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The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more
The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of language development research, and their technological applications.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in the language sciences, specialising in language development. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Mandatory modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
-Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
-Developmental Disorders of Language, Learning and Cognition
-Development of Speech Perception and Production
-Language Acquisition
-Introduction to Children's Language Development
-Semantic and Pragmatic Development

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:
-Neuroscience of Language
-Deafness - Cognition and language
-Speech Processing
-Conversation Analysis
-Second Language Speech Learning
-Phonetic Theory
-Foundations of Linguistics
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Stuttering

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of Language Science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on tho further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and in other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Speech and Language Therapist, Kanton Aaargau, Switzerland
-PhD Biomedical Science- Speech and Hearing, Harvard University
-Speech and Language Therapist, West London Mental Health NHS Trust
-Speech and Language Therapist, Whitting Health Foundation Trust
-PGCE Early Years Teaching, Canterbury Christ Church University

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

The aims of the programme are:

- To analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning

- To provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lang

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643756

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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A high standard of oral proficiency, grammatical accuracy and a sound knowledge of the countries are looked for at interview. Your second language should ideally be at least at or near A-level. Read more
A high standard of oral proficiency, grammatical accuracy and a sound knowledge of the countries are looked for at interview. Your second language should ideally be at least at or near A-level. A lower level may be acceptable, so long as you work at raising your competence before entry and during the course; please enquire. If you do not have a second language to offer you may still be considered.

A Disclosure and Barring Service Check and DfE Fitness to Teach test are also required.

The Faculty of Education has a national reputation for high quality initial teacher training which was rated 'outstanding' by Ofsted in their last inspection. We work with over 1,500 schools, colleges and educational organisations and offer a wide range of of secondary specialisms.

MFL is a national shortage subject and government priority with training bursaries available and this course has an excellent reputation. There is a growing need for high calibre language teachers and as such our trainees are very employable. Where appropriate, sessions are conducted in the relevant target language.

Trainees take a course of supporting study, including English as an additional language (EAL) and special educational needs (SEN). We also provide subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses to support graduates who would benefit from intensive MFL tuition before joining a PGCE MFL initial teacher training programme.

This course will be based at our £139 million new academic building at Birley Fields, All Saints campus, Manchester.

In addition to your main language, you will take one of the other two languages as your second language. You will be prepared to teach your main language throughout the 11-18 age range. In your second language, you will be prepared to teach up to either key stage 3 or key stage 4/GCSE, according to qualifications and linguistic competence. Where possible, we take into consideration other languages you may have.

This course enables you to acquire and develop language teaching skills. You will become aware of the needs of pupils of different abilities and of the goals and methods appropriate to them. You will be prepared for a wide variety of teaching situations by observing good practice in schools, by the use of DVDs, through discussions, peer teaching and practical workshops and through intensive practical teaching to a range of abilities. Feedback from experienced teachers and tutors facilitates your professional development.

Classroom management skills are given high priority both at the University and during school placements. Equally, an emphasis is placed upon careful planning, and you will develop the skills of linguistic analysis and sequencing.

You will learn how to teach both the spoken and written language, how to approach teaching grammar and how to plan for using the target language in the classroom. The course aims to develop a thoughtful and critical approach to the relationship between teaching strategies and the pupils' language learning in the classroom. You will learn how to assess and evaluate pupils' learning and how to use this in future planning. Other issues that form part of the course include language acquisition, cultural background, global citizenship and equal opportunities.

In addition to preparation for Key Stages 3-5, we also include provision for Key Stage 2 and you will compile a Primary Languages Portfolio. Methodology sessions in the university are conducted in your main foreign language where appropriate foreign language tutors and assistants will help you develop or maintain your language skills in your second foreign language.

We aim to develop analytical, successful and enthusiastic beginning teachers who are fully aware of the excitement and challenges which lie ahead and who can work effectively in a variety of educational settings.

