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Masters Degrees (Mitigation)

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The programme links the fundamental disciplines of Civil Engineering (design and construction of civil and environmental structures and infrastructures)… Read more

Mission and Goals

The programme links the fundamental disciplines of Civil Engineering (design and construction of civil and environmental structures and infrastructures) with a broad overview of the most advanced Risk Management tools, with particular attention to forecasting and prevention issues concerning structures and infrastructures and soil, on which they are built or embedded, due to natural and anthropic causes.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering-for-risk-mitigation/

Career Opportunities

The graduate in Civil Engineering for Risk Mitigation deals with the design of structures and infrastructures, planning, control and management of town and land systems, evaluation of the environmental impact of structures and infrastructures as well as research in public and private institutes. He/she can therefore find employment with construction companies, design and consultancy companies and has access to Public Administration offices.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Civil_Eng__Risk_Mitigation.pdf
The Master of Science programme is aimed at providing knowledge and expertise in the field of structural and non-structural measures for the mitigation of natural and anthropic hazards. It offers a synthesis of fundamental and advanced civil engineering tools for Risk Management, integrated by competences in different areas (land use planning, economics and finance, communication, law, psychology). The graduate in C.E.R.M. deals with the design of structures and infrastructures, planning, control and management of town and land systems, and he/she is able to evaluate the environmental impact of structures and infrastructures. He/she can find employment in construction, design and consultancy companies and may have access to contests for positions in the Public Administration.
The programme is taught in English

Subjects

In the first year the following topics are proposed:
- Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
- Soil-Structure Interaction
- Tools for Risk Management
- Flood Risk
- Structural Analysis
- Fundamentals of Gis

In the second year students choose three thematic modules among the followings: Engineering Structures for the Environment; Geo-Engineering Techniques for Unstable Slopes; Emergency Plans for Hydro-Geological Risk; Structure Retrofitting for Seismic and Exceptional Loads; Transport management in emergency planning; Hazards from Industrial Sites: Process Analysis and Risk Assessment.

The final project is devoted to the solution of a field case.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering-for-risk-mitigation/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering-for-risk-mitigation/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on society. The study of the causes and impacts of climate change and the measures required to mitigate the impacts and adapt is complex. Read more
Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on society. The study of the causes and impacts of climate change and the measures required to mitigate the impacts and adapt is complex. It is essential that scientists, engineers and environmental decision-makers understand the fundamentals of the causes, impacts and management measures involved in dealing with such important issues.

The MSc course offers one core module to introduce climate change causes and impacts (Semester 1) and reviews the possible mitigation and adaptation measures in a second (Semester 2). The course structure allows for three optional and relevant modules each semester from amongst the University's postgraduate syllabus so that a 'tailored' course can be constructed.

For potential optional modules please refer to the module/subject areas available and listed in other School MSc courses, specifically those of the School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences, and School of the Built Environment. Advice will be given on the most appropriate modules available from the different Schools of the University in topics ranging across scientific, engineering, economics and management modules.

CORE MODULES

Climate Change: Causes and Impacts
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures
Research Project (MSc only)

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The Global Environmental Change and Policy course focuses on 4 key questions. What are the nature and causes of global environmental change (GEC)?. Read more

The Global Environmental Change and Policy course focuses on 4 key questions:

  • What are the nature and causes of global environmental change (GEC)?
  • What do we know and not know about GEC - and why?
  • What are the biological, physico-chemical and human implications of GEC?
  • What can and should be done about mitigating and adapting to GEC?

Structure and Objectives

By addressing those four questions the overall aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive and broad understanding of the scientific, legal and policy concerns informing the GEC field, and to guide students towards applying, independently, the necessary tools to address GEC questions, analytically and critically. This is done through small group seminars, lectures and case studies arranged into four main strands:

Strand I - Climate Change Science, Environmental and Health Impacts and Adaptation 

This strand explores the analysis and prediction of change in the earth's physical and chemical systems and their impact based on scientific evidence. Sessions include analysis, prediction and impact of changes such as climate change and acidification in the atmosphere, oceans, the water cycle and global land cover and use. In light of the projections of scientific bodies such as the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), students become acquainted with different global warming scenarios and their likely impact on water management, vegetation, soil, health and other relevant sectors, and the correlated adaptation policies required in different parts of the globe in order to manage environmental change. It also addresses specific adaptation policies necessary in areas that are most likely to be affected by climate change, such as in Africa.

