• University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Durham University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
National Film & Television School Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Aberdeen University Featured Masters Courses
"minorities"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Minorities)

We have 50 Masters Degrees (Minorities)

  • "minorities" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 50
Order by 
Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies. Read more
Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies.

This new programme gives you an opportunity to consider Muslim minority communities comparatively, within both western and non-western contexts. You will explore key themes such as ethnicity, gender, and the varieties of religious interpretations and practices that have resulted in issues and challenges arising uniquely within different Muslim minority communities. The programme is highly interdisciplinary and offers a flexible combination of module choices including for example, law, history, international relations, and diplomacy.

You will acquire skills necessary to work in a wide range of professions that require an understanding of inter-cultural relations and policy-making at both local and national levels. You will also gain the expertise to evaluate materials from different sources such as the media, government reports and legal documents as well as academic research.

The programme is offered by the Department of Religions and Philosophies http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/ and delivered by the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD) http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/

Structure

Students take four modules (comprising one core and three elective) over two years and write a dissertation

Core modules:

‌•Muslim Minorities in a Global Context
‌•Dissertation

Optional modules:

‌•Introduction to Islam
‌•Muslim Minorities and the State: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
‌•Islamic Law in a Global Context
‌•Religions and Development
‌•The Art of Negotiation
‌•Global Public Policy
‌•International Security
‌•Global Diplomacy: Citizenship and Advocacy
‌•Strategic Studies
‌•Political Islam in South Asia
‌•Contemporary India, State, Society and Politics

Disclaimer

Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules http://www.soas.ac.uk/infocomp/programme-disclaimer/

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning
Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

This programme is taught 100% online through our VLE. In the VLE you will have access to learning materials and course resources anytime so you can fit your studies around your existing commitments. For each module, students will be provided with access, through both the SOAS Library and the University of London’s Online Library, to all necessary materials from a range of appropriate sources.

A key component of the student experience will be peer to peer learning, with students enrolled in discussion forums.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by five written online assessments (‘etivities’*) comprising 30% and one 5,000 word essay comprising 70% of the module mark. The etivities provide formative and summative feedback to students as a means of monitoring their progress and encouraging areas in which they can improve.

Dissertation

The Dissertation is assessed by the submission of a written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, excluding the bibliography and appendices, which will account for 85% of the mark awarded for the module. The remaining 15% of the module mark will be based on the mark obtained for a 1,500 word research proposal.

* An 'e-tivity' is a framework for online, active and interactive learning following a format that states clearly to the students its 'Purpose'; the 'Task' at hand; the contribution or 'Response' type; and the 'Outcome' (Salmon, G. (2002) E-tivities: The Key to Active Online Learning, New York and London: Routledge Falmer.)

How to Apply

You can apply using our online application form http://www.cefims.ac.uk/forms/appform/cisd_appform.shtml

If you have any questions please use our online enquiry form.

The deadlines for applications are as follows:

31 March 2016 for a 20 April 2016 start
Your completed application will be reviewed by a member of academic staff. If your application is successful, we will send you an official offer within ten working days and you will be asked to submit the relevant supporting documentation. Once in receipt of our offer, we
recommend submitting your documents immediately.

Supporting documentation for applications - please view website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/ma-muslim-minorities-in-a-global-context-online/

Email:

Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050

Read less
2015 and 2016 have witnessed enormous changes in international, regional and national politics. Read more
2015 and 2016 have witnessed enormous changes in international, regional and national politics. In terms of migration policy, these past two years have also seen some of the starkest challenges in terms of approaching key communities as they move within, and frequently beyond the boundaries of both maps and political groupings. The question is therefore how best to understand the broad area of politics as a whole, and the specific trends of migration and minority groupings?

Our MSc in Politics will introduce you to the fundamental principles of political interaction in both global and local spheres, and will refine your knowledge with specialist themes covering migration, asylum, and identity. You will learn in a systematic and engaging way about the origins, evolution and multifaceted character of key political systems, before turning to the Migration and Minorities specialism, which provides dedicated insights on the creation and categorization of power, influence and governance within key structures.

