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Masters Degrees (Modern Language)

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The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. Read more

The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. You will also be able to follow a number of lectures in Tilburg. Our programme is known to be challenging, but it also offers students a very large degree of choice.

Real language in real-life situations

Whenever we use language we are involved in communicating. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme. It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observation skills to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Challenging research environment

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in topics such as language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

Why study Language and Communication (Research) at Radboud University?

  • Radboud University offers this programme jointly with Tilburg University, so that our students can learn from and work alongside a large number of specialists. Our universities have experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication, multimodal messages and social media.
  • The programme is designed so that you can develop a unique professional profile by specialising in an area that meets your interests and research ambitions.
  • You’ll gain substantial hands-on research experience during two lab rotations, while you’ll also develop various research skills (incl. academic writing and grant proposal writing); the programme also challenges you to think about the valorisation process.
  • You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a selected group of highly motivated national and international students.
  • The Radboud campus in Nijmegen offers you a challenging research environment in which you could work together with specialists from four leading research institutes connected to this field: Centre for Language Studies, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Baby Research Centre, and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
  • Radboud University has excellent facilities for doing research, including the University Library with the largest collection in the field of linguistics in the Netherlands, and experimental labs and computer facilities with state-of-the-art equipment

General requirements:

  1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Communication Studies, in Linguistics, in a modern language or a related area with excellent grades. Your Bachelor's thesis or a dedicated research proposal will also need to demonstrate that you’re sufficiently talented for scientific research.
  2. Proficiency in English. Non-native speakers of English* need one of the following:
  • A TOEFL score of >600 (paper based) or >100 (internet based)
  • A IELTS score of >7.0
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Strong motivation

You have to be able to demonstrate your motivation for and affinity with international academic research. A selection committee will evaluate the motivation of each applicant separately.

Career prospects

The primary goal of the programme is academic training, which makes it ideal for those wishing to embark on a research career, for example by taking a PhD. But it also caters for the growing demand from the public and private sectors for people with academic insight and research skills. Many graduates will join research groups in the public and private sector. These may address a wide range of topics such as advanced Internet and enhancing professional communication in an international context.

Our approach to this field

Whenever we use language we are involved in communication with others - to persuade, to inform and to exchange ideas. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together in spoken language and non-verbal cues such as eye-contact or facial expression and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme.

It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. We invite you to discover exciting new areas of research, where language and communication are illuminated by developments in information and communication technology. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observations to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Our research in this field

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language



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This course will prepare you to teach German across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS). Read more

This course will prepare you to teach German across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS).

The course combines master's level academic study of key language learning theories and methods with a range of practical experiences. Approximately two-thirds of the course is spent in our partnership schools and colleges developing practical teaching skills with the support of trained mentors and experienced modern language teachers.

The University teaching team has an international reputation for research, teaching and publications in education. We are dedicated to developing your expertise and we believe passionately in the benefits of creative, motivating and engaging language lessons in order to create the next generation of life-long modern language speakers. Our sessions are all interactive and good pedagogy is modelled by skilled and highly motivated tutors and guest speakers. Your University tutors combine experience as outstanding teachers with academic knowledge of innovative, current and relevant educational research.

We have strong partnerships with schools and colleges, many of which are involved in research projects with the University. We work with a large variety of schools, comprehensives, grammar schools, specials schools and sixth form colleges, allowing us to personalise your placement experiences to your individual needs. University tutors and school-based mentors will provide support and challenge to help you achieve your potential.

What our students say:

The PGCE at The University of Manchester balances just the right amount of University-based training with a great deal of school-based teaching practice. The many opportunities to put the theory into practice, coupled with the high level of support from the University and partner schools led to the PGCE being an enjoyable and challenging year which has prepared me well for my first year of teaching.

For more details on interviews, please visit our PGCE website .

Aims

The academic elements of the course enable trainees to research, observe and reflect on key aspects of education practice including teaching, learning and pedagogy. You will be required to complete master's level assignments on teaching, learning and assessment, and your language skills. The course will also encourage you to pursue your own specific interests in your teaching practice.

