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This course will prepare you to teach German across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS). Read more

This course will prepare you to teach German across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS).

The course combines master's level academic study of key language learning theories and methods with a range of practical experiences. Approximately two-thirds of the course is spent in our partnership schools and colleges developing practical teaching skills with the support of trained mentors and experienced modern language teachers.

The University teaching team has an international reputation for research, teaching and publications in education. We are dedicated to developing your expertise and we believe passionately in the benefits of creative, motivating and engaging language lessons in order to create the next generation of life-long modern language speakers. Our sessions are all interactive and good pedagogy is modelled by skilled and highly motivated tutors and guest speakers. Your University tutors combine experience as outstanding teachers with academic knowledge of innovative, current and relevant educational research.

We have strong partnerships with schools and colleges, many of which are involved in research projects with the University. We work with a large variety of schools, comprehensives, grammar schools, specials schools and sixth form colleges, allowing us to personalise your placement experiences to your individual needs. University tutors and school-based mentors will provide support and challenge to help you achieve your potential.

What our students say:

The PGCE at The University of Manchester balances just the right amount of University-based training with a great deal of school-based teaching practice. The many opportunities to put the theory into practice, coupled with the high level of support from the University and partner schools led to the PGCE being an enjoyable and challenging year which has prepared me well for my first year of teaching.

For more details on interviews, please visit our PGCE website .

Aims

The academic elements of the course enable trainees to research, observe and reflect on key aspects of education practice including teaching, learning and pedagogy. You will be required to complete master's level assignments on teaching, learning and assessment, and your language skills. The course will also encourage you to pursue your own specific interests in your teaching practice.

The course will:

  • Equip you with the professional skills and knowledge required to become an outstanding teacher.
  • Enable you to develop your own preferred teaching styles by demonstrating, and encouraging you to try out, a wide variety of teaching styles.
  • Encourage you to develop your skill as a teacher through reflective practice.
  • Give you a sound understanding of the development of modern language methodology and current issues.
  • Enable you to use and produce teaching resources.
  • Ensure that your teaching takes account of individual pupils' perspectives and learning styles.
  • Ensure that your planning and teaching maximise the progress of all pupils in your classroom.
  • Encourage you to make maximum use of the knowledge and experience that you already have.
  • Encourage you to openly share your ideas and experiences.
  • Demonstrate that teaching and learning are reciprocal processes, and that the best teachers are those who are lifelong learners.

Special features

  • Top university to study a PGCE in the North of England (Good Teacher Training Guide 2017).
  • Rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted.
  • Extensive classroom experience supported by experienced modern language tutors and mentors.
  • 92% of our graduates in a teaching post within six months of completing the course - consistently better than the North West average (The University of Manchester 2013-2016).

Teaching and learning

The structure of our PGCEs includes both school-based and University-based learning. On our secondary PGCEs, around two thirds of your time will be spent in secondary schools, academies or colleges on placements. You will also need to undertake self-directed study in the evenings and weekends, such as background reading, creating lesson plans and completing written assignments.

The course includes a wide range of teaching methods, including: seminars; group discussion; practical workshops; lectures; and presentations. You will be an active participant in your own development as you make the transition from subject expert to excellent modern language teacher.

Coursework and assessment

School and University-based experiences are formally assessed and your school/college mentors and University tutors will help you to record your achievements and to set targets.

During each placement, a University tutor will observe your teaching and at the end of each placement you will receive a report from your mentor. The report will grade you in the following areas: teaching; planning, differentiation and assessment; learning environment; and wider professional responsibilities. The grades are awarded by your mentor in conjunction your University tutor. These reports, together with your record of achievement and development, facilitate your progression as a trainee teacher and on an ongoing basis as a newly qualified teacher.

You are also required to complete a number of written assignments which allow you to gain 60 master's level credits. Modules include: Teaching, Learning and Assessment; a School/College-based Enquiry (with supporting literature review); and a Reflection of Professional Practice. On-going guidance and support to complete these assignments will be available from your University tutors.

Scholarships and bursaries

Generous, tax-free funding is available to the best graduates training in a range of subjects. You could get a £26,000 bursary or be awarded a prestigious scholarship - which provides additional support and benefits throughout your training year.

Information about additional funding options for September 2018 can be found on the Department for Education website

Home/EU students may be eligible for a repayable tuition fee loan. Home students in England may also be eligible for a repayable student maintenance loan. The loans support available to PGCE students is similar to what is available for undergraduate students and information about government financial support for undergraduate students is available here . 

