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Masters Degrees (Model)

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This unique and exciting one year full-time practical diploma course delivered in partnership with Mackinnon & Saunders, and Aardman Animations will equip students with the skills and experience necessary to enhance their career in the field of professional model / prop making within Animation or other media industries. Read more
This unique and exciting one year full-time practical diploma course delivered in partnership with Mackinnon & Saunders, and Aardman Animations will equip students with the skills and experience necessary to enhance their career in the field of professional model / prop making within Animation or other media industries.

-Unique and exciting course
-Delivered at NFTS in partnership with Mackinnon & Saunders, and Aardman Animations
-Intensely practical using current industry standard techniques
-12 month course duration
-Working in a fully equipped studio environment
-Experienced visiting lecturers from industry
-Cross platform Integration with other NFTS courses - Animation, Production Design, Digital Effects, and Cinematography
-Access to all NFTS masterclasses led by major creative figures from Film, Television and the Games industries.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This is the only UK based model making course located in a dedicated film studio environment. We intend to take advantage of that.

We will be creating professional models, sets, props and puppets. Successful candidates will work individually, and as part of a team within a course comprising tutorials and challenging modules, which will culminate in building models and sets on the current grad animation films.

You will be encouraged to research, sample, test, and mix traditional and new techniques throughout the course and will use a vast array of materials to successfully realise the brief. This will be as “real world” as it can be.

CURRICULUM

-Introduction and workshop safe practice
-Pattern and mould making
-Scale set and prop building
-Replica set build
-Sculpture and Puppet making
-Work experience at a leading animation studio

Major project - The major part of the year will involve working on the NFTS Animation grad films.

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Our MSc Model-based Drug Development course provides the knowledge and skills for making evidence-based decisions at various stages of drug development. Read more
Our MSc Model-based Drug Development course provides the knowledge and skills for making evidence-based decisions at various stages of drug development.

It covers the scientific and regulatory aspects of evaluating a drug, with emphasis on the use of modelling and simulation methods. You will learn why these methods are so highly valued by industry and regulatory authorities as effective, cost-saving, decision-making tools. Learning is reinforced via hands-on application of the skills to real data.

The course has been developed with an emphasis on mechanistic approaches to assessing and predicting pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PKPD), such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK).

As this comes under the general umbrella of systems biology, you will be able to apply your knowledge of modelling and simulation in various areas of research within the pharmaceutical industry.

Full-time students benefit from immersion in the varied biomedical research environment at The University of Manchester, including interaction with research staff at the renowned Centre for Applied Pharmacokinetic Research.

Alternatively, part-time students already working in the pharmaceutical industry can take advantage of the flexible, distance learning mode of the course, which allows you to fit study around other commitments.

Aims

The aim of the course is to provide specialist knowledge and skills that are highly relevant for a career linked to drug development and pharmaceutical industry.

It is designed for science, engineering or mathematics graduates who want to acquire:
-Awareness of the commercial and regulatory factors in drug development
-Understanding of the physiological, chemical, and mathematical foundations used to define the safe and effective use of potential medicines
-Training in the use of mathematical modelling and simulation methods to guide drug development

The course aims to:
-Provide background information on the theory and methods for quantitative assessment of drug absorption, distribution and elimination
-Provide an understanding of the role of pharmacometrics in the process of drug development
-Provide background information on in vitro assays used to characterise ADME properties of new drug entities
-Indicate the mathematical framework that is capable of integrating in vitro information with knowledge of the human body to predict pharmacokinetics
-Provide familiarity and experience of using different software platforms related to pharmacometric data analysis including R, Phoenix, NONMEM, MATLAB, Simcyp, WinBUGS and MONOLIX
-Equip you to reflect upon influential research publications in the field, to critically assess recent published literature in a specific area
-Provide awareness of the elements of a convincing research proposal based on modelling and simulation
-Provide the opportunity to undertake a project and carry out original research

Teaching and learning

The course emphasises the development of problem-solving skills. A large portion of the learning involves structured problems requiring the you to apply theory and practical skills to solve typical problems that arise in drug development.

The following teaching and learning methods are used throughout the course:
-Taught lectures
-Hands-on workshops
-Self-directed learning to solve given problems
-Webinars and tutorials by leading scientists in industry/academia
-Supervised research
-Mentorship in solving problems and writing the research dissertation
-Independent study

Career opportunities

This course was originally developed for scientists working within the pharmaceutical industry who wished to qualify as modellers with hands-on experience. The qualification will enhance your abilities within your current role or provide you with skills to progress into new posts.

The course is also appropriate for science and engineering graduates who wish to enter the industry. The role of modelling and simulation or pharmacometrics is assuming greater and greater importance in the pharmaceutical industry. Pharmaceutical companies and government regulatory agencies are recognising its value in making best use of laboratory and clinical data, guiding and expediting development, saving time and costs and a range of well paid jobs exist in this area across the globe. Scientific and industry publications often discuss the current shortage and growing need for modellers.

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Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance. Read more
Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance.

The Theatre Design MA course has just four places on offer in each intake, students receive focused individual mentoring and support from the BOVTS team and high-profile visiting professionals, all set in the environment of an integrated company staging fourteen productions a year.

The course duration is four terms; starting in April the course runs until July the following year.

The full time course is aimed at multi-skilled postgraduate level students. We encourage applicants with a range of experience and previous training in Theatre, Art and Design, (Architecture, Costume, Graphics, Interiors, Film Design, Painting, Sculpture, Drama and Theatre). We do not limit entry to students with previous training, although the majority of applicants come from degree courses. A comprehensive portfolio of artwork is required at interview.

Collaborative working with students from a range of disciplines at BOVTS, design students are offered at least three leading design positions on public productions at a variety of respected venues – from The Bristol Old Vic Theatre to the Brewery Theatre.

Master-classes and workshops with visiting professional practitioners help build a thorough understanding of the subject, these include script analysis, life and figure drawing, model making, technical drawing, CAD, Photoshop and model photography. Specialist lectures cover theatre design and costume history. Research and practical work are supported by site and production visits including trips to theatre design events and exhibitions.

An extensive portfolio of industry-standard work can be achieved over the course of four terms, including staged productions and theoretical projects. Students leave BOVTS with the skills, knowledge and confidence to build careers as professional designers. There are end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art in Bristol and in London.