The course will:

  • Equip you with the professional skills and knowledge required to become an outstanding teacher.
  • Enable you to develop your own preferred teaching styles by demonstrating, and encouraging you to try out, a wide variety of teaching styles.
  • Encourage you to develop your skill as a teacher through reflective practice.
  • Give you a sound understanding of the development of modern language methodology and current issues.
  • Enable you to use and produce teaching resources.
  • Ensure that your teaching takes account of individual pupils' perspectives and learning styles.
  • Ensure that your planning and teaching maximise the progress of all pupils in your classroom.
  • Encourage you to make maximum use of the knowledge and experience that you already have.
  • Encourage you to openly share your ideas and experiences.
  • Demonstrate that teaching and learning are reciprocal processes, and that the best teachers are those who are lifelong learners.

Special features

  • Top university to study a PGCE in the North of England (Good Teacher Training Guide 2017).
  • Rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted.
  • Extensive classroom experience supported by experienced modern language tutors and mentors.
  • 92% of our graduates in a teaching post within six months of completing the course - consistently better than the North West average (The University of Manchester 2013-2016).

Teaching and learning

The structure of our PGCEs includes both school-based and University-based learning. On our secondary PGCEs, around two thirds of your time will be spent in secondary schools, academies or colleges on placements. You will also need to undertake self-directed study in the evenings and weekends, such as background reading, creating lesson plans and completing written assignments.

The course includes a wide range of teaching methods, including: seminars; group discussion; practical workshops; lectures; and presentations. You will be an active participant in your own development as you make the transition from subject expert to excellent modern language teacher.

Coursework and assessment

School and University-based experiences are formally assessed and your school/college mentors and University tutors will help you to record your achievements and to set targets.

During each placement, a University tutor will observe your teaching and at the end of each placement you will receive a report from your mentor. The report will grade you in the following areas: teaching; planning, differentiation and assessment; learning environment; and wider professional responsibilities. The grades are awarded by your mentor in conjunction your University tutor. These reports, together with your record of achievement and development, facilitate your progression as a trainee teacher and on an ongoing basis as a newly qualified teacher.

You are also required to complete a number of written assignments which allow you to gain 60 master's level credits. Modules include: Teaching, Learning and Assessment; a School/College-based Enquiry (with supporting literature review); and a Reflection of Professional Practice. On-going guidance and support to complete these assignments will be available from your University tutors.

Scholarships and bursaries

Generous, tax-free funding is available to the best graduates training in a range of subjects. You could get a £26,000 bursary or be awarded a prestigious scholarship - which provides additional support and benefits throughout your training year.

Information about additional funding options for September 2018 can be found on the Department for Education website

Home/EU students may be eligible for a repayable tuition fee loan. Home students in England may also be eligible for a repayable student maintenance loan. The loans support available to PGCE students is similar to what is available for undergraduate students and information about government financial support for undergraduate students is available here . 

If you have graduated in the last three years from The University of Manchester with a 1st class honours degree, you may also be eligible for our Alumni Scholarship .



Read less
This course will prepare you to teach French across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS). Read more

This course will prepare you to teach French across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS).

The course combines master's level academic study of key language learning theories and methods with a range of practical experiences. Approximately two-thirds of the course is spent in our partnership schools and colleges developing practical teaching skills with the support of trained mentors and experienced modern language teachers.

The University teaching team has an international reputation for research, teaching and publications in education. We are dedicated to developing your expertise and we believe passionately in the benefits of creative, motivating and engaging language lessons in order to create the next generation of life-long language speakers. Our sessions are all interactive and good pedagogy is modelled by skilled and highly motivated tutors and guest speakers. Your University tutors combine experience as outstanding teachers with academic knowledge of innovative, current and relevant educational research.

We have strong partnerships with schools and colleges, many of which are involved in research projects with the University. We work with a large variety of schools, comprehensives, grammar schools, special schools and sixth form colleges, allowing us to personalise your placement experiences to your individual needs. University tutors and school-based mentors will support and challenge you to help you achieve your potential.

What our students say:

The PGCE at The University of Manchester balances just the right amount of University-based training with a great deal of school-based teaching practice. The many opportunities to put the theory into practice, coupled with the high level of support from the University and partner schools led to the PGCE being an enjoyable and challenging year which has prepared me well for my first year of teaching.

For more details on interviews, please visit our PGCE website .

Aims

The academic elements of the course enable trainees to research, observe and reflect on key aspects of education practice including teaching, learning and pedagogy. You will be required to complete master's level assignments on teaching, learning and assessment, and your language skills. The course will also encourage you to pursue your own specific interests in your teaching practice.