If you have graduated in the last three years from The University of Manchester with a 1st class honours degree, you may also be eligible for our Alumni Scholarship .



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The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more

The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of language development research, and their technological applications.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in the language sciences, specialising in language development. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Mandatory modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
  • Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental Disorders of Language, Learning and Cognition
  • Development of Speech Perception and Production
  • Language Acquisition
  • Introduction to Children's Language Development
  • Semantic and Pragmatic Development

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:

  • Neuroscience of Language
  • Deafness - Cognition and language
  • Speech Processing
  • Conversation Analysis
  • Second Language Speech Learning
  • Phonetic Theory
  • Phonetic Theory
  • Foundations of Linguistics
  • Issues in Pragmatics
  • Current Issues in Syntax
  • Stuttering

Not all modules will run every year; some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Language Development) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and in other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary School Teacher (Greek Language), Lysse Lanco Hellenique
  • Speech and Language Therapist, West London Mental Health NHS Trust
  • PGCE Early Years Teaching, Canterbury Christ Church University
  • PhD in Biomedical Science - Speech and Hearing, Harvard University

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This course will prepare you to teach French across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS). Read more

This course will prepare you to teach French across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS).

The course combines master's level academic study of key language learning theories and methods with a range of practical experiences. Approximately two-thirds of the course is spent in our partnership schools and colleges developing practical teaching skills with the support of trained mentors and experienced modern language teachers.

The University teaching team has an international reputation for research, teaching and publications in education. We are dedicated to developing your expertise and we believe passionately in the benefits of creative, motivating and engaging language lessons in order to create the next generation of life-long language speakers. Our sessions are all interactive and good pedagogy is modelled by skilled and highly motivated tutors and guest speakers. Your University tutors combine experience as outstanding teachers with academic knowledge of innovative, current and relevant educational research.

We have strong partnerships with schools and colleges, many of which are involved in research projects with the University. We work with a large variety of schools, comprehensives, grammar schools, special schools and sixth form colleges, allowing us to personalise your placement experiences to your individual needs. University tutors and school-based mentors will support and challenge you to help you achieve your potential.

What our students say:

The PGCE at The University of Manchester balances just the right amount of University-based training with a great deal of school-based teaching practice. The many opportunities to put the theory into practice, coupled with the high level of support from the University and partner schools led to the PGCE being an enjoyable and challenging year which has prepared me well for my first year of teaching.

For more details on interviews, please visit our PGCE website .

Aims

The academic elements of the course enable trainees to research, observe and reflect on key aspects of education practice including teaching, learning and pedagogy. You will be required to complete master's level assignments on teaching, learning and assessment, and your language skills. The course will also encourage you to pursue your own specific interests in your teaching practice.

The course will:

  • Equip you with the professional skills and knowledge required to become an outstanding teacher.
  • Enable you to develop your own preferred teaching styles by demonstrating, and encouraging you to try out, a wide variety of teaching styles.
  • Encourage you to develop your skill as a teacher through reflective practice.
  • Give you a sound understanding of the development of modern language methodology and current issues.
  • Enable you to use and produce teaching resources.
  • Ensure that your teaching takes account of individual pupils' perspectives and learning styles.
  • Ensure that your planning and teaching maximise the progress of all pupils in your classroom.
  • Encourage you to make maximum use of the knowledge and experience that you already have.
  • Encourage you to openly share your ideas and experiences.
  • Demonstrate that teaching and learning are reciprocal processes, and that the best teachers are those who are lifelong learners.

Special features

  • Top university to study a PGCE in the North of England (Good Teacher Training Guide 2017).
  • Rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted.
  • Extensive classroom experience supported by experienced modern language tutors and mentors.
  • 92% of our graduates in a teaching post within six months of completing the course - consistently better than the North West average (The University of Manchester 2013-2016).

Teaching and learning

The structure of our PGCEs includes both school-based and University-based learning. On our secondary PGCEs, around two thirds of your time will be spent in secondary schools, academies or colleges on placements. You will also need to undertake self-directed study in the evenings and weekends, such as background reading, creating lesson plans and completing written assignments.

The course includes a wide range of teaching methods, including: seminars; group discussion; practical workshops; lectures; and presentations. You will be an active participant in your own development as you make the transition from subject expert to excellent modern language teacher.