A fascinating and relevant degree, supported in 2017 by a competitively-awarded Jean Monnet Studentship (£2000), as well as the possibility of in-house internships. CCCU graduates in Politics are well-placed to pursue wide-ranging careers in local, national and international relations, enhanced with an expertise in one of the most pressing issues of today: migration and minorities.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/politics.aspx

Course detail

Through a combination of core and specialist modules, the MSc in Politics will enable you to analyse the multifaceted origins, evolution and development of contemporary political systems, within and beyond Europe. You will explore the application of a range of foundational theories and contemporary concepts that make up the canon of Politics. With the fundaments firmly in place, you will then interrogate the relative merits and shortcomings of political, economic and socio-cultural philosophies, structures of power, and systems of governance in order to better understand the challenges of managing dynamics like migration and balancing majority and minority demands within local and global political systems.

Suitability

The new MSc in Politics offered at Canterbury Christ Church University is established upon a firm foundation of research­led teaching, using innovative and blended learning methods, expertise driven insights, and a clear commitment to guiding and supporting all facets of graduate student development. Our Politics pathway will provide you with the opportunity to gain comprehensive conceptual knowledge of the prime structures and interconnections that make up local, national and international politics, as well as an indispensable practical understanding of institutional, legal, political, economic and socio­cultural actors of European and non-European communities.

Offered both full and part-time, CCCU’s innovative MSc in Politics will help you tackle the ‘big issues’ in contemporary politics with confidence and curiosity, equipping you for career paths in national, European and international arenas thanks to innovative modules and a ‘calling card’ thesis.

Content

• Research Methods 1 and 2 (40 Credits)
• Advanced Research in Politics and International Relations (20 Credits)
• Critical Issues: Shifting Perspectives (20 Credits)
• The Politics of Migration (20 Credits)
• Nationalism, Ethnicity and Minority Politics (20 Credits)
• Dissertation: Assessing Politics, Migration and/or Minorities (60 Credits)

Format

The MSc in Politics programme utilises a wide range of cutting-edge teaching and learning methods, including:
• Interactive lectures
• Practical classes
• Workshops
• Virtual learning environments
• Seminars
• Simulation games
• Problem based learning group work

Tutorials with supervisors, where graduate students will study in an informative, engaging, stimulating and participative environment.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of methods, including essays, briefing notes, book reviews, portfolios, individual and group oral presentations, action research, political role play, simulations, standard examinations, as well as a sustained piece of academic work in the form of a thesis.

What can I do next?

Our students will be able to thoroughly and expertly use a wide range of national and international sources and forms of information to critically assess the challenges and opportunities facing states and institutions, their various distributions of power and influence, and ensuing forms of authority and governance within national, regional and international modes. Students will also be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the numerous forms of migration and asylum policy, as well as the modes of understanding the construction and categorization of given communities.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

Read less
The Minorities, Rights and the Law Masters is set within the significant and growing field of human rights law and focuses on the specific area of minorities, rights and the law. Read more
The Minorities, Rights and the Law Masters is set within the significant and growing field of human rights law and focuses on the specific area of minorities, rights and the law. It is taught by leading exponents in the field and enables you to concentrate on your chosen interest while gaining an advantage in a competitive field through links with non-governmental organisations. The Head of the Law Department, Professor Joshua Castellino, helped to establish one of the world's most respected programmes in Human Rights Law at the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is also an international expert on minority rights and this expertise is fully integrated into this new course.

- The group of academics teaching on the programme are experts in migration, international human rights, vulnerable groups, globalisation and discrimination
- We offer innovative teaching methods with small group work and close contact with a supervisory tutor.
- You have opportunities to focus on issues of particular interest both in the taught modules and through the dissertation.
- You will be supported to find placements through our dedicated placement service - our London location ensures you have access to the best opportunities.
- Open to non-law graduates, provided they take the short non-assessed -Introduction to Law - module during the induction period.