Strand II – Climate Change Mitigation, Business Strategies and Innovation

This strand focuses on climate change mitigation (non-LULUCF) and related business strategies and the development of technologies in the transition towards a low-carbon economy. A number of greenhouse gas mitigation and alternative energy policies – including renewable energy deployment and Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) - are selected for analysis. It examines the social and economic causes of the environmental changes with respect to population, urbanisation, energy policy, and pollution and addresses the policy options to mitigate climate change. It includes a study of international and regional schemes, carbon markets and alternative policies such as carbon or fuel taxes. In addition, this strand assesses the broader question of quantifying the costs and benefits of mitigation and adaptation in light of the developmental priorities of different regions of the globe, as well as possible business solutions towards low carbon economic growth.

Strand III – Biodiversity, Land Use Change and Forestry, and Conservation Strategies

This strand explores biodiversity loss, conservation strategies, the monitoring and prediction of change in the earth's ecosystems and their response to a range of environmental changes including climate change, and the impact of these changes on humans, ecosystems and the management of natural resources. The different mechanisms proposed or already applied to protect biodiversity broadly and in relation to climate change are covered in this part of the course. Among other things, we may critique mitigation policies applicable to the agricultural sector and look at the sustainability of biofuels as cleaner sources of energy.

Strand IV – Law and Governance 

The strand draws together some of the issues outlined above. The role of international law and policy in developing innovative solutions for global environmental problems, such as climate change and biodiversity loss, is emphasised. It addresses the law and politics behind the negotiation of, inter alia, global climate change agreements, the international framework for climate change, environmental governance, examines the role of compliance and monitoring, asks bigger philosophical questions related to rights, equity and justice in an environmental context and looks at the fundamental principles and norms of the international environmental law regime and their utility in going forwards. 

Learning and Teaching

The course structure, individual seminars and activities are designed to enable each student to attain the following:

Understanding of:

  • the current state of knowledge about GEC and the uncertainties surrounding it;
  • the similarities and differences between the problems raised by GEC and other environmental problems;
  • the key processes, drivers and interrelationships involved;
  • the principal impacts of GEC on natural and human systems; and the principal ethical, legal and socio-economic issues raised;
  • particular problems faced by developing countries;
  • interregional and regional institutional mechanisms and scientific organisations;
  • the social, economic and environmental objectives for the global environment.

Skills in:

  • the analysis of the global dimension of environmental problems, and the extent to which GEC raises distinctive challenges;
  • the location, handling, critical evaluation, interpretation and analysis of GECP information;
  • the application and appraisal of selected analytical techniques;
  • the design and execution of a GEC-related project; communicating clear, unambiguous information, evidence or advice.

Capabilities in:

  • applying global perspectives to complex environmental problems; 
  • analysing the key drivers of GEC and their interrelationships;
  • developing independent judgement in relation to GEC-related issues and evidence;
  • participating in the formulation, implementation or evaluation of GEC-related policies;
  • participating effectively in competent consultancy or advisory work.

Coursework

Understanding, skills and capabilities are developed and assessed through active participation in coursework which comprises research and presentation, negotiation and conflict management and a panel group exercise. Panel Meetings run throughout the option term. The aims of these sessions are to establish and coordinate research, discussion, presentation and negotiation in respect of selected global environmental change issues, leading ultimately to the formal conclusion or agreed policy and scientific statement on one or more aspects of GECP.

Examples of GECP Student Destinations

  • UK Department for Business, Energy and Innovation
  • Greenstone
  • Royal Borough of Greenwich
  •  Natural Capital Partners
  • ERM
  • ShareAction
  • Ricardo Energy & Environment
  • UK Department for Transport
  • PwC


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The only programme of its kind in the world, GCU's MSc Climate Justice explores one of the most pressing issues of our times. climate justice, where climate change, human rights and policy development intersect. Read more

The only programme of its kind in the world, GCU's MSc Climate Justice explores one of the most pressing issues of our times: climate justice, where climate change, human rights and policy development intersect.

Each year, the effects of climate change become more pronounced. People all over the world are already being displaced due to rising sea levels, crop-destroying droughts and disasters like floods and forest fires. Over the next decade, these climate consequences will only intensify. How we chose to move forward may be one of the most important ethical questions of the 21st century.

Your MSc Climate Justice programme will prepare you to think strategically and contribute to the growing field of climate justice. You might help craft public policy at a local or global level, work with a non-profit or intergovernmental agency, assist a developmental organisation or pursue academic research in the field.

