect
  • Web developer

Computer software engineering

  • Computer software engineer, applications
  • Computer software engineer, systems software
  • Database designer/architect

Information technology security

  • Information technology security analyst
  • Network security analyst
  • Information technology business analyst
  • Technology risk manager

Network/systems administration

  • Computer programmer
  • Database programmer
  • Application programmer
  • Systems programmer

Learn more about the career outlook for graduates with a MS in Information Technology



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See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science. The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Read more
See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science

The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Formal course work includes consideration of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, the applications of physical and geometrical optics to electro-optical systems, the mathematical evaluation of image forming systems, digital image processing, and the statistical characterization of noise and system performance. Technical electives may be selected from courses offered in imaging science, color science, engineering, computer science, science, and mathematics. Both thesis and project options are available. In general, full-time students are required to pursue the thesis option, with the project option targeted to part-time and online students who can demonstrate that they have sufficient practical experience through their professional activities.

Faculty within the Center for Imaging Science supervise thesis research in areas of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, digital image processing, remote sensing, nanoimaging, electro-optical instrumentation, vision, medical imaging, color imaging systems, and astronomical imaging. Interdisciplinary efforts are possible with other colleges across the university.

The program can be completed on a full- or a part-time basis. Some courses are available online, specifically in the areas of color science, remote sensing, medical imaging, and digital image processing.

Plan of study

All students must earn 30 credit hours as a graduate student. The curriculum is a combination of required core courses in imaging science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background and interests, and either a research thesis or graduate paper/project. Students must enroll in either the research thesis or graduate paper/project option at the beginning of their studies.

Core courses

Students are required to complete the following core courses: Fourier Methods for Imaging (IMGS-616), Image Processing and Computer Vision (IMGS-682), Optics for Imaging (IMGS-633), and either Radiometry (IMGS-619) or The Human Visual System (IMGS-620).

Speciality track courses

Students choose two courses from a variety of tracks such as: digital image processing, medical imaging, electro-optical imaging systems, remote sensing, color imaging, optics, hard copy materials and processes, and nanoimaging. Tracks may be created for students interested in pursuing additional fields of study.

Research thesis option

The research thesis is based on experimental evidence obtained by the student in an appropriate field, as arranged between the student and their adviser. The minimum number of thesis credits required is four and may be fulfilled by experiments in the university’s laboratories. In some cases, the requirement may be fulfilled by work done in other laboratories or the student's place of employment, under the following conditions:

1. The results must be fully publishable.

2. The student’s adviser must be approved by the graduate program coordinator.

3. The thesis must be based on independent, original work, as it would be if the work were done in the university’s laboratories.

A student’s thesis committee is composed of a minimum of three people: the student’s adviser and two additional members who hold at least a master's dgeree in a field relevant to the student’s research. Two committee members must be from the graduate faculty of the center.

Graduate paper/project option

Students with demonstrated practical or research experience, approved by the graduate program coordinator, may choose the graduate project option (3 credit hours). This option takes the form of a systems project course. The graduate paper is normally performed during the final semester of study. Both part- and full-time students may choose this option, with the approval of the graduate program coordinator.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS in imaging science, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (undergraduate studies should include the following: mathematics, through calculus and including differential equations; and a full year of calculus-based physics, including modern physics. It is assumed that students can write a common computer program),

- Submit a one- to two-page statement of educational objectives,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work,

- Submit letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or research capabilities,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (requirement may be waived for those not seeking funding from the Center for Imaging Science), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) or 100 (Internet-based) are required. Students may also submit scores from the International English Language Testing System. The minimum IELTS score is 7.0. International students who are interested in applying for a teaching or research assistantship are advised to obtain as high a TOEFL or IELTS score as possible. These applicants also are encouraged to take the Test of Spoken English in order to be considered for financial assistance.

Applicants seeking financial assistance from the center must have all application documents submitted to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Applicants who lack adequate preparation may be required to complete bridge courses in mathematics or physics before matriculating with graduate status.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The Master of Science in Computer Science provides you with a comprehensive background in. algorithms, computational theory, computer architecture, operating systems, compiler design and software based systems. Read more

The Master of Science in Computer Science provides you with a comprehensive background in:

  • algorithms, computational theory, computer architecture, operating systems, compiler design and software based systems
  • theory and design of modern high-level programming languages and applications in development of systems software
  • design and analysis of efficient algorithms
  • advanced topics in computer architecture, illustrated by case studies from classic to modern processors, including large-scale computer systems
  • topics specific to your area of specialization, such as software engineering, computer security, networks, computer graphics, databases, information security, and artificial intelligence

Our 30-credit curriculum also offers a thesis option in which you’ll take six credits relating to thesis courses. This allows you to gain specialization in areas that make you better qualified for specific research and development opportunities.