Inspiring leadership by Head of Design Angela Davies, who is an award-winning theatre designer with high-level industry links. The course equips its graduates for entry into prestigious Theatre Design competitions such as the Linbury Prize for Stage Design and the RSC’s trainee scheme. BOVTS graduates held 5 out of the 12 final places in the Linbury Prize 2013.

Applications are accepted at least one year in advance of the course start date. The four-term course starts at the beginning of the summer term and completes at the end of the summer term of the following academic year.

Recent graduates have held design positions at the RSC, Pilmlico Opera, Bristol Old Vic, The Brewery Theatre and the Tobacco Factory, The Finsborough Theatre The Vault Festival and with Kneehigh Theatre Company.

To receive more information on course structure and highlights, please contact

Course Outline

Term 1
- Intensive skills-based classes from professional practitioners, including model-making and technical drawing
- Theatre script analysis and period research workshops
- Exploration of the collaborative creative process with a professional director and the MA Directors at BOVTS on the Theatre and Short Play Project
- Master-classes in advanced model-making techniques, technical drawing, an introduction to Photoshop and model photography
- Production and site visits.

Term 2
- Continued exploration of the design process through to presentation with meetings with a visiting professional on the Opera Project
- Regular design tutorials with additional workshops and classes to extend understanding.
- Theory is put into practice by designing the set or costumes for a BOVTS Spring production
- Collaborative working with a staff or visiting director and the BOVTS production teams for professional theatre venues

Term 3
- Design presentations and exploration of the production process through to full stage realisation.
- Close collaboration with actors, stage managers, technicians and scenic artists
- Work with the BOVTS MA Directors to complete production designs for the Brewery Theatre
- Skills classes and support in CAD and Photoshop and an introduction to portfolio design.

Term 4
- Series of small-scale productions for the Brewery Theatre
- Work begins on summer productions, exploring the role of set or costume designer in-depth
- More independent working with mentoring and support through the process
- Development of CV and professional portfolio
- Preparations for the end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art, Bristol and London
- Exhibitions and Industry interviews with professional practitioners from a range of theatre disciplines, providing networking opportunities and pathways to work

PLEASE NOTE THAT APPLICATIONS ARE FOR APRIL 2016 ENTRY AND WILL CLOSE ON 27TH FEBRUARY 2015 AT 4PM.

Offline Applications
Please contact:The Admissions Office, 1-2 Downside Road, Bristol BS8 2XF.

Tel: 0117 973 3535.
Email: .

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The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. Read more

About the programme

The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. The first year of courses is taught at the ULB Engineering Campus in Brussels, while the second year is taught at VUB.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering educates students to become innovative engineers who will contribute to their profession and to society. Engineers in chemistry and materials play a unique role in sustainable development, where they must manage resources, energy and the environment in order to develop and produce novel materials and chemical commodities. Our graduates are prepared to face the demands of the modern technological employment field and for an international career with English as their professional language.

Course content

The Master in Chemical and Material Engineering (120 ECTS) offers a solid core of courses in both of these engineering fields. The integrated and the multidisciplinary approach provides students up-to-date knowledge enabling them to propose innovative engineering solutions in numerous modern technological sectors. Students have the possibility to specialize in Process technology or Material Science.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering program consists of two profiles: Process Technology and Materials.

Profile: Process Technology:
The Process Technology orientation trains students to become engineers who are employable and innovative both in production units (operation and optimization of production facilities) and in engineering groups (develop new production units that meet desired performance specifications). An emphasis is placed on the biotechnology and food industries. Students are also trained to identify, solve and avoid environmental problems including waste management, water, air and soil pollution.

Profile: Materials:
The Materials orientation prepares students for the materials and materials technology sectors (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites). Students are trained to become creative engineers capable of designing sustainable multi-functional materials which meet specific applications. Students also have the capacity to contribute to the whole life-cycle of materials from their processing into semi or full end products using environmentally friendly and safe production processes to their recycling.

Become a skilled scientific engineer

This Master offers:
- a unique interdisciplinary programme which prepares you for employment in a professional field related to chemical engineering, materials or environmental technology.
- a high level scientific education that prepares you to a wide range of job profiles.
- the possibility to work in close contact with professors who are internationally recognized in their own disciplines and favor interactive learning.

Curriculum

http://www.vub.ac.be/en/study/chemical-and-materials-engineering/programme

The programme is built up modularly:
1) the Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS)
2) the Specific Profile Courses (30 ECTS)
3) the master thesis (24 ECTS)
4) electives (10 ECTS) from 1 out of 3 options.
Each of the modules should be succesfully completed to obtain the master degree. The student must respect the specified registration requirements. The educational board strongly suggests the student to follow the standard learning track. Only this model track can guarantee a timeschedule without overlaps of the compulsory course units.

Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering:
The Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS) is spread over 2 years: 46 ECTS in the first and 10 ECTS in the second year. The Common Core emphasizes the interaction between process- and materials technology by a chemical (molecular) approach. The Common Core consists out of courses related to chemistry, process technology and materials and is the basis for the Process Technology and the Materials profiles.

Specific Courses Profile Materials:
The profile 'Materials' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Materials I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Materials II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds material-technological courses to the common core.

Specific Courses Profile Process Technology:
The profile 'Process Technology' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Process Technology I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Process Technology II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds process technological courses to the common core.

Elective Courses:
The elective courses are divided into 3 options:
- Option 1: Internship (10 ECTS)
- Option 2: Elective courses (incl. internship of 6 ECTS)
- Option 3: Entrepreneurship
The student has to select one option and at least 10 ECTS within that option. All options belong to the 2nd year of the model learning track.

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Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity. Read more
Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity.

Software plays a role in almost every aspect of our daily lives and in every organisation anywhere in the world. It can often be a crucial key to their success. Well-structured software that is attuned to an organisation’s needs and future plans can be cost effective, improve efficiency, offer better services and be innovative. Many companies, in every branch out there, are therefore looking for highly skilled software specialists. Graduates of the Master’s specialisation in Software Science will have no trouble finding a job.

Producing software is not merely a technological enterprise but a deeply scientific and creative one as well. Modern cars drive on 20 million lines of code. How do we develop all this software and control its complexity? How do we ensure correctness of software on which the lives in a speeding car literally depend on? This specialisation goes far beyond basic code writing. It’s about analysing and testing code in order to improve it as well as simplify it.

