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Masters Degrees (Molecular Dynamics)

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The MSc Molecular Genetics course aims to provide instruction in current concepts and techniques of molecular genetics as applied in modern research. Read more
The MSc Molecular Genetics course aims to provide instruction in current concepts and techniques of molecular genetics as applied in modern research. The MSc offers practical experience of experimental techniques and provides a framework to develop skills to plan research and devise strategies to achieve specific goals. The MSc acts as a springboard for graduates who want employment in molecular, biomedical or biotechnological research, or for entry to PhD programmes.

The MSc was established in 1988 and has been developed over the years to reflect the research strengths within the Faculty. Our students find the course to be demanding and challenging but also exciting, stimulating and rewarding.

The MSc consists of 180 course credits and is split into two phases:
Taught Phase 60 credits September - January
Research Project 120 credits January - August

Taught Phase
The taught phase is based around a series of taught practical experiments that introduce a variety of modern molecular techniques and research strategies. The experiments are run Tuesday-Friday of each week in the period September-December, with the Monday being reserved for a supporting lecture programme. The practical experiments are intensive and are used to help students develop analytical and reasoning skills as well as to learn how to plan and execute experimental investigations. There are some weeks set aside for students to complete written assignments and prepare for exams.

Research Project
For the research project students become part of an active research group and choose from a broad range of projects offered by departments of the Faculty of Medicine and Biological Sciences, the MRC Toxicology Unit, or collaborating research institutes or industrial partners (when available). The spread of projects covers a wide variety of disciplines involving molecular genetics and a variety of organisms.

Below are examples of project titles from a previous year:

• Molecular engineering of novel ligands with therapeutic potential

• Detection of oxidative damage to DNA in specific gene sequences

• Analyzing human disease genes in yeast

• Single molecule methods for watching the assembly of splicing complexes

• Secretory protein expression in pancreatic β-cells

• The iron responsive regulatory system of Campylobacter jejuni

• Non-recombining segments of the human genome as tools to study evolutionary history

• Analysis of telomere length dynamics in mice that lack telomerase by the amplification of single mouse telomeres.

• Molecular mechanisms underlying antisense-RNA mediated CpG island methylation in mammalian cells

• Mutations in the LMNA Gene in Emery Dreyfuss Muscular Dystrophy – consequences for in vitro differentiation of muscle cell cultures

• Alternative lengthening of telomeres in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia


Assessment of the research project is based on:
• Research performance (60 credits)
• A written report on the research (50 credits)
• A research seminar (10 credits).

Students submit the project report in August and the research seminars are held near the end of August.

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This exciting interdisciplinary MSc programme focuses on providing advanced academic training in the cellular and molecular processes that relate to the production of biomedicines for use in healthcare. Read more
This exciting interdisciplinary MSc programme focuses on providing advanced academic training in the cellular and molecular processes that relate to the production of biomedicines for use in healthcare.

This is coupled with rigorous practical training in the design, production and characterisation of biomolecules using state-of-theart biotechnological and bioengineering analytical and molecular technologies.

You acquire practical, academic and applied skills in data analysis, systems and modelling approaches, and bioinformatics, together with transferable skills in scientific writing, presentation and public affairs. On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to integrate these skills to develop novel solutions to modern biotechnological issues from both academic and industrial perspectives.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/213/biotechnology-and-bioengineering

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science and biophysics. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

The MSc in Biotechnology and Bioengineering involves studying for 120 credits of taught modules, as indicated below. The taught component takes place during the autumn and spring terms, while a 60-credit research project take place over the summer months.

The programme is taught by staff from the Industrial Biotechnology Centre, an interdisciplinary research centre whose aim is to solve complex biological problems using an integrated approach to biotechnology and bioengineering. It is administered by the School of Biosciences who also contribute to the programme.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

BI830 - Science at Work (30 credits)
BI836 - Practical and Applied Research Skills for Advanced Biologists (30 credits)
BI852 - Advanced Analytical and Emerging Technologies for Biotechnology and Bio (30 credits)
BI857 - Cancer Research in Focus (15 credits)
CB612 - New Enterprise Startup (15 credits)
CB613 - Enterprise (15 credits)
BI840 - Cancer Therapeutics: From the Laboratory to the Clinic (15 credits)
BI845 - Research project (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the research project.

