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Masters Degrees (Molecular Modeling)

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How does a disease develop in a patient or model system? Which substances can influence this process? How is effective medication designed and tested? Can you cure diseases with stem cells?. Read more
How does a disease develop in a patient or model system? Which substances can influence this process? How is effective medication designed and tested? Can you cure diseases with stem cells?

You study the causes and pathophysiology of diseases and intervention with drugs. The programme is interdisciplinary covering the whole range of drug development disciplines. From basic drug target discovery to molecular modeling of targets. And from synthesis andanalysis, pharmacology, toxicology and biopharmacy to clinical pharmacoepidemiology and post marketing surveillance.

The main feature of the programme are research projects in which you will learn about conducting research by actually doing it. You will independently perform experiments and go through the whole process of conducting science developing skills such as studying scientific literature, formulating hypotheses, designing and performing experiments, and interpreting and presenting your results. The programme therefore is a good preparation for a PhD programme or for independent practice of science in a future job.

You can either choose to design your programme tailored to your individual research interest or choose a specialisation. Available specialisations:Toxicology and Drug Disposition, with focus on adverse drug reactions and toxicokinetics of drugs, or Pharmacoepidemiology which studies intended and unintended effects of drugs in daily life.

Why in Groningen?

- Groningen drug research is among the best in the world
- Unique interdisciplinary cooperation between clinical, preclinical and pharmaceutical research fields
- Specialisations: Toxicology and Drug Disposition | Pharmacoepidemiology

Job perspectives

When you have finished the Master's programme in Medical Pharmaceutical Sciences you have multiple career options. You are optimally prepared to start a research career but you can also choose for a position that links science to business and policy.

Researcher (usually as a PhD) in a variety of organisations:
- Universities
- Academic and general hospitals
- Pharmaceutical, biomedical industries and food industries

Positions linking medical pharmaceutical sciences to a business or policy strategy in:
- Governmental and semi-governmental institutions such as the Medicines Evaluation Board or the Ministry of Health and Welfare
- Societal and patient organisations

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The master of science degree in bioinformatics provides students with a strong foundation in biotechnology, computer programming, computational mathematics, statistics, and database management. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in bioinformatics provides students with a strong foundation in biotechnology, computer programming, computational mathematics, statistics, and database management. Graduates of the program are well-prepared for careers in the biotechnology, bioinformatics, pharmaceutical, and vaccine industries. Based on consultation with individuals within the industry nationwide, the job market is rich with opportunities for those who obtain a graduate degree in bioinformatics, particularly when coupled with industry-sponsored research as thesis work. This research provides exposure to real-world problems—and their solutions—not otherwise attainable in an academic setting.

The program provides students with the capability to enter the bioinformatics workforce and become leaders in the field. The curriculum is designed to fulfill the needs of students with diverse educational and professional backgrounds. Individuals entering the program typically have degrees in biology, biotechnology, chemistry, statistics, computer science, information technology, or a related field. The program accommodates this diversity in two ways. First, a comprehensive bridge program exists for students who need to supplement their education before entering the program. Second, the program itself consists of two tracks, one for students with backgrounds in the life sciences and one for those with backgrounds in the computational sciences. Regardless of the track pursued, students are prepared to become professional bioinformaticists upon graduation. The program is offered on a full- or part-time basis to fulfill the needs of traditional students and those currently employed in the field.

Plan of study

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for completion of the program. A number of graduate electives are offered for students to pursue areas of personal or professional interest. In addition, every student is required to complete a research project that addresses a relevant and timely topic in bioinformatics, culminating in a thesis. Graduate electives may be chosen from relevant RIT graduate courses.

Curriculum

Bioinformatics, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Bioinformatics Seminar
-Graduate Bioinformatics Algorithms
-Graduate Ethics in Bioinformatics
Choose one of the following
-Database Management for the Sciences
-Cell and Molecular Genetics
-Graduate Elective*
-Graduate Statistical Analysis for Bioinformatics
-Graduate Molecular Modeling and Proteomics
-Graduate Elective*
Second Year
-Thesis

* Any graduate level course deemed related to the field of bioinformatics by the program director. See website for details.