Why study Software Science at Radboud University?

- Although not the only focus, our programme puts a lot of emphasis on embedded software and functional programming.
- We teach a unique range of software analysis techniques and application down to practical/commercial use in industry.
- This specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of the Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS) in areas such as model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages. We also closely collaborate with the Embedded Systems Institute.
- Our approach is pragmatic as well as theoretical. As an academic, we don’t just expect you to understand and make use of the appropriate tools, but also to program and develop your own.
- For your Master’s research we have a large number of companies like Philips, ASML and NXP offering projects. There are always more projects than students.
- Thanks to free electives students can branch out to other Computing Science domain at Radboud University such as security, machine learning or more in-depth mathematical foundations of computer science.
- The job opportunities are excellent: some of our students get offered jobs before they’ve even graduated and almost all of our graduates have positions within six months after graduating.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Computing Science or related area
In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor’s degree in Computing Sciences or a related discipline.
2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

Writing good software is a highly creative process, which requires the ability to approach problems in entirely novel ways through computational thinking. Besides creativity, a professional software scientist also has fine problem-solving, analytical, programming, and communication skills. By combining software programming, model-checking techniques and human intellect, software scientists can make a real difference to help and improve the devices that govern such a large part of our lives.

The job perspective for our graduates is excellent. Industry desperately needs software science specialists at an academic level, and thus our graduates have no difficulty in find an interesting and challenging job. Several of our graduates decide to go for a PhD and stay at a university, but most of our students go for a career in industry. They then typically either find a job at a larger company as consultant or programmer, or they start up their own software company.

Examples of companies where our graduates end up include the big Dutch high-tech companies such as Océ, ASML, Vanderlande and Philips, ICT service providers such as Topicus and Info Support and companies started by Radboud graduates, like AIA and GX.

Our research in this field

The Master’s programme in Computing Sciences is offered in close collaboration with the research Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS). Research at iCIS is organised in three different research sections:
- Model Based System Development
- Digital Security
- Intelligent Systems

The Software Science specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of iCIS in areas such model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages.

Research project and internship

For your research project, you may choose to do your internship at:
- A company
---- SME, such as as Océ, Vanderlande, Clarity or GX
---- multinational, such as the Philips, ASML, NXP, Logica or Reed Business Media
- A governmental institute, such as the (Dutch) Tax Authorities or the European Space Agency.
- Any department at Radboud University or another university with issues regarding software, like studying new techniques for loop bound analysis, the relation between classical logic and computational systems, or e-mail extension for iTasks.
- One of the iCIS departments, specialising on different aspects of Software Science.
- Abroad, under supervision of researchers from other universities that we collaborate with. For instance, exploring a new technique for automata learning at Uppsala University in Sweden, or verifying the correctness of Erlang refactoring transformations at the Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest, Hungary.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience

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The Master of Science in Kinesiology (MSc) is a thesis-based degree. Areas of study can include topics broadly related to the natural health and physical sciences. Read more

Master of Science in Kinesiology

The Master of Science in Kinesiology (MSc) is a thesis-based degree. Areas of study can include topics broadly related to the natural health and physical sciences. Graduate students are drawn to the School to work with specific research faculty members and benefit from their expertise in specific content areas. The MSc program operates using a mentor model. The benefits of a mentor model are numerous including clarification of research and other funding support at time of application and focused supervision from the time of registration. The MSc program prepares graduates for a broad range of careers. Former MSc students have pursued additional training including doctoral and post-doctoral degrees. Many former Kinesiology graduates have become successful academics. Other students have pursued careers in Medicine, Physical Therapy, industry, and governmental and non-governmental work.

What makes the program unique?

Graduate students are drawn to the School to work with specific research faculty members and benefit from their expertise in specific content areas. The MSc program operates using a mentor model. The benefits of a mentor model are numerous including clarification of research and other funding support at time of application and focused supervision from the time of registration. The School offers competitive financial packages to highly qualified students in the form of teaching assistantships and entrance scholarships. Individual faculty members can "top up" a financial package from external grant sources to assist with recruitment of exceptional students.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Kinesiology
- Subject: Health and Medicine
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education
- School: School of Kinesiology

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This program is designed to provide graduates with expertise in delivery of individualised assessment and therapy procedures suited to the presenting problems which occur in the Counselling context. Read more

About the program

This program is designed to provide graduates with expertise in delivery of individualised assessment and therapy procedures suited to the presenting problems which occur in the Counselling context. The Master of Counselling degree extends teaching content across the lifespan (i.e., childhood, adolescence, and adulthood) and range of presenting issues which impact adversely on the capacity of individuals to function effectively in their day-to-day lives. This degree incorporates coursework, practical experience gained in class and during practicum placement, and research. The teaching curriculum emphasises development of personal competencies, broad-based knowledge, and applied skills required for registered practicing Counsellors. The Counselling program draws from a range of theoretical models derived from current research and practice. Graduates complete a number of practicum placements under the supervision of appropriately qualified and experienced supervisors where they gain experience in applying best-practice models which meet the standards for appropriate ethical and professional practice. The philosophy which underpins the processes used to train graduates is embedded in core principles which are considered to guide ethical and professional practice in the Counselling context.

- Principle 1: Training in the scientist-practitioner model
The scientist-practitioner model trains graduates in methods for systematic and objective investigation (scientist) as well as techniques for applying evidence-based practices to the presenting issues of clients (practitioner). This model aims to enhance professional practice by guiding graduates to understand the interconnection between their own day-to-day practice and the evidence which arises from scientific enquiry. This model also trains graduates to submit the techniques and procedures they implement in day-to-day practice to continued review and to establish clear processes for measuring client outcomes. Graduates are also assisted to use self-reflection and personal enquiry to become aware of the reasons for their decisions and the consequences of their actions. They are sensitised to the risks of using intuitive thinking or unsubstantiated approaches to working with their clients.

- Principle 2: Respect for the client-counsellor bond at all times
The client-counsellor bond is conceptualised as being central to the counselling process and graduates are trained in methods for building rapport, establishing professional boundaries, and responding to clients in a respectful manner. Graduates are assisted to learn methods for engaging in authentic and collaborative interactions with their clients and to minimise any procedure which might create a power imbalance between themselves and their client. Although graduates are taught a number of theoretical perspectives and practical techniques to drive effective assessment and therapy, it is emphasised that the potential for these to create positive client outcomes depends on a strong client-counsellor bond.