The course will:

  • Equip you with the professional skills and knowledge required to become an outstanding teacher.
  • Enable you to develop your own preferred teaching styles by demonstrating, and encouraging you to try out, a wide variety of teaching styles.
  • Encourage you to develop your skill as a teacher through reflective practice.
  • Give you a sound understanding of the development of modern language methodology and current issues.
  • Enable you to use and produce teaching resources.
  • Ensure that your teaching takes account of individual pupils' perspectives and learning styles.
  • Ensure that your planning and teaching maximise the progress of all pupils in your classroom.
  • Encourage you to make maximum use of the knowledge and experience that you already have.
  • Encourage you to openly share your ideas and experiences.
  • Demonstrate that teaching and learning are reciprocal processes, and that the best teachers are those who are lifelong learners.

Special features

  • Top university to study a PGCE in the North of England (Good Teacher Training Guide 2017).
  • Rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted.
  • Extensive classroom experience supported by experienced modern language tutors and mentors.
  • 92% of our graduates in a teaching post within six months of completing the course - consistently better than the North West average (The University of Manchester 2013-2016).

Teaching and learning

The structure of our PGCEs includes both school-based and University-based learning. On our secondary PGCEs, around two thirds of your time will be spent in secondary schools, academies or colleges on placements. You will also need to undertake self-directed study in the evenings and weekends, such as background reading, creating lesson plans and completing written assignments.

The course includes a wide range of teaching methods, including: seminars; group discussion; practical workshops; lectures; and presentations. You will be an active participant in your own development as you make the transition from subject expert to excellent modern language teacher.

Coursework and assessment

School and University-based experiences are formally assessed and your school/college mentors and University tutors will help you to record your achievements and to set targets.

During each placement, a University tutor will observe your teaching and at the end of each placement you will receive a report from your mentor. The report will grade you in the following areas: teaching; planning, differentiation and assessment; learning environment; and wider professional responsibilities. The grades are awarded by your mentor in conjunction your University tutor. These reports, together with your record of achievement and development, facilitate your progression as a trainee teacher and on an ongoing basis as a newly qualified teacher.

You are also required to complete a number of written assignments which allow you to gain 60 master's level credits. Modules include: Teaching, Learning and Assessment; a School/College-based Enquiry (with supporting literature review); and a Reflection of Professional Practice. On-going guidance and support to complete these assignments will be available from your University tutors.

Scholarships and bursaries

Generous, tax-free funding is available to the best graduates training in a range of subjects. You could get a £26,000 bursary or be awarded a prestigious scholarship - which provides additional support and benefits throughout your training year.

Information about additional funding options for September 2018 can be found on the Department for Education website

Home/EU students may be eligible for a repayable tuition fee loan. Home students in England may also be eligible for a repayable student maintenance loan. The loans support available to PGCE students is similar to what is available for undergraduate students and information about government financial support for undergraduate students is available here . 

If you have graduated in the last three years from The University of Manchester with a 1st class honours degree, you may also be eligible for our Alumni Scholarship .



Read less
This course will prepare you to teach Spanish across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS). Read more

This course will prepare you to teach Spanish across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS).

The course combines master's level academic study of key language learning theories and methods with a range of practical experiences. Approximately two-thirds of the course is spent in our partnership schools and colleges developing practical teaching skills with the support of trained mentors and experienced modern language teachers.

The University teaching team has an international reputation for research, teaching and publications in education. We are dedicated to developing your expertise and we believe passionately in the benefits of creative, motivating and engaging language lessons in order to create the next generation of life-long modern language speakers. Our sessions are all interactive and good pedagogy is modelled by skilled and highly motivated tutors and guest speakers. Your University tutors combine experience as outstanding teachers with academic knowledge of innovative, current and relevant educational research.

We have strong partnerships with schools and colleges, many of which are involved in research projects with the University. We work with a large variety of schools, comprehensives, grammar schools, specials schools and sixth form colleges, allowing us to personalise your placement experiences to your individual needs. University tutors and school-based mentors will provide support and challenge to help you achieve your potential.

What our students say:

The PGCE at The University of Manchester balances just the right amount of University-based training with a great deal of school-based teaching practice. The many opportunities to put the theory into practice, coupled with the high level of support from the University and partner schools led to the PGCE being an enjoyable and challenging year which has prepared me well for my first year of teaching.

For more details on interviews, please visit our PGCE website .

