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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Read more

Multicultural, Multi-Disciplinary MA

The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Students analyse imperial ascendancies, race and racial theories, nationalist movements, postcolonial experiences, the rise of neo-colonial thought, multiculturalism and interculturalism, and the implications of globalisation and development for the modern world.

This MA allows students to combine the specialisation of postgraduate research with the adaptable skills training of a multi-disciplinary approach. Students benefit from the legacy of an MA programme established in 1994; the programme has continuously re-invented itself in changing ideological climates while maintaining its primary goal: to offer a critical education in the cultural discourses of power.

Careers

MA in Culture and Colonialism graduates have gone on to careers in development work, NGOs, law, university lecturing, publishing, media, journalism, community work, teaching (primary and secondary), film-making, advertising, and the Civil Service. The programme has a particularly strong record in research training: a high proportion of its students have proceeded to doctoral programmes in Ireland, Britain and North America, with many of them winning prestigious funding awards.

Teaching Staff

The programme's teaching staff over the years has been drawn from the disciplines of English, History, Political Science and Sociology, Economics, Irish Studies, Film Studies, Spanish, French, Archaeology, German, Italian, and Classics, and is supplemented by Irish and international guest lecturers.

Programme Outline

The full-time degree taken over a twelve-month period from September. The year is divided into two teaching semesters (September to December and January to April), with the summer period devoted to completing the dissertation. A two-year part-time option is also available. Students take six taught modules together with a (non-assessed) research training seminar, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation (30 ECTS) on a topic of their choice.

Programme Modules

Central Modules

EN541 Colonialism in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Cultural Theory
This module focuses on issues of identity, political agency and representation. It offers an introduction to twentieth-century theorisations of colonialism and neo-colonialism, especially in relation to cultural production, and their implications for twenty-first century socio-political thought. The distinctive position of Ireland in relation to postcolonial theory is considered, together with other national and international contexts. Some of the theorists discussed include Fanon, Said, Spivak and Ahmad.

SP544 Decolonization and Neo-Colonialism: The Politics of 'Development'
The phenomena of development and underdevelopment in those lands that have experienced colonial rule have been theorised in two broadly contrasting ways in social science: the modernisation perspective, which derives from the northern hemisphere by and large, and a series of counter-perspectives (such as structuralism, dependency, neo-Marxism and world systems theory), whose exponents hail from the southern hemisphere in the main. The module also considers the issue of how much light modernisation and counter-perspectives can shed on the Irish experience of development and underdevelopment.

HI546 Studies in the History of Colonialism and Imperialism
This module introduces students to some of the key thinkers and concepts in the writing of British imperial history. The work of scholars such as J. A. Hobson, Ronald Robinson and Jack Gallagher, Peter Cain and Tony Hopkins, Chris Bayly, Alan Lester and John Darwin will be discussed. Concepts such as finance imperialism, informal empire, the official mind, gentlemanly capitalism, colonial knowledge, imperial networks, and bridgeheads will be examined from a critical perspective. Students will be asked to read key texts, undertake wider reading and research to help put these key texts in context, comment on their readings, and present their own ideas as the basis for class discussion and debate.

Research Seminar (compulsory but not examined)
This module provides a training in research, analysis and writing techniques appropriate to the programme, as well as individual consultations on the formulation of dissertation topics. The seminar will take place throughout the year.

Option Modules (two chosen)

EN547 Literature and Colonialism
This module considers the relationship between literary modes and aesthetics and political power. It analyses literature connected to the British Empire and its former colonies, discussing English, Irish, Indian and African writers in relation to colonial power structures, nationalist movements and postcolonial developments. Genres covered include imperial adventure fiction, travel writing, late-Victorian urban Gothic, modernist and post-modernist fiction and poetry, postcolonial writing, and the twenty-first century multicultural novel.

EC535 Political Economy, Colonialism and Globalization
The aim of the module will be to identify the fundamental concepts of globalization by analysing the various ideologies, systems and structures that underpin the progression of global capitalism through the ages. Underlying philosophical theories will be linked with political, legal sociological and economic ideals that are often the driving forces behind these processes.

EN573 Travel Literature
The genre of travel writing includes a vast array of literary forms from journals to letters, ambassadorial reports, captivity narratives, historical descriptions, ethnographies, and natural histories. The appearance of such accounts explodes in the early modern period in an era of expanded travel for purposes of trade, education, exploration, and colonial settlement. This module looks at a range of documents from different historical moments to track the development of this important genre, including the emergence of travel writing by women.