Coursework and assessment

School and University-based experiences are formally assessed and your school/college mentors and University tutors will help you to record your achievements and to set targets.

During each placement, a University tutor will observe your teaching and at the end of each placement you will receive a report from your mentor. The report will grade you in the following areas: teaching; planning, differentiation and assessment; learning environment; and wider professional responsibilities. The grades are awarded by your mentor in conjunction your University tutor. These reports, together with your record of achievement and development, facilitate your progression as a trainee teacher and on an ongoing basis as a newly qualified teacher.

You are also required to complete a number of written assignments which allow you to gain 60 master's level credits. Modules include: Teaching, Learning and Assessment; a School/College-based Enquiry (with supporting literature review); and a Reflection of Professional Practice. On-going guidance and support to complete these assignments will be available from your University tutors.

Scholarships and bursaries

Generous, tax-free funding is available to the best graduates training in a range of subjects. You could get a £26,000 bursary or be awarded a prestigious scholarship - which provides additional support and benefits throughout your training year.

Information about additional funding options for September 2018 can be found on the Department for Education website

Home/EU students may be eligible for a repayable tuition fee loan. Home students in England may also be eligible for a repayable student maintenance loan. The loans support available to PGCE students is similar to what is available for undergraduate students and information about government financial support for undergraduate students is available here . 

If you have graduated in the last three years from The University of Manchester with a 1st class honours degree, you may also be eligible for our Alumni Scholarship .



Read less
This course will prepare you to teach Spanish across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS). Read more

This course will prepare you to teach Spanish across the 11-16 or 11-18 age range. It is a 10 month course which allows graduates to train to teach, gain a postgraduate qualification and qualified teaching status (QTS).

The course combines master's level academic study of key language learning theories and methods with a range of practical experiences. Approximately two-thirds of the course is spent in our partnership schools and colleges developing practical teaching skills with the support of trained mentors and experienced modern language teachers.

The University teaching team has an international reputation for research, teaching and publications in education. We are dedicated to developing your expertise and we believe passionately in the benefits of creative, motivating and engaging language lessons in order to create the next generation of life-long modern language speakers. Our sessions are all interactive and good pedagogy is modelled by skilled and highly motivated tutors and guest speakers. Your University tutors combine experience as outstanding teachers with academic knowledge of innovative, current and relevant educational research.

We have strong partnerships with schools and colleges, many of which are involved in research projects with the University. We work with a large variety of schools, comprehensives, grammar schools, specials schools and sixth form colleges, allowing us to personalise your placement experiences to your individual needs. University tutors and school-based mentors will provide support and challenge to help you achieve your potential.

What our students say:

The PGCE at The University of Manchester balances just the right amount of University-based training with a great deal of school-based teaching practice. The many opportunities to put the theory into practice, coupled with the high level of support from the University and partner schools led to the PGCE being an enjoyable and challenging year which has prepared me well for my first year of teaching.

For more details on interviews, please visit our PGCE website .

Aims

The academic elements of the course enable trainees to research, observe and reflect on key aspects of education practice including teaching, learning and pedagogy. You will be required to complete master's level assignments on teaching, learning and assessment, and your language skills. The course will also encourage you to pursue your own specific interests in your teaching practice.

The course will:

  • Equip you with the professional skills and knowledge required to become an outstanding teacher.
  • Enable you to develop your own preferred teaching styles by demonstrating, and encouraging you to try out, a wide variety of teaching styles.
  • Encourage you to develop your skill as a teacher through reflective practice.
  • Give you a sound understanding of the development of modern language methodology and current issues.
  • Enable you to use and produce teaching resources.
  • Ensure that your teaching takes account of individual pupils' perspectives and learning styles.
  • Ensure that your planning and teaching maximise the progress of all pupils in your classroom.
  • Encourage you to make maximum use of the knowledge and experience that you already have.
  • Encourage you to openly share your ideas and experiences.
  • Demonstrate that teaching and learning are reciprocal processes, and that the best teachers are those who are lifelong learners.

Special features

  • Top university to study a PGCE in the North of England (Good Teacher Training Guide 2017).
  • Rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted.
  • Extensive classroom experience supported by experienced modern language tutors and mentors.
  • 92% of our graduates in a teaching post within six months of completing the course - consistently better than the North West average (The University of Manchester 2013-2016).