Aims

The academic elements of the course enable trainees to research, observe and reflect on key aspects of education practice including teaching, learning and pedagogy. You will be required to complete master's level assignments on teaching, learning and assessment, and your language skills. The course will also encourage you to pursue your own specific interests in your teaching practice.

The course will:

  • Equip you with the professional skills and knowledge required to become an outstanding teacher.
  • Enable you to develop your own preferred teaching styles by demonstrating, and encouraging you to try out, a wide variety of teaching styles.
  • Encourage you to develop your skill as a teacher through reflective practice.
  • Give you a sound understanding of the development of modern language methodology and current issues.
  • Enable you to use and produce teaching resources.
  • Ensure that your teaching takes account of individual pupils' perspectives and learning styles.
  • Ensure that your planning and teaching maximise the progress of all pupils in your classroom.
  • Encourage you to make maximum use of the knowledge and experience that you already have.
  • Encourage you to openly share your ideas and experiences.
  • Demonstrate that teaching and learning are reciprocal processes, and that the best teachers are those who are lifelong learners.

Special features

  • Top university to study a PGCE in the North of England (Good Teacher Training Guide 2017).
  • Rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted.
  • Extensive classroom experience supported by experienced modern language tutors and mentors.
  • 92% of our graduates in a teaching post within six months of completing the course - consistently better than the North West average (The University of Manchester 2013-2016).

Teaching and learning

The structure of our PGCEs includes both school-based and University-based learning. On our secondary PGCEs, around two thirds of your time will be spent in secondary schools, academies or colleges on placements. You will also need to undertake self-directed study in the evenings and weekends, such as background reading, creating lesson plans and completing written assignments.

The course includes a wide range of teaching methods, including: seminars; group discussion; practical workshops; lectures; and presentations. You will be an active participant in your own development as you make the transition from subject expert to excellent languages teacher.

Scholarships and bursaries

Generous, tax-free funding is available to the best graduates training in a range of subjects. You could get a £26,000 bursary or be awarded a prestigious scholarship - which provides additional support and benefits throughout your training year.

Information about additional funding options for September 2018 can be found on the Department for Education website

Home/EU students may be eligible for a repayable tuition fee loan. Home students in England may also be eligible for a repayable student maintenance loan. The loans support available to PGCE students is similar to what is available for undergraduate students and information about government financial support for undergraduate students is available here . 

If you have graduated in the last three years from The University of Manchester with a 1st class honours degree, you may also be eligible for our Alumni Scholarship .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more

The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of language development research, and their technological applications.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in the language sciences, specialising in language development. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Mandatory modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
  • Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental Disorders of Language, Learning and Cognition
  • Development of Speech Perception and Production
  • Language Acquisition
  • Introduction to Children's Language Development
  • Semantic and Pragmatic Development

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:

  • Neuroscience of Language
  • Deafness - Cognition and language
  • Speech Processing
  • Conversation Analysis
  • Second Language Speech Learning
  • Phonetic Theory
  • Phonetic Theory
  • Foundations of Linguistics
  • Issues in Pragmatics
  • Current Issues in Syntax
  • Stuttering

Not all modules will run every year; some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Language Development) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and in other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary School Teacher (Greek Language), Lysse Lanco Hellenique
  • Speech and Language Therapist, West London Mental Health NHS Trust
  • PGCE Early Years Teaching, Canterbury Christ Church University
  • PhD in Biomedical Science - Speech and Hearing, Harvard University

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The French and Francophone Studies pathway of the MA in Language, Culture and History aims to encourage innovative approaches to issues in the field, as well as to sharpen students' creative and critical responses. Read more

The French and Francophone Studies pathway of the MA in Language, Culture and History aims to encourage innovative approaches to issues in the field, as well as to sharpen students' creative and critical responses.

About this degree

The programme provides a thorough understanding of key methods and issues in textual criticism, and of aspects of French and francophone culture, within a broadly interdisciplinary focus. The modules are designed to offer exciting critical engagement with topical issues currently being addressed in French and francophone studies and modern language studies more widely, such as text and theory, text and image, historiography, trauma, creativity and post-colonial theory.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), and a research dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality.

