• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
London Metropolitan University Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
"morphology"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Morphology)

  • "morphology" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 55
Order by 
This MSc gives students all of the intellectual and practical skills to engage in linguistics research, either for its own sake, or as part of cross-disciplinary research. Read more

Programme description

This MSc gives students all of the intellectual and practical skills to engage in linguistics research, either for its own sake, or as part of cross-disciplinary research.

Students graduating from our programme will understand how to analyse key data in syntax, semantics, phonology, and morphology, how to theorise such data, and how to exploit empirical methods to test their theories.

The key aims of the programme are to:

provide specialist knowledge within the fields of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics
integrate relevant knowledge in those fields
establish a foundation for advanced research within phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics
provide a comprehensive understanding of the basic principles of research in theoretical and descriptive linguistics
develop the students’ analytical skills in an interdisciplinary context

We offer a strong focus on theoretical understanding: students will learn how to analyse data in the context of current theoretical understanding of linguistic structure at all levels, drawing on the expertise of the department, which is particularly strong in theory development, and will be well placed to compare and evaluate competing proposals, both from within the same theoretical model, and from competing models. Additionally, students will acquire the necessary data-elicitation skills, and skills in naturally occurring data in corpora.

All of these skills provide a firm foundation for further PhD study, either in Linguistics or in a related discipline that makes heavy use of core Linguistics (e.g. Developmental Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, etc.).

The programme is best suited to applicants whose academic background is in Linguistics, English Language, Philology or Cognitive Science.

Programme structure

The programme (a total of 180 credit points) requires students without a background in Linguistics to take the following five core courses totalling 50 credits:

Introduction to Morphology
Introduction to Phonology
Introduction to Semantics
Introduction to Syntax

Students with a background in Linguistics may be exempted from any or all of the courses at the Programme Director’s discretion.

Students will also need to choose, under the guidance of the programme director, additional course options (totalling 70 credits for students with no background) from an approved list of level 11 courses; students who are exempted from any of the courses listed will have to choose courses to ensure that their total number of credits excluding the dissertation comes to 120.

All students are expected to take Introduction to Language Research.

It is possible for students to take up to 20 credits of their optional courses from other MSc options offered within the School subject to the Programme Director’s approval.

All students will be required to write a dissertation of approximately 8,000-10,000 words.

Learning outcomes

Students graduating from this new programme will understand how contemporary research approaches the study of language.

Students will acquire and enhance the following professional/subject-specific/practical skills:

-general analytical (ability to construct, re-construct, critically evaluate an argument)
-organisational (ability to complete a project, setting up research goals, identifying necessary means and ways to completion)
-team- or group-work (presentations, in-class discussions)
-critical thinking (ability to select and evaluate the relevant data, such as experimental evidence or evidence from secondary sources)
-writing (how to convey purpose, motivation, method, results, and interpretation in written form)

Read less
Modern linguistics is the scientific study of all aspects of the world’s languages from their sound systems and grammatical structure through to the interaction of language with culture, the study of meaning in language, and the use of language in modern technology. Read more
Modern linguistics is the scientific study of all aspects of the world’s languages from their sound systems and grammatical structure through to the interaction of language with culture, the study of meaning in language, and the use of language in modern technology. Linguists try to establish what types of structures are shared by different languages and the extent to which language may differ from each other.

MA Linguistics at SOAS is a modular programme which combines the intensive study of the core areas of formal linguistics - phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics - with a choice of options in different areas of the discipline. The programme is run on a modular basis to suit the needs of the following four categories of students:

- Those with a degree in linguistics who wish to pursue more regional and language-based study;

- Those with a degree in linguistics who wish to pursue more research-oriented topics before proceeding to a research degree;

- Those with little or no previous training in linguistics who wish to acquire a knowledge of the discipline;

- Those with little or no previous training in linguistics who wish to take the degree as a conversion course before; proceeding to a research degree.

The course can be taken full time over one calendar year or part time over two or three years (daytime only.) The taught part of the course consists of core lectures which introduce basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars which extend the core material into other areas. A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest.

MA Linguistics is for students who would like to acquire general postgraduate-level training in formal linguistics (perhaps as preparation for further training or research).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/maling/

Structure

The MA Linguistics consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research.