Other admission requirements

-Have an undergraduate GPA of 3.2 or higher (on a 4.0 scale).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose primary language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 79 (Internet-based) is required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

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Located in Canada's most enterprising city and neighboring one of the nation's best playgrounds - the Rockies - the Department of Chemistry's graduate program offers you the opportunity to collaborate with world-class researchers, work in highly sophisticated labs, and build the skills you need to pursue stimulating careers in both research and industry. Read more
Located in Canada's most enterprising city and neighboring one of the nation's best playgrounds - the Rockies - the Department of Chemistry's graduate program offers you the opportunity to collaborate with world-class researchers, work in highly sophisticated labs, and build the skills you need to pursue stimulating careers in both research and industry.

Among many other things, our 40 faculty members and 100+ graduate students work on advancing knowledge and finding solutions to problems regarding Chemistry for Cleaner Energy, Chemistry for Life and Health and Chemistry for the Quantum-Nano World that involve the following various research themes:
-Biological and Medicinal Chemistry
-Chemical Education Research
-Chemical Synthesis and Catalysis
-Computational Chemistry and Molecular Modeling
-Energy and Environment
-Nanotechnology and Materials Chemistry

The MSc (Thesis-based) is a full-time degree with an average completion time of two years, typically requiring a Bachelor's degree in the same or a closely related discipline.

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The Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography at Memorial University of Newfoundland has a well-established graduate studies program backed by a strong tradition of research. Read more
The Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography at Memorial University of Newfoundland has a well-established graduate studies program backed by a strong tradition of research. The Department has offered MSc programs since the inception of graduate studies at Memorial in 1960 and its first PhD program was created in 1969. In the present day, our students are supervised by faculty with international experience, connections, and recognition. Our research programs receive generous funding from NSERC, the CFI, and other organisations. Our labs and computer facilities are equipped to offer students world-class research opportunities.

Research opportunities in physical oceanography include coastal oceanography, numerical modeling, ocean acoustics, ocean mixing, fisheries oceanography, laboratory fluid dynamics, ocean instrumentation, and operational oceanography. Research in experimental and theoretical condensed matter physics spans four broad themes: (i) biomaterials and soft matter, (ii) magnetic and electronic materials, (iii) nanoscience and molecular physics, and (iv) photonics, spectroscopy, and microscopy. Theoretical and computational studies include numerical and analytic calculations pertaining to condensed matter (magnetic systems, superconductors, polymers, carbon nanostructures, the glass transition, nucleation and dynamics in supercooled liquids) and gravitational and black hole physics. Computational research within the Department is supported by excellent high performance computing facilities.

The MSc program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

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Chemistry as a discipline is growing and changing rapidly. The traditional divisions of Chemistry into analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry no longer reflect the dynamic and multidisciplinary nature of the field. Read more
Chemistry as a discipline is growing and changing rapidly. The traditional divisions of Chemistry into analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry no longer reflect the dynamic and multidisciplinary nature of the field. Chemistry is, in fact, the "central science", having relevance in areas such as molecular biology, molecular physics, materials science, molecular engineering, biotechnology, environmental science and drug design.

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Chemistry at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, you will have the chance to study in programs that reflect the current, central, position of Chemistry and you will learn from diverse, innovative faculty at the forefront of their fields of research.

Our mission is to offer research and instructional opportunities in the emerging areas of Chemistry while maintaining a program rooted in the basics of the discipline. Postgraduate programs emphasize training in original research focusing on fundamental, interdisciplinary and applied areas. Complementing our formal degree programs is an active seminar program allowing students to meet prominent and international scientists who are pioneering the creation of new chemical knowledge.

The Department now has 19 full-time faculty members and about 90 postgraduate students, a favorable ratio allowing students to interact closely with academics. The research environment is an exciting one and we take pride in the high quality of our programs.

The MPhil program is a research-based degree consisting of approved coursework and an original research thesis. It is designed with flexibility in order that students may tailor course selections according to their needs and interests in the field of Chemistry.

Submission and successful defense of a thesis based on original research are required to obtain the degree.