Trainees will engage with current educational issues and recent and relevant research in order to further develop their understanding and to generate challenging and lively debate. There will be a focus on:

Promoting an inclusive learning and teaching environment:
Working in multi-professional teams
Creating a climate for learning in the classroom
Learning and teaching strategies
Managing students' behaviour
Planning and evaluating students' learning
Developing knowledge and understanding of teachers' professional responsibilities

Trainees will be prepared to teach in a range of different schools, varied in social context, size, philosophy and intake. Posts now also offer scope for Modern Foreign Language teaching in primary schools, to support the 2010 introduction of languages for all primary school children. Many graduates also take up mentoring of new trainee teachers.

There are also opportunities for further study. The PGCE MFL course includes 60 Masters Level CAT ponts which can be credited to our MA Language Education for teachers wishing to develop expertise teaching bilingual learners, English as first language and MFL. We also offer MAs in Education, Educational Leadership and Management and opportunities to study to PhD level at the Education and Social Research Institute, ranked in the UK top 10.

School placements are central to the course and 24 of the 36 weeks will be spent in school. As an intending teacher, you will begin by developing professional awareness, understanding and skills common to learning and teaching in a variety of settings. You will begin to understand the inter-relationship between the school and its community. Your placements will be in at least two different schools or colleges and will range from inner city to rural settings, mixed and single gender schools, City Academies, Comprehensives and Selective Schools, 11-16, 11-18, sixth form and further education colleges.

Special Features

. Programme rated Ofsted 'outstanding'
. European Award for Languages 2010: Teacher Training Toolkit for COLT (Community and Lesser Taught Language Project)
. National reputation in secondary teacher education
. Practice placements available in a diverse range of schools and colleges
. SKE courses available where required (on confirmation of PGCE place)
. Community languages considered
. Course includes 60 Masters Level CAT points which can be credited to our MA Language Education for teachers wishing to develop expertise teaching bilingual learners, English as a first language and MFL
. Access to NQT alumni support in your first year of teaching

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This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world. If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence. Read more
This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world.

If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence.

You explore teaching methods and the description of English used in the investigation of language learning and teaching, and study additional topics according to your needs. These might include:
-How second language learners acquire vocabulary, and how vocabulary can be taught
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Materials design and evaluation
-Teaching Writing in EFL/ESL

You also gain hands-on teaching experience through our Teaching Practice I and Teaching Practice II modules.

Whether you have no prior teaching experience or are already an English language teacher, this course can be adapted to suit you. If you have little or no previous teaching experience, you receive ‘hands on’ teaching practice throughout the course via TEFL, while if you already have more than two year’s full-time teaching experience, you can undertake specialist study through TESOL instead.

You'll be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned. Florence Myles authored the best-selling Second Language Learning Theories, and Bob Borsley wrote both Syntactic Theory: a Unified Approach and Modern Phrase Structure Grammar.

Other teachers on this course include Christina Gkonou, who has conducted extensive research into the effects of individual factors like anxiety on success in language learning, and Julian Good and Tracey Costley, who have taught English in Europe, the Far East and South America for many years before coming to Essex.

Karen Roehr-Brackin is a leading expert on the relationship between metalinguistic knowledge (conscious awareness of the rules of language) and language learning ability, and Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez is a leading expert on the use of computers and the role that interaction in the classroom plays in language learning.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Takers of our MA TEFL and other courses in English Language Teaching come with the specific intention of entering the ELT/TESOL profession, which they duly go on to do.

Students on these courses often join us after a career in English teaching, to update their expertise and return to the classroom with a career enhancement.

The specialist knowledge you gain enables you to take senior or specialist roles (for example in computer-assisted language-learning, ESP or teaching young learners), not necessarily only in the classroom but also in educational advice and management, programme evaluation, syllabus design and teacher education.

We also work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Teaching Practice I
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL
-Research Methods I
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Research Methods II
-MA Dissertation
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Foundations of Computer Assisted Language Learning (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Teaching and Learning Grammar (optional)
-Teaching English to Young Learners: Principles and Practice (optional)
-Teaching Practice II (optional)
-Reflective Practitioner (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)

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The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Read more
The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Research in this fascinating area has a long and distinguished history at the University of Manchester. We have a lively research culture, with talks, seminars and conferences that you will be able to attend in addition to your taught courses. You will also be able to draw on the expertise of scholars engaged in cutting-edge research at the John Rylands Research Institute, where the programme is based. The John Rylands Library houses exceptional medieval and early-modern treasures (which are currently being digitised) and offers many exciting research and study opportunities. Staff teaching on this MA represent the disciplines of History, Art History and Visual Studies, English, Religions and Theology, Classics, and European Languages. Two pathways are available for students who wish to extend their knowledge in a particular chronological direction: Medieval, and Early Modern.