EN549 Cinema and Colonialism
This module considers the relationships between colonialism and the theory and practice of cinema. Seminars may address the following themes: the Hollywood genres of the ‘Western’ and the ‘Vietnam movie’; postcolonial theories of cinema; Cuban cinema; cinema of anti-colonial revolution; neocolonialism and Irish cinema; African cinema; gender, colonialism and cinema; and Western representations of imperialism.

HI588 Studies in Regional Identities
This module introduces students to concepts of regional identities and explores various interpretative approaches to regional identity. Students will examine the role of history, language and religion in the construction and perpetuation of regional identity and will consider the relationship between regions and nation states. This is a team-taught module. While the content may vary according to the availability of staff from year to year, it will include Irish and European case studies.

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The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the skills and professional level expertise in the industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of contemporary media products. Read more
The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the skills and professional level expertise in the industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of contemporary media products. As a student with a first degree in a discipline other than a technically-based media subject, you will learn to operate digital equipment and manipulate data to produce finished products for the creative industries.

This course covers video and audio production, computer graphics and animation, and the making of interactive products for distribution via new media platforms, as well as the longer established media of television, video and audio. You will work on the award-winning Brookes TV, making and producing broadcasts. There are also opportunities to work on live projects for external clients, producing promotional materials, a fast expanding area of employment.

Why choose this course?

This course will enhance your career prospects and offer you the opportunity to acquire the skills needed to work in the media industry. We have excellent facilities to support your learning and use the latest industry standard tools, such as Avid, Maya, After Effects, DaVinci Resolve and ProTools.

You will learn practical skills that will enhance your portfolio and improve your employment prospects. You have the opportunity to be part of the award-winning Brookes TV and learn the art of news production. You will benefit from being part of a large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industrial experience and connections.

This course is open to students from any academic background. Students join us from first studies in areas such as arts, literature, business, computing and engineering, among others.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three time periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period runs through until the end of September.

To qualify for a master’s degree you must pass all taught modules and the dissertation, together with the research and study methods module. The modules are as follows:
-Video Production
-Web Media
-Creating Character Models
-Creating Digital Animation and Visual Effects
-Newsroom Operation
-Professional Media Production
-Research and Study Methods
-The Dissertation

The course benefits from the rigorous validation and review processes at the University, and the external examiners are very positive about the course.

Please note, as courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the module lists you choose from may vary from the ones shown here.

Teaching and learning

Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, presentations, seminars, and practical and project work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, involving approximately 200 hours of student input and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through a weekly three-hour teaching block over a 12-week period.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, class tests, project work, design and oral presentations, workshops, simulations, and practical exercises.

Teaching and learning also draws on the diverse professional backgrounds, experience and knowledge of academics and visiting lecturers from industry.

Careers and professional development

Students graduate from the course with a broad skill set that equips them to move into a career in film and television post production, the computer games industry or live television production. Our graduates may work as freelance movie producers, graphic or games designers, but also find successful careers in international companies, such as Google, Microsoft, Discovery Channel and the BBC.

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The Master in Arts Management offers a unique learning experience preparing students to embark on a management career in the arts and creative industry. Read more
The Master in Arts Management offers a unique learning experience preparing students to embark on a management career in the arts and creative industry. The one-year program aims at developing skills and providing tools to deal with the new challenges of the domains of both the visual and performing arts, with an international perspective.

Learning objectives

The main goals of the program are:

● Build and strengthen basic knowledge and understanding of History of Art (visual and performing arts), with particular attention to the contemporary world and the international scene

● Build and strengthen competence in economics and management and as it applies to the cultural industry

● Build and strengthen competence in legislative transmit and reinforce the legislative competences and their application to the cultural field, in an international perspective

● To contribute to the advancement of cultural institutions and companies in Italy and abroad, by fostering interests for Art and its proliferation

Career opportunities & professional recognition

The Master’s qualification in Arts Management will open up professional opportunities in the fields of Organization, Marketing and Communications, Accounting, Legal Affairs, Projects and Events Management in cultural institutions and companies. Other professional opportunities are to be found in consulting and service companies in the fields of promotion, communication and management of cultural events, products and services.

Curriculum

● Visual Arts Management: seminars, lectures and hands-on activities and visits to build up competencies related to museum management, galleries, corporate collectors, and, more widely, institutions and organizations in the field of visual arts promotion and communication.

● Performing Arts Management: seminars, lectures and hands- on activities to build up competencies in the field of performing arts, ranging from the movie industries to the management of cultural events.

