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The School of Clinical Medicine offers a programme in Medical Imaging with an option in Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety or Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography. Read more
The School of Clinical Medicine offers a programme in Medical Imaging with an option in Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety or Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

The Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety strands are offered in parallel on a bi-annual basis, the Magnetic Resonance Imaging and CT strand are offered on alternate years. In September 2013, the MRI and CT strands will commence.

The main aim of the programme is to train and qualify Radiographers in the practice of Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography.

The course is intended for qualified Radiographers with a clinical placement in a Nuclear Medicine Department, a Radiology Department, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department or a Computed Tomography Department. It is a course requirement that the student must spend a minimum of 15 hours per week on clinical placement in a Nuclear Medicine Department, a Radiology Department, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department or a Computed Tomography Department as appropriate to fulfill the requirements of the course.

The M.Sc. in Medical Imaging will be run over 12 months on a part-time basis.

In the M.Sc. in Medical Imaging, there are 4 separate strands: Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography. Students will choose one of the 4 options.

The taught component of the course is covered in the first 8 months. The student may opt to exit the programme upon completion of the taught component with a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Imaging.

From May to September, students undertake an independent research project. Successful completion of the research component of the programme leads to the award of M.Sc. in Medical Imaging.

The list of common core modules currently available to students of the Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and CT strands are:

Medico-Legal Aspects, Ethics and Health Services Management (5 ECTS)
Clinical Practice (10 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Nuclear Medicine strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation, and Computer Technology Radiation Protection and Quality Control in Nuclear Medicine (15 ECTS)
Clinical Applications of Nuclear Medicine and Hybrid Imaging (15 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to Nuclear Medicine (5 ECTS)
Radiopharmacy (5 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Radiation Safety strand are:

Radiation Protection Legislation (10 ECTS)
Practical Aspects of Radiation Protection (5 ECTS)
Physics and Instrumentation and Computer Technology (10 ECTS)
Quality Management and Quality Control (15 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation of MR and computer technology (15 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to MR (10 ECTS)
Safety in MR and Quality Control (5 ECTS)
MR Imaging Techniques and Protocols (15 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Computed Tomography strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation of CT and computer technology (10 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to CT (10 ECTS)
CT Imaging Techniques and Protocols (15 ECTS)
Radiation protection and quality assurance in CT (5 ECTS)

All common modules and strand-specific modules must be undertaken. The taught component thus consists of 60 ECTS.
Dissertation (30 ECTS)

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The MSc in Interactive Media is a CONVERSION COURSE; it is an intensive taught course focusing on the practical and technical aspects of interactive media. Read more
The MSc in Interactive Media is a CONVERSION COURSE; it is an intensive taught course focusing on the practical and technical aspects of interactive media.

The broad aim of the course is to equip students from a wide range of backgrounds with a thorough understanding of the technology and industry-standard tools used in the digital media sector. Interactive digital media seeks to entertain, inform and inspire an audience. The creation of interactive digital media is a challenging and complex activity requiring a blend of creative and technical skills using a range of existing and emerging technologies.

On successful completion of the course, you will have a comprehensive knowledge of the underlying concepts, technologies and practices of interactive digital media and be able to apply these to create interactive digital media products.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr05/

Course Detail

The MSc (Interactive Media) is a taught programme that may be taken full-time over 12 months or part-time over 24 months from the date of first registration for the programme.

Format

- Lectures: 12 hours per week
- Laboratory sessions: Six hours per week

You are expected to undertake independent reading and study.

Students must attain 90 credits through a combination of:

- Core Modules (30 credits)
- Elective Modules (30 credits)
- Research & Development Project (30 credits)

Core Modules (Period 1)

Full-time students are required to take the following 30 credits of core modules. Part-time students are required to take three of the following core modules in each year (15 credits), for a total of six separate modules over the two years (30 credits).

CS6100 Authoring (5 credits) - Dr. John O'Mullane
CS6101 Digital Publishing and Hypermedia Systems (5 credits) - Dr. Ian Pitt
CS6102 Graphics and Graphic Design (5 credits) - Dr. Sabin Tabirca
CS6103 Audio and Sound Engineering (5 credits) - Mr. David Murphy
CS6104 Digital Video Capture and Packaging (5 credits) - Dr. Ian Pitt
CS6111 3D Graphics and Modelling (5 credits) - Mr. David Murphy

Elective Modules (Period 2)

Full-time students are required to take 30 credits from the following elective modules. Part-time students are required to take three of the following elective modules in each year (15 credits), for a total of six separate modules over the two years (30 credits).

CS6105 Future and Emerging Interaction Technologies (5 credits) - Mr. David Murphy
CS6113 Internet-based Applications (5 credits) - Dr. Frank Boehme
CS6114 Digital Video Compression and Delivery (5 credits) - Dr. Frank Boehme
CS6115 Human Computer Interaction (5 credits) - Dr. Ian Pitt
CS6116 Mobile Multimedia (5 credits) - Dr. Sabin Tabirca
CS6117 Audio Processing (5 credits) - Mr. David Murphy

Note: Not all modules may be offered in a particular year and are subject to change.

Project Phase (After Period 2)

Full-time and part-time students are required to take a project as follows:

CS6200 Dissertation (30 credits)

Assessment

Full details and regulations governing Examinations for each programme will be contained in the Marks and Standards 2015 Book and for each module in the Book of Modules 2015/2016 - http://www.ucc.ie/modules/

Postgraduate Diploma in Interactive Media

Students who successfully achieve the pass standard in the examination may opt not to proceed to the digital media project and may opt instead to be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma in Interactive Media.