Coursework and assessment:
Summative assessment is primarily via extended pieces of written work: the dissertation of around 15,000 words, long essays of around 4,000-6,000 words, and a variety of shorter pieces for palaeography or language classes. There is a pass mark of 50% for all assignments, marks over 60% are given as merit and over 70% as distinction. In addition, depending on the units selected, formative assessment may be based on oral presentation, class discussion, and feedback on written draft material. Assessment varies from course unit to course unit; full details of the assessment procedure for individual units can be obtained from the course director.
Those who only attain 120 credits (out of 180) will be awarded the PG Diploma in Medieval Studies.

Course unit details:
The first component takes the form of the compulsory core courses and research training units. These are taken by students on all pathways:

Semester 1:
- Perspectives on Medieval and Early Modern Studies (30 credits)
- From Papyrus to Print: The History of the Book (15 credits)

Semester 2:
- Reading the Middle Ages and Early Modern period: Palaeography, Codicology, and Sources (15 credits)

These courses are designed to introduce you to the basics of interdisciplinary analysis, and to research training skills appropriate to the scope of the course. 'From Papyrus to Print: The History of the Book' and 'Reading the Middle Ages and Early Modern period: Palaeography, Codicology and Sources' are taught in the magnificent surroundings of the John Rylands Library, with the support of specialist library staff. You will get the opportunity to view and handle rare books and manuscripts from across the entire period. The aim is to consider all aspects of book production, from the roll to the codex and from script to print, as well as the uses (practical and symbolic) of texts in medieval culture. You will be introduced to a range of medieval sources, recent theoretical approaches to archival research, and learn methodological skills, such as palaeography and codicology.

'Perspectives in Medieval and Early Modern Studies Studies' aims to explore the methodological, historiographical and analytical choices that shape our study of the medieval and early modern periods. Highlighting the variety of disciplinary approaches that are in use in current scholarship, this module shall investigate a series of relevant themes within the field, and will be taught by specialists from across the School. Students will be encouraged to question issues of historical periodisation, the benefits of interdisciplinarity, and how an intellectual framework for the study of the medieval and early modern periods may be conceptualised.

The second component consists of 60-credits worth of optional modules. These options range widely over the history, literature, art and material culture of the medieval and early modern world. You may also take a language.

The modules on offer vary from year to year. Current offerings (2015-6) include:
Saints and Society: Art & the Sacred in Italy 1200-1500 (AHVS60262, 30 credits)
Prometheus Unbound: Art, Science, and Technology in the Renaissance (AHVS60321, 30 credits)
Renaissance Print Cultures (AHVS60362, 30 credits)
Northern Renaissance (AHVS 60341, 60 credits)
Broken Flesh: Pain, Wounds and Belief, 1300-1650 (AHVS61012, 30 credits)
Troy Stories (ENGL60752, 30 credits)
Wonders, Miracles & Supernatural Landscapes in Medieval & Early Modern Europe (HIST63192, 15 credits)
Club Med? How Mediterranean Empires Went Global (HIST64192, 15 credits)
The Secret Life of Objects (HIST65172, 15 credits)
Jews among Christians and Muslims: Introduction and Methodology in Jewish Studies (RELT70561, 30 credits)
Language: Latin or Old/Middle English (15-30 credits) - appropriate level taken to be discussed with the Programme Director, in consultation with the relevant department. Options to take other languages, such as Hebrew, Arabic, or Greek can be considered, in consultation with the programme director. A student can take no more than 30 language credits.

Medieval Pathway:
Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:
Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the early modern period.