Advanced Courses

The goals of the advanced courses are to build up competencies in specific fields of arts management in order to provide participants with advanced knowledge about how to solve problems and cope with the challenges of the arts field

● Cultural Policy: cultural policy will be discussed from historical and international perspectives in order to focus on the main policy challenges when managing arts organizations

● Marketing for the Arts: marketing policies and practices for cultural organizations will be covered, ranging from for-profit to non-profit cultural organizations

● HR and Leadership in the Arts Industry: organization forms for cultural industries, project management tools and the most advanced people management topics will be discussed during the course

● Accounting and Fundraising in the Arts Industry: accounting principles and contemporary fundraising tools for non-profit and cultural organizations will be discussed and applied

● Law and the Arts: relevant and most up-to-date criminological knowledge about the empirical dimension of offences against both movable and immovable cultural property, at both national and
international level will be covered

● Media in the Arts: the role of technology, especially new media, in changing the business and organizational model of cultural institutions will be analyzed

Educational activities are divided into Core Courses and Advanced courses. On top of the basic and advanced courses, participants will be involved in team-building activities at the beginning of the program.

Team Building Activities

The goals of team building activities is to help participants know each other and create a collaborative atmosphere in class. Moreover, these activities will introduce participants to Milano and its cultural assets. Team building will include:

● Dinner with the class and the Master Faculty

● Team building experiences to know your class

● Guest speeches from established professionals in the field

Core Courses

The goals of basic courses is to reinforce competences related to the two souls of the Master Program: Humanities and Management. The courses provide training for skills in art history and in their management and they will give participants the op- portunity to align their competencies and exchange knowledge.

● Art History: seminars, lectures and visits to provide participants with fundamentals of visual arts history

● History of Performing Arts: seminars and lectures to share fundamentals about film, theatre and music history.

Internship

To complete the Master in Arts Management, participants are required to carry out a three-months internship in a cultural institutions or company in one of the above mentioned fields. They will have the chance to be included in the Master Curricu- lum Vitae book, that will be transmitted to the major institutions and organizations in Italy and abroad.

An international learning experience

Located in the unique city of Milan which contributes to a valuable international perspective. This glowing city allows students to merge the learning experience with the cultural atmosphere of the city. Students will have the opportunity to practice their knowledge through field projects and internships even beyond the classroom.

Trained faculty

A national and international academic and professional faculty using teaching methods that foster an interactive and hands-on approach to issues of cultural heritage management.

Scholarships

All scholarships are assigned on a merit basis and will be mostly given to students who apply by the priority deadline. Some scholarships may also target specific geographic regions.

Scholarship value: €2500

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The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. Read more
The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. This course provides the wide perspectives and specific skills that are essential for success in the broadcasting industry.

This innovative course examines the different ways in which broadcasting is organised around the world. It has a particular emphasis on the production techniques of British television, approaching them through a comparative international lens. Students study a major BBC drama series in depth (currently the Saturday evening series Casualty) from conception, through to scripting and production organisation. The course includes visits to the production base in Cardiff as well as crucial skills training in the industry-standard MovieMagic budget and schedule software.

Each student takes creative control of their own television or radio production to complete the course. The Media Arts department’s extensive range of industry-standard equipment, our TV production studio, state-of-the-art Mac Labs and location store (all of which has recently benefited from a £100,000 investment), is available to all students and training is provided in using it as part of the course.

Located near London, the course provides students with a privileged insight into the production practices of the UK television industry. You will have guest lecturers from both production and management in the broadcasting industry. The wide range of past guest lecturers include:

- Alex Graham (CEO of Wall to Wall TV, executive producer of Who Do You Think You Are),
- Karen Mullins (Project Manager for Channel 4 Racing, London Olympics, Rugby World Cup)
- James Quinn (Executive Producer My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding)
- Pip Clothier (Producer of undercover documentaries including BBC’s Panorama: Cash for Questions).

What you will study:
- The nature of television as a medium: scheduling, genres, formats
- How to produce your own short television or radio programme, using industry-standard equipment
- The changing ways in which digital programming is being produced and delivered
- The ways in which formats and programming are traded globally
- The organisation and regulation of broadcasting around the world
- The differing industrial structures of TV
- The crucial skills of scheduling and budgeting, including training on the industry standard Movie Magic software.
- TV series narrative arcs and character development
- The TV production process, planning and execution, (including lectures by the producers of BBC’s Casualty

You will be taught by world-leading scholars including:
- Professor John Ellis (author of Visible Fictions, Seeing Things; independent TV producer; formerly deputy chair of PACT, the UK independent producers’ trade organisation)