Taking a practical, multi-disciplinary approach, the curriculum offers a solid foundation in the complex issues of climate justice.

  • Explore topics in resources and sustainability
  • Learn about carbon management and renewable energy technologies
  • Study how water access affects public health
  • Investigate gender issues and their implications for human rights
  • Master the basics of project management and environmental management

GCU's Centre for Climate Justice is taking the lead, collaborating to drive research and policy in the field. At GCU, the University for the Common Good, you'll join a community dedicated to achieving meaningful social change. You'll find friends, classmates, colleagues and professors who share your values in the fight for human rights.

As we come to this crossroads, we believe in working together to transform our society and strengthen our communities - for the common good.

What you will study

The MSc Climate Justice explores the principles that underpin climate justice; human rights, development and climate change. The programme is tailored to provide a practical angle to climate justice to allow students to graduate with a Masters which provides them with skills, approaches and methodologies for addressing climate justice in their future work plans. It can be studied full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

Resources and Sustainability

This module provides an overview of our resources (water, air, forests, soil, raw materials, energy, etc) and how to critically analyse how and why these resources are exploited on a global scale. This module will focus on both the natural and social and economic sciences to provide a holistic understanding of sustainable resource use and management.

Climate Change and Carbon Management

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of global climate change issues and the role of built environment in it, and an ability to conduct practical investigation of carbon management in the context of the built environment.

Climate Justice

Provides an overview of key issues that underpin climate justice (injustice) and the history of the climate justice movement and critique thereof Climate injustice and human rights to life are explored via addressing equity and equality including the implications, complexities and trade-offs between climate change and poverty. Controversial issues are examined by exploring challenging current economic models and theories and analysing failures(Kyoto, CDM and MDGs).

Human Rights, Gender and Development

This module critically examines the variety of ways in which a rights based approach seeks to engage with the impact of climate change. It does so by considering climate change within broader debates surrounding human rights and the structured nature of vulnerability in relation to gender and development.

Environmental Ethics and Climate Change

Critically examines the ethics of climate change. Rather than taking the concept of climate justice as its starting point, however, the focus is on locating the phenomena of climate change within the wider debates and schools of thought that are prevalent in the field of environmental ethics.

Climate Change, Adaptation and Mitigation

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of global climate change issues and the ways that differing political cultures can impact adaptation and mitigation measures. In addition, sectoral responses to climate change will be explored and country/regional mitigation strategies will be considered, using climate modelling to investigate how decisions regarding adaptation and mitigation emerge.

Water, Justice and Public Health

Develops a student's understanding and knowledge of the important links between water and public health and explores the water/food/energy nexus that prevents developing world countries from making the most of economic development opportunities. It discusses whether developed world solutions are appropriate or even desirable for implementation in the developing world.

Renewable Energy Technologies

The module concentrates on therenewable energy technologies most likely to succeed in the UK and other temperate countries, i.e. solar energy, energy from waste, wind, hydro and biomass. Renewable energy is regarded as an integral part of a sustainable development strategy and is intimately linked to safe water access and agriculture based economic development.

Master's Dissertation/Project

Provides the student with the opportunity to conduct an individual in-depth piece of research, into a topic of their own choosing. This includes elements of time management, achieving deadlines and outputs and different ways of presenting work.

Assessment methods

Students will be assessed via a combination of coursework, oral presentations, on-line discussions, computer based exercises, case study analysis, reports and a final dissertation.

Graduate prospects

Graduates of the MSc Climate Justice will find rewarding careers with development organisations, the UN and related organisations, government agencies and non-profit organisations - as well as within academic and research institutions.



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The Earthquake Engineering with Disaster Management (EEDM) MSc combines specialist structural and earthquake engineering knowledge with an advanced understanding of risk modelling for natural hazards in order to produce engineers who can deliver design holistic solutions and are able to work in engineering, catastrophe modelling and disaster management roles. Read more

The Earthquake Engineering with Disaster Management (EEDM) MSc combines specialist structural and earthquake engineering knowledge with an advanced understanding of risk modelling for natural hazards in order to produce engineers who can deliver design holistic solutions and are able to work in engineering, catastrophe modelling and disaster management roles.