- Principle 3: Emphasis is on idiographic understanding of client presenting issues
Graduates are trained to focus their therapeutic attention on understanding the reasons for their clients’ responses and life experiences as opposed to simply labelling these. The idiographic approach is based on in-depth investigation of individual experiences, understanding of client needs, and acquisition of client skills to facilitate positive change. This approach trains graduates in collaborative data-collection and analysis related to specific aspects of client performance to develop client- rather than label-driven treatments. The idiographic approach offers a strong philosophical foundation for viewing client responses as serving a function and constituting a coping mechanism for those life situations which cause the client challenge.

- Principle 4: Non-manualised therapies designed to enhance client competencies
Counselling is presented to graduates as a learning process and not a situation of containment of "psychic abnormalities". Therapy outcomes are achieved by the client acquiring skills capable of being transferred to real life situations. These skills arise from the counselling process itself and are tailored to address specific aspects of the client’s performance or particular concerning situations. Graduates are trained in client-focused and behaviourally-based frameworks to help individual clients learn how to approach life’s challenges in more satisfying and effective ways.

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/master-counselling

Professional outcomes

The Counselling programs at Bond University are designed to train students for work as general or specialist counsellors. Graduates of this program are also suitable for careers as mental health professionals. This program also assists teachers who are interested in developing expertise in the area of counselling.

English language proficiency requirements

As tuition is delivered in English, all students will be required to provide documented evidence of the required level of proficiency in the English language. Read more detailed information on English Language Proficiency Requirements for university study https://bond.edu.au/future-students/study-bond/how-apply/information-international-students/english-language-requirements .

Find out how to apply here https://bond.edu.au/future-students/study-bond/how-apply

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/master-counselling

For contact information see here https://bond.edu.au/program/master-counselling

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Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Read more
Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in:
-Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data.
-Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.
-Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge.
-Reporting results in a clear and logical manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The six study lines are as follows:
Aerosol Physics
Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the most recent theoretical concepts, measurement techniques and computational methods applied in aerosol research.

Geophysics of the Hydrosphere
Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes.

Meteorology
Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example. As a graduate of the meteorology line, you will be an expert in atmospheric phenomena who can produce valuable new information and share your knowledge.

Biogeochemical Cycles
Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Remote Sensing
Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry. As a graduate of the remote sensing line you will have broad expertise in the operational principles of remote sensing instruments as well as methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Atmospheric Chemistry and Analysis
Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods. As a graduate of this line you will have understanding of the chemical processes of the atmosphere and the latest environmental analytical methods, so you will have vital skills for environmental research.

Programme Structure

The basic degree in the Programme is the Master of Science (MSc). The scope of the degree is 120 credits (ECTS). As a prerequisite you will need to have a relevant Bachelor’s degree. The possible major subjects are Physics, Meteorology, Geophysics, Chemistry, and Forest Ecology. The programme is designed to be completed in two years. Studies in ATM-MP consist of various courses and project work: lecture courses, seminars, laboratory work and intensive courses.

Your first year of studies will consist mainly of lecture courses. During the second year, you must also participate in the seminar course and give a presentation yourself. There is also a project course, which may contain laboratory work, data analysis, or theoretical or model studies. You will have to prepare a short, written report of the project. There are also several summer and winter schools as well as field courses for students in the Programme. Many of the courses take place at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. The intensive courses typically last 5–12 days and include a concise daily programme with lectures, exercises and group work.

Career Prospects

There is a global need for experts with multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and environmental issues. Governmental environmental agencies need people who are able to interpret new scientific results as a basis for future legislation. Industry, transportation and businesses need to be able to adapt to new regulations.

As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. Graduates of the Programme have found employment in Meteorological Institutes and Environmental Administration in Finland and other countries, companies manufacturing instrumentation for atmospheric and environmental measurements and analysis, and consultancy companies. The Master's degree in ATM-MP also gives you a good background if you intend to proceed to doctoral level studies.

Internationalization

The Programme offers an international study environment with more than 30% of the students and teaching staff coming from abroad.

The ATM-MP is part of a Nordic Nordplus network in Atmosphere-Biosphere Studies, which gives you good opportunities to take courses currently in fourteen Nordic and Baltic universities. There are also several Erasmus agreements with European universities. The PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX) project provides you with opportunities to carry out part of your studies especially in China and Russia.

Research Focus

All the units teaching in the Programme belong to the National Centre of Excellence (FCoE) in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM), which is a multidisciplinary team of the Departments of Physics, Forest Sciences and Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Eastern Finland (Kuopio) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

The main objective of FCoE ATM is to quantify the feedbacks between the atmosphere and biosphere in a changing climate. The main focus of the research is on investigating the following topics:
1. Understanding the climatic feedbacks and forcing mechanisms related to aerosols, clouds, precipitation and biogeochemical cycles.
2. Developing, refining and utilising the newest measurement and modelling techniques, from quantum chemistry to observations and models of global earth systems.
3. Creating a comprehensive understanding of the role of atmospheric clusters and aerosol particles in regional and global biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and their linkages to atmospheric chemistry.
4. Integrating the results in the context of understanding regional and global Earth systems.

In addition to the research focus of FCoE, current research in hydrospheric geophysics at Helsinki University has an emphasis on cryology, with a focus on the effect of aerosols on Indian glaciers, the impact of climate change on the Arctic environment, the dynamics of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard, and the winter season in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

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This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. Read more
This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. The program is delivered by faculty with professional and practitioner industry insight, providing a functional, real-world understanding of the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication issues.

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program will give graduates the skills necessary to communicate effectively in complex circumstances, through the use of diverse media and communication genres and engaging different audiences across multiple cultural settings.

Graduates will be familiar with non-governmental, civic, and business organizations and will have an understanding of how the making and shaping of meaning is fundamental to the reproduction of culture.