Facilities

The Department is well equipped with modern laboratories and state-of-the-art instrumentation. Equipment includes two 400 MHz FT-NMR and two 300 MHz NMR spectrometers, one mass spectrometer equipped with a GC-TOF module and a MALDI Micro module, one triple-quadrupole MS/MS system, an ion-trap MSn system, X-ray diffractometers, a Bruker FT-IR / FT-Raman system, a UV-Vis fluorimeter, GC / MS, HPLC.

Relevant central University facilities include the Materials Characterization and Preparation Facility, the Nanoelectronics Fabrication Facility and Environmental Central Facility, all offering a wide range of advanced instruments.

Computer facilities for postgraduate students include molecular graphic / modeling, quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics computations.

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Programming for biology. Overview of molecular biology/genetics concepts. Statistical computing in R. Algorithms for molecular biology. Read more

Core modules

• Programming for biology
• Overview of molecular biology/genetics concepts
• Statistical computing in R
• Algorithms for molecular biology
• Medical genomics I: genomics of rare and common diseases
• Medical genomics II: the cancer genome
• Genomics techniques I: sequencing library preparation
• Genomics techniques II: genomics data analysis

Optional modules

• Scientific visualization
• Probabilistic models for molecular biology
• Molecular and cell biology of cancer
• Advanced and applied immunology
• Stochastic processes
• Machine learning
• Applied statistics
• Advanced probability with applications
• Linear modeling
• Bayesian Modeling

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Joining the Department as a postgraduate is certainly a good move. The Department maintains strong research in both pure and applied mathematics, as well as the traditional core of a mathematics department. Read more
Joining the Department as a postgraduate is certainly a good move. The Department maintains strong research in both pure and applied mathematics, as well as the traditional core of a mathematics department. What makes our Department different is the equally strong research in fluid mechanics, scientific computation and statistics.

The quality of research at the postgraduate level is reflected in the scholarly achievements of faculty members, many of whom are recognized as leading authorities in their fields. Research programs often involve collaboration with scholars at an international level, especially in the European, North American and Chinese universities. Renowned academics also take part in the Department's regular colloquia and seminars. The faculty comprises several groups: Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Probability and Statistics.

Mathematics permeates almost every discipline of science and technology. We believe our comprehensive approach enables inspiring interaction among different faculty members and helps generate new mathematical tools to meet the scientific and technological challenges facing our fast-changing world.

The MPhil program seeks to strengthen students' general background in mathematics and mathematical sciences, and to expose students to the environment and scope of mathematical research. Submission and successful defense of a thesis based on original research are required.

Research Foci

Algebra and Number Theory
The theory of Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations play an important role in many of the recent development in mathematics and in the interaction of mathematics with physics. Our research includes representation theory of reductive groups, Kac-Moody algebras, quantum groups, and conformal field theory. Number theory has a long and distinguished history, and the concepts and problems relating to the theory have been instrumental in the foundation of a large part of mathematics. Number theory has flourished in recent years, as made evident by the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. Our research specializes in automorphic forms.

Analysis and Differential Equations
The analysis of real and complex functions plays a fundamental role in mathematics. This is a classical yet still vibrant subject that has a wide range of applications. Differential equations are used to describe many scientific, engineering and economic problems. The theoretical and numerical study of such equations is crucial in understanding and solving problems. Our research areas include complex analysis, exponential asymptotics, functional analysis, nonlinear equations and dynamical systems, and integrable systems.

Geometry and Topology
Geometry and topology provide an essential language describing all kinds of structures in Nature. The subject has been vastly enriched by close interaction with other mathematical fields and with fields of science such as physics, astronomy and mechanics. The result has led to great advances in the subject, as highlighted by the proof of the Poincaré conjecture. Active research areas in the Department include algebraic geometry, differential geometry, low-dimensional topology, equivariant topology, combinatorial topology, and geometrical structures in mathematical physics.

Numerical Analysis
The focus is on the development of advance algorithms and efficient computational schemes. Current research areas include: parallel algorithms, heterogeneous network computing, graph theory, image processing, computational fluid dynamics, singular problems, adaptive grid method, rarefied flow simulations.