About this degree

Graduates will be able to:

  • determine the vulnerability of ordinary and special structures to seismic actions
  • apply both current seismic codes and novel unconventional methodologies of seismic design, repair and assessment
  • assess the adequacy, economic viability and life-saving effectiveness of pre-event risk mitigation and post-event risk management solutions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) consisting of seven core modules (105 credits) and one optional module (15 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering
  • Structural Dynamics
  • Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Introduction to Seismic Design of Structures
  • Advanced Seismic Design Structures
  • Seismic Risk Assessment
  • Seismic Loss Mitigation and Strengthening of Low-Engineered Buildings

Optional modules

  • Advanced Structural Analysis
  • Catastrophe Risk Modelling
  • Finite Element Modelling and Numerical Methods
  • Natural and Environmental Disasters
  • Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Taught modules have been developed and are delivered in collaboration with experts from industry and non-governmental organisations. In addition a field trip is organised every year to an earthquake affected region.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Earthquake Engineering with Disaster Management MSc

Careers

Students graduate with strong technical engineering skills and rarely taught knowledge of risk evaluation. They are also able to understand the wider implications of disasters and are exposed to both industry and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates have gone on to successful careers in the civil engineering industry, in international NGOs, in the financial sector, and in academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Engineer, Wuzhou Engineering Corporation Ltd.
  • Design Civil Engineer, Cyprus Ministry of Education and Culture
  • ENgineer in HSE and Disaster management, MHS, Mabna Sazeh Houshmand , IRAN
  • PhD Earthquake Sciences,UCL
  • PhD Strengthening Buildings and Structure, The Cyprus University of Technology

Employability

The programme aims to create a new type of global earthquake engineer able to take a holistic approach to earthquake engineering and disaster management. Graduates of the programme will have developed the specialist skills necessary for a career in the engineering sector and other areas that require knowledge and understanding of earthquake engineering and disaster risk management/mitigation principles. The MSc is accredited by the Institute of Civil Engineers as a further learning programme that can count towards chartership.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering hosts EPICentre, a leading research centre in earthquake engineering, and provides an exciting environment in which to explore this new, multidisciplinary and constantly evolving science.

The programme has extensive links to industry through professional engineers and disaster managers who deliver lectures and seminars and support students on their research projects as industrial supervisors.

Students benefit from a voluntary field trip to the closest location of a recent major earthquake to study disaster management and the effects of the earthquake on the built environment, structural strengthening techniques and disaster management.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering

60% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Programme description. Based upon our highly successful on-campus MSc Carbon Management, this online programme utilises a blend of interactive content, videos, virtual case studies and online discussions to explore the science and business responses to climate change. Read more

Programme description

Based upon our highly successful on-campus MSc Carbon Management, this online programme utilises a blend of interactive content, videos, virtual case studies and online discussions to explore the science and business responses to climate change.

We examine the leading ways in which the global climate change challenge can be addressed, covering adaptation and mitigation solutions across a wide range of sectors and regions. The programme is designed for those with a passion for tackling climate change and who require the flexibility that online learning provides.

Online learning

This programme is delivered as flexible part-time study using our online virtual learning environment. You will learn from academics working at the leading edge of carbon management and climate change.

The lectures are all delivered online through our virtual learning environment. The lectures are delivered as a series of short video segments, animated slides and accompanying reading resources and links.

Each week students and staff also meet online to discuss issues, questions and ideas with the group.

As a student of one of our online learning programmes, you will:

  • have the flexibility to study when most convenient for you
  • be able to study from anywhere with an internet connection
  • have access to all University services and relevant academics
  • become part of a rich and varied online community of people in your field
  • learn the latest developments from people working at the leading edge in your field
  • study for an internationally-recognised Postgraduate Certificate

Programme structure

This programme takes one year to complete (September to July), with one course per semester.

The programme comprises three compulsory courses that move from the science of climate change and its impacts, through the key adaptation and mitigation solutions, to examination of the business response to climate change, and the risks and opportunities it represents.

The compulsory core courses typically are:

  • Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation
  • Climate Change Mitigation
  • Climate Change and Corporate Responsibility

All courses are subject to change.

With this Postgraduate Certificate you can choose to:

  • study it as a standalone qualification
  • combine it with our Postgraduate Certificate in Carbon Innovation to form a Postgraduate Diploma in Carbon Management
  • study it as one third of our MSc Carbon Management

Read more about our related online qualifications:

Career opportunities

Our existing MSc Carbon Management boasts excellent relationships with relevant employers, as well as a great alumni network covering more than 25 nations and providing unrivalled opportunities to link up on research projects and find new positions in the field of carbon management.