Read less
Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights. Read more
Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights.

International law and human rights have been at the heart of teaching and scholarly work at Regent’s for many years: this new programme offers a truly unique opportunity to be guided by special guests from Doughty Street alongside our talented team of academics.

You will be introduced to a range of topics in the field including, a history of human rights law, international relations, humanitarian intervention, free speech, prohibition of torture and inhumane treatment and international criminal law, with all theory supplemented by cutting edge research and case studies.

Why should I choose this programme?

The issues covered within this programme have never been so pertinent and in demand. The programme will enable you to address some of the contemporary challenges faced in operational environments which aim to protect and promote human rights. The programme informs those already in professional practice or those aspiring to work in this field with the skills and knowledge and the ability to introduce changes that will improve human rights policies at an international, regional and domestic level.

This programme is unique in its close link with practising professionals and real life cases, allowing you to really explore and understand what’s happening in the world today. We have an exceptionally talented team of lecturers including:

‌•Dr. Sara Bazoobandi, an author on food security and Associate Fellow of Chatham House.
‌•Dr. Mireille Hebing, an expert on migration and refugees.
‌•Dr. Neven Andjelic, recently elected to the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities.
‌•Professor Yossi Mekelberg, expert and author on human rights issues ranging from right for self determination, gender, freedom of speech, refugees, collective punishment and house demolitions, rights of minorities and others. Professor Mekelberg has been a member of the London Committee of Human Rights Watch for the last 7 years and is regularly asked to write in international media about abuses of human rights.

As well as being guided by our team of experts, you will benefit directly from visiting lectures from renowned barristers from the Doughty Street Chambers who include:

‌•Geoffrey Robertson, QC
‌•Kirsty Brimelow, QC
‌•Professor Marc Weller
‌•Graeme Hall
‌•Edward Fitzgerald OBE, QC
‌•Professor Geraldine Van Beuren, QC
‌•Andrea Saccucci
‌•Jen Robinson

Engaging with these distinguished professionals will really bring the subject to life and provide you with a deep and comprehensive understanding of human rights law.

Key skills, aims and objectives

You will gain:

A systematic and comprehensive knowledge of international human rights law
The ability to identify and critically evaluate contemporary issues relating to international human rights
An understanding of how theory relates to practice, with extensive use of current and relevant case studies
The ability to interpret principal source materials as well as understanding relevant concepts, cases, statutes and treaties
Exposure to world renowned human rights lawyers who will share their knowledge and experience of working on landmark cases in the field

Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a number of careers, in areas such as diplomacy, international relations, domestic and international legal practice, international charities, and non-governmental organisations, as well as practising professionals in law, journalism, politics and economics.

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/ma-international-human-rights-law.aspx#tab_course-overview

Read less
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

Read less
Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

Read less
The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. Read more

Overview

The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to protect vulnerable groups, including minorities, migrants and peoples with disabilities. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and politics, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.

Placement opportunities with partner civil society organisations, such as Transparency International (Ireland) will be available.

Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations, workshops and masterclasses.

The programme will be very attractive to law graduates who wish to specialise in the field of international law and to non-law graduates who may be interested in undertaking a vocational law programme in the future.


Minimum English language requirements:
•IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
•TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
•TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
•PTE (Pearson): 62

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

Students must complete 90 credits in total, completing 30 taught credits in each semester. A 30 credit dissertation is completed during the summer. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester. Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints.Modules offered include Public International Law, International Human Rights Law, International Criminal law, the rights of Minorities and Indigenous peoples, and Globalisation, Migration and the Law.