Course themes include:
-Intercultural and International Communication
-Intercultural Competence
-Media Relations in a Global Context
-Public Affairs and Advocacy
-Social Marketing
-Sport for Society
-Communication for Health and Well-Being

This program is delivered in two formats: an 18-month on-campus program, or a two-year blended program incorporating online learning with one on-campus residency, with the opportunity for an internship or research course. As well, this program features an intercultural field study experience to ensure you have opportunities to apply your learning in both intercultural and international contexts.

This program is recognized as full-time by StudentAid BC, meaning B.C. residents on this program are eligible for full-time government student loan assistance.

Who It’s For

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program is for strategic and independent-thinking communication managers looking to improve their ability to assist organizations respond to the rapidly changing global environment, as well as individuals with an arts or science undergraduate degree who want to pursue or advance their career in professional communication in the intercultural or international sphere. This program is designed to balance Intercultural Communication with International Communication to better integrate theory and practice.

There are two learning models available for this program, with each model traditionally attracting slightly different students:
-Two-Year Blended Model – The students that lean towards this option tend to have significant professional experience, and have a background as communication managers and leaders.
-18-Month On-Campus Model – Shortly after completing their bachelor degree, the students that tend to take up this model have a solid understanding of the theoretical aspects of communication, with some relevant work experience as communication specialists and liaisons.

Through our Flexible Admission process, significant professional experience in lieu of academic requirements is also considered.

Outcomes

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication prepares individuals for work in:
-International or multicultural governmental or non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
-International journalism and documentary-reporting
-Multi-ethnic and multicultural communities
-International media
-Intercultural conflict management
-International communication enterprises
-Social marketing and development aid
-International relations
-Community activism
-Sustainable international and intercultural development
-Cultural interpretation and mediation
-Further studies in any of these fields

Graduates will gain:
-Knowledge of both the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication and an ability to communicate successfully through multiple modes (e.g. through written and oral discourse, visual language, multimodal media) across culturally diverse settings.
-The ability to use computer-mediated technology to manage the processes required for the production and reproduction of culture.
-Knowledge of traditional and new media and their operation across diverse audiences.
-Knowledge of government, non-government, civic, and business organizations and an understanding of how meaning-making is fundamental to the operation of these.
-An understanding of the social forces shaping the globalization of the world, combined with a practical understanding of how processes such as transnationalism, travel and tourism, global commerce, migration, diaspora, refugee movement, global identity politics, information flows, postcolonial governmental relations, and much more, shape communities worldwide.
-An understanding of the cultural dynamics underpinning the formation of local, regional and national communities with regard to issues such as the formation of cultural identities, the shaping of gender inclusion, racialization, multicultural policy and education, ritualization, language protection and cultural revival, multicultural health communication campaigns, environmental culture, political culture, indigenous governance, sustainable development, and all forms of cross-cultural interaction.
-An understanding of culture, international and intercultural communication, negotiation and conflict management. An ability to communicate ethically in diverse and difficult circumstances.

Upon successful completion of the MA Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University, you will have demonstrated your competency at a professional and international level, and that you are prepared to meet the challenges facing communication managers in today’s fast-changing cultural, socio-economic, and political environments.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-All applicants must show evidence of having sufficient knowledge, skills and abilities to complete a demanding academic course of study at a master's level and have significant professional communication experience.
-Applicants without an undergraduate degree, but more than three years (90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education, should have at least two years of relevant work experience, preferably in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with 2-3 years (60-90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education should have at least five years of relevant international/intercultural work experience in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with less than two years of relevant post-secondary education should have at least ten years of high-level, professional communication experience in a leadership capacity.

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The Master of Philosophy specialising in Inclusive Innovation (MPhil) is an interdisciplinary, research-based degree that leads to the development of novel and sustainable solutions for social challenges. Read more

The Master of Philosophy specialising in Inclusive Innovation (MPhil) is an interdisciplinary, research-based degree that leads to the development of novel and sustainable solutions for social challenges. Join like-minded visionaries on a rich learning journey, and spend a year working both individually and with others where expertise, life experience, passion and innovation converge to support new possibilities and ideas.

Overview

The MPhil Inclusive Innovation is a one-year modular programme designed to be a collaboration between GSB faculty and pass innovators. The MPhil curriculum is structured around three main components: learning, engaging, and reflecting and creating – this can be referred to as praxeology (the study of purposeful human action).  

1. Learning

The programme provides a grounding in the fundamentals of inclusive innovation, as well as the challenges facing those working on social and environmental issues in Africa today. A typical class flows from student presentations and group feedback to focusing on topics such as values-based leadership and business model innovation, integrative thinking and design thinking.

2. Engaging

From the start of the programme, innovators identify a problem of interest and start developing a deep understanding of the context behind the issue they’d like to address. They conduct independent research, including a literature review, field studies, interviews, observations and assessment of market needs. This scholarly approach leads to a fuller understanding of the practical possibilities for contributing to the issue concerned.

3. Reflecting and creating

Personal reflections and peer-to-peer feedback all help to spur on the intellectual development of inclusive innovators and their ideas.

The MPhil’s desired outcomes are:

  • A practical outcome or artefact – prototype, framework, business model, etc.
  • A research thesis that has a strong narrative around the artefact development and clearly illustrates a contribution to knowledge.
  • An embodied experience of business model innovation (entrepreneuring)

Inclusive innovators who complete the MPhil will be skilled at:

  • Undertaking and managing complex innovation-focused projects.
  • Identifying and coping with the internal experience of entrepreneuring.
  • Using systems thinking, design thinking and integrative thinking to take on business-model innovation.
  • Planning a new venture or process, including a detailed strategy and feasibility.

MPhil Benefits

You will gain the following during the MPhil in Inclusive Innovation programme:

New thinking

This MPhil degree encourages inclusive innovators to think critically and innovatively to meet new demands. The programme gears participants towards becoming advanced strategic and systems thinkers.

Shorter invention cycles

MPhil innovators will test assumptions and prototype solutions in a “living lab” environment. It’s a free-thinking cross disciplinary space that helps shorten the cycle time from invention to application of innovations and solutions through interaction and debate with consumers, experts, industry and organisations in the relevant ecosystem.

Access to industry experts

Innovators will be exposed to key local and global specialists – from deep-content experts to market experts in the community. The insight and feedback they receive will help them iterate and improve their solutions at various stages.

Networking

Inclusive innovators will build personal relationships with leading experts across different industries and will be plugged into the next generation of African innovators.