Teaching and learning

The structure of our PGCEs includes both school-based and University-based learning. On our secondary PGCEs, around two thirds of your time will be spent in secondary schools, academies or colleges on placements. You will also need to undertake self-directed study in the evenings and weekends, such as background reading, creating lesson plans and completing written assignments.

The course includes a wide range of teaching methods, including: seminars; group discussion; practical workshops; lectures; and presentations. You will be an active participant in your own development as you make the transition from subject expert to excellent languages teacher.

Scholarships and bursaries

Generous, tax-free funding is available to the best graduates training in a range of subjects. You could get a £26,000 bursary or be awarded a prestigious scholarship - which provides additional support and benefits throughout your training year.

Information about additional funding options for September 2018 can be found on the Department for Education website

Home/EU students may be eligible for a repayable tuition fee loan. Home students in England may also be eligible for a repayable student maintenance loan. The loans support available to PGCE students is similar to what is available for undergraduate students and information about government financial support for undergraduate students is available here . 

If you have graduated in the last three years from The University of Manchester with a 1st class honours degree, you may also be eligible for our Alumni Scholarship .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

The aims of the programme are:

- To analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning

- To provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lang

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643756

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world. If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence. Read more
This is a Masters course that can take you into employment anywhere in the world.

If you are enthusiastic about teaching English as a foreign or second language, then our course offers you vocationally-relevant, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by academics known for their teaching excellence.

You explore teaching methods and the description of English used in the investigation of language learning and teaching, and study additional topics according to your needs. These might include:
-How second language learners acquire vocabulary, and how vocabulary can be taught
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Materials design and evaluation
-Teaching Writing in EFL/ESL

You also gain hands-on teaching experience through our Teaching Practice I and Teaching Practice II modules.

Whether you have no prior teaching experience or are already an English language teacher, this course can be adapted to suit you. If you have little or no previous teaching experience, you receive ‘hands on’ teaching practice throughout the course via TEFL, while if you already have more than two year’s full-time teaching experience, you can undertake specialist study through TESOL instead.

You'll be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned. Florence Myles authored the best-selling Second Language Learning Theories, and Bob Borsley wrote both Syntactic Theory: a Unified Approach and Modern Phrase Structure Grammar.

Other teachers on this course include Christina Gkonou, who has conducted extensive research into the effects of individual factors like anxiety on success in language learning, and Julian Good and Tracey Costley, who have taught English in Europe, the Far East and South America for many years before coming to Essex.

Karen Roehr-Brackin is a leading expert on the relationship between metalinguistic knowledge (conscious awareness of the rules of language) and language learning ability, and Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez is a leading expert on the use of computers and the role that interaction in the classroom plays in language learning.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Takers of our MA TEFL and other courses in English Language Teaching come with the specific intention of entering the ELT/TESOL profession, which they duly go on to do.

Students on these courses often join us after a career in English teaching, to update their expertise and return to the classroom with a career enhancement.

The specialist knowledge you gain enables you to take senior or specialist roles (for example in computer-assisted language-learning, ESP or teaching young learners), not necessarily only in the classroom but also in educational advice and management, programme evaluation, syllabus design and teacher education.

We also work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Teaching Practice I
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL
-Research Methods I
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Research Methods II
-MA Dissertation
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Foundations of Computer Assisted Language Learning (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Teaching and Learning Grammar (optional)
-Teaching English to Young Learners: Principles and Practice (optional)
-Teaching Practice II (optional)
-Reflective Practitioner (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)

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The . MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.  is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's . Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Read more

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS), and is currently run from the History Department. The programme is suitable for students whose undergraduate training is in Archaeology, Classics, History, Literature/Languages, Philosophy, Theology, or other related disciplines. The main aim of the programme is to prepare students for doctoral research in the study of the medieval and early modern past by offering outstanding interdisciplinary training to equip students with the skills they need for their future careers. It is taught by specialists who are members of IMEMS, primarily from the departments of ArchaeologyClassicsEnglishHistoryModern Languages and CulturesPhilosophy and Theology.

Students are incorporated into the vibrant research communities within departments, IMEMS, and the university. Durham has a large and extremely active postgraduate community, and IMEMS supports the Medieval and Early Modern Student Association (MEMSA), whose members organise regular seminars and conferences. IMEMS has more than fifty staff members from arts, humanities, social science and science departments across the University, all active researchers, and is one of the largest gatherings of scholars in this area in the world. IMEMS is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham CathedralDurham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of medieval and early modern studies at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant.