Careers

Companies actively recruiting Computer Science graduates in 2014-15 include:

Accenture, Aer Lingus, Amazon, Apple, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Bank of Ireland, BT, Cisco, CiTi-Technology, Cloudreach, Dell, Digital Turbine Asia Pacific, EMC, Enterprise Ireland, Ericsson, First Derivatives, Guidewire, IBM, Intel, Open Text, Paddy Power, Pilz, PWC, SAP Galway Transverse Technologies, Trend Micro, Uniwink, Version 1 (Software).

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The Higher Diploma in Applied Computing Technology is a CONVERSION COURSE open to graduates from non-computing disciplines. Read more
The Higher Diploma in Applied Computing Technology is a CONVERSION COURSE open to graduates from non-computing disciplines. The course provides you with an understanding of the principles of internet-based computer systems and will equip you with a range of core IT skills, including web design, web server configuration, managing and manipulating multimedia content, interfacing with databases and working with common office software.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cko08/

Course Details

The Higher Diploma is offered as a one year full-time or a two years part-time.

This is a CONVERSION COURSE and is intended for graduates who do not have Computer Science Degree and would like to attain skills in demand by the IT sector.

Format

A typical five credit module includes:
• two lecture hours
• one to two hours of practicals per week
• outside these regular hours, you are required to study independently

Full-Time Mode

Full-Time students take 60 credits as follows: 30 credits in teaching period 1 and 30 credits in period 2.

CS1117 Introduction to Programming (15 credits) - Dr. Jospeh Manning
CS5002 Web Development 1 (5 credits) - Dr. Frank Boehme
CS5007 Computer Applications with Visual Basic (5 credits) - Dr. James Doherty
CS5008 Internet Computing (5 credits) - Mr. Adrian O'Riordan
CS5009 Multimedia (5 credits) - Prof. James Bowen
CS5018 Web Development 2 (5 credits) - Dr. Derek Bridge
CS5019 Systems Organization I (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5020 Systems Organization II (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5021 Introduction to Relational Databases (5 credits) - Dr. Kieran Herley
CS5022 Database Design and Administration (5 credits) - Mr. Humprey Sorensen

Part-Time mode

Part-Time students take 30 credits in each of the two academic years as follows:

- Year 1 -

CS1117 Introduction to Programming (15 credits) - Dr. Joseph Manning
CS5002 Web Development 1 (5 credits) - Dr. Frank Boehme
CS5018 Web Development 2 (5 credits) - Dr. Derek Bridge
CS5021 Introduction to Relational Databases (5 credits) - Dr. Kieran Herley

- Year 2 -

CS5007 Computer Application with Visual Basic (5 credits) - Dr. James Doherty
CS5008 Internet Computing (5 credits) - Mr. Adrian O'Doherty
CS5009 Multimedia (5 credits) - Prof. James Bowen
CS5019 Systems Organization I (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5020 Systems Organization II (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5022 Database Design and Administration (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Diploma/Science/page14.html

Assessment

The Higher Diploma in Applied Computing Technology will be examined through a combination of end-of-year exams and module assignments.

Careers

Companies actively recruiting Computer Science graduates in 2014-15 include:

Accenture, Aer Lingus, Amazon, Apple, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Bank of Ireland, BT, Cisco, CiTi-Technology, Cloudreach, Dell, Digital Turbine Asia Pacific, EMC, Enterprise Ireland, Ericsson, First Derivatives, Guidewire, IBM, Intel, Open Text, Paddy Power, Pilz, PWC, SAP Galway Transverse Technologies, Trend Micro, Uniwink, Version 1 (Software).

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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This MSc programme will provide you with the skills required to understand the entrepreneurship and innovation required for the software industry. Read more
This MSc programme will provide you with the skills required to understand the entrepreneurship and innovation required for the software industry. Many national and multinational companies employ computer science graduates in areas such as software development and engineering, artificial intelligence, systems and networks, database and systems security as well as mobile multimedia, modelling, research and development. You will also get the chance to demonstrate the skills you have learned by completing a substantial research and development project.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr40/

Course Details

Students must attain 90 credits through a combination of:

- Core Modules (30 credits)
- Elective Modules (30 credits) (15 credits from Group 1 and 15 credits from Group 2 below)
- Research & Development Project (30 credits)

Core Modules

CS6403 Case Studies in Computing Entrepreneurship (5 credits) - Dr. John Herbert
CS6406 Large-Scale Application Development and Integration 1 (5 credits) - Prof. Gregory Provan
CS6407 Large-Scale Application Development and Integration 2 (5 credits) - Prof. Gregory Provan
CS6408 Database Technology (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen
CS6409 Information Storage and Retrieval (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen
CS6410 Project Development Skills (5 credits) - Mr. Marc Van Dongen

Elective Modules Group I

CS6312 Mobile Devices and Systems (5 credits) - Dr. Dan Grigoras
CS6314 Mobile Applications Design (5 credits) - Dr. Sabin Tabirca
CS6320 Formal Methods for Distributed Systems (5 credits) - Dr. John Herbert
CS6321 Model-Based Software Development (5 credits) - Dr. John Herbert
CS6322 Optimisation (5 credits) - Dr. Steve Prestwich

Elective Modules Group 2

CS6313 Services and Mobile Middleware (5 credits) - Dr. Dan Grigoras
CS6315 Mobile Systems Security (5 credits)
CS6316 Cellular Network Services (5 credits)
CS6317 Multimedia Technology in Mobile Networks (5 credits) - Dr. Sabin Tabirca
CS6323 Analysis of Networks and Complex Systems (5 credits) - Prof. Gregory Provan
CS6325 Network Security (5 credits) - Dr. Simon Foley
CS6405 Datamining (5 credits) - Dr. Marc Van Dongen

Research Phase (after period 2)

CS6400 Dissertation in Computing Science (30 credits)

Assessment

Full details and regulations governing Examinations for each programme will be contained in the Marks and Standards 2015 Book and for each module in the Book of Modules 2015/2016 - http://www.ucc.ie/modules/

- Postgraduate Diploma in Computing Science -

Students failing to achieve an aggregate of at least 60% across all modules but who achieve a pass in each of the taught modules at their first attempt graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Computing Science. Students may also opt to exit the programme and graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Computing Science provided they have achieved a pass in each module.