MA Linguistics:
This track is for students who would like to acquire general postgraduate-level training in formal linguistics (perhaps as preparation for further training or research). The core courses are as follows:

- Phonology (Masters) (0.5 unit) is intended to introduce students to the general principles and properties which characterise (i) possible sound systems in human languages and (ii) the structures and processes which build words and determine their realisation. Topics covered include: the scope of phonology and morphology; theoretical foundations; the nature of phonological and morphological representations – units, constituents and structure; inflectional and derivational morphology; the phonology-lexical interface.

- Syntax (Masters) (0.5 unit) addresses questions of the nature of grammatical representations, the relationship between morphemes, words, grammatical structures and their corresponding semantic counterparts. Syntactic constructions across different languages are investigated, introducing the fundamental concepts of syntactic theory.

Programme Specification

MA Linguistics - Programme Specifications 2013/14 (binary; 120kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/maling/file83228.pdf

Employment

An MA in Linguistics from SOAS equips students with essential skills such as competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers.

MA Linguistics graduates leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The field of Architecture and Urban Design is closely linked to some of today’s most pressing societal, environmental and cultural challenges. Read more
The field of Architecture and Urban Design is closely linked to some of today’s most pressing societal, environmental and cultural challenges. It encompasses a wide range of capabilities, from design and technology to critical thinking.

Programme description

The Master’s Programme in Architecture and Urban Design provides the skills and knowledge needed to practice professionally. The programme emphasizes a research-oriented approach in order to anticipate future challenges for architects and urban designers. Its profile is design led and practical, as well as academic and theoretical.

A majority of the coursework is project-based and it takes place in design studios led by experienced architects and researchers. These studios function as lab environments that target current specializations within the field. Studios are supplemented with course modules that focus on history and theory, design and technology, as well as leadership and professional practice.

The Department of Architecture at Chalmers houses an excellent infrastructure in the form of studio spaces, an architecture library, model workshops and digital fabrication, a robot lab and several research groups and centres. A national and international network is provided through collaborations and partnerships with external practitioners, researchers, stakeholders and industry.

Who should apply

The programme welcomes students that hold a Bachelor’s degree in architecture, urban design, architecture and engineering, interior architecture, or landscape architecture. A portfolio containing architectural and/or urban design work is required.

Research facilities

Studio spaces - all students have personal desks and storage areas in studio spaces with 24/7 access. Studio spaces are equipped with workstations, printers and large scale plotters, as well as Wi-Fi.

Architecture Library - has an extensive collection of printed volumes, journals and magazines within the fields of architecture and urban design.

CAD-lab - houses workstations with software for CAD-drawing, 3D-modelling, desktop publishing, video editing, and GIS.

A-Workshop - is a fully equipped architecture workshop with wood, plastics and metal working equipment. It also contains a number of computer controlled (CNC) machines for model building and rapid prototyping, including: Laser cutter, 3D-printers (2), CNC Mill and CNC Foam cutter.

Robot Lab - is a research facility that investigates robotic technology in architectural design. Equipment includes three robotic arms.

Centre for Healthcare Architecture - conducts research and graduate studies and encourage education and training within the field of physical environments for care.

Centre for Housing - is a national platform for transfer of knowledge, debate, development and research in the field of residential housing.

Mistra Urban Futures - is a centre for sustainable urban development with the ambition to become a world leader in the field in the near future.

The Spatial Morphology Group - is engaged in urban research within the fields of urban morphology, space syntax and design theory.

Read less
Human activities, not the least manifested in the built environment, are responsible for a large amount of the stress our societies put on the environment and there is a global challenge in meeting the need for sustainability while adapting to a local reality and situation. Read more
Human activities, not the least manifested in the built environment, are responsible for a large amount of the stress our societies put on the environment and there is a global challenge in meeting the need for sustainability while adapting to a local reality and situation. This programme focuses on methods and design approaches for understanding and analysing different local contexts in order to propose adequate solutions in designing for a sustainable future.