Optional modules

Students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Dead Things and Demolition Sites: Cultural, Visual and Historical Representations in France, 1598-1889
  • Advanced Translation into French
  • Advanced Translation into English
  • Gender, Race and Sexuality: New Readings in Francophone Literature and Visual Culture
  • The French New Wave

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project related to the broad area of French and Francophone Studies, which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words, for the taught pathway and 18,000 words for the research pathway.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. French-specific translation modules are assessed by take-home examinations. Other modules are mainly assessed by essays.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: French and Francophone Studies MA

Careers

The programme provides an excellent foundation for further doctoral study in the field. Graduates of the department have entered a wide range of professions including finance, commerce, journalism, education, the media, public relations, translation and interpreting, and the police.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a renowned tradition in both teaching and research in French, dating back to its foundation in 1826 and continuing to the present day. UCL is at the leading-edge of current debate in French, which involves challenging the boundaries of French studies and contributing to its remapping. Students are taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in their fields.

There is a thriving research culture in the school: students can attend and participate in an extensive programme of seminars. Students also have access to conferences held at the Institute of Modern Language Research and are welcome to participate in its graduate forum.

The department has excellent research facilities, including an extensive library of films on DVD.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This programme will enable you to teach across the curriculum in two consecutive primary school age ranges, with either French, German or Spanish as a specialist subject. Read more

This programme will enable you to teach across the curriculum in two consecutive primary school age ranges, with either French, German or Spanish as a specialist subject. Our exciting and challenging course aims to develop both competence and confidence.

In this course you will follow an innovative structure combining three strands that will help you develop the knowledge, skills and understanding you need in teaching and learning modern foreign languages at primary level. You will be engaged in practical and theoretical enquiry, both in College and on a school placement, to enable you to reach your full potential as a qualified teacher.

You follow the same programme as other PGCE (Primary) students, but also take these modern languages elements as part of curriculum studies:

  • theories of second language learning and some aspects of bilingualism
  • pedagogical approaches to modern language learning
  • impact of parents, teachers and socio-cultural context on language learning
  • critical and analytical approach to teaching strategies and resources
  • curriculum design for primary modern language teaching (QCA guidelines for KS2, linguistic progression, differentiation, assessment)
  • planning of modern languages in conjunction with other curricular areas (cross-curricular links with literacy, numeracy, citizenship, ICT, etc)
  • planning the implementation of modern languages into primary school and the transition from primary to secondary education
  • a linguistic component to support the development of your own language skills
  • a cultural component (awareness and understanding)
  • school experience in England. As part of your school placement, you teach French, German or Spanish alongside all other curriculum areas

Additional costs

You will have to cover your travel costs to your school placements. We produce reading packs electronically and in hard copy format. There’s a small charge for the hard copy reading packs. You may also be asked to contribute towards trips and some materials for your modules..

Structure

Two modules are offered at Masters (M) level. These are General Professional Studies – a classroom-based research project with a pedagogic focus – and Curriculum Studies, which has an integrated focus in which there are a number of options. School Experience is offered at higher (H) level.

For the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), you are also formally assessed on your competence in the classroom and your ability to meet Department for Education Professional Standards including computer-based tests in literacy and numeracy, which are now a condition of entry to the programme.



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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a Foreign Language (EFL). Read more

This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular, those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

Outcomes

The aims of the programme are:

  • Analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing
  • Explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment
  • Evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework
  • Develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning
  • Provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Full time

Year 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Part time

Year 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Year 2

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Careers

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.



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This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world. If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence. Read more
This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world.

If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence.

You explore teaching methods and the description of English used in the investigation of language learning and teaching, and study additional topics according to your needs. These might include:
-How second language learners acquire vocabulary, and how vocabulary can be taught
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Materials design and evaluation
-Teaching Writing in EFL/ESL

You also gain hands-on teaching experience through our Teaching Practice I and Teaching Practice II modules.

Whether you have no prior teaching experience or are already an English language teacher, this course can be adapted to suit you. If you have little or no previous teaching experience, you receive ‘hands on’ teaching practice throughout the course via TEFL, while if you already have more than two year’s full-time teaching experience, you can undertake specialist study through TESOL instead.

You'll be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned. Florence Myles authored the best-selling Second Language Learning Theories, and Bob Borsley wrote both Syntactic Theory: a Unified Approach and Modern Phrase Structure Grammar.

Other teachers on this course include Christina Gkonou, who has conducted extensive research into the effects of individual factors like anxiety on success in language learning, and Julian Good and Tracey Costley, who have taught English in Europe, the Far East and South America for many years before coming to Essex.