Careers

Companies actively recruiting Computer Science graduates in 2014-15 include:

Accenture, Aer Lingus, Amazon, Apple, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Bank of Ireland, BT, Cisco, CiTi-Technology, Cloudreach, Dell, Digital Turbine Asia Pacific, EMC, Enterprise Ireland, Ericsson, First Derivatives, Guidewire, IBM, Intel, Open Text, Paddy Power, Pilz, PWC, SAP Galway Transverse Technologies, Trend Micro, Uniwink, Version 1 (Software).

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. Read more
The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. The purpose of the programme is to provide high level linguistic, archive and research skills for a new generation of academic art historians and museum curators. The art historical and scholarly traditions of the Warburg Institute are linked to the practical experience and skills of the National Gallery to provide an academic programme which will equip students either as academic art historians with serious insight into the behind the scenes working of a great museum or as curators with the research skills necessary for high-level museum work.

This twelve-month, full-time programme provides an introduction to:

Museum knowledge, which covers all aspects of curatorship including the technical examination of paintings, connoisseurship, materials and conservation, attribution, provenance and issues relating to display.
Art history and Renaissance culture to increase students’ understanding of methods of analysing the subjects of works of art and their knowledge of Renaissance art works and the conditions in which they were commissioned, produced and enjoyed.
Current scholarship and professional practice in these areas as well as new and emerging areas of research and scholarship.
The programme will be taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Warburg Institute and by National Gallery curatorial and archival experts. The teaching staff of the Warburg Institute are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely and are involved with research related to the topics they teach.

Structure

All students will take three core modules and two optional modules. The core modules include language and paleography classes, which will be selected following an individual language audit for each student, and are spread over two terms. The optional subjects will vary from year to year and students must select at least one in an art historical field.

Core courses:

Art History – Iconology – Dr Paul Taylor
Language, Paleographical and Archive Skills – Various tutors for language and palaeography classes; Dr Claudia Wedepohl (The Warburg Institute) and Mr Alan Crookham (National Gallery) for archive skills
Curatorship in the National Gallery – Curatorial, conservation and scientific staff of the National Gallery, including Dr Ashok Roy, Dr Susanne Avery-Quash, Mr Larry Keith and Ms Rachel Billinge
Optional courses (two to be chosen):

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 – Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton

Students will also be encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer will be spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff of the Warburg Institute or a member of staff from the National Gallery.

Assessment

The usual format for classes is a weekly seminar. All students are required to submit three essays of 4,000 words, one at the beginning of the second term and the remaining two at the beginning of the third term. A dissertation of 15,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these four pieces of written work, a catalogue entry (submitted at the end of the first term), and examinations in language, paleographical and archive skills. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the staff at the Warburg Institute and the National Gallery. Because of the small numbers involved (places are limited to 12 per year), students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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The MSc in Data Science & Analytics, jointly offered by the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Statistics, provides an education in the key principles of this rapidly expanding area. Read more
The MSc in Data Science & Analytics, jointly offered by the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Statistics, provides an education in the key principles of this rapidly expanding area. The combination of sophisticated computing and statistics modules will develop skills in database management, programming, summarisation, modelling and interpretation of data. The programme provides graduates with an opportunity, through development of a research project, to investigate the more applied elements of the disciplines.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr49/

Course Details

The MSc in Data Science and Analytics is a significant collaboration between the Departments of Computer Science and Statistics; designed to provide graduates with the skills and knowledge required to help companies and public bodies deal with ever increasing and complex data. The programme emphasises the application of Computer Science and Statistics methodologies helping transform data into useful information that can support decision making.

Format

A typical 5 credit module:
• 2 lecture hours per week
• 1–2 hours of practicals per week
• Outside these regular hours students are required to study independently by reading and by working in the laboratories and on exercises.

Structure

Students must attain 90 credits through a combination of:

- Core Modules (30 credits)
- Elective Modules (30 credits)
- Dissertation (30 credits)

Part 1 (60 credits)

- Core Modules (30 credits) -

CS6405 Data Mining (5 credits) - Dr. Marc Van Dongen
ST6030 Foundations of Statistical Data Analytics (10 credits)
ST6033 Generalised Linear Modelling Techniques (5 credits)

- Database Modules -

Students who have adequate database experience take:

CS6408 Database Technology (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen
CS6409 Information Storage and Retrieval (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen

- Students who have not studied databases take:

CS6503 Introduction to Relational Databases (5 credits)
CS6505 Database Design and Administration (5 credits)

Elective Modules (30 credits)

Students must take at least 10 credits of CS (Computer Science) modules and at least 10 credits of ST (Statistics) modules from those listed below:

CS6322 Optimisation (5 credits) - Dr. Steve Prestwich
CS6323 Analysis of Networks and Complex Systems (5 credits) - Prof. Gregory Provan
CS6509 Internet Computing for Data Science (5 credits)
ST6032 Stochastic Modelling Techniques (5 credits)
ST6034 Multivariate Methods for Data Analysis (10 credits)
ST6035 Operations Research (5 credits)
ST6036 Stochastic Decision Science (5 credits)

- Programming Modules -

Students who have adequate programming experience take:

CS6406 Large-Scale Application Development and Integration l (5 credits) - Professor Gregory Provan
CS4607 Large-Scale Application Development and Integration ll (5 credits) - Professor Gregory Provan

- Students who have not studied programming take:

CS6506 Programming in Python (5 credits)
CS6507 Programme in Python with Data Science and Applications (5 credits) - Dr. Kieran Herley

Part 2 (30 credits)

Students select one of the following modules:

CS6500 Dissertation in Data Analytics (30 credits)
ST6090 Dissertation in Data Analytics (30 credits)

Assessment

Full details and regulations governing Examinations for each programme will be contained in the Marks and Standards 2015 Book and for each module in the Book of Modules 2015/2016 - http://www.ucc.ie/modules/

Postgraduate Diploma in Data Science and Analytics

Students who pass each of the taught modules may opt to exit the programme and be conferred with a Postgraduate Diploma in Data Science and Analytics.