All students on the MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies take two core modules, Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past, and Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past (30 credits each); both of these run throughout Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms. Students also write a 15,000-word dissertation (60 credits), supervised by one of Durham's specialists, which allows them to focus on a specialist topic of their choice in the period AD 300-1700, which may be interdisciplinary or focused primarily on one of the individual disciplines which make up the programme. They also take two optional modules (30 credits each) which run either in Michaelmas or Epiphany or throughout both terms. These may be content, language or skills modules, and are drawn from the seven participating departments as well as Durham’s other centres and programmes. All elements of the programme have embedded within them a range of content, subject-specific skills, and key skills.

Core modules

The two team-taught core modules enable students to develop advanced skills in interpreting and usinga range of different kinds of source-material from the medieval and early modern periods, including textual, material and visual culture. They allow students to consider developments over the longue duree and enable a more rounded understanding of how a range of themes, ideas and institutions changed from the end of the classical world, through the Middle Ages and into the early modern era. These modules are intended to guide students whose backgrounds are in a range of disciplinary specialisms towards an understanding of how study of the medieval and early modern past can be nuanced and enhanced by approaches from multiple different disciplines used alongside each other. The modules also help students develop from a more tutor-led approach to independent learning, in order to support their work on their dissertations and their future careers. Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past takes one key item or body of material (e.g. a text, a site, an archive) as a lens through which to explore different disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to studying the period 300-1700. Students are assessed by a 5000-word essay on a topic of their choice connected with the themes of the module. Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past focuses on major themes, movements and institutions which can best be examined across the whole medieval and early modern period, and which can best be explained by close study of change and continuity over a long period of time. A number of these themes will invite interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary approaches, and thus will allow students to develop their skills in bringing together different kinds of material for study of the past. Students are assessed for this module by a) a 4000-word essay on a topic of their choice, connected with the themes of the module, and b) a 15-minute presentation.

Optional modules

Students choose two optional modules offered by the departments participating in the programme. These modules are taught by subject specialists and usually involve a series of seminars with an emphasis on close study of original material from the medieval and early modern periods, and provide a ‘step up’ from the level of final-year undergraduate study. The breadth of modules available means that students can develop their skills and research interests according to their own tailored programme and with the advice of their dissertation supervisor, ensuring the best possible preparation for the future. There are also some modules focusing on particular skills-training such as medieval or modern languages or auxiliary skills (e.g. Latin; Ancient Greek; Old Norse; Old English; Academic French; Academic German; Palaeography).

The range of optional modules in each year varies according to staff availability and departmental provision, but as a representative sample optional modules may include the following:

  • Anglo-Saxon Societies and Cultures: interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval England
  • Archaeology of the Book
  • Christian Northumbria, 600-750
  • Contact and Conflict: Texts and Cultures
  • Courts and Power in Early Modern Europe and the New World
  • Latin for Research
  • Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
  • Negotiating Life in the Early Modern World
  • Old English Language, Texts and Contexts
  • Old Norse
  • Palaeograpy: Scribes, Script and History from Antiquity to the Renaissance
  • Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages
  • Renaissance Humanism
  • Rewriting Empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History
  • Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
  • Work and Play in Early Modern Europe


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Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;. Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;

Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;

Students who wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;

Students who come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist migration and diaspora related topics along with regional or language-based study
Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in issues relating to migration and diaspora.
The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.
The programme encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Core course:

- African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit)
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (1 unit)
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology (1 unit). This is recommended for students without a previous anthropology degree.

OPTION COURSES
- Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Option Courses list. A language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Migration and Diaspora Studies and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 253kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/file93570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- To introduce students to important areas of contemporary social theory which deal with issues of migration, globalisation, the postcolonial world, and cultural transformations.

- To ground students in the historical basis of these issues

- To encourage transdisciplinary thinking on issues of migration

- To enable students to translate theoretical perspectives for practical application in the material world.

- To provide students with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be expected to grasp the key debates in migration and diaspora studies from a critical perspective

- To understand the global/historical/political and cultural background within which issues of migration and diaspora occur.

- A critical understanding of the ways that migration has shaped the modern world, and the implications of this for future research.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- The development of analytical and theoretical skills based on a detailed understanding of the social science literature on migration and diaspora.

- To approach theories and debates from a critical and reflexive basis.

- To develop their presentation skills and their ability to articulate arguments coherently in order to promote class discussion and critical engagement with ideas and practices.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Communicate effectively in writing, in academic English

- Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources including print and other forms of mass media

- Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.