Programme description

Sustainable development is a political vision that entails huge challenges for social and technical innovation all over the world. It has consequences for all professions, not least for urban planning, architectural design and the full complexity of societal development can be addressed and managed through design for sustainable development.
This programme provides you with the skills and methods valid where design approaches are required. As a student, you are trained to find solutions that support sustainable development in a large variety of contexts and in dynamic situations. The perspective is holistic and systemic, comprising system levels and scales from urban structures, buildings and technical support systems to detailed construction elements. The programme is based on studios where real life situations and problems faced by society are handled in close contact with local stakeholders and actors.

The overall point of departure is the everyday life of people and the support of dignified lives and livelihoods in rapidly changing and sometimes extreme environments, through the development and implementation of aesthetic, affordable, socially and culturally appropriate, energy and material efficient, healthy and user friendly design solutions.

The programme offers a selection of courses and design studios from which the students can build upon in order to shape an individual profile during two years. Potential profiles are:

Sustainable building with a focus on building scale, building systems and sustainable solutions
Sustainable Urban planning & Design with a focus on urban (or regional) scale, planning processes, development and design of the built environment
Sustainable Conservation and Transformation with a focus on building or urban scale, relation to redevelopment within the existing built environment
Design for Sustainable Development in Local Contexts Internationally on multiple scales and with a socio-technical approach.

The Chalmers School of Architecture fosters a humanistic view of architecture and emphasises an explorative orientation and research by design approach in order to unfold the professional profile, skill and scope of the design professions. The ambition is to promote convincing joint future visions for the development of the built environment.

We also emphasis the integration of research in education, the respect for existing built structures as cultural, social and economic resources and interdisciplinary co-operation.

Educational methods

The pedagogical approach is to support you in developing your design skills through a series of design studios, dealing with complex design tasks in very different situations and contexts e.g., neighbourhoods and municipalities in Sweden, informal settlements in developing countries, and technical and social challenges of sustainable building and transformation.

This approach challenges and develops your ability to analyse and situate local situations in relation to broader contexts. Such design studios contain experience-based learning, fieldwork, tailored lectures, literature studies, seminars, workshops and exhibitions. A common thread through the studios is the use of a systems approach to design although both problems and potential solutions will vary significantly.

Research facilities

Studio spaces - all students have personal desks and storage areas in studio spaces with 24/7 access. Studio spaces are equipped with workstations, printers and large scale plotters, as well as Wi-Fi.
Architecture Library - has an extensive collection of printed volumes, journals and magazines within the fields of architecture and urban design.
CAD-lab - houses workstations with software for CAD-drawing, 3D-modelling, desktop publishing, video editing, and GIS.
A-Workshop - is a fully equipped architecture workshop with wood, plastics and metal working equipment. It also contains a number of computer controlled (CNC) machines for model building and rapid prototyping, including: Laser cutter, 3D-printers (2), CNC Mill and CNC Foam cutter.
Robot Lab - is a research facility that investigates robotic technology in architectural design. Equipment includes three robotic arms.
Centre for Healthcare Architecture - conducts research and graduate studies and encourage education and training within the field of physical environments for care.
Centre for Housing - is a national platform for transfer of knowledge, debate, development and research in the field of residential housing.
Mistra Urban Futures - is a centre for sustainable urban development with the ambition to become a world leader in the field in the near future.
The Spatial Morphology Group - is engaged in urban research within the fields of urban morphology, space syntax and design theory.

Read less
Embark on an incredible journey with a course that focuses on studying the biology, behaviour and conservation of primates. You will gain the skills required to carry out theoretical and field research in primatology, to advance your career or further study. Read more

Summary

Embark on an incredible journey with a course that focuses on studying the biology, behaviour and conservation of primates. You will gain the skills required to carry out theoretical and field research in primatology, to advance your career or further study.

Primatology is a discipline that has its roots in anatomy, biology, anthropology and psychology. This course covers a comprehensive range of topics within primatology and combines theoretical investigation with fieldwork and laboratory sessions. It also offers intensive training in research methods and statistics.

Recent examples of topics covered include social behaviour, cognition, endocrinology, ranging and habitat use, social networks, human-wildlife conflict, morphology and brain size evolution.

The University of Roehampton has established networks with leading institutions and field sites including the Zoological Society of London , German Primate Centre, Gashaka Primate Project (Nigeria), Trentham Monkey Forest (UK), and Berenty Reserve (Madagascar).