- Dr George Guo (graduate of Westminster University and Communication University of China who publishes on TV drama in China)

- Dr James Bennett (author of Television as Digital Media, Television Personalities)

- Mike Dormer (producer of The Whale (2013), Blue Murder (2007-9) New Tricks (2003-5))
a team that combines an international perspective, substantial experience in the TV industry, and innovative theoretical thinking.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mainternationaltelevisionindustries.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will develop an international outlook on broadcasting, equipping you to pursue a career in the broadcasting industry, both in the UK or abroad

- You'll be taught by renowned scholars and experienced practitioners

- The MA is taught in a department devoted to TV and film production and its study

- There is an in-depth focus on the UK and its excellence in broadcast production

- You will be trained and develop advanced skills in the use of our industry-standard equipment, which includes Final Cut Studio 2 editing systems, Sony HVR-V1E cameras, Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

Department research and industry highlights

The Media Arts department at Royal Holloway has a vibrant production culture. Most staff members have substantial production experience in TV and cinema. Around 300 undergraduate and 60 postgraduate students every year are engaged in making their own productions, including MA International Television Industries students.

Staff include the feature film director John Roberts (War of the Buttons, Day of the Flowers), award-winning documentary maker Marc Isaacs (All White in Barking, The Road), former controller of BBC1 and head of BBC Drama, Jonathan Powell.

You will be taught by leading independent producers Professor John Ellis (Brazil: Beyond Citizen Kane, Cinema in China) and Mike Dormer (The Whale, New Tricks, The Bill).

On completion of the programme graduates will have:

- a thorough understanding of the world broadcasting market and its organisation
- a thorough understanding of the main issues in broadcasting culture
- a deep knowledge of the main genres and forms of broadcast programming
- a detailed understanding of the nature of British TV series drama and the production processes that are involved in realising a TV drama series
- an invaluable experience of production to a broadcast standard
- a critical self-knowledge gained from analysing the process of producing their own work

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including:
- seminar presentations
- written essays
- research portfolios
- project work
- self-assessment documents

Employability & career opportunities

On graduation, you will have a range of knowledge and a portfolio of written and media work which will be invaluable in finding employment in the broadcasting industry, particularly in those territories where the business is expanding rapidly.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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This unique diploma course delivered in partnership with the BBC and with the added support of the Assistant Directors Association and the Production Guild, will equip students with the skills and capabilities required to foster a successful future career as a First, Second, Third Assistant Director and/or Floor Manager. Read more
This unique diploma course delivered in partnership with the BBC and with the added support of the Assistant Directors Association and the Production Guild, will equip students with the skills and capabilities required to foster a successful future career as a First, Second, Third Assistant Director and/or Floor Manager.

Quick Facts

- 12 Month Course
- Part-time
- Course starts in September
- Next intake: September 2016
- UK and EEA applicants only

- Unique course
- Delivered at NFTS in Partnership with BBC
- Intensely practical and hands on
- 10 days work experience
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School
- Just 12 months long
- Work and learn with the UK's next generation of talent
- Benefit from the schoolwide masterclasses from the world's leading filmmakers and screening of both contemporary and classic films and shows

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 07 JUL 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/assistant-directing-and-floor-managing

COURSE OVERVIEW

Being an Assistant Director or Floor Manager is a demanding role that requires a level head, self-confidence and strong communication skills in order to ensure that the crew and the production meet the challenges of demanding conditions and time constraints.

Assistant Directors and Floor Managers are responsible for the daily operation of the shooting set / television studio. Their objective is to provide the Director with everything he or she needs to realise his or her vision. They are at the heart of ensuring a production stays on track and is delivered successfully.

Assistant Directors and Floor Managers, among many other things, make schedules, attend to the cast, direct extras, oversee the crew as each shot is prepared, create detailed reports of each day's events, and are looked to by cast and crew to solve the many problems that continually arise on set.

The expectation is that on this course you will learn to:

- be a team-leader and motivator
- be a team player
- have organisational and time-management skills
- plan ahead
- trouble-shoot
- pay close attention to detail
- be an excellent communicator
- have tact and diplomacy skills
- routinely deal with problems and handle pressure well
- prioritise tasks
- multi-task
- be flexible
- have a positive approach

CURRICULUM

This course combines practical experience on Fiction films and TV Entertainment shows with industry work experience placements and intensive training.

The course has been developed to meet industry demand and NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School and productions are given cash production budgets.