Programme aims

You will gain the following transferable skills:

- the ability to plan and manage workloads

- self-discipline and initiative

- the development of reflective learning practices to make constructive use of your own assessment of performance and use that of colleagues, staff and others to enhance performance and progress

- communication: the ability to organise information clearly, create and respond to textual and visual sources (eg images, graphs, tables), present information orally, adapt your style for different audiences.

- enhanced understanding of group work dynamics and how to work as part of a group or independently.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/213

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The Composite Materials research degrees are part of a forward-thinking area of research in the school. Read more
The Composite Materials research degrees are part of a forward-thinking area of research in the school. We have close links with the Northwest Regional Development Agency and other leading companies such as, Quickstep, a manufacturer of autoclave processing equipment, as well as a large number of suppliers in the aircraft industry.

Active research
Current research covers interfacial phenomena in composite materials, natural composites and rapid composites manufacture. The deformation mechanics of a range of high performance synthetic reinforcement fibres for composites are explored, as are those of natural and regenerated cellulose fibres. In the later case the main emphasis is on understanding the relationships between the microstructure and molecular structure of these materials and their mechanical properties. Molecular dynamics modelling together with experimental studies have been used to gain an improved insight into the behaviour of natural fibres.

Northwest Composites Centre
We are actively involved with the Northwest Composites Centre, a collaboration which incorporates researchers from several schools in the university, together with colleagues from the University of Liverpool, University of Bolton and Lancaster University covering a wide range of polymer and metallic composites. The hub of this activity is based here at the School of Materials, established through a £2.1m grant from NWDA, and has facilities for rapid processing of composites through a variety of new technologies, including microwave and radio frequency heating as well as Quickstep. There are also extensive facilities for the characterisation of composites.

There are a large number of researchers working in the centre, nearly all on the rapid processing of composites with a view to improving the cycle time and properties of composites. These involve not just the use of rapid curing techniques, but also textile structures for next generation 3 D composites. The evaluation of these materials is also an important part of the projects and therefore supported by state-of-the-art equipment.

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The Composite Materials research degrees are part of a forward-thinking area of research in the school. Read more
The Composite Materials research degrees are part of a forward-thinking area of research in the school. We have close links with the Northwest Regional Development Agency and other leading companies such as, Quickstep, a manufacturer of autoclave processing equipment, as well as a large number of suppliers in the aircraft industry.

Active research
Current research covers interfacial phenomena in composite materials, natural composites and rapid composites manufacture. The deformation mechanics of a range of high performance synthetic reinforcement fibres for composites are explored, as are those of natural and regenerated cellulose fibres. In the later case the main emphasis is on understanding the relationships between the microstructure and molecular structure of these materials and their mechanical properties. Molecular dynamics modelling together with experimental studies have been used to gain an improved insight into the behaviour of natural fibres.

Northwest Composites Centre
We are actively involved with the Northwest Composites Centre, a collaboration which incorporates researchers from several schools in the university, together with colleagues from the University of Liverpool, University of Bolton and Lancaster University covering a wide range of polymer and metallic composites. The hub of this activity is based here at the School of Materials, established through a £2.1m grant from NWDA, and has facilities for rapid processing of composites through a variety of new technologies, including microwave and radio frequency heating as well as Quickstep. There are also extensive facilities for the characterisation of composites.

There are a large number of researchers working in the centre, nearly all on the rapid processing of composites with a view to improving the cycle time and properties of composites. These involve not just the use of rapid curing techniques, but also textile structures for next generation 3 D composites. The evaluation of these materials is also an important part of the projects and therefore supported by state-of-the-art equipment.

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The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of the course. Read more
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of the course.

You’ll share a breadth of experience – the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component means you will share a broad experience of methodological and research issues. Allied with subject specific supervision, this will allow you to develop a unique awareness of knowledge and experiences across the natural and social sciences in addition to a focus on your own research topic.