You will be taught by leading experts in the field who carry out their own world-leading research.

Content

You will begin the year by studying an in-depth a range of topics in primatology, as well as learning the theory and practice of primatological research. After your first semester, the emphasis will be on independent study, where you will be undertaking a substantial piece of original research. You will develop your intellectual, practical and analytical skills to devise a viable project proposal. You will carry out your project and produce both a dissertation and a paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Many of our graduates have subsequently published their work in international journals such as Biology Letters, American Journal of Primatology, International Journal of Primatology, Animal Behaviour and Biological Conservation.

Students’ field work lasts for three months, usually from March to May. You will have the support of your supervisor in arranging data collection for your research project. In the laboratory, students have used geographic information systems to explore ranging behaviour, analysed parasites from wild primates and performed non-invasive hormone analysis.

Read less
The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics. Read more
The Linguistics MA is a flexible programme which aims to explore the breadth and the depth of linguistics. It builds on the widest range of teaching and research expertise, covering all aspects of theoretical and descriptive linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse and conversation analysis, typology, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, computational and corpus linguistics, field linguistics, and the documentation and description of endangered languages. The academic staff teaching on the programme work on various practical applications of linguistics (e.g. language codification and language policy, institutional language, language in the community) and have expertise in a wide range of languages, including English and its varieties, Germanic, Latin and Romance, Russian, Polish, Kurdish and other Iranian languages, Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, and several languages spoken in the Americas (e.g. Huave, Quechua, Ulwa), Australia (e.g. Jamingjung), and beyond.
All students receive a solid foundation for linguistic study in three core modules (of which at least two are compulsory):
Grammatical Theory
Semantics and Pragmatics
Phonetics and Phonology
The remainder of the programme allows the students to make the most of what the staff have to offer. Students can either take a variety of course units in different areas including the new Forensic Linguistics unit, or specialise in one of the following pathways: Phonetics and Phonology, Sociolinguistics, Syntax and Semantics, Typology or Romani Linguistics.

Aims

The course aims to give students a grounding in breadth and depth in Linguistics, by exploring the central features of linguistic theory: its history, objectives, principal theoretical frameworks, methodologies, contested areas and uncontested results. Students will gain experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the School is also home to world-leading research in Linguistics.

Teaching and learning

Teaching takes on a variety of forms. Core course units and other MA specific course units are typically taught as seminars, in a small group, combining lectures with discussion. Many of them have practical tutorials as well which will help students prepare for individual research projects. Directed Readings involve individual or small group meetings during which pre-set readings on a particular topic are discussed. The enhanced Level 3 undergraduate course units combine lectures or seminars, depending on the aim of the course unit, with more optional tutorials. The aim across all teaching forms is to create the opportunity for intensive scholarly work, with areas of focus determined by the participants and their individual interests, which can be investigated in considerable depth.

Read less
This intensive programme will enable you to delve deeper into the structure of the English language’s phonology, syntax and semantics and modern and historical development. Read more

Programme description

This intensive programme will enable you to delve deeper into the structure of the English language’s phonology, syntax and semantics and modern and historical development.

The MSc can function either as a stand-alone masters qualification or as a basis for further postgraduate study, typically at PhD level.

Joining an internationally acclaimed centre for research and teaching in the linguistic study of English, you will explore in depth a global language with a rich history and great social and geographical variation.

You will be taught by world-leading experts who will give you a detailed awareness of the ways in which English is used in Britain and around the world.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

The programme focuses initially on the structure of English, and also offers option courses on aspects of the history of English, on current varieties of the language and on a good number of approaches to the study of the language and English linguistics.

Compulsory courses:

Introduction to Language Research
Introduction to Phonology
Introduction to Syntax
History of the English Language

Optional courses:

Corpus Linguistics
Current Issues in Phonology: Current Issues in Syntax
Diachronic Linguistics
Dialects of English in Britain & Ireland
Early Germanic Dialects
English Grammar: a Cognitive Account
Global Englishes
Historical Phonology
Introduction to Discourse Analysis
Introduction to Morphology
Introduction to Semantics
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Middle English
Pragmatics
Pragmatics of Linguistic Communication
Reading Old English
Scots and Scottish English

You can also choose optional courses from a wide range of other areas of linguistic study. You may be able to take a course from other degree programmes in the School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences, and in some cases, from elsewhere in the University.