Our Entrepreneurship and Technology Innovation Center in Old Westbury offers you the opportunity to join research projects in areas such as cybersecurity, health care, and energy. This may lead to your work getting published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at major conferences. You can also join us at the annual Cybersecurity Conference at our Manhattan campus, where we welcome experts from academic, business, and government worldwide.



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The master of science degree in computer engineering provides students with a high level of specialized knowledge in computer engineering, strengthening… Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in computer engineering provides students with a high level of specialized knowledge in computer engineering, strengthening their ability to successfully formulate solutions to current technical problems, and offers a significant independent learning experience in preparation for further graduate study or for continuing professional development at the leading edge of the discipline. The program accommodates applicants with undergraduate degrees in computer engineering or related programs such as electrical engineering or computer science. (Some additional bridge courses may be required for applicants from undergraduate degrees outside of computer engineering).

Plan of study

The degree requires 30 semester credit hours and includes Analytical Topics in Computer Engineering (CMPE-610), two core courses, four graduate electives, two semesters of graduate seminar, and the option of completing either a thesis research or a graduate project. The core courses and graduate electives provide breadth and depth of knowledge. The Computer Engineering Graduate Seminar (CMPE-795) provides students with exposure to a variety of topics presented by researchers from within RIT, industry, and other universities, and guides students to choose either a thesis or project as their culminating experience. The Project/Thesis Initiation Seminar (CMPE-796) guides students to complete their thesis proposal or project execution plan with their faculty adviser.

Students who pursue the thesis option complete nine semester credit hours of thesis research (CMPE-790) to conduct research with a faculty adviser to answer a fundamental science/engineering question that contributes to new knowledge in the field. Students are expected to formulate the problem under the faculty adviser's guidance and conduct extensive quantitative or qualitative analyses with sound methodology. Research findings should be repeatable and generalizable, with sufficient quality to make them publishable in technical conferences and/or journals. Students who pursue the project option take six semester credits of graduate electives directly related to their project deliverables and three semester credits of Graduate Project (CMPE-792) to professionally execute a project under the supervision of a faculty adviser. The project generally addresses an immediate and practical problem, a scholarly undertaking that can have tangible outcomes, where students are expected to give a presentation or demonstration of the final deliverables of the project.

Research tracks/Graduate electives

Students may select four graduate electives from within the following research tracks. Students are encouraged to choose most of their graduate electives within a single research track. At least two of the electives must be from the computer engineering department (computer engineering department courses begin with the prefix CMPE). Courses outside the lists below may be considered with approval from the department of computer engineering. Research tracks are available in the following areas (see website for research track details):
-Computer architecture
-Computer vision and machine intelligence
-Integrated circuits and systems
-Networks and security
-Signal processing, control and embedded systems
-Additional graduate-level math courses

Curriculum

Thesis and project options differ in course sequence, see website for a particular option's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have an GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
-Submit two letters of reference from individuals well qualified to judge the candidate's ability for graduate study, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cast/packaging/ms-packaging-science. The MS degree in packaging science is designed to meet the needs of professionals who are employed in the field or students who wish to pursue a graduate program immediately upon earning a bachelor's degree. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cast/packaging/ms-packaging-science

The MS degree in packaging science is designed to meet the needs of professionals who are employed in the field or students who wish to pursue a graduate program immediately upon earning a bachelor's degree.

Plan of study

The program requires the completion of 36 credit hours comprised of six required core courses, elective courses, plus a thesis or project. Faculty advisers assist students in selecting the thesis or project option and the corresponding plan of study is approved by the graduate program chair.

- Elective courses

All elective courses are approved by the student’s adviser and must meet degree requirements. In certain circumstances, with pre-approval by the graduate adviser and where individual need indicates appropriateness, a limited number of upper-level undergraduate courses may be used to fulfill elective credit. Students, with adviser permission, may include independent study as part of their elective credits. However, independent study may not be used toward the required packaging core course work. Courses selected for elective credit can be combined to create special areas of focus with program chair approval.

- Thesis/Project/Comprehensive Exam

The thesis option requires 6 credit hours and develops and tests a hypothesis by scientific method and is grounded in a theoretical framework. Individuals who can capture, interpret, and apply information by this method can add value to their roles as contributors in the workplace. The thesis option is for students seeking to pursue careers that offer a greater opportunity for further research or advanced study in the field of packaging science. It is meant to provide depth of study, emphasizing the research process. The thesis option is by invitation only.