Careers

This programme aims to prepare students to manage, analyse and interpret large heterogeneous data sources. Graduates will design, compare and select appropriate data analytic techniques, using software tools for data storage/management and analysis, machine learning, as well as probabilistic and statistical methods. Such abilities are at the core of companies that constantly face the need to deal with large data sets.

Companies currently seeking graduates with data analytics skills include: firms specialising in analytics, financial services and consulting, or governmental agencies.

Companies actively recruiting Computer Science graduates in 2014-15 include:

Accenture, Aer Lingus, Amazon, Apple, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Bank of Ireland, BT, Cisco, CiTi-Technology, Cloudreach, Dell, Digital Turbine Asia Pacific, EMC, Enterprise Ireland, Ericsson, First Derivatives, Guidewire, IBM, Intel, Open Text, Paddy Power, Pilz, PWC, SAP Galway Transverse Technologies, Trend Micro, Uniwink, Version 1 (Software).

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Le Master en Acoustique et Mécanique de l’Université du Maine (Le Mans, France) propose une formation solide relevant des principaux domaines de l’acoustique fondamentale et appliquée. Read more
Le Master en Acoustique et Mécanique de l’Université du Maine (Le Mans, France) propose une formation solide relevant des principaux domaines de l’acoustique fondamentale et appliquée : Acoustique physique, Acoustique non linéaire et aéroacoustique, Acoustique de la matière condensée, Electroacoustique, Vibroacoustique, Acoustique musicale et acoustique des salles, Perception et psychoacoustique, Acoustique physiologique, Méthodes expérimentales en acoustique, Méthodes numériques en acoustique, etc.

Le Master Acoustique se dessine de la manière suivante :

La première année :
- Un parcours commun de manière à apporter à l’étudiant les connaissances de base en acoustique
- Des modules spécifiques pour chaque spécialité en acoustique

La deuxième année :
avec trois parcours différents
- Parcours Recherche Acoustique (MR AC),
- Parcours Recherche CND, Acoustique et Matériaux (MR CND),
- Parcours Professionnel Acoustique des Transports, de la Ville et de l’Environnement (MP ATVE),
- avec un socle commun de modules fondamentaux et des modules plus spécifiques pour chaque domaine,
- un stage en fin de Master, obligatoire, de 4 à 6 mois dans un laboratoire, dans un grand organisme ou dans une entreprise.

Important : tout au long du Master en Acoustique et Mécanique, une partie des enseignements scientifiques est dispensée en anglais (le reste des cours étant enseigné en français).

Les cours sont donnés en ANGLAIS dans les proportions suivantes :
Master 1, semestre 1 : 74%
Master 1, semestre 2 : 52%
Master 2, semestre 1 : 45%
Master 2, semestre 2 : 0% (stage obligatoire de 4 à 6 mois)

Visitez le site du Master (en français) : http://sciences.univ-lemans.fr/MASTER-Acoustique
Master's degree website (in English) : http://sciences.univ-lemans.fr/master-acoustique/?lang=en

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This module aims to enable you to. -Critically evaluate the Magnetic Resonance (MR) protocols used in clinical practice with respect to the evidence base in order to inform service delivery and practice policy. Read more
This module aims to enable you to:
-Critically evaluate the Magnetic Resonance (MR) protocols used in clinical practice with respect to the evidence base in order to inform service delivery and practice policy
-Develop your ability to evaluate MR images within a structured and monitored experiential learning environment

The learning in the module will utilise the knowledge and understanding gained in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging module, which is a pre-requisite and apply it to your own clinical practice. Evidence-based content will be delivered by Faculty experts with support from the technical and clinical fields.

You will be encouraged to identify the evidence base and critique clinical practice and protocols. In the clinical workplace you will undertake clinical MRI examinations of a wide range of anatomical regions/systems for a variety of clinical indications, gaining experience of advanced practice where applicable.

Tutorials will be used to facilitate peer learning and sharing of information by students. Case scenarios will facilitate group discussion and enhance your confidence in debating and justifying imaging techniques.

Why Bradford?

Postgraduate provision in Medical Imaging at the University of Bradford has long been established and is known for its quality and success in supporting development of healthcare professionals in their diverse roles, with students coming from around the UK, and full time international students choosing to study here. The modules are delivered by an experienced radiography team, clinical specialists and medical physicists, and a research informed curriculum ensures it is relevant to current and innovative practice.

Modules

This module is provided as part of this interdisciplinary Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables students to create an individualised programme of study that will meet either their needs and/or the employers’ needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The modules and academic awards are presented in areas representing employment practice or work based or clinical disciplines.

Whilst some students can build their own academic awards by choosing their own menu of module options, other students will opt for a named academic award. The Framework also provides the option for students to move from their chosen named award to another award if their job or personal circumstances change and they need to alter the focus of their studies. The majority of named awards also offer students, the option of choosing at least one module, sometimes more, from across the Faculty module catalogue enabling them to shape their award more specifically to their needs.