Applied Sciences
The applications of mathematics to interdisciplinary science areas include: material science, multiscale modeling, mutliphase flows, evolutionary genetics, environmental science, numerical weather prediction, ocean and coastal modeling, astrophysics and space science.

Probability and Statistics
Statistics, the science of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting data, is an essential tool in a wide variety of academic disciplines as well as for business, government, medicine and industry. Our research is conducted in four categories. Time Series and Dependent Data: inference from nonstationarity, nonlinearity, long-memory behavior, and continuous time models. Resampling Methodology: block bootstrap, bootstrap for censored data, and Edgeworth and saddle point approximations. Stochastic Processes and Stochastic Analysis: filtering, diffusion and Markov processes, and stochastic approximation and control. Survival Analysis: survival function and errors in variables for general linear models. Probability current research includes limit theory.

Financial Mathematics
This is one of the fastest growing research fields in applied mathematics. International banking and financial firms around the globe are hiring science PhDs who can use advanced analytical and numerical techniques to price financial derivatives and manage portfolio risks. The trend has been accelerating in recent years on numerous fronts, driven both by substantial theoretical advances as well as by a practical need in the industry to develop effective methods to price and hedge increasingly complex financial instruments. Current research areas include pricing models for exotic options, the development of pricing algorithms for complex financial derivatives, credit derivatives, risk management, stochastic analysis of interest rates and related models.

Facilities

The Department enjoys a range of up-to-date facilities and equipment for teaching and research purposes. It has two computer laboratories and a Math Support Center equipped with 100 desktop computers for undergraduate and postgraduate students. The Department also provides an electronic homework system and a storage cloud system to enhance teaching and learning.

To assist computations that require a large amount of processing power in the research area of scientific computation, a High Performance Computing (HPC) laboratory equipped with more than 200 high-speed workstations and servers has been set up. With advanced parallel computing technologies, these powerful computers are capable of delivering 17.2 TFLOPS processing power to solve computationally intensive problems in our innovative research projects. Such equipment helps our faculty and postgraduate students to stay at the forefront of their fields. Research projects in areas such as astrophysics, computational fluid dynamics, financial mathematics, mathematical modeling and simulation in materials science, molecular simulation, numerical ocean modeling, numerical weather prediction and numerical methods for micromagnetics simulations all benefit from our powerful computing facilities.

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Introduction to programming for biology. Introduction to statistical computing in R. Algorithms for molecular biology. Medical genomics I. Read more

Core modules

• Introduction to programming for biology
• Introduction to statistical computing in R
• Algorithms for molecular biology
• Medical genomics I: genomics of rare and common diseases
• Medical genomics II: the cancer genome
• Genomics techniques I: sequencing library preparation
• Genomics techniques II: genomics data analysis

Optional modules

• Scientific visualization
• Probabilistic models for molecular biology
• Molecular and cell biology of cancer
• Advanced and applied immunology
• Stochastic processes
• Machine learning
• Applied statistics
• Advanced probability with applications
• Linear modeling
• Bayesian Modeling

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Graduate education in Computational Science and Engineering (CMSE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program among the Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering. Read more
Graduate education in Computational Science and Engineering (CMSE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program among the Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering. In this program graduate students are trained on modern computational science techniques and their applications to solve scientific and engineering problems. New technological problems and associated research challenges heavily depend on computational modeling and problem solving. Because of the availability of powerful and inexpensive computers model-based computational experimentation is now a standard approach to analysis and design of complex systems where real experiments can be expensive or infeasible. Graduates of the CMSE Program should be capable of formulating solutions to computational problems through the use of multidisciplinary knowledge gained from a combination of classroom and laboratory experiences in basic sciences and engineering. Individuals with B.S. degrees in biology, chemistry, physics, and related engineering disciplines should apply for graduate study in the CMSE Program.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Computational Biology & Bioinformatics
• Computational Chemistry
• Computational Physics
• Molecular Dynamics and Simulation
• Parallel and High Performance Computing
• Computational Fluid Dynamics
• Dynamical and Stochastic Systems
• Quantum Mechanics of Many Body Systems
• Electronic Design Automation
• Numerical Methods
• Simulation of Material Synthesis
• Structural Dynamics
• Biomedical Modeling and Simulation
• Virtual Environments