Career Options

The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate. Students can gain work experience through optional placements offered as part of the programme.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MH65J

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
Minimum English language requirements. IELTS. 6.5 minimum overall score. TOEFL (Paper based test). 585. TOEFL (Internet based test). Read more
Minimum English language requirements:
•IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
•TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
•TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
•PTE (Pearson): 62
National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Overview

The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to protect vulnerable groups, including minorities, migrants and peoples with disabilities. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and politics, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.

Placement opportunities with partner civil society organisations, such as Transparency International (Ireland) will be available.

Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations, workshops and masterclasses.

The programme will be very attractive to law graduates who wish to specialise in the field of international law and to non-law graduates who may be interested in undertaking a vocational law programme in the future.

Course Structure

Students must complete 90 credits in total, completing 30 taught credits in each semester. A 30 credit dissertation is completed during the summer. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester. Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints.Modules offered include Public International Law, International Human Rights Law, International Criminal law, the rights of Minorities and Indigenous peoples, and Globalisation, Migration and the Law.

Career Options

The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate. Students can gain work experience through optional placements offered as part of the programme.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MH64J

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
Minimum English language requirements. please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. Read more
Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Overview

The Postgraduate Diploma in International Justice and Law provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to protect vulnerable groups, including minorities, migrants, and peoples with disabilities. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology, and politics, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.
Placement opportunities with partner civil society organisations, such as Transparency International (Ireland) will be available.
Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations, workshops, and masterclasses.
The programme will be very attractive to Law graduates who wish to specialise in the field of International Law and to non-law graduates who may be interested in undertaking a vocational Law programme in the future.

Course Structure

Students complete a total of 60 ECTS over the course of this programme. Students are required to complete the Public International Law module and then have the opportunity to choose from a wide range of optional modules. Students must complete 60 taught credits over two semesters.
Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester. Modules offered include Public International Law, International Human Rights Law, International Criminal law, the rights of Minorities and Indigenous peoples, and Globalisation, Migration and the Law. Students also undertake a module on Professional Development (No Dissertation).

Career Options

The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate. Students can gain work experience through optional placements offered as part of the programme.

How To Apply

Students complete a total of 60 ECTS over the course of this programme. Students are required to complete the Public International Law module and then have the opportunity to choose from a wide range of optional modules. Students must complete 60 taught credits over two semesters.
Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester.
The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate.

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH72J/MH71J

The following information should either be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results and two letters of reference MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Prospective applicants who do not meet the entry requirements can apply to have prior learning and experience recognised for the purposes of admission. For details on how to apply, see the Department of Law's Policy for Assessment of Non-Standard Entrants' Applications for Postgraduate Programmes.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
Developed with the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB), the MSc Construction Management at GCU is accredited by four professional bodies and focuses on developing sustainable construction methods and innovative management practices. Read more
Developed with the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB), the MSc Construction Management at GCU is accredited by four professional bodies and focuses on developing sustainable construction methods and innovative management practices.

This course has several different available start dates and study options - please view the relevant web-page for more information:
SEPTEMBER 2017 (Distance Learning) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00729-1DLA-1718/Construction_Management_(Distance_Learning)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2017 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00792-1PTAB-1617/Construction_Management_(Part-time)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Distance Learning) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00729-1DLAB-1718/Construction_Management_(Distance_Learning)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Full time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00944-1FTAB-1718/Construction_Management_(January)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P00792-1PTAB-1718/Construction_Management_(January)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

Programme performance

The MSc Construction Management programme began in 1994 and has been successfully delivered to many students who are now in senior positions working in Construction firms around the world. The School of Engineering and Built Environment at Glasgow Caledonian is the largest of its kind in Scotland and regularly produces more construction and surveying graduates than any other university in the UK. It is ranked in the top 20 UK universities for research in the Architecture and the Built Environment subject area and is highly regarded in Scotland for its innovative teaching and learning methods. It has extensive links with the construction industry which it supports through consultancy, knowledge exchange and a flow of highly employable graduates.

Programme description

Developed with the support of the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB), the programme is accredited by four distinct professional bodies and is designed to meet the increasing demand for innovative and far-sighted construction managers. It offers a choice of modules covering the wide variety of skills that modern construction professionals need.