Learning activities and assessment

Achievement of the learning outcomes will be demonstrated through the completion of a portfolio, to include reflective journal entries, work-based case studies, a presentation and a log of clinical experience as part of the learning process. All assessments within a module must achieve 40% to pass.

Career support and prospects

The module is designed to support healthcare practitioners develop the knowledge, understanding and skills in medical imaging that are required of a professional who aspires to work at an advanced level of practice.

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The LLM Law and Economics is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. Read more

Overview

The LLM Law and Economics is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. It is a specialist programme which aims to provide rigorous training in theoretical and applied economic analysis as a means of analysing law and the legal framework. It is designed for students with an academic background in Law or Economics.

This Masters in Law course will enable lawyers to master a new discipline and to consider financial and economic dilemmas, and allow economists to comprehend the rationale for regulation and how to think like a lawyer.

This course is ideal for you if you are already in, or plan a career in, law or economics in academia, the public sector, international institutions, the financial or legal industry or consulting.

This programme will:

* Enhance your career options by allowing you to specialise in the highly sought after interdisciplinary areas of law, economics and finance.
* Provide you with the theory, knowledge, practical skills and latest developments required to work in both emerging and established economies in legal, banking, financial, governmental or research institutions.
* Give you the chance to meet leading practitioners in banking, finance and law.

Institute of Global Law, Economics and Finance

The Institute for Global Law, Economics and Finance (IGLEF) at Queen Mary is a forum for stimulating and conducting interdisciplinary research and disseminating knowledge on the areas of law, economics and finance.

Why study LLM in Law and Economics at Queen Mary?

The School of Law is firmly established as a centre of national and international excellence in legal studies and research, with leading academics in the field of banking, finance, regulation, insolvency, international commercial law and insurance law, including Professors Rosa Lastra, Philip Rawlings, George Walker, Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal and Dr Leon Vinokur.

High profile guest lecturers teaching on the courses have included Sean Hagan, General Counsel and Director of the Legal Department at the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Graham Nicholson, Chief Legal Advisor, Bank of England, Mr Lee Buchheit, Partner, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, USA.

The School of Economics and Finance is one of the top economics schools in the country, with particular expertise in economic theory, econometrics and finance, and applied economics including Professors Francis Breedon, Emmanuel Guerre, Marco Manacorda, Xavier Mateos-Planas, Dr Leone Leonida and Dr Ioannis Kokkoris.

You will have invaluable contributions from respected City practitioners and industry experts including banks, fund management businesses, who also teach students, bringing practical insights in to the classroom by applying the theory to real world scenarios.

You will have access to an unparalleled set of optional short courses designed to equip you with further practical training and key technical skills that are highly valued in the Financial Sector.

State-of-the-art facilities such as a virtual trading floor, which provides exclusive access to the latest technology and financial software used in the banking and finance industry, and access to specialised financial and economic databases and software used by economists in finance or in government for data analysis and simulation.

Hui Zheng, Allen & Overy, gave a guest lecture on this programme. He said:

“Mastering the complexities of economics and finance is essential for anyone intending to become an effective international corporate or banking lawyer”

Facilities

You will have access to facilities and equipment at both Schools, including the Postgraduate School of Law Centre in Lincoln's Inn Fields, Holborn, based in the legal district of London, which comprises of workstations, wireless internet access, projectors and a common room.

As well as housing the Law Library and a European Documentation Centre, the Queen Mary Library at Mile End provides access to all the main British, European and international textbooks, law reports and periodicals and also offers one of the best commercial law collections in the country. Through the University of London College network, students have access to an unrivalled range of electronic law journals and databases.

In addition, Queen Mary provides free access to extensive online databases and collections including: Lexis, Nexis, Westlaw, Justis, Eur-lex, Hein-Online, Business Source Complete, Index to Legal Periodicals, International Court of Justice Reports, Kluwer Arbitration, Oxford Scholarship Online (Law), Reports of Patent, Design and Trademark Cases, UK Statute law database and United Nations Treaty Collection.

You will be able to access the well-stocked law library at the University of London’s Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS). The Institute, located at Russell Square, a few minutes’ walk from Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is one of the major law libraries worldwide. You will also have access to the University of London Library at Senate House.

The School of Economics and Finance is able to offer excellent facilities and resources to its students.

IT Software

Real Time Data/Trading Software: Queen Mary is one of the few UK universities offering training and access to both Reuters and Bloomberg trading terminals (in our designated trading room) as well as Interactive Brokers Trader Workstation (TWS) and FXCM FX Trading Station.
Time Series Data Software: A full range of economic and financial data is available through DataStream, Macrobond and the WRDS platform (including Bankscope and CRSP).
Statistical Analysis Software: A wide range of Econometric software including Eviews, Stata, Matlab, Gauss etc.
Computers rooms

2 computers labs with 70 PC s and designated printers.
Trading Room

Designated Trading Room offering training and access to Reuters, Bloomberg, Interactive Brokers Trader Workstation (TWS) and FXCM FX Trading Station.

Find out more about the course structure: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/coursefinder/courses/121407.html

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes.

You'll gain knowledge of the protection of international human rights within the context of international development and refugee practice and the role of a rights-based approach to international development practice.

Events

The Law Department hosts annual events such as updates on Human Rights delivered by our Visiting Professors, Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Joel Bennthan QC and Imran Khan. We also host the Young Legal Aid Lawyers Question Time and occasional events such as our recent inter-professional conference – Responding to Rape, and meetings and seminars for Burmese human rights campaigners.