The diploma course is 12 months full-time and is delivered at the NFTS:

Specifically students will learn about:

- Reading a script and developing a shooting schedule
- How to use relevant industry software (e.g Movie Magic and Adobe Story)
- The impact of budget, cast availability and script coverage on the shooting schedule
- Supporting the hiring of locations, props and equipment
- Leading a technical recce
- Set and Studio Floor protocols and etiquette
- Liaising with the production office to create call sheets, movement orders, location agreements and other production paperwork
- Managing a set or studio floor with confidence during a shoot
- Managing talent
- Health and Safety and First Aid

PLACEMENT

Each student will complete a minimum of 10-days work experience. This is a requirement to pass the course. Students are encouraged and supported to complete further work experience as appropriate.

SPECIALIST WORKSHOPS

During the course there will be a range of other specialist workshops on a range of relevant topics, such as, Working with Talent, Tracking Vehicles, Stunts, Firearms & Special FX.

NFTS BENEFITS

Assistant Directing and Floor Managing course participants will have full access to the NFTS’ optional creative stimulus strands, including: Cinema Club, Screen Arts and NFTS Masterclasses - these strands see major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Speakers have included David Fincher (Director, Seven, Gone Girl), Graham Linehan (The IT Crowd, Father Ted), Abi Morgan (Suffragette, The Hour), Christopher Nolan (Interstellar, The Dark Knight) and Hamish Hamilton (Director, Super Bowl XLVIII).

APPLY WITH

- Please tell us about a Production or Event you have worked on how it could have been better organised and managed. Include information on whether the production had a budget etc.
No more than two pages (A4 paper)

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR ASSISTANT DIRECTING AND FLOOR MANAGING COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1961

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Production Managers are the key to any smooth running production. Production Management calls on a variety of skills from budgeting and scheduling to managing crews. Read more
Production Managers are the key to any smooth running production. Production Management calls on a variety of skills from budgeting and scheduling to managing crews.

Quick Facts

- 12 Month Course
- Full-time
- Course starts in September
- Next intake: September 2016
- UK and EEA applicants only
- Two scholarships from Sargent-Disc available

-Course developed to meet Industry demand
- Alternates Industry-recognised training modules with practical experience
- Plenty of hands-on practice – in both locations and in studios
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 12 MAY 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/production-management-film

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in September each year. So what does it take to be a Production Manager? An individual who can multi-task, be dynamic, communicate well and stay calm under pressure. Someone who is creative with budgets but keeps a sharp eye on the bottom line; someone who knows enough about Health and Safety to protect the cast and crew but not detract from getting the right shot; someone who knows about the best locations at the best price - and who knows production from start to finish!

This course combines intensive training with practical experience on fiction films, TV Entertainment shows, documentary and animation films at the NFTS and industry work experience placements.

Career Progression

Most production managers are freelance, moving from contract to contract, and may find themselves working anywhere in the UK, or even abroad. As a production manager, you could also work for independent production companies on feature films, documentaries, or TV shows, become a Line Producer or progress to Head of Production.

New NFTS graduates are sought-after and typically find employment soon after completing their courses. NFTS alumni are some of the most successful people working in UK film and television today, and many of our students make contacts while at the NFTS which continue in the professional world.

*12-month course; next intake September

Sargent-Disc (http://www.sargent-disc.com/sargent-disc-uk/news-insights/news/nfts-scholarship-update.aspx) generously provide two scholarships worth £3875 to support the training of talented individuals in the field of Production Management for Film & TV.

CURRICULUM

Covering the key skills required by Production Managers in today’s rapidly-changing environment, this course alternates workshops with practical experience on a range of NFTS productions including TV entertainment shows (live and multi-camera studio shoots), dramas, animation and documentary films.

The course has been developed to meet industry demand and NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School and productions are given cash production budgets.

The course covers these key skills recognised by the Industry:

- Extensive instruction and practice on scheduling & budgeting
- Health & Safety training including Production Safety Passport qualification
- Production Management for location and studio shoots
- First Aid for Film & TV Production
- Cash flow management and cost reporting
- Location Management
- Shooting abroad
- Research
- Contracts, copyright and legal
- Child licensing
- Post Production routes & delivery for film & television

This course includes work experience opportunities throughout the year and an industry placement at the end of the course. Previous students have enjoyed placements at Film4, Eon, Carnival Films, Endemol, Kudos, Dragonfly and Revolution Films. Television productions include Big Brother, Come Dine With Me, The BBC Proms, Babylon, 24-Live Another Day and Downton Abbey and feature films such as the Bond films:SkyFall and Spectre, Assassin’s Creed, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

TUTORS

Head of Production Management is Bex Hopkins who has worked in film and television production since 1999. Her short films have won many festival prizes including the LFF Turner Classic Movie Best Short Film award and BAFTA nominations for Nits and Lucky. Her feature film Mad, Sad & Bad premiered at EIFF 2009 and was released in 2010. She has taught on the Production Management diploma since 2010.