- Students with no knowledge of media technologies will have the opportunity to learn photographic and film making techniques through the Media unit.

- Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
Students will be expected to learn to:

- Plan, organise and write masters’ level essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
- Understand unconventional ideas.
- Present (non–assessed) material orally.
- Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
- Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
- Be prepared to enter a Social Science PhD programme.
- An ability to work, and be at ease in, a multicultural environment

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics. Read more

The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in neuroscience and communication such as neurobioliogy, speech processing, developmental and acquired language disorders and linguistics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two specialisation modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Introduction to Syntax
  • Students select two specialisation modules from those below:
  • Intermediate Phonetics
  • Neurobiology of Speech Processing
  • Neuroscience of Language
  • Seminar in Neurolinguistics

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. Possible options are listed below:

  • Conversation Analysis
  • Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech
  • Deafness - Cognition and Language
  • Designing and Analysing an fMRI Experiment
  • Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition
  • Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Introduction to Event-Related Potential Techniques
  • Language Acquisition

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on an aspect of speech, language and cognition which culminates in a research plan of 3,000-6,000 words and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Employability

This MSc is full of opportunities for students to improve reading, writing and communication skills generally. These opportunities include writing essays, oral presentations, critical reading of scientific articles, and group discussion. These skills are critical for success in a wide range of jobs. Likewise, the programme will help to improve critical thinking skills through the critical evaluation of scientific research. This skill is applicable to those careers requiring problem-solving. Lastly, the programme provides practical experience in conducting research, which is highly valuable to those interested in pursuing a research career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. Read more
This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. You will study the process of learning and the use of second languages. The programme allows you to focus your research on your language of choice, for instance Dutch as a second language, but also French, German, Swedish, Chinese, or any other language.
You will approach second language acquisition from many different angles, including psychology, social interaction and language teaching. You will be introduced to the field of linguistics, language acquisition and language teaching theory.
The program focuses especially on Dynamic System Theory, which explains how cultural differences become bodily differences. You will learn about the social, cultural and political processes that play a role in using a language or that may cause the use of a second language to decline. You will explore didactic applications of recent research and theoretical developments, and learn about computer assisted language learning.

Why in Groningen?

The MA Applied Linguistics at the University of Groningen is a unique programme focussing on the processes involved in second language learning, as well as teaching theories. The programme encompasses various fields of study, as learning and using a second language may be approached from many different angles. Students will explore and discuss the factors that relate to second language development, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching, and culture.

In addition to theoretical and teaching paradigms, students will also take classes in the research practices and methodology essential for conducting applied linguistics studies and research. These classes will act as the foundation from which students will be able to conduct their own applied linguistics research in the form of the MA thesis in Semester 2.The MA Applied Linguistics is a truly international programme, welcoming students from all over the world. The classes are taught entirely in English, and students are encouraged to use their own language experiences as the basis for their individual linguistic enquiries and research.Our degree programme is small, which means that students benefit from small, intimate classes and close collaborative relationships with the other students as well as instructors.

Job perspectives

After completing this programme, you can pursue a career in research, or set up language teaching projects. You are also equipped to take positions on the European level that deal with issues of language policy.

Job examples

- Linguist (L2)
- language research
- language education
- language policy
- language testing
- curriculum development
- publishing

Research in Applied Linguistics focuses on the process of learning and using a second language. It covers various fields of study because learning and using a second language can be approached from many different angles, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching and culture.

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Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the modern historians at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about modern history from the nineteenth century through to contemporary history. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity. Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the cultural and political history, visual culture and media studies, sports history, regional and international histories. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, Africa, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Modern History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms
Students may choose to take a skills module: these are mainly medieval/ancient languages (e.g. Old English, Old Norse, Latin, Greek), modern languages for reading (e.g. Academic French, Academic German), or research skills (e.g. palaeography). Students who take a skills module write a 60-credit dissertation instead of a 90-credit dissertation.