The main employment sectors for our graduates are those of climate change consultancy, renewable energy and carbon management project development, and government and NGO climate change advisors. Several of our graduates are also now studying for climate change-focused PhDs.



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The world’s climate is rapidly changing due to global warming, and will continue to do so for the decades and centuries ahead. This poses major challenges for future agricultural systems to provide food and other bioresources for the 9 billion people that will occupy the planet by 2050. Read more
The world’s climate is rapidly changing due to global warming, and will continue to do so for the decades and centuries ahead. This poses major challenges for future agricultural systems to provide food and other bioresources for the 9 billion people that will occupy the planet by 2050.

The 1 year MSc in Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) provides students with the skills and tools for developing agricultural practices, policies and measures addressing the challenge that global warming poses for agriculture and food security worldwide.

The MSc CCAFS programme is a partnership with the international CGIAR Research Programme on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), which is led by the CGIAR and Future Earth, and currently involves over 700 partners worldwide http://www.ccafs.cgiar.org.

Graduates of the MSc CCAFS programme will be equipped to pursue roles associated with local, national and international efforts to promote sustainable agricultural production, global food security and climate change adaptation.

There is now a growing recognition of how different agriculture systems can contribute to climate change, past and present. Hence, the dual challenge of adapting future agricultural systems to climate change, must also include mitigation of the effects of agriculture on climate change.

The MSc in Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) is aimed at students who want to combine scientific, engineering, technical, social or policy skills so that they are better equipped to understand and make significant contributions regarding adaptation and mitigation of climate change impacts on global agriculture and food security.

As the climate change challenge for sustainable development and sustainable business on the planet intensifies, there will be a need in all organisations for personnel skilled in both climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies/approaches for the development of greener economies, agrifood systems and low-environmental footprint supply chains.

Graduates of the MSc CCAFS will be well positioned and competitive for positions in research, policy, enterprise, business, administration and other activities across a wide range of public and private sector institutions internationally. Career mentoring, advice, strategy and facilitation will be provided to all students on the MSc CCAFS to ensure that MSc CCAFS graduates rapidly enter employment in relevant institutions and activities where they can build from their interests, experience and training.

Weblinks:

http://www.plantagbiosciences.org/msc-ccafs
http://www.nuigalway.ie/ccafs/
https://twitter.com/MScCCAFS_NUIG

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This programme is for graduates who wish to pursue a career in the environment sector in the UK or internationally, or those already working in the sector seeking to enhance their skills and employability. Read more
This programme is for graduates who wish to pursue a career in the environment sector in the UK or internationally, or those already working in the sector seeking to enhance their skills and employability. Graduates have an excellent track record of securing jobs in environmental consultancy, research and government agencies.

The unique emphasis of this programme is the practical challenge of measuring, analysing and evaluating dynamic environmental data for environmental problem-solving and management purposes. Learning is focussed around practical field and laboratory work.

A key element of the programme is the dissertation, for which students undertake research relating to any special interests they have in environmental management.

Core study areas include tools for river management, lake monitoring and management, wind erosion measurement and mitigation, natural hazard and catastrophe modelling, applied environmental GIS, hydroclimatological monitoring and modelling, evidence-based environmental management, research design, professional practice in environmental management, and a dissertation.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/geography/environmental-monitoring-management/

Programme modules

Environment-specific theory and skills:
- Tools for River Management
- Lake Monitoring and Management
- Wind Erosion Measurement and Mitigation

Generic skills:
- Natural Hazard and Catastrophe Modelling for Environmental Management
- Applied Environmental GIS
- Hydroclimatological Monitoring and Modelling
- Evidence-based Environmental Management
- Research Design
- Professional Practice in Environmental Management

Research Project:
- Dissertation

Selection

Interviews may be held on consideration of a prospective student’s application form. Overseas students are often accepted on their grades and strong recommendation from suitable referees.

Assessment

Coursework reports and a dissertation of up to 50 pages on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

Our graduates have outstanding employment prospects. Recent graduates are working in research, consultancy and government agencies in the fields of flood risk modelling and engineering, catastrophe risk analysis, water quality monitoring and transport planning.

Scholarships and sponsorships

Support may be available in the form of scholarships, and studentships awarded on a competitive basis.

Why choose geography at Loughborough?

The Department of Geography is a dynamic and vibrant place to be a postgraduate student and we are proud of our reputation for creating a friendly, supportive working environment.