Career opportunities

The programme has been designed to help you progress your career as an English language specialist in academia. The analytical skills you develop and the research training you receive will be valuable in a wide range of careers.

Read less
The MArch in Digital Architecture and Tectonics focuses on the role and application of materials and technology in the creation of contemporary architecture. Read more
The MArch in Digital Architecture and Tectonics focuses on the role and application of materials and technology in the creation of contemporary architecture.

This course is designed to ensure that the most appropriate technologies are integrated into comprehensive design thinking. As such, it provides insight into recent technological developments in the fields of structures morphology, performance orientated design, digital modelling, rapid prototyping technologies, advanced materials and construction methods.

An innovative feature of this course in the interdisciplinary nature where architects, engineering and individuals from associated disciplines work together in the design studio.

Students will develop:

an understanding of the current international challenge to reduce energy consumption
the economical need to enhance user comfort in existing and new buildings
the opportunities offered by novel materials and structures
the ability to communicate ideas effectively in written reports,
verbally and by means of presentations to groups
the ability to exercise original thought
the ability to plan and undertake an individual project
interpersonal, communication and professional skills

Previous research projects completed by students on this MSc have included:

A discourse on structure of adaptive building components
Performance based model in generative design - daylight or solar performance as primary criterion
Facade design and fabrication
The integrated design process: An insight into a holistic methodology towards sustainable design

This course does not convey professional accreditation in the UK.

Read less
Student research degrees in Metallic Materials are based within a vibrant research group, which is one of the largest in the UK. The research encompasses all aspects of metals alloys and composites, including their design, processing, forming, joining and performance. Read more
Student research degrees in Metallic Materials are based within a vibrant research group, which is one of the largest in the UK. The research encompasses all aspects of metals alloys and composites, including their design, processing, forming, joining and performance.

Research Focus
The research extends from fundamental science, and the ‘blue skies’ development of novel technologies and techniques, to the very applied, with the aim of improving our understanding of the basic governing principles, process simulation and physical modelling. While our research is broad ranging, we focus on light alloys for aerospace and transport applications, high-temperature materials for aeroengines and power generation, and metal composites, as well as the failure of metallic materials, their environmental degradation and surface treatment. The research is supported by state of the art equipment for materials characterisation, testing, simulation and processing.

Examples of recent student PhD projects include; Microstructure Modelling for Friction Stir Welding, Laser Surface treatment of Aerospace Alloys, Advanced Strain Mapping for Structural Integrity application, Dynamic Grain Growth in Super Plastic Forming, Dynamics and Morphology of Stress Corrosion Cracking Using 3D X-ray Tomography, and Laser Depositioning of Nickel Base Superalloys.

Industry links
We have strong links with industry and the funding councils and sponsorship from global companies, including; Airbus, Alcan, Alcoa, British Energy, Rolls Royce, BNF and Jaguar. Major initiatives include the £6M EPSRC-Manchester Portfolio Partnership in Light Alloys for Environmentally Sustainable Transport and the Materials Performance Centre, a research alliance established with Nexia Solutions (supported by the NDA) in 2002, and partnered with British Energy, Serco Assurance, EDF and Westinghouse.

Read less
Student research degrees in Metallic Materials are based within a vibrant research group, which is one of the largest in the UK. The research encompasses all aspects of metals alloys and composites, including their design, processing, forming, joining and performance. Read more
Student research degrees in Metallic Materials are based within a vibrant research group, which is one of the largest in the UK. The research encompasses all aspects of metals alloys and composites, including their design, processing, forming, joining and performance.

Research Focus
The research extends from fundamental science, and the ‘blue skies’ development of novel technologies and techniques, to the very applied, with the aim of improving our understanding of the basic governing principles, process simulation and physical modelling. While our research is broad ranging, we focus on light alloys for aerospace and transport applications, high-temperature materials for aeroengines and power generation, and metal composites, as well as the failure of metallic materials, their environmental degradation and surface treatment. The research is supported by state of the art equipment for materials characterisation, testing, simulation and processing.