Personal fulfillment

Self-reflection, introspection and personal growth are core elements of the programme. The MPhil develops inclusive innovators who boldly pursue ambitious ideas and dreams.



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The MSc in Computational Finance will introduce students to the computational methods that are widely used by practitioners and financial institutions in today's markets. Read more

The MSc in Computational Finance will introduce students to the computational methods that are widely used by practitioners and financial institutions in today's markets. This will provide students with a solid foundation not only in traditional quantitative methods and financial instruments, but also scientific computing, numerical methods, high-performance computing, distributed ledgers, big-data analytics, and agent-based modelling. These techniques will be used to understand financial markets from a post-crisis perspective which incorporates findings from the study of financial markets at high-frequency time scales, modern approaches to understanding systematic risk and financial contagion, and disruptive technologies such as distributed-ledgers and crypto-currencies. The programme is highly practical, and students will have the opportunity to apply their learning to real-world data and case studies in hands-on laboratory sessions.

Key benefits

  • An understanding of modern financial technology (FinTech) including electronic trading and distributed-ledger technology.
  • Practical hands-on techniques for working with and analysing financial data, which draw on modern developments in Artificial Intelligence and Big Data technology.
  • The opportunity to understand the practical aspects of quantitative finance and FinTech from Industry experts located in the heart of one of the World’s financial centres.

Description

Computational Finance studies problems of optimal investment, risk management and trade execution from a computational perspective. As with any engineering discipline, computational finance analyses a given problem by first building a model for it and then examining the model. In computational finance, however, our model is typically analysed by running computer programs, rather than solving mathematical equations. In addition to standard computational methods such as Monte-Carlo option pricing, you will also learn more advanced modelling techniques such as agent-based modelling, in which the model itself takes the form of a computer program.

The programme will provide a foundation in the core skills required for successful risk management and optimal investment by giving a grounding in the key quantitative methods used in finance, including computer programming, numerical methods, scientific computing, numerical optimisation, and an overview of the financial markets. You can then go on to study more advanced topics, including the market micro-structure of modern electronic exchanges, high-frequency finance, distributed-ledger technology and agent-based modelling.

Career prospects

Students are expected to go in to careers such as Investment Banking, Hedge Funds and Regulatory Bodies.  



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This course is for people already working in a healthcare setting (in areas including psychiatry, clinical and forensic psychology, occupational therapy, social work, nursing, general medical practitioners) who are interested in delivering Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) in clinical settings. Read more

This course is for people already working in a healthcare setting (in areas including psychiatry, clinical and forensic psychology, occupational therapy, social work, nursing, general medical practitioners) who are interested in delivering Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) in clinical settings. It will provide sufficient theoretical and skills training and can develop your career as a therapist and the service you provide.

CBT is the model of psychotherapy most tested by research trials for a range of mental and even physical disorders, ranging from depression, anxiety and phobias to eating disorders, schizophrenia and chronic pain. Healthcare professionals are increasingly required to demonstrate a flexible, multidisciplinary approach to make the best use of skills and resources.

The NHS actively promotes provision of evidence-based management. CBT is the evidence-based psychotherapy par excellence. It can be effective as a stand-alone treatment and can also be used in conjunction with other medical or psychological treatments. The model is versatile and creative and its techniques can be used selectively in general medical, psychological and nursing practice, as well as informing whole courses of integrated treatment.

This course will help you refine your CBT skills, empower you to use the model in a range of clinical situations, and focus on the development of a respectful and pro-active relationship with patients. The therapeutic alliance is central to the delivery of CBT and the course will teach you to forge a positive collaborative relationship with patients as a means of improving and maintaining the patient’s mental health.

Teaching, learning and assessment

The teaching and learning methods used will encourage participative and independent learning and you will arrange to see patients one day per week. Assessment methods will include essays, audio recordings of therapy sessions, case studies and supervisor assessments. Class sizes are usually around 30 for the PgCert and 15 for the PgDip. The course is delivered by staff of NHS Lothian and Greater Glasgow.

Teaching hours and attendance

You will attend a 10-day induction block followed by a four day teaching block in the first week of every month. Links with industry/professional bodies On completion, you can apply to be accredited by the BABCP (British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies) in due course.

Modules

15 credits: CBT for Anxiety and Depression/ Principles of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy/ Research Skills in CBT/ Advanced CBT for Anxiety Disorders/ Introduction to Complex Adaptation of CBT 30 credits: Application of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy If studying for the MSc, you will also complete a dissertation of a research project within a chosen specialist area of CBT. The components of the dissertation will include: a research proposal; a literature review; and a paper for publication.

Careers

There is a growing demand for therapists specifically trained in this field. This course will enable you to develop your career and the service you provide.

Quick Facts

  • Learn the theory and practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) – the best evidenced psychotherapy in mental health.
  • Core CBT competencies are developed through multiple methods, including lectures, workshops, role play, academic evaluation and close clinical supervision.
  • As trainee therapists, students benefit from the vast experience of expert CBT practitioners from throughout the UK delivering on our specialist postgraduate teaching course.


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This is a full-time research-based postgraduate degree, run jointly by Imperial College London and the Natural History Museum, London. Read more
This is a full-time research-based postgraduate degree, run jointly by Imperial College London and the Natural History Museum, London.

OPEN DAY

visit the course pages for more information about the next Open Day at NHM on Wednesday 7 June 2017.

OUTLINE

Taxonomy and systematics provide the foundation for studying the great diversity of the living world. These fields are rapidly changing through new digital and molecular technologies. There is ever greater urgency for species identification and monitoring in virtually all the environmental sciences, and evolutionary ‘tree thinking’ is now applied widely in most areas of the life sciences. These courses provide in-depth training in the study of biodiversity based on the principles of phylogenetics, evolutionary biology, palaeobiology and taxonomy. The emphasis is on quantitative approaches and current methods in DNA-based phylogenetics, bioinformatics, and the use of digital collections.

LOCATION

The course is a collaboration of Imperial College London (Silwood Park) with the Natural History Museum. This provides an exciting scientific environment of two institutions at the forefront of taxonomic and evolutionary research.