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in modern history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for modern history included: The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Interpretations of Terror and Genocide in Modern Europe; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9200&title=Modern+History&code=V1K707&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more

The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of speech and hearing research, and their technological applications.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules and then have the opportunity to specialise in speech and hearing sciences. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
  • Development of Speech Perception and Production
  • Intermediate Phonetics
  • Experimental Phonetics
  • Phonetic Theory

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. Options include:

  • Deafness, Cognition and Language
  • Second Language Speech Learning
  • Web Programming for Psychology and Language Sciences
  • Stuttering
  • Advanced topics in Speech Perception
  • Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from the Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Early Stage Researcher, UCL and studying PhD in Linguistics, Karl-Franzens-Universitハt Graz (University of Graz)

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The German History pathway of the MA in Language, Culture and History allows students to investigate in depth the rich, diverse traditions and violent upheavals of German and Austrian history. Read more

The German History pathway of the MA in Language, Culture and History allows students to investigate in depth the rich, diverse traditions and violent upheavals of German and Austrian history. Drawing on the expertise of an unparalleled range of specialists at UCL, this programme provides a foundation for understanding some of the most important junctures and developments of the modern era.

About this degree

The MA offers students the opportunity to explore a range of aspects of German history, and gives students a grounding in one of the principal areas of modern history, essential for an understanding of contemporary Europe and its past. Text-based language teaching is available for students wishing to develop their linguistic skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme offers two pathways: taught and research.

Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), and a research dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits), full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

The core Language, Culture and History module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest, such as:

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality.

Optional modules

Students choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
  • Parzival
  • Reading Modern Novels
  • Staging the Past: German Historical Drama since 1770
  • Writing and Rewriting Marchen and other Fantastic Tales
  • Language, Power and Ideology
  • Translation From and into German Language; Advanced Translation
  • Discussion and Essay in German Language; Intensive Essay Writing
  • German Literature and Psychology

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Formal teaching occurs in the first two terms and the third term is devoted to revision sessions, examinations and detailed supervision of the dissertation project. Student performance is assessed through coursework essays, a dissertation, and unseen written examinations.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: German History MA

Careers

The degree offers a graduate qualification in its own right, as well as serving as a pathway towards doctoral research in the field of German and European history. Many students progress from one of our MA programmes to an MPhil or PhD research degree.

Employability

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, German Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, teaching and academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is ranked third in the UK for Modern Languages in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

UCL's central location offers students easy access to excellent resources, including the British Library, the Institute for Germanic Studies, the German Historical Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

The cultural offerings of the Goethe-Institut, the Austrian Institute, and a wealth of exhibitions, films and theatrical performances are all nearby.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA is for experienced teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice. Read more

The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA is for experienced teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice.

The study course offers you an excellent opportunity to further your career in TEFL/TESOL and develop expertise in specialist fields such as language assessment and testing, materials development, teaching EAP, management and evaluation and ESOL.

Please note that we also offer an alternative version of the Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA, in conjunction with International House London. That route involves a slightly different programme of study and leads to the award of the Cambridge DELTA, as well as the MA itself

Key benefits

  • Opportunities to expand your knowledge of current theoretical and practical aspects of language teaching.
  • Excellent tutorial support and extensive programme-specific training in research methods and academic writing.
  • Exchange ideas with other experienced language teaching professionals from many different backgrounds.
  • Opportunities to develop professional expertise relevant to your career development in areas such as EAP, teaching ESOL, materials development, language testing and assessment, teacher education.

Description

The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA course offers you opportunities to explore current research and specialist areas such as teacher education, materials development, teaching English for academic purposes, management and evaluation in ELT and intercultural studies.

You will study required modules covering language-teaching methodology and curriculum design, linguistic analysis for language teaching, issues in language acquisition and use (sociolinguistics, social and psychological aspects of second language learning) and research methods. We also place emphasis on the view of informed teaching and the need for teachers to mediate between theory and practice in constructing pedagogies according to specific teaching-learning situations.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the 180-195 credit course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete. If you have the Cambridge ESOL DELTA or Trinity House Diploma in ELT, you may be eligible for the ‘fast track’ version of the course which will give you exemption from Principles and Practices in Second/Foreign Language Teaching. The fast track option can only be studied part-time. As students on this pathway are exempt from a module, they will not take any taught modules in one of the terms (normally Term 1 of Year 2). They may, however, be working on their dissertation during this time. 

Course purpose

For experienced language teachers who want to reflect upon and further develop their understanding of the various theoretical and practical issues that impact on the field of language learning and teaching.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

You will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. The total contact time for each 30-credit taught module is typically 40 hours (20 hours per 15 credit module). These sessions will include lectures, teacher-led and student-led group discussions based on the main areas of study, in addition to other practical, technical and analytical activities. Each 30-credit taught module has 260 hours of self-guided learning time (130 hours for a 15 credit taught module). Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will receive six hours of one-to-one dissertation supervision. Lectures involving research methods will involve an additional 20 hours of contact time, to complement the 574 hours of self-study.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of essays, language analysis tasks, exams and oral presentations. Most optional modules are assessed by a 3,500-word essay. The dissertation will be assessed by one 15,000-word extended piece of writing. The format of your optional module assessment will depend on the options chosen.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates from the Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA course choose to remain in further education and go on to follow MPhil/PhD pathways.