Biosciences pathway:
Students pursuing the bioscience pathway would be expected to have research which falls within the areas of the members of the biomolecular research group (BMRG). The BMRG have specialities in cell and molecular biology, protein science, chemical and structural biology, cancer biology, bioinformatics, metabolomics and evolutionary genetics. A selection of current research projects include:

*Development of fluorescent chemosensors for medical applications, biochemical investigations, environmental monitoring, biotechnology and drug discovery.
*Investigating the protein structure and biological control potential of plant lectins.
*Studying organism development and ageing with respect to environmental stimuli.
*Studying prion protein development and maintenance in yeast.
*Investigating the therapeutic potential of novel animal venoms as anti-microbial, anti-parasitic and anti-cancer agents.
*Computationally investigating the molecular dynamics of cell skeletal components.
*Investigating mammalian embryology and comparative genomic studies in a variety of avian species.
*Investigating the biochemical and biophysical properties of muscle proteins.
*Investigating alternative splicing and the circadian clock in plant stress responses.
*Deployment of molecular techniques an attempt to understand the patterns in the spatial distribution of organisms.

Members also have collaborative interests with external partners including local schools and biotechnology businesses. For more information on member’s research activities or for contact details, please click on a member’s individual Staff Profile.

We are a close-knit community of academics, researchers and students dedicated to the study of Life Sciences. You would be joining an active and dynamic post-graduate community and would have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from this community.

Find out more about the section of Life Sciences at https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/human-and-life-sciences/life-sciences/about-us.aspx. You can also find out more about our research https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/human-and-life-sciences/life-sciences/research/research.aspx.

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Graduate education in Computational Science and Engineering (CMSE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program among the Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering. Read more
Graduate education in Computational Science and Engineering (CMSE) at Koç University is offered through an interdisciplinary program among the Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering. In this program graduate students are trained on modern computational science techniques and their applications to solve scientific and engineering problems. New technological problems and associated research challenges heavily depend on computational modeling and problem solving. Because of the availability of powerful and inexpensive computers model-based computational experimentation is now a standard approach to analysis and design of complex systems where real experiments can be expensive or infeasible. Graduates of the CMSE Program should be capable of formulating solutions to computational problems through the use of multidisciplinary knowledge gained from a combination of classroom and laboratory experiences in basic sciences and engineering. Individuals with B.S. degrees in biology, chemistry, physics, and related engineering disciplines should apply for graduate study in the CMSE Program.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Computational Biology & Bioinformatics
• Computational Chemistry
• Computational Physics
• Molecular Dynamics and Simulation
• Parallel and High Performance Computing
• Computational Fluid Dynamics
• Dynamical and Stochastic Systems
• Quantum Mechanics of Many Body Systems
• Electronic Design Automation
• Numerical Methods
• Simulation of Material Synthesis
• Structural Dynamics
• Biomedical Modeling and Simulation
• Virtual Environments

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The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. Read more
The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. The department emphasizes both pure and applied mathematics. Research in the department covers algebra, number theory, combinatorics, differential equations, functional analysis, abstract harmonic analysis, mathematical physics, stochastic analysis, biomathematics and topology.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Ring Theory and Module Theory, especially Krull dimension, torsion theories, and localization

• Algebraic Theory of Lattices, especially their dimensions (Krull, Goldie, Gabriel, etc.) with applications to Grothendieck categories and module categories equipped with torsion theories

• Field Theory, especially Galois Theory, Cogalois Theory, and Galois cohomology

• Algebraic Number Theory, especially rings of algebraic integers

• Iwasawa Theory of Galois representations and their deformations Euler and Kolyvagin systems, Equivariant Tamagawa Number
Conjecture

• Combinatorial design theory, in particular metamorphosis of designs, perfect hexagon triple systems

• Graph theory, in particular number of cycles in 2-factorizations of complete graphs