[[SYLLABUS ]]
The MRes in Biosystematics features hands-on research projects that cover the main methodological approaches of modern biosystematics. After 6 weeks of general skills training, students will ‘rotate’ through three research groups each conducting a separate 14-week project in specimen-based phylogenetics, molecular systematics/genomics, and bioinformatics. The projects may be of the student’s own design. Students attend small group tutorials, lab meetings and research seminars.

TRANSFERABLE SKILLS]

The GSLSM (Graduate School of Life Sciences and Medicine) at Imperial College London provides regular workshops covering a wide range of transferable skills, and MRes students are encouraged to undertake at least four during the year. Topics include: Applied Writing Skills, Creativity and Ideas Generation, Writing for Publication, Introduction to Regression Modelling, Introduction to Statistical Thinking.

RECENT PROJECTS

MORPHOLOGICAL

The Natural History Museum’s Dorothea Bate Collection of dwarfed deer from Crete: adaptation and proportional size reduction in comparison with larger mainland species
Cambrian lobopodians and their position as stem-group taxa
Atlas of the Caecilian World: A Geometric Morphometric perspective
Tooth crown morphology in Caecilian amphibians
Morphometrics of centipede fangs: untapping a possible new source of character data for the Scolopendromorpha
Phylogeny of the Plusiinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Exploring conflict between larvae and adults
A comparison between species delineation based on DNA sequences and genital morphometrics in beetles (Coleoptera)

MOLECULAR

Geographical distribution of endemic scavenger water beetles (Hydrophilidae) on the island of Madagascar based on DNA sequence data
Cryptic diversity within Limacina retroversa and Heliconoides inflate
Phylogenetics of pteropods of the Southern Oceans
Molecular discrimination of the European Mesocestoides species complex
A molecular phylogeny of the monkey beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Hopliini)
The molecular evolution of the mimetic switch locus, H, in the Mocker Swallowtail Papilio dardanus Brown, 1776
Phylogenetic and functional diversity of the Sargasso Sea Metagenome

BIOINFORMATICS

A study into the relation between body size and environmental variables in South African Lizards
Cryptic diversity and the effect of alignment parameters on tree topology in the foraminifera
Delimiting evolutionary taxonomic units within the bacteria: 16S rRNA and the GMYC model
Testing the molecular clock hypothesis and estimating divergence times for the order Coleoptera
Taxon Sampling: A Comparison of Two Approaches
Investigating species concepts in bacteria: Fitting Campylobacter and Streptococcus MLST profiles to an infinite alleles model to test population structure
Assessing the mitochondrial molecular clock: the effect of data partitioning, taxon sampling and model selection

ON COMPLETION OF THE COURSE, THE STUDENTS WILL HAVE:

• a good understanding of the state of knowledge of the field, together with relevant practical experience, in three areas of biosystematic science in which he or she has expressed an interest;
• where applicable, the ability to contribute to the formulation and development of ideas underpinning potential PhD projects in areas of interest, and to make an informed decision on the choice of potential PhD projects;
• a broad appreciation of the scientific opportunities within the NHM and Imperial College;
• knowledge of a range of specific research techniques and professional and transferable skills.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Students are encouraged to view the NHM website for further information, and to contact the course administrator if they have any queries. Visits can be arranged to the NHM to meet the course organisers informally and to be given a tour of the facilities. Applications should be made online on the Imperial College London website.

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Clinical Academic Programme -. The academic programme is based on a ‘core competency’ model (BPS, 2007) and comprises four main areas of teaching. Read more

About the course

Clinical Academic Programme -

The academic programme is based on a ‘core competency’ model (BPS, 2007) and comprises four main areas of teaching: Professional Practice and Personal Development; Therapeutic Models and Interventions; Research Methods in Clinical Psychology; and Client Groups and Client Contexts.

Each of these four areas is further divided into a number of specific teaching modules that span the three years of training and correspond as much as possible with the structure and sequence of clinical placements. An awareness of the issues of ethical practice and equality for all is highlighted in all modules. Particular consideration is given to the many ways in which issues relating to diversity and inequality impact on the work of practising clinical psychologists within the lectures, and all lectures are formally evaluated on this by the trainees. Additionally, there are specific lectures considering a wide range of diversity issues within the Clients in Context module taught across the three years.

Four models of psychological therapy are currently taught on the programme: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), systemic and family psychotherapy, personal construct therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The content of the introductory CBT module is mapped onto the IAPT curriculum to enable trainees to include this in their portfolio of competencies, should they wish to seek employment where this is a specific requirement. More advanced training is provided in the third year of training. A previous trainee recently gained accreditation with the BABCP based on their CBT training at the University of Hertfordshire.

The academic programme is located within the overall programme philosophy which places particular emphasis on incorporating constructivist and social constructionist approaches to conceptualising psychological difficulties and their management. In line with the programme philosophy, an important aim of the academic programme is to train clinical psychologists who can understand and apply a range of psychological theories and approaches to both clinical practice and research. We teach our trainees to draw on multiple theoretical and evidence bases to develop individually tailored assessments, formulations, interventions and evaluations of complex psychological problems. We emphasise the flexibility to adapt and combine different approaches as a key competence, and our curriculum therefore aims to develop a broad, thorough and sophisticated understanding of various psychological theories and therapeutic approaches.

Service User Participation:

The DClinpsych course encourages service user and carers' participation in the training and have established a committee of service users and carers who consult and participate in the training course.

Problem Based learning -

Problem-based learning (PBL) forms an important part of clinical training at the University of Hertfordshire. As part of the academic programme trainees complete a series of small-group based PBL exercises, which aim to promote reflective, collaborative and self-directed learning.

Throughout the three years, trainees also participate in a series of small group discussions to consider academic papers and clinical cases. These discussions provide an academic context for trainees to integrate theory and research, to highlight theory-practice links, and to enable peer review of formulation and intervention plans. More formal case presentations are undertaken in the third year.

A unique feature of our clinical psychology training at UH is the access that our teachers and trainees have to a purpose-built, advanced simulation training centre.

The trainees are regarded as mature students, and for this reason an adult learning model is adopted. In line with this model and the overall programme philosophy, it is recognised that not only do trainees learn in different ways, but also that they can pursue their own perceptions of the material being taught and interpret it for themselves.

In line with HPC requirements for all clinical training programmes, all trainees selected will be informed of the various activities that form part of the academic curriculum (e.g., role-plays, problem-based learning, simulation training, small group discussions, etc). Consent to participate in all aspects of the academic programme will be sought prior to the programme commencing.