Other tutors include successful Line Producers and Production Managers; Jo Farr (Calendar Girls and Love and Other Disasters), Paul Sarony (Hideously Kinky, Bhaji on the Beach, Mrs Brown, Vampire Academy, and The Adventurer:The Curse of the Midas Box), Linda Stradling (I Shouldn’t be Alive, Seconds From Disaster, Horizon, Megastructures and author of the book ‘Production Management in TV & Film’) and Tina Jaffray (Weakest Link, Record Breakers, Blue Peter, London 2012 Olympic & Paralympic ceremonies, Vikings Live from the British Museum).

APPLY WITH

Please tell us of an event/production/gathering that you have organized. Include information on whether you had a budget and if so how successful you were in keeping to it; what preparation you did and what you would have done differently. No more than two pages (A4 paper)

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT FOR FILM AND TELEVISION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=42

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The heart of Centennial College's Interactive Media Management program is user experience (UX). Your ability to design and create meaningful interactive digital experiences will position you to succeed as an interactive media professional. Read more
The heart of Centennial College's Interactive Media Management program is user experience (UX). Your ability to design and create meaningful interactive digital experiences will position you to succeed as an interactive media professional.

This Interactive Media Management program, facilitated through the School of Communications, Media and Design, is ideal for you if you have completed a post-secondary program and wish to apply your skills to a career in interactive media management. If you're passionate about making interactive experiences that "just work", this program is for you.

Your courses teach you how to plan all elements of an effective interactive digital experience, starting from assessing what your audience needs then accommodating their needs through the interface, its design and the words it contains. You also have the opportunity to work on your own project, from concept to prototype.

The interactive digital media industry is changing as mobile and immersion computing becomes more important and prevalent. As such, this collaborative and project-driven program emphasizes:
-Digital strategy
-UX design
-Content strategy and planning
-Interactive storytelling
-Analytics
-Digital project management (grant charts, budgets, project planning, agile methodology)
-Researching and surveying the interactive media landscape

You learn about the industry and available career options in the early stages of the Interactive Media Management program and you complete your learning with a nine-week industry field placement.

Career Opportunities

Future Alumni
Where do program graduates go? With a combination of creative and practical skills, alumni are well-positioned as the interactive media professionals of the future. Alumni work in all aspects of the interactive media industry both in Canada and internationally.

Some of the Interactive Media Management program's alumni include:
-Angelique Abranches, Interface Architect, Shaw Media
-Christine Hanson, User Experience Architect, Critical Mass
-Guilherme Chee, Interactive Designer at Electrolux (Brazil)
-Jaimie Lerner, Digital Content Producer, Indie88
-Danielle Williams, Web Content Coordinator, The Shopping Channel
-Matthew Flanagan, Digital Content Coordinator, Movie Services at Bell Media
-Miguel Martinez, Pipeline Technical Director, Atomic Cartoons
-Laura James, Digital Content Producer & Strategist; CEO at Mulberry Media Interactive
-Rebecca Milner, Community Manager, OneMethod
-Andrew Rajaram, UX Architect, OneMethod

Program Highlights
-In the first semester, you gain fundamental skills in analyzing, designing, and creating interactive user experiences. As a result, you acquire a solid understanding of elements of UX, with an emphasis on content and audience analysis, UX strategy, wire framing, practical coding, A/V production and management skills.
-The second semester is spent working on your own senior project, while you apply advanced learning in business, analytics, technology and planning documentation.
-In your third and final semester you learn how to pitch and present an interactive media project and polish your entrepreneurial skills before heading out to work in the industry on your field placement.

Career Outlook
-Interactive producer
-Digital strategist
-Content strategist
-Social media manager
-Information architect
-Web development
-User experience (UX) designer
-Digital content producer
-Technical director
-Games producer

Areas of Employment
-Interactive and game studios
-Advertising agencies
-Marketing companies
-PR agencies
-TV broadcasters
-Radio stations
-Content production companies (video, animation)
-Government, financial and tetail sectors
-High-tech industries
-Freelance production/strategy

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Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. You will learn the essentials (story, structure, conflict and, most importantly, comic voice) and the business of getting in the door (pitching, dos and don’ts, how to handle rewrites and writing for producers). You will graduate with the satisfaction of knowing that your experience is truly a one-of-a-kind accomplishment.