Students may choose other relevant options from across the School, subject to approval by the relevant course directors. Details of new available options will appear in the course listing at http://www.jrri.manchester.ac.uk/study/taught-masters/ma-medieval-and-early-modern-studies/

The third component consists of the dissertation, which allows you to research a topic of your choice (60 credits).

Students on all pathways must complete a dissertation.

Medieval Pathway:
The dissertation topic selected must lie within the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:
The dissertation topic selected must lie within the early modern period.

Career opportunities:
The programme is designed to equip students with the critical skills and tools necessary for research in the history, literatures, and art of the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Many of these theoretical and methodological skills are highly transferrable, making our graduates popular with a wide range of employers.

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Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;. Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;

Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;

Students who wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;

Students who come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist migration and diaspora related topics along with regional or language-based study
Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in issues relating to migration and diaspora.
The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.
The programme encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Core course:

- African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit)
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (1 unit)
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology (1 unit). This is recommended for students without a previous anthropology degree.

OPTION COURSES
- Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Option Courses list. A language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Migration and Diaspora Studies and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 253kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/file93570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- To introduce students to important areas of contemporary social theory which deal with issues of migration, globalisation, the postcolonial world, and cultural transformations.

- To ground students in the historical basis of these issues

- To encourage transdisciplinary thinking on issues of migration

- To enable students to translate theoretical perspectives for practical application in the material world.

- To provide students with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be expected to grasp the key debates in migration and diaspora studies from a critical perspective

- To understand the global/historical/political and cultural background within which issues of migration and diaspora occur.

- A critical understanding of the ways that migration has shaped the modern world, and the implications of this for future research.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- The development of analytical and theoretical skills based on a detailed understanding of the social science literature on migration and diaspora.

- To approach theories and debates from a critical and reflexive basis.

- To develop their presentation skills and their ability to articulate arguments coherently in order to promote class discussion and critical engagement with ideas and practices.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Communicate effectively in writing, in academic English

- Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources including print and other forms of mass media

- Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.

- Students with no knowledge of media technologies will have the opportunity to learn photographic and film making techniques through the Media unit.

- Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
Students will be expected to learn to:

- Plan, organise and write masters’ level essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
- Understand unconventional ideas.
- Present (non–assessed) material orally.
- Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
- Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
- Be prepared to enter a Social Science PhD programme.
- An ability to work, and be at ease in, a multicultural environment

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. Read more
This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. You will study the process of learning and the use of second languages. The programme allows you to focus your research on your language of choice, for instance Dutch as a second language, but also French, German, Swedish, Chinese, or any other language.
You will approach second language acquisition from many different angles, including psychology, social interaction and language teaching. You will be introduced to the field of linguistics, language acquisition and language teaching theory.
The program focuses especially on Dynamic System Theory, which explains how cultural differences become bodily differences. You will learn about the social, cultural and political processes that play a role in using a language or that may cause the use of a second language to decline. You will explore didactic applications of recent research and theoretical developments, and learn about computer assisted language learning.

Why in Groningen?

The MA Applied Linguistics at the University of Groningen is a unique programme focussing on the processes involved in second language learning, as well as teaching theories. The programme encompasses various fields of study, as learning and using a second language may be approached from many different angles. Students will explore and discuss the factors that relate to second language development, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching, and culture.

In addition to theoretical and teaching paradigms, students will also take classes in the research practices and methodology essential for conducting applied linguistics studies and research. These classes will act as the foundation from which students will be able to conduct their own applied linguistics research in the form of the MA thesis in Semester 2.The MA Applied Linguistics is a truly international programme, welcoming students from all over the world. The classes are taught entirely in English, and students are encouraged to use their own language experiences as the basis for their individual linguistic enquiries and research.Our degree programme is small, which means that students benefit from small, intimate classes and close collaborative relationships with the other students as well as instructors.

Job perspectives

After completing this programme, you can pursue a career in research, or set up language teaching projects. You are also equipped to take positions on the European level that deal with issues of language policy.

Job examples

- Linguist (L2)
- language research
- language education
- language policy
- language testing
- curriculum development
- publishing

Research in Applied Linguistics focuses on the process of learning and using a second language. It covers various fields of study because learning and using a second language can be approached from many different angles, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching and culture.