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The Department of Population Medicine emphasizes a One Health approach to the understanding, prevention and control of diseases in domestic animal populations, as well as zoonotic diseases in human populations. Read more
The Department of Population Medicine emphasizes a One Health approach to the understanding, prevention and control of diseases in domestic animal populations, as well as zoonotic diseases in human populations. MSc programs are offered in the fields of epidemiology, health management and theriogenology. The PhD program in epidemiology prepares people for careers in research with advanced analytic skills.

The program is designed to provide advanced knowledge and skills in field study design, data gathering, analysis and interpretation, oral presentation, and problem solving, as well as training in basic and applied epidemiological research.

Faculty

We have faculty strength across a breadth of disciplines focused on epidemiology and health management. Our faculty members
conduct leading research in epidemiology and health management of farm animals, and the epidemiology of zoonoses and other foodborne and waterborne diseases of humans.

Research Environment

We emphasize population and field research and faculty have excellent access to ongoing field studies, population databases, and
external collaborative networks. We also have computing facilities for advanced quantitative analyses for disease surveillance, multi-level modeling, disease modeling, and molecular epidemiology, and participate in a Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses, which promotes and supports collaborative and interdisciplinary research in public health at the human/animal/environmental interface.

Active research links with scientists in the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) provide excellent opportunities for research in public health.

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/healthsciences/graduate-programs/medical-illustration/. A medical illustrator is a professional artist with advanced education in the life sciences and visual communication. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/healthsciences/graduate-programs/medical-illustration/

A medical illustrator is a professional artist with advanced education in the life sciences and visual communication. Collaborating with scientists and physicians, medical illustrators transform complex information into visual images that are used in education, research, patient care, public relations, legal cases, and marketing efforts.

Plan of study

The MFA program provides training in the biomedical sciences, the principles of visual communication, and a variety of digital media including 2D illustration, 3D computer modeling, animation, and interactive media. Students produce a thesis, which involves independent research and visual problem-solving to communicate a complex scientific subject.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA in medical illustration, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of the arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited college. The undergraduate degree should include studio art courses, one year of general or introductory biology (for biology majors), and a minimum of three advanced biology courses, such as vertebrate anatomy, physiology, neurobiology, cell biology, molecular biology, immunology, microbiology, genetics, developmental biology, or pathology.

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Demonstrate, through the submission of a portfolio, outstanding drawing skills, particularly the ability to draw subjects from direct observation.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System may be submitted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Those applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

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The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

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The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. Read more
The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. The department emphasizes both pure and applied mathematics. Research in the department covers algebra, number theory, combinatorics, differential equations, functional analysis, abstract harmonic analysis, mathematical physics, stochastic analysis, biomathematics and topology.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Ring Theory and Module Theory, especially Krull dimension, torsion theories, and localization

• Algebraic Theory of Lattices, especially their dimensions (Krull, Goldie, Gabriel, etc.) with applications to Grothendieck categories and module categories equipped with torsion theories

• Field Theory, especially Galois Theory, Cogalois Theory, and Galois cohomology

• Algebraic Number Theory, especially rings of algebraic integers

• Iwasawa Theory of Galois representations and their deformations Euler and Kolyvagin systems, Equivariant Tamagawa Number
Conjecture

• Combinatorial design theory, in particular metamorphosis of designs, perfect hexagon triple systems

• Graph theory, in particular number of cycles in 2-factorizations of complete graphs

• Coding theory, especially relation of designs to codes

• Random graphs, in particular, random proximity catch graphs and digraphs

• Partial Differential Equations

• Nonlinear Problems of Mathematical Physics

• Dissipative Dynamical Systems

• Scattering of classical and quantum waves

• Wavelet analysis

• Molecular dynamics

• Banach algebras, especially the structure of the second Arens duals of Banach algebras

• Abstract Harmonic Analysis, especially the Fourier and Fourier-Stieltjes algebras associated to a locally compact group