Demand for highly skilled, innovative construction managers is constantly increasing. This comes from a growing drive to find sustainable and environmentally sound construction methods and innovative management practices to replace traditional procurement routes and management methods.

The programme offers a wide choice of modules which cover the skills that modern construction professionals need in order to meet the challenges of the industry. The programme allows you the scope to develop a bespoke skill set by selecting from the range of elective modules. It provides recent graduates and experienced professionals with an outstanding opportunity to upgrade their skills in order to enhance their career choices.

Why Choose This Programme?

The UK construction industry is the single biggest industry sector in the economy, contributing almost 10 of Gross Domestic Product and employing one in ten of the working population. Demand for highly skilled, innovative and far-sighted Construction Managers is constantly increasing. This comes from a growing drive to find sustainable and environmentally sound construction methods and innovative management practices to replace 'traditional' procurement routes and management methods. The sector is dynamic and increasingly committed to innovative practices and the development of a culture of professionalism. Recent government policy is geared to actively promoting the attractions of the industry to women and ethnic minorities, who have until now been under-represented in the industry. Careers in the industry are varied, challenging and invariably well-paid. Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) is at the leading-edge of providing professional training for people wishing to take up key positions in the development and management of construction and the built environment.

Career Opportunities

The MSc Construction Management programme began in 1994 and successful graduates are now in senior positions working for global contractors and consultants. The programme is particularly suited to those who are currently employed in the construction industry and may only possess an HNC or HND but have substantial construction industry experience.

Read less
One of two specialised master’s pathways within our global health and development programme, this award is relevant for those who want to mark their focused interest and expertise in aspects of sexual heath and reproductive health. Read more

One of two specialised master’s pathways within our global health and development programme, this award is relevant for those who want to mark their focused interest and expertise in aspects of sexual heath and reproductive health. The course will equip you to work at a senior level to promote the sexual and reproductive health and social wellbeing of people, especially those living in low and middle income countries, through the development of effective, contextualised  sexual and reproductive health policies, services and interventions.

The award has been designed in response to the increasing need for personnel of governments, global health institutions and non-governmental organisations to be trained to support development in this key area. This award focuses on the social and political issues influencing sexual and reproductive health, with a special focus on low and middle income countries. It focuses on integration of theory and practice and enables you to draw on your experience, develop critical thinking skills and widen your perspective on current and historical sexual and reproductive health issues.

Teaching, learning and assessment

Teaching is comprised of a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, case studies, simulation exercises and projects. Assessment is continuous and incorporates assignments, action plans, projects and examinations. For their dissertation projects, students can chose to collect desk-based studies, or conduct primary data collection in collaboration with national or international organisations working in health and development.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Your exact attendance  requirements at QMU will depend on which module you are studying and whether you are studying full or part time. Modules typically run over five weeks and involve two sessions of three hours in class each week. In addition, for each module students spend around 10-12 hours of each week on preparatory class work independently and with colleagues, including readings and exercises available on dedicated web-based learning platforms.

Modules

Students study core modules totalling 105 credits. This includes foundational study of global heath and development, through such subjects as Global Health and Social Policy; Researching Global Health and Development; Global Public Health; and Health Systems; and then extends through more focused study of subjects such as Sexual and Reproductive Health and Gender, Health and Development. You will also choose one 15 credit elective class from classes available within the Institute or from other QMU programmes recognised as of relevance.

For the MSc award the culmination of your study will be completion of a dissertation involving desk study or fieldwork on an approved topic related to sexual and reproductive health and development (60 credits).

Careers

As a graduate you will be well equipped for employment as a global health practitioner with a particular focus on sexual and reproductive health issues.

Graduates have secured technical, advocacy and leadership positions with national and global programmes, addressing such issues as safe motherhood, adolescent friendly health services, health of sexual minorities, HIV treatment and prevention, and FGM.