Modules

Core Modules:

Images of development
Research methods
International law and human rights
International law in the developing world
Dissertation

Optional Modules:

International business, trade and less developed countries
International humanitarian law
Forced migration and resettlement
International refugee law
Case management
Advocacy
International criminal law
Forced migration in developing societies

Teaching and learning

The LSBU Law Department has a strong set of experts, consultants and international advisors in the field of Human Rights and hosts a number of annual events and conferences.

Head of the Law Department, Andy Unger, has worked as a consultant in former communist countries such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia. In the South Caucuses, his most recent working has been with the British East-West Centre, designing and supervising the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office funded projects offering human rights training to lawyers and justice officials in the region.

Senior Lecturer in Law Caron Thatcher has observed elections in many parts of the former Soviet Union including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and also in Russia itself and monitoring the final election of Mr. Putin in 2004.

Professional links

Through our growing pool of visiting fellows and professors, the Law Department has developed a strong network of contacts with leading law practitioners in the UK. Many members of the Law Department are practitioners, or retain strong links with the legal profession. We enjoy strong links with a number of leading European Law Faculties, including Universitie Cergy Pontoise in France, INHOLLAND University in the Netherlands and Zagreb University in Croatia.

Employability

You'll graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to work in the fields of law, human rights and development (either in the UK or abroad) as advisors, experts, researchers and policy makers.

With a background in law, you might practise in human rights, immigration and asylum, and public law.

With a development studies background you might go on to practice in the NGO sector employing a rights-based approach to development.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The Masters in Economics comprehensively covers the core areas of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. Our graduates are not only well-trained technically in these areas, but are capable of bringing their analytical strengths to bear on applied issues. Read more

The Masters in Economics comprehensively covers the core areas of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. Our graduates are not only well-trained technically in these areas, but are capable of bringing their analytical strengths to bear on applied issues.

The programme includes training in research methodology which provides you with the skills needed to undertake independent research in economics and complete your dissertation.

The range of elective modules allows you to tailor your education. These modules encapsulate the broad range of academic expertise and active research interests within the School.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The primary aims of the programme are to:

  • Enable and encourage students to develop their capacity for learning and communication within an open, scholarly, environment
  • Develop an appreciation of economics, both as an intellectual discipline and as an important contributor to an understanding of the world in ways which are of practical significance
  • Prepare students for a range of careers and other activities in which independent thought and analysis, as well as effective communication, can contribute to an improvement in social and economic welfare
  • Enable better performing students completing an MSc programme to progress either to further postgraduate research or to a career as a professional economist
  • Provide an opportunity for students to apply and demonstrate a range of skills, including the capacity for independent study, through the completion of an MSc dissertation

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An advanced understanding of the core principles in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics
  • An understanding of the techniques which have been used in contemporary economic research
  • Critical awareness of current and advanced problems and new insights in economics
  • An understanding of different methodologies and an ability to choose amongst these as required by particular problems

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • An ability to combine relevant theory and analytical techniques with insightful data analysis to produce convincing explanations of economic phenomena
  • The skills necessary to comprehend published economic research papers, and to integrate the implications of published research in their own studies

Professional practical skills

  • An ability to select appropriate techniques to evaluate policy interventions
  • The ability to formulate a plan for specific individual research which would further existing knowledge
  • The ability to communicate the results of independent research in the form of a dissertation

Key / transferable skills

  • General skills, such as literacy, numerical, IT and computing
  • Interpersonal skills, such as communication

Scholarships

The Ting Memorial Prize

A prize of £100, established in memory of Mr Check Yew Ting who died in 1979 while studying on the MSc Economics Course, awarded to the student with the best overall performance in Economics on the Masters degree course.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level. An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas. Both core and specialist modules are assessed by essay. Read more

MLitt in Film Studies

• The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level.
• An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas.
• Both core and specialist modules are assessed by essay.
• Two specialist modules provide you with the opportunity to transfer and apply the theoretical knowledge and research skills acquired in the core module to a more concrete level of intellectual investigation, focusing on the creation of meaning and aesthetic value in the context of global dynamics of cultural production and distribution.
• The specialist modules vary annually and reflect current staff research interests. Emphasis throughout the year is placed on individual research.

Features

* Film Studies was ranked first in Scotland for world leading and internationally excellent research in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.

* Senior expertise of high profile scholars, such as Professor Robert Burgoyne, Professor Richard Dyer, Mr Jean Michel Frodon and Professor Dina Iordanova, all internationally known and respected leaders in the field .

* Regular visits from high-profile film critics, film. The most recent have been celebrated Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán, who in April 2015 visited the Department and attended a screening of two of his films, followed by a Q&A session.

* The new programme in Global Cinema: Managing and Cultural Curation, is offered out of the Institute for Global Cinema and Creative Cultures (IGCCC: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/globalcinema ) which capitalise on achievements, global connections and on our reputational advantages as leaders in the study of global culture, film circulation and film festivals.

In learning and teaching, St Andrews sets the highest of standards and attracts students from all over the world with understandably high expectations. In its first five-yearly review in 2009, the Department’s teaching provision achieved the highest possible commendation. Teaching and research are closely co-related, and postgraduate teaching is informed by the staff’s research activity.

At St Andrews, we investigate cinema as a key form of cultural output and as the dominant type of creative expression. Focusing on the global dimension, our programmes cover key aspects of Film Studies through the lens of transnational cultural studies.

Film Studies at St Andrews is committed to questioning the traditional view of what is ‘normal’ cinema. We attempt to uncover the agendas (be they national, ‘western’, cultural, commercial, industrial, and so on) that define how we think about cinema, both in terms of the kinds of films we watch for pleasure, and those we study at university. There is much to be learned by studying what is produced at the margins of dominant societies, in addition to the canonical films of Hollywood and the European art house. We are interested in exploring the ways in which racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual subcultures conceptualise their identities. Similarly, we are keen to look at films produced at the periphery of established nations, co-productions between smaller players struggling to survive in the global marketplace and popular genre films often deemed unworthy of high-brow critical attention. Similarly, we
look at films that focus on transnational communities or appeal to international markets that deal with lesser-known histories and are made in foreign languages but are nonetheless worthy of critical examination and intellectual engagement.