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Kent’s MA in Modern European Literature enables you to study European writers, genres, figures or movements within their respective socio-historical contexts. Read more
Kent’s MA in Modern European Literature enables you to study European writers, genres, figures or movements within their respective socio-historical contexts.

The literary cultures of Europe have produced some of the world’s richest writings, including the works of Proust, Kafka, Woolf, Joyce, and Dostoevsky, among many others. This MA programme enables you to engage in detail with these and other writers and to study them in their original languages. You should be able to read literary texts in two modern languages in addition to English.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/index.html) and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/index.html), particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

The MA in Modern European Literature is an ideal programme for anyone with language skills wanting to gain in-depth insight into modern Europe, its culture and literatures, and fosters independent critical thinking as well as an awareness of linguistic and national specificities.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/31/modern-european-literature

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
LS810 - History and Memory: Exploring the Independence period throug (30 credits)
CP813 -Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
FR804 - Real Fictions: The Documentation of Modernity (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for the academic study of European or single-language literature at MPhil/PhD level

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender, or physical disability from within the UK

- enable you to begin to specialise in specific research areas whilst maintaining broad comparative interests

- enable you to hone your ability to read literature and literary theory critically and comparatively in at least two European languages as well as English

- provide you, consistent with point 1 above, with a transition from undergraduate study to independent research

- provide you with a training that will culminate, if followed through to PhD level, in the ability to submit articles to refereed journals across the range of European literature.

Research areas

- Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS)

Founded in 2007, the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS) promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and sub-disciplines of linguistics.

- Centre for Modern European Literature

Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

Comparative literature graduates develop key skills, including critical thinking, analysis and problem solving. They go on to successful careers in areas such as the media, academia and many different cultural institutions including libraries, museums and galleries.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics. Read more
The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in neuroscience and communication such as neurobioliogy, speech processing, developmental and acquired language disorders and linguistics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), a research report (105 credits) and plan (15 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Introduction to Syntax
-Students select two specialisation modules from those below:
-Introduction to Speech Sciences
-Neurobiology of Speech Processing
-Neuroscience of Language
-Seminar in Neurolinguistics

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:
-Conversation Analysis
-Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech
-Deafness - Cognition and Language
-Designing and Analysing an fMRI Experiment
-Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition
-Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
-Introduction to Event-Related Potential Techniques
-Language Acquisition

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on an aspect of speech, language and cognition which culminates in a research plan of 3,000-6,000 words and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Employability
This MSc is full of opportunities for the students to improve reading, writing and communication skills generally. These opportunities include writing essays, oral presentations, critical reading of scientific articles, and group discussion. These skills are critical for success in a wide range of jobs. Likewise, the programme will help to improve critical thinking skills through the critical evaluation of scientific research. This skill is applicable to those careers requiring problem solving. Lastly, the programme provides practical experience in conducting research, which is highly valuable to those interested in pursuing a research career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the modern historians at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about modern history from the nineteenth century through to contemporary history. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity. Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the cultural and political history, visual culture and media studies, sports history, regional and international histories. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, Africa, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Modern History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms
Students may choose to take a skills module: these are mainly medieval/ancient languages (e.g. Old English, Old Norse, Latin, Greek), modern languages for reading (e.g. Academic French, Academic German), or research skills (e.g. palaeography). Students who take a skills module write a 60-credit dissertation instead of a 90-credit dissertation.

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in modern history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for modern history included: The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Interpretations of Terror and Genocide in Modern Europe; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9200&title=Modern+History&code=V1K707&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. Read more
The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. The core modules cover a wide range of disciplines, giving you a broad understanding of the early modern period. You can then tailor your programme to suit your interests, with over forty optional modules, covering the culture, history and society of the early modern.