• Coding theory, especially relation of designs to codes

• Random graphs, in particular, random proximity catch graphs and digraphs

• Partial Differential Equations

• Nonlinear Problems of Mathematical Physics

• Dissipative Dynamical Systems

• Scattering of classical and quantum waves

• Wavelet analysis

• Molecular dynamics

• Banach algebras, especially the structure of the second Arens duals of Banach algebras

• Abstract Harmonic Analysis, especially the Fourier and Fourier-Stieltjes algebras associated to a locally compact group

• Geometry of Banach spaces, especially vector measures, spaces of vector valued continuous functions, fixed point theory, isomorphic properties of Banach spaces

• Differential geometric, topologic, and algebraic methods used in quantum mechanics

• Geometric phases and dynamical invariants

• Supersymmetry and its generalizations

• Pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics

• Quantum cosmology

• Numerical Linear Algebra

• Numerical Optimization

• Perturbation Theory of Eigenvalues

• Eigenvalue Optimization

• Mathematical finance

• Stochastic optimal control and dynamic programming

• Stochastic flows and random velocity fields

• Lyapunov exponents of flows

• Unicast and multicast data traffic in telecommunications

• Probabilistic Inference

• Inference on Random Graphs (with emphasis on modeling email and internet traffic and clustering analysis)

• Graph Theory (probabilistic investigation of graphs emerging from computational geometry)

• Statistics (analysis of spatial data and spatial point patterns with applications in epidemiology and ecology and statistical methods for medical data and image analysis)

• Classification and Pattern Recognition (with applications in mine field and face detection)

• Arithmetical Algebraic Geometry, Arakelov geometry, Mixed Tate motives

• p-adic methods in arithmetical algebraic geometry, Ramification theory of arithmetic varieties

• Topology of low-dimensional manifolds, in particular Lefschetz fibrations, symplectic and contact structures, Stein fillings

• Symplectic topology and geometry, Seiberg-Witten theory, Floer homology

• Foliation and Lamination Theory, Minimal Surfaces, and Hyperbolic Geometry

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This course blends theory and practice to help you develop the skills required for a career in molecular and cellular biology. Our teaching focuses on integrated mammalian biology and animal models of human disease, drawing on our pioneering biomedical research. Read more

About the course

This course blends theory and practice to help you develop the skills required for a career in molecular and cellular biology. Our teaching focuses on integrated mammalian biology and animal models of human disease, drawing on our pioneering biomedical research.

Where your masters can take you

Graduates with skills in stem cell and regenerative medicine are in demand. Your degree will prepare you for a career in research in academia or industry, or in a clinical-related field. Our graduates are working all over the world – from the UK to China, India and the USA – and over half go on to doctoral study.

Learn from the experts

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rates us No 1 in the UK for research in this field. Our international reputation attracts highly motivated staff and students. Sheffield is a vibrant place to take a masters based on pioneering research.

Regular seminars from distinguished international experts help you to connect your studies to the latest developments. We’re also part of collaborative research groups for developmental biology, cell biology, physiology, pharmacology, neuroscience, models of human disease, stem cell science and regenerative medicine.

Our three research centres focus on translating laboratory research to the clinical environment: Bateson Centre, the Centre for Stem Cell Biology, and the Centre for Membrane Interactions and Dynamics.

Leaders in our field

We have a long track record of groundbreaking discoveries. These include breakthroughs in human stem cells for hearing repair, and the generation of animal models for Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, muscular dystrophies and their use for therapeutic studies.

Labs and equipment

We have purpose-built facilities for drosophila, zebrafish, chick and mouse genetics and for molecular physiology. Other facilities provide all the tools you’ll need to examine and analyse a range of cellular structures. We have an electron and a light microscopy centre, a PCR robotics facility, a flow cytometry unit and an RNAi screening facility.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures, practical classes, tutorials and seminars. In small group teaching classes you’ll discuss, debate and present on scientific and ethical topics. Laboratory placements within the department provide you with one-to-one attention, training and support to do your individual research project. Assessment is by formal examinations, coursework assignments, debates, poster presentations and a dissertation.