Examples of recent student PhD projects include; Microstructure Modelling for Friction Stir Welding, Laser Surface treatment of Aerospace Alloys, Advanced Strain Mapping for Structural Integrity application, Dynamic Grain Growth in Super Plastic Forming, Dynamics and Morphology of Stress Corrosion Cracking Using 3D X-ray Tomography, and Laser Depositioning of Nickel Base Superalloys.

Industry links
We have strong links with industry and the funding councils and sponsorship from global companies, including; Airbus, Alcan, Alcoa, British Energy, Rolls Royce, BNF and Jaguar. Major initiatives include the £6M EPSRC-Manchester Portfolio Partnership in Light Alloys for Environmentally Sustainable Transport and the Materials Performance Centre, a research alliance established with Nexia Solutions (supported by the NDA) in 2002, and partnered with British Energy, Serco Assurance, EDF and Westinghouse.

Read less
This course enables you to carry out an original piece of research in museum, gallery and heritage studies. As a research student you will join an interdisciplinary group of researchers and academics at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies, fully supported by world expert supervisors. Read more

Course overview

This course enables you to carry out an original piece of research in museum, gallery and heritage studies. As a research student you will join an interdisciplinary group of researchers and academics at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies, fully supported by world expert supervisors.

MPhil and PhD students in Museum, Gallery and Heritage Studies are based in the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies (ICCHS), a leading academic centre for research and teaching at Newcastle.

ICCHS is internationally renowned for its research, securing significant support (around £3m since 2008) from a variety of funders, such as the UK Research Councils and the European Commission. We have a thriving, high-profile interdisciplinary research community made up of postgraduate research students and experienced academic researchers who are key figures in their fields.

Our academic supervisors have significant experience and expertise in interdisciplinary research and practice in the UK and abroad. Through our emphasis on empirical research and having a grounding in professional practice, our research alumni have been successful in securing careers in academia, governmental organisations, and the cultural and creative industry sectors worldwide.

Research themes

Cultural politics and policy: factors that determine how cultural policy is constructed, institutionally, locally, regionally, nationally and internationally; how management strategies affect heritage resources; the impact of large-scale constitutional change upon cultural policy; intended and unintended consequences of implementing international conventions, charters and instruments; contribution of research to cultural policy construction; the intersection of political movements and agendas with heritage; definitions and attributed values of heritage

Identity, community and place: construction and representation of identities, places and communities through heritage; how heritage is used by, and for, communities; relationships between notions of place and identities, communities, and heritages locally regionally, nationally and internationally; principles of community museology and ecomuseology practice in different contexts; relationships between heritage tourism and identities, communities and places; identities produced through the consumption of heritage; relationship between identity construction and wellbeing.

Media and representation: how media works in heritage organisations and how organisations work as media; factors shaping the production, morphology and consumption of media and media representations in heritage organisations; representations made possible through institutional technologies specific to heritage organisations and how they are analysed to understand culture, society and knowledge; study and design of digital heritage applications and digital cultural engagement.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/museum-gallery-heritage-studies-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/museum-gallery-heritage-studies-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

Read less
The MPhil in Human Evolutionary Studies is a full-time interdisciplinary course, taken over a period of ten months, and involving teaching in evolutionary anthropology, human and hominin morphology, primate behaviour and evolution, archaeology and genetics. Read more
The MPhil in Human Evolutionary Studies is a full-time interdisciplinary course, taken over a period of ten months, and involving teaching in evolutionary anthropology, human and hominin morphology, primate behaviour and evolution, archaeology and genetics. The lecturers are primarily involved in research and teaching within the Division of Biological Anthropology, in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsbamphes

Course detail

This taught MPhil recruits students who are prepared for graduate work and wish to receive interdisciplinary training, but who do not have sufficient education in human evolutionary studies in their background to be considered for the research MPhil or doctoral work. This is a demanding course which enables students to obtain interdisciplinary training and specialist knowledge in an area of human evolutionary studies over a relatively short time frame. The course prepares students to undertake an advanced degree, subject to performance in the examination.

Assessment

All students will write a thesis of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding tables, appendices, and references, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science. This is worth 50% of the final mark.