Students work on a one-to-one basis with an award-winning, internationally acclaimed writer who critiques, supports and helps improve their writing. Program faculty have made millions laugh and have included Joe Flaherty (Second City Television (SCTV), Happy Gilmore, Freaks and Geeks) and David Flaherty (SCTV, Maniac Mansion).

Your experience will span 30 weeks. Correspondence is as close as your fingers are to your laptop. No classroom here – just you and your ideas. Our advisory committee provides regular review and input to our curriculum, ensuring our program is always on the cutting edge of industry developments.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.

• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Think you have a funny premise for a TV show? How about an idea that would make a great movie? If you’ve ever dreamt about writing a comedy, make it happen. And the beauty is, you can write comedy anywhere, any time your schedule allows.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Students in Humber’s Post-Production graduate certificate program will develop technological skills, creative and critical abilities combined with a thorough knowledge of industry practice and workflows. Read more
Students in Humber’s Post-Production graduate certificate program will develop technological skills, creative and critical abilities combined with a thorough knowledge of industry practice and workflows. You will learn the fundamentals of digital media and technologies, both through hands-on and lecture-based work and have the opportunity to specialize and target very specific post-production skills. With technology as the major focus of the program, you will be given extensive practical training with industry-standard post-production software, hardware, gear, encoding methods and distribution platforms.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Prepare detailed post-production budgets using Movie Magic Budgeting programs.
• Evaluate documentaries, narrative films, TV series and music videos for creative features and technical aspects.
• Prepare and integrate 2-D and 3-D graphic and animation footage using post-production applications.
• Manage the editing process using an Edit Decision List.
• Complete picture editing projects using non-linear editing suites within specified time frames and budgets.
• Complete audio editing projects using non-linear editing suites within specified time frames and budgets.
• Design and build a network system for post-production applications.
• Manage post-production teams.
• Manage post-production projects.
• Distribute interactive content produced through the Web and DVD.
• Compile a portfolio of creative work for presentations to funding agencies and post-production facilities in order to secure employment.

Modules

Semester 1
• PPFT 5000: Digital Media Foundation
• PPFT 5001: Post-Production Technologies
• PPFT 5002: Production Foundation
• PPFT 5003: Business of Post-Production

Semester 2
• PPFT 5050: Digital Media Foundation 2
• PPFT 5051: Post-Production Supervision 1
• PPFT 5052: Post-Production Mastery 1
• PPFT 5053: Audio and Video Techologies for the Web

Semester 3
• PPFT 5552: Post-Production Mastery 2
• PPFT 5555: Field Placement

Work Placement

There is a 150-hour work placement in semester three of the program. We work with you to find a suitable placement in your chosen field of specialization, allowing you to apply the skills you’ve learned in a professional environment. Placements will take place in post-production houses and media companies in Toronto. Work placements are typically unpaid but provide you with the opportunity to further your knowledge in your chosen field and begin to build your resumé and network of professional contacts.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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This Master's programme concentrates on the technological aspects of gaming and multimedia in the context of computer science, with a unique thematic focus for research-minded students. Read more

Game and Media Technology

This Master's programme concentrates on the technological aspects of gaming and multimedia in the context of computer science, with a unique thematic focus for research-minded students.

Gaming and multimedia have assumed an important place in our society, giving rise to a booming industry with turnovers exceeding the entertainment movie industry and leaps in computer software and hardware development. Advances show no sign of slackening with new types of games and hardware reaching the market regularly. Moreover, the value of games as an educational tool is increasingly being recognised and the integration of multimedia tools into everyday life is still continuing, creating fertile grounds for those with a high-level degree in the area of Game and Media Technology.

The research field deals with modelling virtual worlds, creating characters and behaviour, generating effective scenarios, building multi-sensory interfaces and redesigning didactic concepts. Simulating the physics, biology and psychology of the real world and bringing it to life in multi-sensory simulations are major challenges on their own. In this context, media technology plays an important part as it deals with the effective transfer of information using audio, speech, sound, and music, video, 3D objects, interactive virtual environments.

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The Secondary Postgraduate Certificate in Education is a one academic year (36 week) course that trains graduates to be secondary school teachers of geography. Read more
The Secondary Postgraduate Certificate in Education is a one academic year (36 week) course that trains graduates to be secondary school teachers of geography.

The PGCE programme has been designed to train teachers to practice as a subject specialist teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). Trainees are assessed against the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) across the age range. Trainees will also often gain experience of the 16-18 age range, although they will not be formally assessed in this phase.