We have over 25 academic staff who are all leading international experts in their fields.For example, our human geographers conduct research that informs government policy on student housing, international aid, alcohol policy and community cohesion, while our physical geographies continue to influence climate adaptation and development planning, the management of river sediments, and conservation management.

The work undertaken in our Department spans the breadth of contemporary physical and human geographical research (and involves strong connections into other disciplines) and deals with many of the most striking environmental, social and economic challenges facing our world, as demonstrated by our innovative programmes.

- Research
Postgraduate research, whether at PhD or MSc dissertation level, is a very important part of the academic life of our Department, and we invest a great deal of time and resources in supporting postgraduate students in their research.

- Career prospects
Loughborough postgraduates are highly employable. Employability skills are embedded throughout our programmes, with graduates appointed to posts across a full range of industries and sectors. Almost all of our postgraduates are in employment within a few months of graduating, and many who have studied in the Geography Department have embarked on academic research careers.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/geography/environmental-monitoring-management/

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MSc International Development. Environment, Climate Change and Development links environmental understanding grounded in the physical sciences with study of the social and economic bases of planning and managing development. Read more

MSc International Development: Environment, Climate Change and Development links environmental understanding grounded in the physical sciences with study of the social and economic bases of planning and managing development.

Over the past two decades, environmental considerations have become central to development policy and management. As a result, there is a growing need for policymakers, planners and managers to be fully conversant with the environmental dimension of development.

The course is therefore perfect if you're looking to benefit from research-led teaching by world-class academics that examines radical alternatives and critical insights into mainstream environmentalism.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide an interdisciplinary training to equip you with an understanding of the environmental and climate change dimensions of development trends and interventions.
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between environmental issues, climate change and development processes, and make judgements about policies and their implementation.
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote climate change adaptation, mitigation and sustainable development.
  • Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different approaches to promoting climate change adaptation, mitigation and sustainable development.
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to environment, climate change, and development.
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication.
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of environment, climate change, and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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This course focuses on both the scientific knowledge of hazards and modern strategies of emergency planning. Its interdisciplinary approach combines traditional classroom and field-based teaching and learning techniques with modern ICT-based learning support. Read more
This course focuses on both the scientific knowledge of hazards and modern strategies of emergency planning. Its interdisciplinary approach combines traditional classroom and field-based teaching and learning techniques with modern ICT-based learning support. A strong emphasis is placed on research-led teaching, student-centred learning and team-based activities, all of which develop the necessary skills required by practitioners in the field of hazard and disaster management.

-This course is ideal if you want to start or advance a career in hazard or risk management, environmental monitoring, emergency planning or catastrophe-related mitigation.
-Small student numbers allow us to modify the emphasis of the course content from year to year to cater to individual needs.
-Our unique approach to focusing on both the scientific knowledge of hazards and modern strategies of emergency planning make graduates of this course highly employable.
-The independent research project gives you the chance to specialise further by studying an area of interest in greater depth and gain valuable research skills. Our students often find this an excellent selling point when looking for a job or promotion.
-We have strong links with industry and practitioners in the emergency and disaster management field, including Search And Rescue Assistance In Disasters (SARAID), RNLI, Tearfund, Community Resilience and Surrey County Council Emergency Planning Unit.

Assessment

Written examinations, coursework (incorporating scenario-based hazard management exercises, ICT-based and paper-based practical exercises, role-play exercises, oral presentations, field reports, essays).

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Fieldwork opportunities

Fieldwork is an essential part of the Hazard and Disaster Management MSc. You will undertake a supervised week-long visit to a European field destination affected by multi-hazards (usually to Tenerife in June). You will conduct hazard, risk and vulnerability assessment of the area and evaluate existing hazard management strategies by the regional/local authorities. Find out more...

Course structure

You will study the underpinning scientific principles of both natural hazards (eg hurricanes, storms and tornadoes, flooding, landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis and radon gas emissions) and human-induced disasters (eg terrorism, explosions and oil tanker accidents).

You will also cover modern disaster management strategies and planning techniques for the mitigation (eg structural measures and education), preparation (eg early warning), response (eg search and rescue) and recovery (eg insurance) phases.

You will also undertake active research in one or more of your chosen hazard areas.