Studying film at St Andrews will help you master a range of advanced research skills and acquire knowledge related to the construction and analysis of the moving image, the past and present day realities of various national and regional film traditions, the dynamics of the global film industry, and the theoretical approaches related to film.

Facilities and collections

The Department is housed in its own buildings, in North Street. They are within easy walking distance of the University Library, local cinema and town centre. The Department is well resourced with a dedicated teaching room. Recently the Department has started to use the wonderful facilities at the nearby Byre Theatre for most of our seminars, and for other film-related activities. MLitt classes are usually held at the Byre. A Film Studies Postgraduate Study Centre houses a DVD collection, postgraduate workspaces, viewing stations and off-air recording facilities.

At St Andrews you will be exposed to a rich and diverse film programme. Regular course-related film showings take place in a custom-built theatre. In addition, a range of screenings takes place across the University during term time, featuring films related to anthropology, international relations, and history.

St Andrews has excellent library provision, with book, journal and other information resources in Film Studies at a level consistent with an international centre of excellence. The Main Library hosts one of the best collections of international cinema on DVD and video (over 9,000 titles). The Library also holds over 1,000,000 print monographs, over 32,000 electronic books, and substantial journal title holdings in print and over 33,900 full-text electronic titles. Well over 2,000 monographs are classified under Film Studies and related subjects. There are holdings of approximately 100 film, television and media-related journals, of which about 65 are available electronically; there is also networked access to various databases, including Box of Broadcasts, Film Indexes Online and Film & Television Literature Index Full-Text.

Careers

In our media saturated culture, the opportunities for Film Studies graduates are remarkably diverse. Directly related are careers in academia, creative industries, development, distribution, film festival/cinema programming, and arts administration.

A Film Studies degree opens doors to many other spheres, including media management, film and TV research, journalism, publishing, advertising, cultural entrepreneurship, nongovernmental organisations, marketing, public relations and education. Recent destinations include: Junior Assistant Producer, European Tour Productions (IMG Media); Adjunct Instructor, SUNY (State University of New York) at Oswego; Consultant for Propel London Media.

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The Master in Middle Eastern Studies (MIMES) is specifically tailored for graduates of various disciplines and backgrounds, who are interested in obtaining a better knowledge of the Middle East region, taking into account its social-historical complexity and cultural plurality. Read more
The Master in Middle Eastern Studies (MIMES) is specifically tailored for graduates of various disciplines and backgrounds, who are interested in obtaining a better knowledge of the Middle East region, taking into account its social-historical complexity and cultural plurality. The program aims to offer solid historical, political and institutional perspectives of the current domestic, regional and international dynamics affecting the stability of the region, as well as a critical outlook on current debates over the Middle East.

Learning objectives

MIMES aims to guide students across this diverse and fascinating region, which, since decades, is at the center of the geostrategic interest of the international system. The program mainly focuses on the contemporary period, through a multi-disciplinary approach ranging over international relations, geopolitics, conflicts and security, economy and energy. Nonetheless, specific sections are devoted to the analysis of the historical and religious foundations of the modern Middle East, from the birth of Islam to the evolution of Islamic thought, law and economy. A dedicated course will offer a linguistic analysis of the political and juridical terminology and a glossary in Arabic. MIMES analyses in details infra-regions and inter-regions peculiarities and relations, from Maghreb to Central-Southern Asia, encouraging a comparative and holistic area studies approach.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

MIMES provides graduate students with a detailed, comprehensive knowledge of the wider Middle East, beneficial to under-take a number of different careers, consistently with their previous training and experience, within international institutions, private companies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), research centers and area studies, media networks, etc.

Curriculum

The Master in Middle Eastern Studies is articulated in five complementary levels, fostering multidimensional training and cross-fertilization, integrating scientific methodologies and operative competences.

1st level - Propaedeutic Phase: history, power and institution. The conceptual foundation of the Middle East
● Methodological introduction: debates on the Middle East
● History of the Middle East
● Religion, society and thought in the Islamic Middle East
● Islamic law and economy
● Study of political and juridical terminology - glossary in Arabic
● Middle East within the 20th century international order

2nd level - In-depth Analytical Phase: sub-regional contexts
● Maghreb
● Mashreq
● Sub-Saharan Africa
● South-West Asia and the Gulf
● Central-Southern Asia

3rd level - Thematic and Contemporary Issues
● Politics in contemporary Middle East and the current International Relations context
● Global security: jihadism, violent activism, conflicts and nuclear proliferation
● Post-conflict institution-building and human security
● Gender, ethno-religious diversity and pluralism in the Middle East
● Energy and geopolitics of resources
● Contemporary economic trends

4th level - Project Work
Students are required to develop a personal research project on a topic related to Middle Eastern affairs, under the supervision of a MIMES professor and/or a professional from a partner institution. The project work will often be connected to the internship experience.

5th level - Internship
The Master is completed with an internship in Italy or abroad within an institution whose mission and activities are consistent with the Master’s program. This gives students the invaluable opportunity to test and strengthen the competencies acquired during the Master and it usually lasts three months. As an alternative, students who do not carry out an internship may choose to attend an Arabic language course. Students will receive support and tutoring for their internship research.

Faculty & teaching staff

The Master in Middle Eastern Studies offers high quality training to students from all over the world. They will take part in team projects with the guidance of important scholars and leading professionals from the Middle East as well as from Europe and the U.S.