Karen Roehr-Brackin is a leading expert on the relationship between metalinguistic knowledge (conscious awareness of the rules of language) and language learning ability, and Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez is a leading expert on the use of computers and the role that interaction in the classroom plays in language learning.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Takers of our MA TEFL and other courses in English Language Teaching come with the specific intention of entering the ELT/TESOL profession, which they duly go on to do.

Students on these courses often join us after a career in English teaching, to update their expertise and return to the classroom with a career enhancement.

The specialist knowledge you gain enables you to take senior or specialist roles (for example in computer-assisted language-learning, ESP or teaching young learners), not necessarily only in the classroom but also in educational advice and management, programme evaluation, syllabus design and teacher education.

We also work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Teaching Practice I
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL
-Research Methods I
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Research Methods II
-MA Dissertation
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Foundations of Computer Assisted Language Learning (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Teaching and Learning Grammar (optional)
-Teaching English to Young Learners: Principles and Practice (optional)
-Teaching Practice II (optional)
-Reflective Practitioner (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)

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The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. Read more

The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore a wide array of texts in connection with the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge. Furthermore, the MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research.

The MA is suitable for students who have taken English language and/or literature modules at undergraduate level, and others who have taken allied disciplines such as TESOL. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study and those teaching English who wish to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field.

If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language and/or literature), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core modules Subjectivities: Modern and Contemporary Fictions and Institutions and Histories examine classic and contemporary critical texts on literature in relation to ideas in larger contexts, such as history, the visual image, gender, psychoanalysis and post- colonialism, while the module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts.

The teaching is mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Option modules

Career path

The English Language and Literature MA will provide you with sophisticated analytical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base, which will enable you to study at MPhil or PhD levels with a view to pursuing an academic career. The course is also particularly relevant to teaching English as a first or foreign language, and to a range of professions involving the study and use of language and literary texts.

While studying the MA, you will also benefit from the careers workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator.



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The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. Read more

The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore a wide array of texts in connection with the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge. Furthermore, the MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research.

The MA is suitable for students who have taken English language and/or literature modules at undergraduate level, and others who have taken allied disciplines such as TESOL. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study and those teaching English who wish to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field.

If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language and/or literature), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core modules Subjectivities: Modern and Contemporary Fictions and Institutions and Histories examine classic and contemporary critical texts on literature in relation to ideas in larger contexts, such as history, the visual image, gender, psychoanalysis and post- colonialism, while the module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts.

The teaching is mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Option modules

Career path

The English Language and Literature MA will provide you with sophisticated analytical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base, which will enable you to study at MPhil or PhD levels with a view to pursuing an academic career. The course is also particularly relevant to teaching English as a first or foreign language, and to a range of professions involving the study and use of language and literary texts.

While studying the MA, you will also benefit from the careers workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator.



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The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. Read more

The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. The programme places a strong emphasis on language training, on theoretically informed approaches to Classical texts, and on practical engagement with your chosen specialism. The programme lasts for one year full-time (two years part-time).

Course Structure

You will take modules to a total of 180 or 190 credits. The structure of the course is as follows:

  • Core research training module (30 credits)
  • Language module in an ancient or modern language relevant to research in the area of Classics (20-40 credits)
  • 15,000-word Dissertation (60 credits)
  • Optional modules (60-70 credits).

MA modules are 30 credits; you may substitute two undergraduate (20 credit) modules for one MA module. You may also take up to 40 credits of modules offered by other Departments (subject to approval).

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly.

Core Modules

  • Classical Research Methods and Resources
  • Language module in an ancient or modern language relevant to research in the area of Classics
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules are offered according to the current research interests of members of staff. In recent years, optional modules available in the Department have included:

  • Akkadian
  • Ancient Philosophers on Necessity, Fate and Free Will
  • Ancient Philosophers on Origins
  • Animals in Graeco-Roman Antiquity
  • Forms After Plato
  • Greek Text Seminar on Homeric Epic
  • Greek Sacred Regulations
  • Latin Love Elegy
  • Latin Text Seminar on Roman Epic
  • Life and Death on Roman Sarcophagi
  • Monumental Architecture of the Roman East
  • Religious Life in The Roman Near East
  • Rewriting Empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History
  • The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
  • The Queen of the Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra’s Civilization
  • The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MA in Classics is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Three or four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. You must choose one module involving work with a relevant language (ancient or modern; beginners modules in each language and specialised text seminars for those who have already studied Greek and Latin are offered every year). All the modules offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (often no more than five or six in a class) . Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest. 