All students will undertake a quantitative exercise on statistical analysis and interpretation, worth 10% of the final mark.

All students will write two essays of each not more than 2,500 words in length, excluding tables and references, based upon material from the core courses, as well as a 'News and Views' type of essay no longer than 1500 words. These are each worth 10% each of the final mark.

Finally, students will undertake a lab report based on one of the two lab practicals that will be carried out. The lab practicals will be based on hormones and genetics. These will contribute to 10% of the final mark.

Formative feedback is provided in written comments on essays for lecture papers and,when appropriate, for practical work. Verbal feedback is also given at the end of each term.

Continuing

MPhil students often apply to do a PhD following their masters degree and the department provides all students with the facilities and opportunities to do so.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are opportunities to apply for funding through the application process, as well as from external sources that applicants may wish to investigate.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
This is a full-time research-based postgraduate degree, run jointly by Imperial College London and the Natural History Museum, London. Read more
This is a full-time research-based postgraduate degree, run jointly by Imperial College London and the Natural History Museum, London.

OPEN DAY

visit the course pages for more information about the next Open Day at NHM on Wednesday 29 March 2017.

OUTLINE

Taxonomy and systematics provide the foundation for studying the great diversity of the living world. These fields are rapidly changing through new digital and molecular technologies. There is ever greater urgency for species identification and monitoring in virtually all the environmental sciences, and evolutionary ‘tree thinking’ is now applied widely in most areas of the life sciences. These courses provide in-depth training in the study of biodiversity based on the principles of phylogenetics, evolutionary biology, palaeobiology and taxonomy. The emphasis is on quantitative approaches and current methods in DNA-based phylogenetics, bioinformatics, and the use of digital collections.

LOCATION

The course is a collaboration of Imperial College London (Silwood Park) with the Natural History Museum. This provides an exciting scientific environment of two institutions at the forefront of taxonomic and evolutionary research.

[[SYLLABUS ]]
The MRes in Biosystematics features hands-on research projects that cover the main methodological approaches of modern biosystematics. After 6 weeks of general skills training, students will ‘rotate’ through three research groups each conducting a separate 14-week project in specimen-based phylogenetics, molecular systematics/genomics, and bioinformatics. The projects may be of the student’s own design. Students attend small group tutorials, lab meetings and research seminars.

TRANSFERABLE SKILLS]

The GSLSM (Graduate School of Life Sciences and Medicine) at Imperial College London provides regular workshops covering a wide range of transferable skills, and MRes students are encouraged to undertake at least four during the year. Topics include: Applied Writing Skills, Creativity and Ideas Generation, Writing for Publication, Introduction to Regression Modelling, Introduction to Statistical Thinking.

RECENT PROJECTS

MORPHOLOGICAL

The Natural History Museum’s Dorothea Bate Collection of dwarfed deer from Crete: adaptation and proportional size reduction in comparison with larger mainland species
Cambrian lobopodians and their position as stem-group taxa
Atlas of the Caecilian World: A Geometric Morphometric perspective
Tooth crown morphology in Caecilian amphibians
Morphometrics of centipede fangs: untapping a possible new source of character data for the Scolopendromorpha
Phylogeny of the Plusiinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Exploring conflict between larvae and adults
A comparison between species delineation based on DNA sequences and genital morphometrics in beetles (Coleoptera)

MOLECULAR

Geographical distribution of endemic scavenger water beetles (Hydrophilidae) on the island of Madagascar based on DNA sequence data
Cryptic diversity within Limacina retroversa and Heliconoides inflate
Phylogenetics of pteropods of the Southern Oceans
Molecular discrimination of the European Mesocestoides species complex
A molecular phylogeny of the monkey beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Hopliini)
The molecular evolution of the mimetic switch locus, H, in the Mocker Swallowtail Papilio dardanus Brown, 1776
Phylogenetic and functional diversity of the Sargasso Sea Metagenome