Degree information

The MA will teach you critical reading skills, the ability to assess and weigh evidence, and construct persuasive arguments. It combines training in book history, bibliography, and paleography with a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of the early modern period.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), between two and four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Early Modern Exchanges: Methods, Histories, Cultures A
-Early Modern Exchanges: Methods, Histories and Cultures B

Optional modules (indicative list) - up to 60 credits from a list which varies each year. An up-to-date list is available on our website. Below is an indicative list, showing modules that have been offered previously.
-Shakespeare in his Time
-Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
-From Renaissance to Republic: The Netherlands: 1555-1609
-Early Modern Science
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
-Early Modern Books and Their Readers: Historical Bibliography for Researchers
-I.T. for Graduate Research
-Paradoxes of Enlightenment: German Thought from Leibniz to Humboldt
-Political Thought in Renaissance Europe
-The Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe
-Trade, Money and Institutions in the Ottoman Mediterranean 1600-1914
-Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
-Giordano Bruno
-The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476-1800: Print Culture, Censorship and Propaganda
-Men on the Moon: Cosmic Voyages in the Early Modern Period
-Thinking with Women: Gender as an Early Modern Category
-Web 0.1: Early Modern Information Culture, c.1450-c.1750
-The Conquest of Mexico
-Witches in History, Fiction and Scholarship

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 18,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of tutorials, seminars, workshops, presentations, class discussions and library, archive, museum and gallery visits. Assessment is through essays, annotated bibliography and the dissertation.

Careers

Many of our students have been accepted to undertake further study as research students both at UCL and elsewhere, including the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, York and Swansea. In addition our students have been successful in obtaining funding and prizes including the Bryce-Jebb and Dorris Russell Scholarships and the prestigious John Edward Kerry Prize awarded by the Malone Society. Graduates may also find careers in the heritage or cultural industries.

Employability
This MA will give you a very specific skill set, including manuscript handling and archival research. Depending on the optional modules you select you may also develop language skills and knowledge in information technologies and database use. These skills will make you very employable within the heritage or cultural sectors, as well as library work, the arts, and other roles which require information management.

Why study this degree at UCL?

A bespoke programme of study, unique to your interests; there are over forty optional modules, all taught by leading scholars, in a wide range of subjects including art, history, law, literature, politics and science.

Practical, hands-on modules, with ‘traditional’ skills such as palaeography and textual bibliography taught alongside the latest techniques in databases and XML. The programme includes fieldtrips to museums, archives and galleries.

Privileged access to a wide range of world-class museums, rare-books libraries and archives in central London. Located in Bloomsbury, it is a short walk to the exceptional resources of the British Library and the British Museum.

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The MA in Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures. Read more

Overview

The MA in Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures: Narratives of Conflict (German lead language) aims to provide students who already have a background in German at undergraduate level with an opportunity to specialise in the area of literary analysis with particular emphasis on narratives of conflict in the cultures and societies of German-speaking countries. The programme introduces students to academic research, new ideas and theoretical approaches. It aims to equip students with academic, analytical, creative, reflective and presentation skills in order to foster interest and involvement in the field of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures with specific emphasis on narratives of conflict. It also aims to enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of important concepts of European languages, literatures, cultures and societies, in particular with regard to Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/german/our-courses/ma-modern-languages-literature-and-culture-narratives-conflict-german-0

Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/international/study-maynooth/postgraduate ) website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

The part-time MA in Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures: Narratives of Conflict is a two-year degree programme. The structure is the same as outlined for the full-time programme but it is spread over two years. Before registration for the part-time programme, students should agree a plan of taking modules with the Head of Subject of the ‘lead language’ (German).

The Viva Voce Examination will be taken at the end of the second year, and the minor thesis has to be submitted by the end of July of the second year for graduation in November of the same year. Alternatively, the thesis can be submitted by the end of October of the second year (without any additional financial implications) for graduation in September of the following year.

1. Students choose a ‘lead language’; they are obliged to take both language modules in this language.

2. Students have to take at least one (in French two) of the subject-specific modules offered by the lead language subject.

3. Students have to take ML 610 (Research Skills) and the modules concerned with narratives of conflict.

4. For the remaining 10 credits, students can either choose the remaining subject-specific module(s), or they can choose two of the remaining SMLLC modules.