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Modules
-Natural Hazards: Science and Society
-Managing Disasters
-GIS for Hazards and Emergency Planning
-Research Methods and Techniques
-Research Project (Dissertation)

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Large global changes, and climate change in particular, are having significant impacts on the environment. The study of impacts and mitigation/adaptation measures in the marine environment requires a truly interdisciplinary approach. Read more
Large global changes, and climate change in particular, are having significant impacts on the environment. The study of impacts and mitigation/adaptation measures in the marine environment requires a truly interdisciplinary approach. It is essential that scientists, engineers and environmental decision-makers understand the fundamentals of the causes, impacts and management measures involved in dealing with such important issues. The course specialises in the challenges facing the marine environment and is part of the University's programme of teaching and research in climate change related issues. There are a variety of optional modules available but the core modules are listed below.

CORE MODULES

Climate Change: Causes and Impacts
Marine Conservation and Sustainability
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures
Research Project (MSc only)

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Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. Read more
Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. This programme aims to provide an understanding of climate change causes, impacts, mitigation and adaptation measures from a life science perspective in conjunction with developing a wide variety of mathematical modelling skills that can be used to investigate the impacts of climate change.

The programme closely follows the structure of our Applied Mathematical Sciences MSc. Two of the mandatory courses will specifically focus on understanding the issues related to climate change and are taught by the School of Life Sciences.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures;
Dynamical Systems (recommended);
Stochastic Simulation (recommended)

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Applied Linear Algebra;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Bayesian Inference.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Climate Change Impact;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Vegetation Patterns in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

The final part of the MSc is an extended project in mathematical modelling the impacts of climate change on environmental systems, giving the opportunity to investigate a topic in some depth guided by leading research academics.

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Designed to meet the career needs of people working in international development and climate change policy and practice, the course will address multiple dimensions. Read more
Designed to meet the career needs of people working in international development and climate change policy and practice, the course will address multiple dimensions: International policy frameworks on climate change; urban climate change governance; adaptation and mitigation choices and pathways; linking climate change mitigation and development; carbon trade, markets and development; climate change and poverty reduction, trade-offs and synergies; local responses to extreme events and disasters; sectoral responses (eg water, energy, food and forests).

Taught by a team of internationally-renowned natural scientists, policy analysts and economists, course material will draw upon existing and ongoing research and applied work through the School of International Development and the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. Its interdisciplinary approach ensures students opportunity to collaborate with the School of Environmental Sciences through science-based modules on climate change.

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The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Read more
The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Planning has a key role to play in improving the condition of life in our towns, cities and rural areas. Towns and cities themselves impact on global sustainability and can play a very influential role in tackling global environmental, social and economic problems. Equally, implementing sustainability principles within urban and rural areas is essential for the well-being of the local residents and improvement of the local environment. Creating more sustainable towns and cities will be central to the future of society and the planet. The planning system is so important because it provides one of the most sophisticated mechanisms for regulating environmental change. Recent policy changes have made planning in neighbourhoods and in communities even more important.

About the course

Increasingly planners are being required to facilitate the creation of more sustainable urban environments. This requires expertise and skills in a diverse range of disciplines and nationally there is a shortage of relevant skills. This course offers both personal opportunities for students to gain valuable skills that make them highly employable, and allows them to contribute to a much needed and fast changing professional area.

Why choose this course?

This exciting new course is specifically aimed at people wishing to gain expertise in contemporary sustainability issues. It provides graduates with excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design, community development, regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and other planning related careers. The course is suitable for:
-Students who have work experience in planning or related discipline and require a postgraduate qualification and subsequent professional accreditation to develop their career further
-New graduates starting their career in planning with a first degree in geography, environmental science, conservation, sociology, architecture and urban studies
-Students from other disciplines who have developed an interest in planning from voluntary work, work experience or project work.

Key Features

-A combination of stimulating academic study and strong career orientation
-Focus on the role of planning in addressing key sustainability concerns: climate change; urban sprawl; social cohesion; and demands for personal mobility
-Using the latest techniques including GIS; urban design tools and community design engagement techniques such as charettes
-Practical problem based approach to learning that uses real planning issues and case studies
-Flexibility of study based on a programme of short courses scheduled over two or three days at weekends
-UK field trips including visits to the start of town planning nearby at Letchworth and the first New Towns
-International study visit to look at European best practice in France and Germany

This course is available both full and part-time. Full time study in Semester A takes 1 year. Full time study beginning in Semester B will take 15 months. Part time study options typically take two years but students are given a maximum of five years to complete.