The project option is 3 credit hours and has a practical, application-oriented grounding in literature. It is considered secondary research or the compilation of existing information presented in a new way. The project option is for students who desire advanced study in packaging science, but who do not intend to pursue a research career or further studies beyond the master’s level. Students choosing the project option are required to complete one additional elective course.

The comprehensive exam option is 0 credit hours and allows students to complete an exam in place of a thesis or project. Students who choose this option take two additional elective courses.

The student’s graduate committee makes the final decision regarding the proposal idea and whether it meets the program’s requirements as a graduate project or thesis; or if a student is best served by completing the comprehensive exam.

Admission requirements

Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores are not required. However, in cases where there may be some question of the capability of an applicant to complete the program, applicants may wish to submit scores to strengthen their application.

Students who do not have an equivalent bachelor’s degree in packaging science will be evaluated and the appropriate undergraduate bridge courses will be prescribed. These courses may not be used for credit toward the MS degree.

Applicants are required to have one semester of physics (mechanics focus), one semester of calculus, one year of chemistry (including organic chemistry), statistics, and basic computer literacy.

Students who do not have an equivalent bachelor’s degree in packaging science will be evaluated and the appropriate undergraduate bridge courses will be prescribed. These courses may not be used for credit toward the MS degree.

Additional information

- Advising

Students are appointed an academic adviser who works with the program coordinator to develop a program of study. Students follow an outlined curriculum to complete their degree requirements and, with adviser approval, choose packaging electives to enhance their career objectives. Students choose a faculty adviser with approval from their program coordinator for their thesis or project. The faculty adviser guides the student on topic choice and works with the program coordinator for approval and timely completion of the thesis or project.

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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/212/physics

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The University has good facilities for modern research in physical sciences. Among the major instrumentation and techniques available on the campus are NMR spectrometers (including solutions at 600 MHz), several infrared and uvvisible spectrometers, a Raman spectrometer, two powder X-ray diffractometers, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption in flame and graphite furnace mode, gel-permeation chromatography, gaschromatography, analytical and preparative highperformance liquid chromatography (including GC-MS and HPLC-MS), mass spectrometry (electrospray and MALDI), scanning electron microscopy and EDX, various microscopes (including hot-stage), differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis, dionex analysis of anions and automated CHN analysis. For planetary science impact studies, there is a two-stage light gas gun.

- Interdisciplinary approach

Much of the School’s work is interdisciplinary and we have successful collaborative projects with members of the Schools of Biosciences, Computing and Engineering and Digital Arts at Kent, as well as an extensive network of international collaborations.

- National and international links

The School is a leading partner in the South East Physics Network (SEPnet), a consortium of seven universities in the south-east, acting together to promote physics in the region through national and international channels. The School benefits through the £12.5 million of funding from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), creating new facilities and resources to enable us to expand our research portfolio.

The School’s research is well supported by contracts and grants and we have numerous collaborations with groups in universities around the world. We have particularly strong links with universities in Germany, France, Italy and the USA. UK links include King’s College, London and St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London. Our industrial partners include British Aerospace, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, and Ophthalmic Technology Inc, Canada. The universe is explored through collaborations with NASA, ESO and ESA scientists.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Nature; Science; Astrophysical Journal; Journal of Polymer Science; Journal of Materials Chemistry; and Applied Optics.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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A Message from Department Chair Lekan Latinwo, Ph.D. On behalf of Biology faculty, staff, and students, I am delighted to welcome you to the department of Biological Sciences at Florida A&M University, and to also provide you with a brief overview of our department through this electronic medium. Read more

A Message from Department Chair Lekan Latinwo, Ph.D

On behalf of Biology faculty, staff, and students, I am delighted to welcome you to the department of Biological Sciences at Florida A&M University, and to also provide you with a brief overview of our department through this electronic medium. The department offers Bachelors and Masters Degree programs and currently has an enrollment of 850 majors with low attrition rate. The undergraduate degree program consists of three tracks: 1) General Biology, 2) Pre-Medicine/Pre-Dentistry, and 3) Cellular and Molecular Biology. The M.S. degree is offered in the following three areas: 1) Cell and Molecular Biology, 2) Physiology, 3) Ecology and Plant Physiology.