Course detail

If you have a passion for geography and enjoy working with young people then this is course for you! At UWE and through working in our partnership schools you will learn to become a teacher of geography who feels equipped to cope with the demands of secondary school teaching today. Secondary school students need teachers who can motivate, inspire and challenge them through a wide range of innovative and creative lessons. The PGCE Secondary Geography course at UWE will support you in becoming a confident and competent teacher of geography.

The course is active and practical allowing trainees to develop professional competence through work undertaken in schools and in the University. Trainees work with young people, develop their expertise in their specialist subject area, share and discuss educational issues and study relevant educational research. The course is just the beginning of what we hope will be a process of continual professional development throughout a challenging and rewarding career.

Structure

The course is part of the Department of Education's programme for Initial Teacher Training. Units studied are:

• Enabling Learning
• Meeting Curriculum Challenges
• Becoming a Teacher

These units are studied in both the school and the University-based parts of the course, the work on each site being complementary.

Aims of the programme

We aim to help you to develop:

• your skills, knowledge and understanding of geography as set out in the National Curriculum, GCSE, AS/A2 and of the contribution of geography to Applied GCSE courses such as Travel and Tourism
• confidence in planning geography activities which are challenging, engaging and relevant to young people
• activities that promote an enquiry-based approach to teaching and learning
• fieldwork and other geographical skills, such as mobile learning with mapwork, the creative use of photographs, GIS and ICT
• creative approaches such as using poetry, creative writing and artistic expression
• an appreciation of the importance of geography in the school curriculum and its contribution to other areas of the curriculum including citizenship and environmental education
• knowledge of teaching and learning approaches in other humanities subjects including history and religious education
• your use of digital and media technology, including active learning techniques with videos, movie-making and animation within a geography context
• your sensitivity to the teaching of the many important and controversial issues that arise in our subject

Format

University sessions involve whole cohort lectures, cross subject seminar groups and geography specialist sessions. In geography you will learn through a wide range of teaching and learning styles. Each seminar session involves practical hands on application of theory, learning independently, in pairs and through group work. Activities provide you with the skills and understanding required to plan, resource and teach challenging and effective lessons in schools. All sessions are made available on the university's blackboard system for you to download and revisit. In school your subject mentor and colleagues in the geography department will continue to support you continue to learn what makes an outstanding teacher.

Placements

24 weeks are spent on placement: a total of eight weeks in one placement during the autumn term and 16 weeks in a second placement during the spring and summer.

As well as teaching, the programme includes contact time with a Senior Professional Tutor and a Subject Mentor, directed study time and personal study time.

There is an opportunity to spend time in a primary school and some students may also visit other institutions, such as special schools or colleges of further education.

Assessment

In order to pass the course, trainees are required to pass each unit. They are assessed on a number of written assignments and also on classroom practice against the standards specified by the Secretary of State for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. Read more
MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. The project work undertaken is underpinned with research, analysis and evidence of strategic thinking as well as self reflection.

On this course you will be able to devise new means of attracting audiences, whether in the areas of promotion and advertising or within the exhibition and corporate sector, moving image for mobile devices, the web, and in every area of motion design and the world of moving image.

The course has been designed for those looking for innovative, creative and critical learning, as you will engage with video, environmental, digital editing, sound and animation to develop your creative ideas and build a strong conceptual and technical basis for your development.

As well as providing opportunities to engage with more traditional areas of moving image such as short narrative film, promotions and branding, animation, motion graphics and broadcast design, the pathway also covers areas such as 3D projection and video mapping and CGI.

You will be expected to respond to new ideas, where the screen is not confined to the movie theatre or the living room. You will be encouraged to extend your knowledge of creative, interpretative and critical approaches to moving image practices. MA Moving Image provides an intensive arena for the discussion, development and production of high quality original audio-visual work. You will also be encouraged to engage with the wider context of moving image practice, for instance through submitting work to festivals and competitions.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

In the Technology Issues unit, and Concept and Prototyping unit, you will have the opportunity to engage with industry standard software (for example: After Effects, Cinema 4D, Final Cut Pro, Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop).

Supported in particular by the Research Process and Technology Issues units, the pathway will enable you to deepen your conceptual thinking and technical application through the development of your individual practice.

New technologies have transformed the relationships between traditional film, video and digital formats, offering new opportunities for experimentation and the business context of this is explored through the Business and Innovation unit.

In the Concept and Prototyping unit you will develop your main concepts with reference to theoretical and business contexts; and this work will culminate in the Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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