BIOINFORMATICS

A study into the relation between body size and environmental variables in South African Lizards
Cryptic diversity and the effect of alignment parameters on tree topology in the foraminifera
Delimiting evolutionary taxonomic units within the bacteria: 16S rRNA and the GMYC model
Testing the molecular clock hypothesis and estimating divergence times for the order Coleoptera
Taxon Sampling: A Comparison of Two Approaches
Investigating species concepts in bacteria: Fitting Campylobacter and Streptococcus MLST profiles to an infinite alleles model to test population structure
Assessing the mitochondrial molecular clock: the effect of data partitioning, taxon sampling and model selection

ON COMPLETION OF THE COURSE, THE STUDENTS WILL HAVE:

• a good understanding of the state of knowledge of the field, together with relevant practical experience, in three areas of biosystematic science in which he or she has expressed an interest;
• where applicable, the ability to contribute to the formulation and development of ideas underpinning potential PhD projects in areas of interest, and to make an informed decision on the choice of potential PhD projects;
• a broad appreciation of the scientific opportunities within the NHM and Imperial College;
• knowledge of a range of specific research techniques and professional and transferable skills.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Students are encouraged to view the NHM website for further information, and to contact the course administrator if they have any queries. Visits can be arranged to the NHM to meet the course organisers informally and to be given a tour of the facilities. Applications should be made online on the Imperial College London website.

Read less
This programme is for students who are passionate about early life, dinosaurs, mass extinctions, macroevolution, fossil preservation and understanding the palaeobiology of extinct organisms. Read more
This programme is for students who are passionate about early life, dinosaurs, mass extinctions, macroevolution, fossil preservation and understanding the palaeobiology of extinct organisms. It examines quantitative aspects of the fossil record and the history of life. The research-oriented MSc bridges the biology-geology divide and will provide you with a strong background for independent research to PhD level or for a career in museums, libraries, management or the media.

This interdisciplinary programme is taught mainly in the School of Earth Sciences, along with some archaeology and biology units. You will engage in current debates in evolutionary biology, systematics and palaeobiology.

You will learn how to analyse problems quantitatively, and design experimental approaches to resolving questions in macroevolution and in the study of ancient organisms. First-hand training in research methods in palaeobiology involves laboratory techniques. In addition, you will learn a range of advanced skills throughout the programme, such as computer software use, numeracy, planning research, problem-solving and communication skills. You will learn multimedia techniques, including presentation of palaeontological data through talks, posters and formal written reports. A key aspect of the programme is preparing your projects for publication, and we provide continuing support to ensure as many projects as possible are published in leading international journals.

Programme structure

The first half of the programme consists of lectures, practical classes, tutorials and visiting speakers, designed to provide a firm foundation in the theory and methodology of the subject.

The programme comprises five core units which all students take, and a number of optional units of which students choose four. We recommend that biologists take some of the more geologically-orientated optional units, and that geologists take some of the biological optional units.

Core units
-Current Controversies in Palaeobiology and Macroevolution
-Scientific Communication
-Phylogenetic Methods in Palaeobiology
-Literature Review
-Research Methods in Palaeobiology

Optional units
-Biomechanics and Functional Morphology
-The Cambrian Explosion: the origin of animal body plans
-Early Human Origins
-Evolutionary Biology*
-Evolution of the Biosphere
-Geology for Research Palaeobiologists**
-Micropalaeontology
-Tree of Life
-Vertebrate Palaeobiology and Evolution

*Mandatory for non-biologists
**Mandatory for non-geologists

Careers

The degree is research-based, and about half the graduates go on to academic careers, usually starting with a PhD. The MSc is focused on methods, and you will learn the latest techniques in phylogenetics, biomechanics, and macroevolution training, which is highly sought after by PhD supervisors across the world.

The training in professional skills, including writing scientific papers, is also highly regarded. Some students have used the MSc as a means to go on to careers in museums, the media and education and now hold senior positions as curators and collection managers in national and regional museums. Graduates also work in making scientific documentaries, or are involved in science education at all levels.

Finally, some graduates have gone into commercial work in marketing, the oil industry and computing, where their practical skills in palaeobiology and communication have proved invaluable.

Read less
The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. Read more
The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. The programme provides an appreciation of the concepts, modes of analysis and theoretical approaches in the area of Language Pedagogy, including second language learning theories and teaching methodologies. Students will also be familiarised with the general areas of linguistic inquiry (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse structure) and how they are relevant to the study of second language acquisition.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X