Our teaching covers ethics, practical scientific skills and an overview of the current literature. You’ll also develop useful career skills such as presentation, communication and time management.

Core modules

Literature Review; Practical Research Project; Analysis of Current Science; Ethics and Public Understanding.

Examples of optional modules

Integrated Mammalian Biology; Practical Cell Biology; Practical Developmental Genetics; Cancer Biology; Modelling Human Diseases; Epithelia in Health and Disease.

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The Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography at Memorial University of Newfoundland has a well-established graduate studies program backed by a strong tradition of research. Read more
The Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography at Memorial University of Newfoundland has a well-established graduate studies program backed by a strong tradition of research. The Department has offered MSc programs since the inception of graduate studies at Memorial in 1960 and its first PhD program was created in 1969. In the present day, our students are supervised by faculty with international experience, connections, and recognition. Our research programs receive generous funding from NSERC, the CFI, and other organisations. Our labs and computer facilities are equipped to offer students world-class research opportunities.

Research opportunities in physical oceanography include coastal oceanography, numerical modeling, ocean acoustics, ocean mixing, fisheries oceanography, laboratory fluid dynamics, ocean instrumentation, and operational oceanography. Research in experimental and theoretical condensed matter physics spans four broad themes: (i) biomaterials and soft matter, (ii) magnetic and electronic materials, (iii) nanoscience and molecular physics, and (iv) photonics, spectroscopy, and microscopy. Theoretical and computational studies include numerical and analytic calculations pertaining to condensed matter (magnetic systems, superconductors, polymers, carbon nanostructures, the glass transition, nucleation and dynamics in supercooled liquids) and gravitational and black hole physics. Computational research within the Department is supported by excellent high performance computing facilities.

The MSc program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

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Research projects are available in the field of Molecular Cell Biology that include; the analysis of structure, function and dynamics of telomeres in yeast… Read more
Research projects are available in the field of Molecular Cell Biology that include; the analysis of structure, function and dynamics of telomeres in yeast and parasites, and of centromeric DNA in mammalian cells; investigation of stress-response networks in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and of micro RNAs during the evolution of developmental processes in Drosophila; establishment of the relationship between nuclear structure and function using the giant nuclei of amphibian oocytes; analysis of biological membranes, biomaterials and biophysical aspects of cellular interactions as well as filopodia, lamellipodia and stress fiber formation; investigation of blood substitutes from microbial cell factories and of artificial gas-carrying fluids for enhancing growth of cells in culture.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Research in this area will examine systems responsible for maintaining genome integrity and securing accurate chromosome transmission in bacteria, archaea, yeast and vertebrates. Read more
Research in this area will examine systems responsible for maintaining genome integrity and securing accurate chromosome transmission in bacteria, archaea, yeast and vertebrates. It will also examine the genetics and biochemistry of bacterial motility. Specific projects will focus on chromosome biology, the mechanics of homologous recombination and DNA repair, predatory activities of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus. Telomere biology and genome dynamics are also major areas of interest.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

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This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. The course offers a wide choice of modules and provides training in clinical tropical medicine at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases.

The Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (DTM&H):
All students going on the MSc will take the Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. Students with a prior DTM&H, or holding 60 Masters level credits from the East African Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene may apply for exemption from Term 1 via accreditation of prior learning.

Careers

Graduates from this course have taken a wide variety of career paths including further research in epidemiology, parasite immunology; field research programmes or international organisations concerned with health care delivery in conflict settings or humanitarian crises; or returned to academic or medical positions in low- and middle-income countries.