• Geometry of Banach spaces, especially vector measures, spaces of vector valued continuous functions, fixed point theory, isomorphic properties of Banach spaces

• Differential geometric, topologic, and algebraic methods used in quantum mechanics

• Geometric phases and dynamical invariants

• Supersymmetry and its generalizations

• Pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics

• Quantum cosmology

• Numerical Linear Algebra

• Numerical Optimization

• Perturbation Theory of Eigenvalues

• Eigenvalue Optimization

• Mathematical finance

• Stochastic optimal control and dynamic programming

• Stochastic flows and random velocity fields

• Lyapunov exponents of flows

• Unicast and multicast data traffic in telecommunications

• Probabilistic Inference

• Inference on Random Graphs (with emphasis on modeling email and internet traffic and clustering analysis)

• Graph Theory (probabilistic investigation of graphs emerging from computational geometry)

• Statistics (analysis of spatial data and spatial point patterns with applications in epidemiology and ecology and statistical methods for medical data and image analysis)

• Classification and Pattern Recognition (with applications in mine field and face detection)

• Arithmetical Algebraic Geometry, Arakelov geometry, Mixed Tate motives

• p-adic methods in arithmetical algebraic geometry, Ramification theory of arithmetic varieties

• Topology of low-dimensional manifolds, in particular Lefschetz fibrations, symplectic and contact structures, Stein fillings

• Symplectic topology and geometry, Seiberg-Witten theory, Floer homology

• Foliation and Lamination Theory, Minimal Surfaces, and Hyperbolic Geometry

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Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Read more
Nanoscience and technology have become one of the most visible and fast growing multidisciplinary research areas. Nanoscience and technology research, ranging from nanostructured-materials to nanoelectronics, covers diverse areas in many disciplines, such as medicine and healthcare, aeronautics and space, environmental studies and energy, biotechnology and agriculture, national security and education. A joint postgraduate program in Nanoscience and Technology, initiated by the Schools of Science and Engineering, can offer long-term support to our ongoing research and training as well as to the development of technology and to commercialization efforts. Because of the diverse, multidisciplinary nature of Nanotechnology, its research and training can be best integrated into different disciplines. The aim of the concentration is to equip students with the necessary knowledge in the areas on which they wish to focus on.

Given the above developments, the School of Engineering has introduced the Nanotechnology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. This allows students to enroll in a particular discipline and pursue a focused-study on a specific area of Nanotechnology or Nanoscience.

The Nanotechnology Concentration is open exclusively to School of Engineering research postgraduates. Students must enroll in one of the following research degree programs prior to their registration for the Nanotechnology Concentration:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The research foci of Nanotechnology falls into the following disciplines:

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Study of nanocatalysts, nanocomposite and nanoporous materials, nanomaterials for environmental applications, atmospheric nanoparticle pollutants, usage of nano-sized magnetic particles and nano-electrocatalysts, morphology/property relationship of polymers at nanoscale, bio-functionalized nanoparticles for diagnostics and biosensing, nanocarriers for drug delivery and nanomaterials for tissue engineering, and nano-biomaterials for treatment of industrial effluents.

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Development of iron-based nanoparticles for the removal of heavy metals from groundwater and industrial wastewater, polymeric nanocomposites for the surface coating of concrete structures, and fate, transport, transformation and toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials in water.

Electronic and Computer Engineering
Design, fabrication, and characterization of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices, integration of compound semiconductor-based nano-electronic devices on silicon, modeling of nano-CMOS devices, nanoscale transistors, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), nanosize photo-alignment layers, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanoelectronic devices design and fabrication, and system-on-chip and embedded system designs using nanotechnologies.

Mechanical Engineering
Nano precision machining, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, graphene and organoclay nanoparticles, nanoindentation, applications of nano-particles for printable electronics and nano composites; integrated nano bubble actuator, nanosclae fluid-surface interaction, multiscale mechanics, nanoscale gas transport, micro/nanomechanics; molecular dynamic simulations, thermal interface material; micro fuel cell, and nano-structured materials for lithium ion battery electrodes.

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