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.



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This is a programme geared towards preparing you for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more

This is a programme geared towards preparing you for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars.

The relationship between the classical world and neighbouring civilisations is among the most important and most rapidly expanding areas of classical scholarship, and we have particular strength in this field: we offer tuition in Akkadian, and can draw on the resources of the Oriental Museum in Durham and the expertise pooled in the Centre for the Study of the Ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. The programme lasts for one year full-time (two years part-time).

Course Structure

You will take modules to a total of 180 or 190 credits. The structure of the course is as follows:

  • Core research training module (30 credits)
  • Language module in an ancient or modern language relevant to research in the area of Classics or the study of the Mediterranean and Near East (20-40 credits)
  • Core module for Greece, Rome and the Near East (30 credits)
  • 15,000-word Dissertation (60 credits)
  • Optional modules (30-40 credits)

MA modules are 30 credits; you may substitute two undergraduate (20 credit) modules for one MA module. You may also take up to 40 credits of modules offered by other Departments (subject to approval).

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly.

Core Modules

  • Classical Research Methods and Resources
  • Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
  • Core module for Greece, Rome and the Near East (in 2016-17, options were Akkadian or The Queen of the Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra’s Civilization)
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules are offered according to the current research interests of members of staff. In recent years, optional modules available in the Department have included:

  • Akkadian
  • Ancient Philosophers on Necessity, Fate and Free Will
  • Ancient Philosophers on Origins
  • Animals in Graeco-Roman Antiquity
  • Forms After Plato
  • Greek Text Seminar on Homeric Epic
  • Greek Sacred Regulations
  • Latin Love Elegy
  • Latin Text Seminar on Roman Epic
  • Life and Death on Roman Sarcophagi
  • Monumental Architecture of the Roman East
  • Religious Life in The Roman Near East
  • Rewriting Empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History
  • The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
  • The Queen of the Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra’s Civilization
  • The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches.

 Course Learning and Teaching

The MA in Greece, Rome and the Near East is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Three or four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. You must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern; beginners modules in each language and specialised text seminars for those who have already studied Greek and Latin are offered every year), and one dealing directly with research on interaction between the ancient Mediterranean and the ancient Near East. All the modules offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (often no more than five or six in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.



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The . MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.  is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's . Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Read more

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS), and is currently run from the History Department. The programme is suitable for students whose undergraduate training is in Archaeology, Classics, History, Literature/Languages, Philosophy, Theology, or other related disciplines. The main aim of the programme is to prepare students for doctoral research in the study of the medieval and early modern past by offering outstanding interdisciplinary training to equip students with the skills they need for their future careers. It is taught by specialists who are members of IMEMS, primarily from the departments of ArchaeologyClassicsEnglishHistoryModern Languages and CulturesPhilosophy and Theology.

Students are incorporated into the vibrant research communities within departments, IMEMS, and the university. Durham has a large and extremely active postgraduate community, and IMEMS supports the Medieval and Early Modern Student Association (MEMSA), whose members organise regular seminars and conferences. IMEMS has more than fifty staff members from arts, humanities, social science and science departments across the University, all active researchers, and is one of the largest gatherings of scholars in this area in the world. IMEMS is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham CathedralDurham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of medieval and early modern studies at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant.

All students on the MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies take two core modules, Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past, and Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past (30 credits each); both of these run throughout Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms. Students also write a 15,000-word dissertation (60 credits), supervised by one of Durham's specialists, which allows them to focus on a specialist topic of their choice in the period AD 300-1700, which may be interdisciplinary or focused primarily on one of the individual disciplines which make up the programme. They also take two optional modules (30 credits each) which run either in Michaelmas or Epiphany or throughout both terms. These may be content, language or skills modules, and are drawn from the seven participating departments as well as Durham’s other centres and programmes. All elements of the programme have embedded within them a range of content, subject-specific skills, and key skills.