Awards

The Frederick Murgatroyd Award is awarded each year for the best student of the year. Donated by Mrs Murgatroyd in memory of her husband, who held the Wellcome Chair of Clinical Tropical Medicine in 1950 and 1951.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/tmih_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- understand and describe the causation, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and control of the major parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases of developing countries

- demonstrate knowledge and skills in diagnostic parasitology and other simple laboratory methods

- understand and apply basic epidemiological principles, including selecting appropriate study designs

- apply and interpret basic statistical tests for the analysis of quantitative data

- critically evaluate published literature in order to make appropriate clinical decisions

- communicate relevant medical knowledge to patients, health care professionals, colleagues and other groups

- understand the basic sciences underlying clinical and public health practice

Structure

Term 1:
All students follow the course for the DTM&H. Term 1 consists entirely of the DTM&H lectures, seminars, laboratory practical and clinical sessions, and is examined through the DTM&H examination and resulting in the award of the Diploma and 60 Master's level credits at the end of Term 1.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Recognising that students have diverse backgrounds and experience, the course director considers requests to take any module within the School's portfolio, provided that this is appropriate for the student.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 1: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Clinical Virology*
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Advanced Immunology 1
Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infection
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco
Economic Evaluation
Generalised Liner Models
Health Care Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques
Research Design & Analysis
Sociological Approaches to Health
Study Design: Writing a Proposal

- Slot 2:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology
Advanced Immunology 2
Clinical Bacteriology 1
Family Planning Programmes
Health Systems; History & Health
Molecular Virology; Non Communicable Eye Disease
Population, Poverty and Environment
Qualitative Methodologies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology
Applied Communicable Disease Control
Clinical Immunology
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Implementing Eye Care: Skills and Resources
Medical Anthropology and Public Health
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Nutrition in Emergencies
Organisational Management
Social Epidemiology
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health
Tropical Environmental Health
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination

- Slot 4:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights*
Global Disability and Health*
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Analytical Models for Decision Making
Clinical Bacteriology 2
Design & Evaluation of Mental Health Programmes
Environmental Epidemiology
Evaluation of Public Health Interventions
Genetic Epidemiology
Globalisation & Health
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications
Nutrition Related Chronic Diseases
Population Dynamics & Projections
Reviewing the Literature
Sexual Health
Survival Analysis and Bayesian Statistics
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions

- Slot 5:
AIDS*
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Mycology*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Analysing Survey & Population Data
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Environmental Health Policy
Integrated Vector Management
Integrating Module: Health Promotion
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection
Nutrition Programme Planning
Pathogen Genomics
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/ttmi.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project in a subject of their choice, for submission by early September. Projects may involve writing up and analysing work carried out before coming to the School, a literature review, or a research study proposal. Some students gather data overseas or in the UK for analysis within the project. Such projects require early planning.

Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved. The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html#sixth

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Our MSc by Research in Life Sciences is a dedicated programme which is designed to enable students to further develop their research skills by focusing on a specialist project. Read more
Our MSc by Research in Life Sciences is a dedicated programme which is designed to enable students to further develop their research skills by focusing on a specialist project.

This course provides an opportunity for students from biological subjects to begin research in life sciences. Research may be conducted in a broad range of topics in biology and life sciences and as a researcher in the School, you will have the opportunity to collaborate with academics working on studies and projects.

The School undertakes research at molecular, cellular, organism and population levels in order to answer fundamental questions in molecular biology and biomedical science, forensic science and microbiology, animal and plant biology, and evolution and ecology.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research is conducted within six substantial research groups. Scientists in Animal Behaviour, Cognition and Welfare explore the causes, functions and evolution of animal behaviour and the impact this has on animal welfare.

Those in Evolution and Ecology examine population dynamics and evolutionary processes at all levels of biological organisation. Researchers in Drug Design and Delivery focus on the application and efficacy of novel therapeutics, while academics working in Molecular Basis of Disease aim to understand disease at a molecular level in order to improve diagnosis and treatment.

Example Research Areas:
-Management of Native River Fish
-Forensic Analysis of Burnt Bones
-Public Perception of Dog Breed Types.

Example Research Projects:
-Peptide-guided drug delivery
-Cognitive phylogenetics in parrots
-Sexual selection dynamics in humans
-Protein Biochemistry with the development of cardiovascular disease
-Reconstruction of patterns of habitat colonisation using genetic methods.

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

Facilities

Students have the chance to develop their professional and technical skills in specialist laboratories equipped for research in biomedical, forensic and pharmaceutical science, chemistry, microbiology, molecular biology and animal and plant biology.