Careers

When you graduate from this course you will have excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design and urbanism, community development and regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and adaptation and other planning related careers - all with a special focus on maximizing your sustainability expertise. Prospective employers include: local government; private sector planning consultancies; specialist consultancies in environmental management, urban design, transport planning; public involvement bodies; national government agencies; third sector employers including charities with an urban and rural focus; and professional bodies.

Teaching methods

The MSc Sustainable Planning course structure is based on a series of two to three day short courses and tutorials that usually run Friday and Saturday, though some modules may require a Thursday as well.

For full time students the modules run approximately twice a month which means that you will be attending classes on four weekdays and two Saturdays.

Part-time students attend the MSc Sustainable Planning short courses over two years. This makes the course easy to attend and fit around a busy workload schedule.

Structure

Core Modules
-Development Viability
-Place-making and Spatial Mediation
-Planning law, policy & practice
-Research Methods
-Spatial Planning: Theories and Strategies
-Sustainable Communities & Environment
-Sustainable Energy
-Sustainable Planning Dissertation
-Urban Design and Conservation

Optional
-Community Engagement and the Planning Process
-Planning for Rural Communities
-Research Methods
-Spatial Analysis for Planning
-Urban Regeneration
-Water Resources

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All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken… Read more

All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken by local emergency management professionals, international trends show that the economic and social impact of disaster has increased around the world. This is especially true in the developing world, where large-scale disasters can result in enormous loss of life as well as considerable economic damage.

The MSc in International Disaster Management is designed for participants who are interested in enhancing resilience to disasters through prevention, preparedness, response and recovery from disaster events.

Within the HCRI, this will take place through multidisciplinary study focusing on the critical analysis of current trends in academic research and policies, particularly those related to international disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, and humanitarian action tools commonly used by disaster risk reduction professionals. To this end, the core curriculum brings together the realms of disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, and humanitarian action. The interdisciplinary team of researchers at the HCRI will also support the critical exploration of disaster resilience, prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in order to equip students to work professionally in the fields of disaster risk reduction and sustainable development.

The MSc in International Disaster Management is unique as it incorporates a wide variety of available course units from history, politics, development studies, the arts and medicine. This results in a course that is suitable as a way to develop initial skills in disaster risk reduction or support continuing education for disaster risk reduction professionals.

Aims

On completion of the course, you should be able to show a critical understanding of:

  1. Key issues and debates related to the theory and practices of disaster risk reduction. Students will show familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of polices at international and national levels, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, Sustainable Development Goals, 21 st Conference of Parties on Climate Change (COP21) and the outcomes of the World Humanitarian Summit.
  2. The range of environmental, health and social science topics which influence disaster risk reduction and management (including political, historical, anthropological understandings). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.
  3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of disaster risk reduction including environmental/geological studies, emergency management structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGO's and other civil institutions.
  4. An understanding of common approaches to disaster risk reduction (i.e. risk matrices, disaster typologies), including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with disaster prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in both industrialized and developing countries.
  5. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferable skills through both independent and group-based work.
  6. A detailed understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of disaster risk reduction along with implications and limitations of research findings on this subject, and of how to produce an original piece of academic research. Delivered via a dissertation.

Special features

HCRI also offers bespoke training in International Disaster Management and Continuing Professional Development courses. Please contact Dr Billy Haworth (  ) for details

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Teaching and learning

Delivery of the course will be done through face-to-face teaching at the University of Manchester. This will be supported by streamed lectures, discussion boards and other e-learning elements.

Coursework and assessment

Graduation requirements will be the completion of 180 credits. A total of 120 credits of module coursework will be required for students to move on to dissertation writing. A passing dissertation will lead to the final 60 credits needed for MA completion.

Course unit details

All core modules are convened by existing HCRI staff. A small number of elective modules will be taught from the School of Environment and Development, the School of Social Sciences and the School of Nursing.

Course units may include:

  • Introduction to disaster management
  • Risk management
  • Research & evaluation methods
  • Reconstruction and development
  • Emergency humanitarian assistance
  • Water sanitation planning & policy in the developing world
  • Global health
  • Fundamentals of epidemiology
  • History of humanitarian aid
  • Climate change, poverty and disaster management

Course units may vary from year to year.

Course collaborators

A selection of elective modules are being offered from the School on Environment and Development.

Facilities

Appropriate facilities will be verified through the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. The course has been developed in close co-operation with the Faculty's e-learning team which will offer on-going support for the programme.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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