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The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Read more

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies offers you an opportunity to pursue your interest in the literatures, histories, and cultures of the European Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Research in this fascinating area has a long and distinguished history at the University of Manchester. We have a lively research culture, with talks, seminars and conferences that you will be able to attend in addition to your taught courses. You will also be able to draw on the expertise of scholars engaged in cutting-edge research at the John Rylands Research Institute, where the programme is based. The John Rylands Library houses exceptional medieval and early-modern treasures (which are currently being digitised) and offers many exciting research and study opportunities. Staff teaching on this MA represent the disciplines of History, Art History and Visual Studies, English, Religions and Theology, Classics, and European Languages. Two pathways are available for students who wish to extend their knowledge in a particular chronological direction: Medieval, and Early Modern.

Find out more about Medieval and early Modern Studies at Manchester: Why Manchester?

Associate Programme Director:  .

Coursework and assessment

Summative assessment is primarily via extended pieces of written work: the dissertation of around 15,000 words, long essays of around 4,000-6,000 words, and a variety of shorter pieces for palaeography or language classes. There is a pass mark of 50% for all assignments, marks over 60% are given as merit and over 70% as distinction. In addition, depending on the units selected, formative assessment may be based on oral presentation, class discussion, and feedback on written draft material. Assessment varies from course unit to course unit; full details of the assessment procedure for individual units can be obtained from the course director.

Those who only attain 120 credits (out of 180) will be awarded the PG Diploma in Medieval Studies.

Course unit details

The first component takes the form of the compulsory core courses and research training units. These are taken by students on all pathways.

These courses (details below in the course unit list) are designed to introduce you to the basics of interdisciplinary analysis, and to research training skills appropriate to the scope of the course. 'From Papyrus to Print: The History of the Book' and 'Reading the Middle Ages and Early Modern period: Palaeography, Codicology and Sources' are taught in the magnificent surroundings of the John Rylands Library, with the support of specialist library staff. You will get the opportunity to view and handle rare books and manuscripts from across the entire period. The aim is to consider all aspects of book production, from the roll to the codex and from script to print, as well as the uses (practical and symbolic) of texts in medieval culture. You will be introduced to a range of medieval sources, recent theoretical approaches to archival research, and learn methodological skills, such as palaeography and codicology.

'Perspectives in Medieval and Early Modern Studies Studies' aims to explore the methodological, historiographical and analytical choices that shape our study of the medieval and early modern periods. Highlighting the variety of disciplinary approaches that are in use in current scholarship, this module shall investigate a series of relevant themes within the field, and will be taught by specialists from across the School. Students will be encouraged to question issues of historical periodisation, the benefits of interdisciplinarity, and how an intellectual framework for the study of the medieval and early modern periods may be conceptualised.

The second component consists of 60-credits worth of optional modules. These options range widely over the history, literature, art and material culture of the medieval and early modern world. You may also take Latin or Old/Middle English (15-30 credits) - appropriate level taken to be discussed with the Programme Director, in consultation with the relevant department. Options to take other languages, such as Hebrew, Arabic, or Greek can be considered, in consultation with the programme director. A student can take no more than 30 language credits.

Medieval Pathway:

Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:

Of the optional modules selected, 15 credits must clearly be of relevance to the early modern period.

Students may choose other relevant options from across the School, subject to approval by the relevant course directors. Details of new available options will appear here. Please check again in June, or contact the course director.

The third component consists of the dissertation, which allows you to research a topic of your choice (60 credits).

Students on all pathways must complete a dissertation.

Medieval Pathway:

The dissertation topic selected must lie within the medieval period.

Early Modern Pathway:

The dissertation topic selected must lie within the early modern period.

If you have any further academic queries, please email   .

Additional fee information

Self-funded international applicants for this course will be required to pay a deposit of £1000 towards their tuition fees before a confirmation of acceptance for studies (CAS) is issued. This deposit will only be refunded if immigration permission is refused. We will notify you about how and when to make this payment.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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