Minster House, adjacent to the laboratories, provides specialist facilities for the study of animal behaviour. Our links with local, national and international partners may provide postgraduate students with opportunities for further collaboration with scientists in industry, government and academia.

Career and Personal Development

Postgraduate-level research provides you with the opportunity to advance your knowledge and develop your practical and intellectual skills. Graduates may pursue careers in research and science-related roles, while others may choose to move on to research at doctoral level.

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Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Read more
Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in:
-Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data.
-Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.
-Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge.
-Reporting results in a clear and logical manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The six study lines are as follows:
Aerosol Physics
Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the most recent theoretical concepts, measurement techniques and computational methods applied in aerosol research.

Geophysics of the Hydrosphere
Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes.

Meteorology
Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example. As a graduate of the meteorology line, you will be an expert in atmospheric phenomena who can produce valuable new information and share your knowledge.

Biogeochemical Cycles
Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Remote Sensing
Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry. As a graduate of the remote sensing line you will have broad expertise in the operational principles of remote sensing instruments as well as methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Atmospheric Chemistry and Analysis
Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods. As a graduate of this line you will have understanding of the chemical processes of the atmosphere and the latest environmental analytical methods, so you will have vital skills for environmental research.

Programme Structure

The basic degree in the Programme is the Master of Science (MSc). The scope of the degree is 120 credits (ECTS). As a prerequisite you will need to have a relevant Bachelor’s degree. The possible major subjects are Physics, Meteorology, Geophysics, Chemistry, and Forest Ecology. The programme is designed to be completed in two years. Studies in ATM-MP consist of various courses and project work: lecture courses, seminars, laboratory work and intensive courses.

Your first year of studies will consist mainly of lecture courses. During the second year, you must also participate in the seminar course and give a presentation yourself. There is also a project course, which may contain laboratory work, data analysis, or theoretical or model studies. You will have to prepare a short, written report of the project. There are also several summer and winter schools as well as field courses for students in the Programme. Many of the courses take place at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. The intensive courses typically last 5–12 days and include a concise daily programme with lectures, exercises and group work.

Career Prospects

There is a global need for experts with multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and environmental issues. Governmental environmental agencies need people who are able to interpret new scientific results as a basis for future legislation. Industry, transportation and businesses need to be able to adapt to new regulations.

As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. Graduates of the Programme have found employment in Meteorological Institutes and Environmental Administration in Finland and other countries, companies manufacturing instrumentation for atmospheric and environmental measurements and analysis, and consultancy companies. The Master's degree in ATM-MP also gives you a good background if you intend to proceed to doctoral level studies.

Internationalization

The Programme offers an international study environment with more than 30% of the students and teaching staff coming from abroad.

The ATM-MP is part of a Nordic Nordplus network in Atmosphere-Biosphere Studies, which gives you good opportunities to take courses currently in fourteen Nordic and Baltic universities. There are also several Erasmus agreements with European universities. The PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX) project provides you with opportunities to carry out part of your studies especially in China and Russia.

Research Focus

All the units teaching in the Programme belong to the National Centre of Excellence (FCoE) in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM), which is a multidisciplinary team of the Departments of Physics, Forest Sciences and Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Eastern Finland (Kuopio) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

The main objective of FCoE ATM is to quantify the feedbacks between the atmosphere and biosphere in a changing climate. The main focus of the research is on investigating the following topics:
1. Understanding the climatic feedbacks and forcing mechanisms related to aerosols, clouds, precipitation and biogeochemical cycles.
2. Developing, refining and utilising the newest measurement and modelling techniques, from quantum chemistry to observations and models of global earth systems.
3. Creating a comprehensive understanding of the role of atmospheric clusters and aerosol particles in regional and global biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and their linkages to atmospheric chemistry.
4. Integrating the results in the context of understanding regional and global Earth systems.

In addition to the research focus of FCoE, current research in hydrospheric geophysics at Helsinki University has an emphasis on cryology, with a focus on the effect of aerosols on Indian glaciers, the impact of climate change on the Arctic environment, the dynamics of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard, and the winter season in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

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