5. The Viva Voce Examination ML629 (conducted – at least partly – in the ‘lead language’) in early June.

6. Minor theses will be supervised by SMLLC Full-time members of staff after consultation with the student.

Career Options

This interdisciplinary MA gives students an ideal starting point for an academic career in literary studies, conflict studies or language studies. The combination of subject-specific, interdisciplinary and transferable skills, which are the intended outcome of the programme, would also make it a useful qualification for entry into the teaching profession, research work, or for careers with an international dimension, in diplomacy, journalism, business or academia.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/german/our-courses/ma-modern-languages-literature-and-culture-narratives-conflict-german-0#tabs-apply

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The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more
The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of speech and hearing research, and their technological applications.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules and then have the opportunity to specialise in speech and hearing sciences. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
-Development of Speech Perception and Production
-Introduction to Speech Sciences
-Experimental Phonetics
-Phonetic Theory

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. Options include:
-Deafness, Cognition and Language
-Second Language Speech Learning
-Web Programming for Psychology and Language Sciences
-Stuttering
-Advanced topics in Speech Perception
-Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research dissertation.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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First taught in 2007, the Master’s Degree in Foreign Language Teaching (SFL/EFL) has now split into its two component specialities. Read more
First taught in 2007, the Master’s Degree in Foreign Language Teaching (SFL/EFL) has now split into its two component specialities: English and Spanish. The resulting Master’s Degree in English Language Teaching aims to train professionals to teach English for both general and specific purposes. The degree is a combination of professional and research tracks, and it is designed for national and international graduates, with or without experience, who wish to work professionally in the field of English language teaching.

Student Profile

The Master’s Degree is designed mainly for students with a background in English studies, and such related fields as modern languages, culture and communication, translation and interpretation, or schoolteachers specializing in foreign languages. Nevertheless, the Master’s Degree is also open to people holding some sort of official university degree (bachelor’s degree, pre-Bologna bachelor’s degree or 3-year diploma), or an equivalent that may not be directly related. In the latter case, students will be required to take a bridging course (see the specific regulations).

Career opportunities

The obvious area in which the graduates from this programme can work is English language teaching at all levels. In general, language teaching provides students with multidisciplinary training in the humanities which prepares them for all sorts of activities involving the transmission of cultural knowledge. The future master’s degree graduates will be qualified to work in the following fields:
-Language teaching
-English teachers in private and state-run language teaching institutions in Spain (Official School of Languages, language services, language academies, adult education, etc.)
-English teachers abroad in both private and state-run institutions
-English teachers for specific purposes in private companies, multinationals and international agencies
-Teachers of other subjects in English for bilingual institutions
-Heads or heads of studies in schools
-English language assistants in foreign universities
-English language teachers in secondary schools
-Language advisors for schools, publishers, or other public and private companies
-University lecturers at graduate or postgraduate level
-Researcher into teaching– learning English
-Author of text books for learning English in publishers and similar companies
-Author of teaching materials – online language learning for publishers and similar companies
-Educational advisor in schools, publishers and other public or private institutions
-Research and knowledge transfer in interdisciplinary research groups
-Language and cultural mediation in public or private institutions
-Tourism
-Translation
-Publishing

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The web-based MA Modern English Language offers you the opportunity to follow a wide range of modules from across the expertise of the language section of the School of English. Read more
The web-based MA Modern English Language offers you the opportunity to follow a wide range of modules from across the expertise of the language section of the School of English.

Therefore, this course is ideal if you do not want to specialise in your language study or if you want the flexibility of building your own programme.

The MA has intakes in September and February.

Key facts

The MA courses by web-based distance learning build on the international reputation of the School of English at Nottingham as one of the foremost centres for English Language research in the world.
We are ranked 7th for English in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015, in the world top 50 for English Literature, Language and Linguistics (QS World University Rankings 2014) and 9th in the UK for 'research power' (REF 2014)..
The course is taught using a course tool software called Moodle. It is also supported by extensive online resources, course materials and teaching.
The programme offers an excellent route towards pursuing a PhD.
The MA Modern English Language is also available as a taught full- or part-time course within the University.
As well as completing this course at a pace that suits you and your other commitments, you have the flexibility to study towards a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or an MA (180 credits, including dissertation). Please note that if you wish to study for a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma you still need to apply for the full MA; you would then elect to leave the course with the alternative award once studying.

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