Faculty:
● Prof. Riccardo Redaelli - MIMES Director
● Prof. Paolo Branca - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Dr. Marina Calculli - American University, Beirut
● Prof. Massimo Campanini - Università degli Studi di Trento
● Prof. Martino Diez - Fondazione OASIS and Università Cattoli- ca del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Wael Faruq - American University, Cairo
● Prof. Ersilia Francesca - Università degli Studi di Napoli l’Orientale
● Prof. Elisa Giunchi - Università degli Studi di Milano
● Prof. Mehran Kamrava - Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service
● Prof. Bahgat Korany - American University, Cairo
● Prof. Marco Lombardi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Maurizio Martellini - Landau Network Centro Volta and Insubria Center on International Security
● Prof. Massimo Papa - Università di Roma Tor Vergata
● Prof. Vittorio Emanuele Parsi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
● Prof. Paola Rivetti - Dublin City University
● Prof. Mahmood Sariolghalam - Shahid Beheshti University of Tehran
● Prof. Oktay Tanrisever - Middle East Technical University
● Amb. Roberto Toscano - Barcelona Center for International Affairs
● Mr. Franco Zallio - consultant

ASERI - a center of excellence

This Master has been created thanks to the experience of ASERI in the field of graduate education and training. Università Cattolica’s Graduate School of Economics and International Relations combines quality courses with strong connections to the business world. Courses are taught by academic professors, professionals and leaders from all over the world. The high quality of this training is ensured by the presence of an international faculty composed by renowned professors and experts, coming from both Middle East and US/EU universities and research centers.

Theory & practice

The strong theoretical basis is combined with a solid knowledge of the contemporary issues, in order to provide students’ with a specific understanding of one of the most important region in the international scenario and help them to convert their knowledge in professional skills.

A multidisciplinary approach

Thanks to the expertise of its faculty, this innovative program combines several perspectives on the Middle East: international relations, history, economics, law, geopolitics, security and energy. The analysis of the current dynamics, debates and most important topics regarding the role of the Middle East at a regional and international level, as well as dedicated modules on its sub-regions and their peculiarities, are strengthened by the theoretical basis provided during the first part of the program.

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The inter-relationship between theory, scholarship and the creative process is key to the Goldsmiths MPhil in Creative Writing- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-creative-writing/. Read more
The inter-relationship between theory, scholarship and the creative process is key to the Goldsmiths MPhil in Creative Writing- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-creative-writing/

You'll be expected to combine your own creative writing – whether poetry, fiction or life writing – with research into the genre or area of literature in which you are working, to gain insight into its history and development, and to engage with relevant contemporary debates.

This might be genre in the more traditional sense, for example satire, fictional autobiography, verse drama, or particular traditions to which you feel your work relates, for example projective verse, postmodernist fiction, or Caribbean poetics.

This element – the critical commentary – will constitute around 30 per cent of the final work; the major part – 70 per cent – will be a creative work of publishable standard: a novel, memoir, book of poems or collection of stories, for example.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

Former students include Bernardine Evaristo, whose Jerwood Fiction Uncovered-winning book Mr Loverman was written, in part, at Goldsmiths.

North American applicants especially should note that the British system does not include preparatory taught classes or examinations as part of the MPhil programme, except for an initial course in research methods.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

Department

English at Goldsmiths is ranked:
18th in the UK for the quality of our research**
In the world’s top 150 universities for English language and literature***

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings
***QS World University Rankings by subject 2015

Cervantes. Bukowski. Dostoevsky. Self. From classical literature and linguistics, to creative writing and contemporary fiction, we take a critical and creative approach to the discipline.

As a department we’re interested in a field of enquiry that extends from Old English to 21st-century literatures in English, French, Spanish and Italian. So you can study texts and films across a variety of periods and genres.

We’re engaged

We have a dedicated Writers’ Centre that encourages new writing and stimulates debate about all forms of literature. And we award the annual Goldsmiths Prize (for “fiction at its most novel”), which brings critically acclaimed writers like Ali Smith and Eimear McBride to campus.

We’re nurturing

We may be one of the largest departments at Goldsmiths but that doesn’t mean you won’t get personal support. Learn from our approachable team of academic staff and become part of the student-run English Society.

We’re vibrant

As one of the first departments in the UK to offer creative writing, you’ll be part of a hub of literary excellence – our graduates have gone on to win prestigious awards from the Orange Prize for Fiction to the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year.

Skills

You'll develop transferable skills, including:

enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
the ability to organise information
the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Publishing
Journalism
Public relations
Teaching
Advertising
The civil service
Business
Media

Research training programme

Training in research methods and skills is provided both by the department and Goldsmiths' Graduate School. This begins with an intensive week-long induction in the first week of enrolment and continues later in the first term with a series of seminars focussing on the specific challenges of literary and linguistic research projects. The department will also inform you about any research training seminars or study-days offered elsewhere in the University of London (for exmaple, by the Institute of English Studies or the Institute of Modern Languages Research, School of Advanced Study) or beyond, such as at the British Library. The specific training requirements of your project will be assessed, and guidance provided on specialist seminars and conferences to attend, which can be supported where possible by assistance from departmental funds.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

How detailed a research proposal are we looking for?

Obviously what you put on the form and exactly what you end up researching may be rather different, but in order to judge whether or not to offer you a place, the Department needs to know whether you have the broad outlines of a viable project. This means:

a project that is both worthwhile and interesting, but not over-ambitious
a project that can realistically be achieved within the confines on a full-time (4 years typically) or part-time (6 years maximum) basis
we need to be sure that you have thought about it carefully and are fully committed to the research
your research proposal should give us enough information to be able to interview you (if you are in the UK) or reach a decision as to whether to admit you if you are not based in the UK

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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