How to apply

All applications for funded places to the Doctorate are made through the national Clearing House for Postgraduate Courses in Clinical Psychology (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp)

Our next intake of Trainees will be at the end of September 2016. Application packs are available from the Clearing House from September 2015, and the deadline for applications is early December 2015.

Each academic year starts at the end of September or beginning of October with a compulsory four-week, full-time introductory block of teaching. This is followed by teaching all day on Thursdays and Fridays during term-time.

We are now accepting self funding trainees from September 2015: See below on how to apply.

Up to two fee-paying places, on our doctoral programme for International, European and British applicants, are available for entry in Autumn 2015. Fee-paying students will follow the same programme of study as trainees with NHS funded places.

Applications for our fee-paying places need to be made directly to the programme, using our application form. The closing date for these applications is 1st March 2016.

Overseas applicants are strongly advised to apply for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) from the British Psychological Society (BPS) before applying. For further details about how to go about this, please view the BPS website.

How to contact us

For further information, please contact the Course Administrators Ms Neeli Clarke () or Catriona Roy () or tel +44 (0)1707 286322 +44 (0)1707 286322

How to find us

We are based in the Health Research Building on the College Lane Campus. Where to find us - http://www.herts.ac.uk/contact-us/where-to-find-us/college-lane-maps-and-directions

Why choose this course?

The course has a particular remit to train clinical psychologists to take up NHS positions. Clinical psychologists working in the region support the course, and many are working in collaboration with the Programme Team to provide placement supervision, research supervision, teaching and skills workshops.
The DClinPsy Trainees attend the University for their lectures, seminars and tutor support, but also spend approximately three days per week on their clinical placements.

Careers

In line with the concept of the "scientist-practitioner", the programme of research aims to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills required to undertake high-quality research, appraise literature critically, and adopt an evidence-based approach to clinical practice, where possible. It also aims to foster in trainees an awareness of the need for, and motivation to undertake, research in clinical settings - both during their placements and after qualification - to contribute to the evidence base of the profession.

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Why study at Roehampton. In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.
  • The course is unique in offering students the opportunity to study a comprehensive range of validated attachment procedures at university level.
  • The programme combines theory, practice and research in the field of child and adult attachment in troubled populations.
  • The programme equips students with evaluation skills that will help them mount comprehensive assessments of attachment and family functioning.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015).

Course summary

The MSc Attachment Studies course provides students with a specific qualification in the assessment of child and adult attachment, parenting and family functioning. Designed for health and social care professionals, our aim is to prepare you to be at the forefront of the next generation of attachment scholars and practitioners.

This course is best suited for professionals who are interested in broadening their skills in assessing attachment, improving the outcome of interventions with their clients and conducting small or large scale research projects. Central to the programme is the Patricia Crittenden’s Dynamic Maturational Model of attachment combined with a culturally sensitive approach uniquely applicable to alleviate the suffering of distressed and traumatised people.

A unique feature of this programme is the opportunity to learn how to apply and conduct a wide range of assessments and procedures for forensic, clinical or research purposes. All students are required to learn to code at least one procedure where you will be able to achieve clinical or research levels of reliability in analysing the results. You can also learn to give and to analyse bio-physiological measures such as cortisol levels, EEG and heart rate variability.

Although this course does not offer therapeutic training, you will be taught by experts in the field to gain the necessary knowledge to formulate intervention plans and select therapeutic approaches that will benefit your clients.

You will gain a comprehensive understanding of attachment theory including the latest developments in the neuroscience of attachment relationships and parenting. Our systemic approach broadens the study of attachment from mothers and infants to the attachment of older children, adults, family systems and the wider social and community networks.

The interdisciplinary focus on both practice and research is invaluable for students interested in a research career in the field of attachment studies. Examples of recent and current PhD students’ research include the development of the Meaning of the Child to the Parent Interview, the physiology of developmental trauma (PTSD) in children, the effectiveness of play therapy with traumatised children, and attachment in chimpanzees reared by humans.

Content

In this course, you will gain a variety of skillsets and knowledge through a substantial coverage of the underpinning attachment theory and research. This includes an understanding of the latest development in the neuroscience of attachment and trauma. You will study core concepts of attachment and Dynamic Maturational Model theory, family systems and object relations theory and primatology.

You will also gain a comprehensive knowledge in learning how to administer a wide range of validated attachment and family assessments applicable for use with adults and children of all ages. Examples of these procedures are:

  • The Strange Situation Procedure
  • Pre-school Assessment of Attachment
  • Narrative Story Stems using the Child Attachment and Play Assessment
  • The School Age Assessment of Attachment
  • The DMM-Adult Attachment Interview 
  • The Meaning of the Child to the Parent (a central part of parenting assessments)

This programme offers innovative modules such as the infant mental health module, research methods and the formulation of intervention plans. The infant mental health module is designed to deepen your knowledge of early years development and includes an introduction to the Infant CARE-Index. You will also observe a young child in a natural setting. Besides observing a traditional mother-child relationship, this assessment module also includes observations of older children, adults, family and wider systems.

The research methods module prepares you to design and carry out single case study or small sample empirical research. You will also be able to learn how to administer and analyse bio-physical assessments such as heart rate variability, cortisol and EGG and eye tracking.

The formulation module teaches you to interpret the results of attachment assessments and select the intervention most likely to succeed with a particular client or family. We also offer a forensic model of assessment designed for use with courts and other decision-making forums.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules:

  • Attachment Theory and Research
  • The Application of Assessments to Clinical and Practice Settings
  • Formulation of Treatment and Intervention Plans
  • Coding and Forensic Application of Assessments
  • Infant Mental Health
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation

Postgraduate Certificate

Designed for busy social care professionals, the Certificate in DMM Attachment based family assessment and intervention enables you to build upon your skills at a pace that suits you. 

  • The Certificate consists of three 20-credit modules in Theory, Assessment and Intervention.
  • Each module is delivered by a combination of short blocks in the University, distance learning and private study.
  • On successful completion of the Certificate, you can top up to the MSc.

The Certificate is available for students who would like to apply directly to the University of Roehampton, or it can be delivered by your workplace for employees with a minimum of ten students. 

Career options

Careers in psychology and social work.

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