Core modules

The two team-taught core modules enable students to develop advanced skills in interpreting and usinga range of different kinds of source-material from the medieval and early modern periods, including textual, material and visual culture. They allow students to consider developments over the longue duree and enable a more rounded understanding of how a range of themes, ideas and institutions changed from the end of the classical world, through the Middle Ages and into the early modern era. These modules are intended to guide students whose backgrounds are in a range of disciplinary specialisms towards an understanding of how study of the medieval and early modern past can be nuanced and enhanced by approaches from multiple different disciplines used alongside each other. The modules also help students develop from a more tutor-led approach to independent learning, in order to support their work on their dissertations and their future careers. Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past takes one key item or body of material (e.g. a text, a site, an archive) as a lens through which to explore different disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to studying the period 300-1700. Students are assessed by a 5000-word essay on a topic of their choice connected with the themes of the module. Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past focuses on major themes, movements and institutions which can best be examined across the whole medieval and early modern period, and which can best be explained by close study of change and continuity over a long period of time. A number of these themes will invite interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary approaches, and thus will allow students to develop their skills in bringing together different kinds of material for study of the past. Students are assessed for this module by a) a 4000-word essay on a topic of their choice, connected with the themes of the module, and b) a 15-minute presentation.

Optional modules

Students choose two optional modules offered by the departments participating in the programme. These modules are taught by subject specialists and usually involve a series of seminars with an emphasis on close study of original material from the medieval and early modern periods, and provide a ‘step up’ from the level of final-year undergraduate study. The breadth of modules available means that students can develop their skills and research interests according to their own tailored programme and with the advice of their dissertation supervisor, ensuring the best possible preparation for the future. There are also some modules focusing on particular skills-training such as medieval or modern languages or auxiliary skills (e.g. Latin; Ancient Greek; Old Norse; Old English; Academic French; Academic German; Palaeography).

The range of optional modules in each year varies according to staff availability and departmental provision, but as a representative sample optional modules may include the following:

  • Anglo-Saxon Societies and Cultures: interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval England
  • Archaeology of the Book
  • Christian Northumbria, 600-750
  • Contact and Conflict: Texts and Cultures
  • Courts and Power in Early Modern Europe and the New World
  • Latin for Research
  • Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
  • Negotiating Life in the Early Modern World
  • Old English Language, Texts and Contexts
  • Old Norse
  • Palaeograpy: Scribes, Script and History from Antiquity to the Renaissance
  • Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages
  • Renaissance Humanism
  • Rewriting Empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History
  • Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
  • Work and Play in Early Modern Europe


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Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

Within Modern Language and Cultures, we offer pathways in:

- Latin-American Studies
- Hispanic Studies
- Spanish Studies
- Portuguese Studies, Catalan Studies
- Basque Studies
- French Studies
- German Studies
- Italian Studies
- Film Studies
- Chinese Studies.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

French Studies

Research interests in French Studies cover all areas of French literature, culture and history, including Medieval studies, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century studies, French theatre, French cinema, travel literature, francophone postcolonial studies (including French language representations of India),modern and contemporary France, and sociolinguistics. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the India in the World Research Centre.

German Studies

Postgraduate teaching and supervision in German Studies covers the full range of modern (post 1750) German literary and cultural studies, including German cinema. It also offers tuition and supervision in many areas of social history, where staff specialisms include gender and women’s history since the eighteenth-century, twentieth-century labour history, Holocaust studies, issues of race and ethnicity (Afro-German and Gypsy studies), the culture and politics of East and West Germany and contemporary Berlin. The University Library’s Special Collections include uniquely rich holdings on German and European Gypsy studies. Research contacts exist with numerous universities and institutes in Germany and the United States.

Hispanic Studies

The University has the oldest chair of Spanish in the country (established 1908). It has a distinguished tradition of excellence within an extensive area of Hispanic Studies teaching and research which includes not only the Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), but also Latin America (Peru, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, etc). Among the section’s achievements and publications in research are the Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, a quarterly journal of international influence (published by Liverpool University Press), Hispanic Textual Research and Criticism (TRAC) and a scholarly series of books and editions. Postgraduate supervision and courses are offered in diverse specialist subjects within the broad range of Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan and Latin American Studies. This reflects the varied research interests and publications of members of staff in the section. Postgraduate students have at their disposal in the Sydney Jones Library large holdings in Hispanic books and periodicals, which are among the most comprehensive in the country.

Italian Studies

Postgraduate supervision in Italian is provided in the following areas: sociolinguistics, Italian dialectology, Italian cinema and crime/detective fiction. Postgraduate students benefit from the remarkable digitised collections and resources available in the Sydney Jones Library and the personalised services provided by library staff.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languagesa dn Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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