We are fortunate in our department to have a dynamic group of faculty, staff and students whose strength reside in our abilities to appreciate old ideas, while eagerly willing to investigate and advance new ideas, and promote enduring knowledge. In addition, we are aiming at creating an academic environment in which both young and old students and scholars from all races and ethnic backgrounds can congregate for educational challenges and opportunities to perform their ultimate best. In our department, we strive to shape the agenda and totally refuse to let it shape us. We also engage in necessary dialogues to define and reinforce the goals and values of our department as it relates to the university mission of Excellence with Caring.

OUR MISSION

The Department of Biological Sciences' Mission parallels the mission of Florida A&M University’s, which is to provide an enlightened and enriched academic, intellectual, moral, cultural, ethical, technological and student-centered environment, conducive to the development of highly qualified individuals who are prepared and capable of serving as leaders and contributors in our ever-evolving society. The department is dedicated to providing contemporary quality undergraduate and graduate education in several areas of Biological Sciences including Pre-medical Biology to Science Education. The structure of our programs ensures that students are exposed to courses that will prepare them for careers in all areas of the field of biology. The laboratory experiences offered by the department require that students develop competencies in the use of modern biological techniques, and in the analysis, interpretation and presentation of data. Part of our mission is to create opportunities for our students to gain research experience. Many of our talented faculty members serve as mentors to our undergraduate students conducting research. Our students are well prepared to enter graduate or professional schools, such as medical, dental and pharmacy school, or to enter immediate employment after graduation. It is our goal to produce graduate students who conduct publishable research. We also prepare our graduate students to continue their education in doctoral or medical programs. The department serves non-majors as well, exposing this population of students to biological concepts which impact their lives. The Faculty and Staff of the Department of Biological Sciences strive to always provide Excellence with Caring.

The Department of Biological Sciences Encourages Students to:

* Expand their appreciation for biological diversity

* Form an understanding of Morphology and Physiology of Living systems

* Retain laboratory competency for future careers in the sciences

* Obtain research and presentation experience

* Acquire internship and volunteer experience

* Gain teaching and tutorial experience

* Prepare for Graduate school (M.S. or Ph.D.), Professional School, and Employment in the Sciences



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The Decker School of Nursing provides excellent preparation in nursing education, scholarship and practice, and offers graduate level programs of study ranging from certificates to the PhD. Read more

Nursing

The Decker School of Nursing provides excellent preparation in nursing education, scholarship and practice, and offers graduate level programs of study ranging from certificates to the PhD. The Decker School of Nursing graduate nursing programs are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) through June 19, 2019.

In the Master of Science program (MS), students select one of four functional roles to pursue as a clinical nurse specialist, administrator, educator or nurse practitioner. Dual roles are also available for additional credit.

The Doctorate in Nursing Practice (DNP) program is designed to prepare Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Nurse Specialists to respond more efficiently to changes in health care delivery and emerging health care needs. The DNP focuses on providing leadership for evidence-based practice, and will incorporate the advanced practice content currently included in the master's program.

Recent Doctorate in Nursing Practice graduate placements include: Nurse Practitioner for New York State Office for People with Developmental Disabilities, Family Nurse Practitioner for Vestal Medical Associates, Geriatric Nurse Practitioner, DNP-Family Nurse Practitioner at Columbia University Medical Center. Furthermore, our graduates pioneer in research, development, and new initiatives, such as one of our 2012 graduates who initiated an independent Nurse Practitioner primary care practice, Blue Ridge Medical Center.

Graduate Degrees Offered

MS in Nursing in the following specialty areas (Nurse Practitioner or Nurse Educator/Nurse Administrator programs available):
- Community Health Nursing
- Family Nursing
- Adult-Gerontological Nursing
- Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

Graduates of the program in family nursing are prepared to provide advanced practice nursing care to families in a variety of settings. The CNS role is not available as a functional role if following the Family MS program.
Students choose functional preparation in one of four roles:
- Nurse Practitioner
- Nurse Educator
- Nurse Administrator

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Two letters of recommendation (three letters of recommendation for DNP applicants)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores
- Nursing licensure

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

Depending on your desired program, you must also meet the following requirements:
MS:
- Undergraduate degree in nursing from an NLNAC or CCNE accredited school of nursing
- Previous, successful completion of a course in descriptive statistics
- Computer literacy skills
- A current, unencumbered license to practice as a registered professional nurse
- One year of full-time employment as a registered nurse is strongly encouraged (Candidates without one year of previous full-time employment may wish to consider enrolling in a part-time program while they acquire the needed work experience)
- Note: all applicants are required to have taken and passed the NCLEX examination prior to the start of clinical courses

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