Quick facts

  • Broadens your perspective on a range of sexual and reproductive health issues (eg maternal mortality, unsafe abortion, infertility), paying special attention to politics, gender and inequalities.
  • Offers a unique opportunity to discuss sexual and reproductive health in low, middle and high income settings in an extremely diverse, international group of students.
  • Equips you with insight into rights based approaches and skills to critique and develop sexual and reproductive health policies, services and interventions.

Santander Scholarships

Scholarships Santander Scholarships: 2 x £5,000 scholarships are available for international students undertaking a course within the IGHD.

See http://www.qmu.ac.uk/study-here/fees-andfunding/ scholarships-for-new-students/ for more information.



Read less
The purpose of this course is to develop and consolidate your understanding of the scientific methods that are routinely employed in Psychology. Read more
The purpose of this course is to develop and consolidate your understanding of the scientific methods that are routinely employed in Psychology. Emphasis is placed on training you in the efficient gathering and organising of information as well as the critical evaluation of theory and qualitative and quantitative evidence.

Why study Psychological Research Methods at Dundee?

The programme will lead to the award of the MSc in Psychological Research Methods (exit degrees of Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate are also available on this course). The course offers an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in your first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

You will be given practical experience of working in an active researcher's laboratory and you will also design and carry out a substantial research project under the supervision of a different member of the academic staff. You will be given the opportunity to present and discuss your findings in written, oral and poster formats in a supportive and cohesive environment. Our aim is to significantly improve your prospect for employment in a wide range of contexts where insight into human behaviour and/or rigorous evaluation of information are key elements of good decision making.

The School of Psychology has specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital. Learn more about our research facilities via our website.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:
Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.

Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.

Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.

Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis.

Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.

Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.

Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.

Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audiences
Provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

Who should study this course?

The course will provide a first year of research training for students who intend to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

How you will be taught

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

What you will study

Core Modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation
Two Advanced Modules, typically from:

Decision Making
Evolution and Behaviour
Health in Groups
Majorities and Minorities
Comparative Communication and Cognition

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.
Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs and have used the qualification to improve their chances of getting on to clinical and educational psychology courses. Several students take the course to improve their chances of getting jobs as support workers and Assistant Psychologists. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields of business.

Laura Wakeford graduated in 2010 with an MSc in Psychological Research Methods. She is now studying for a PhD here at Dundee. Laura's research focuses on the relationship between fixation location and attention during silent reading; specifically, whether word recognition proceeds in a serial or parallel fashion. The majority of her work uses the Dr Bouis Eye Tracker.

Read less
This degree offered by the Human Rights Consortium (http://www.sas.ac.uk/hrc/graduate-study/ma-human-rights) is the longest-running interdisciplinary, practice-oriented human rights MA programme in the UK. Read more
This degree offered by the Human Rights Consortium (http://www.sas.ac.uk/hrc/graduate-study/ma-human-rights) is the longest-running interdisciplinary, practice-oriented human rights MA programme in the UK. Its priority is to provide students with practical skills essential to working as human rights practitioners, including advocacy, fundraising and research. The degree develops students as human rights professionals and is therefore particularly suitable for individuals who are, or seek to become, human rights practitioners in the NGO, governmental and inter-govermental sectors This degree addresses essential questions and debates within the field of human rights, such as: where do rights come from? What are their foundations and justifications? Can the discourse of rights secure social justice?

Structure

Degree code: MTCHR
Credit value: 120/180

Required modules:

Understanding Human Rights I: Ideas and Contexts
Securing Human Rights I: Actors and Mechanisms, Skills and Strategies
Translating Human Rights into Law I: The Foundations of International Human Rights Law
Optional modules*:

Understanding Human Rights II: Genocide, Gross Human Rights Violations and Reconciliation (Optional) [10 ECTS]
Securing Human Rights II: Securing Human Rights in Development and in Conflict [10 ECTS]
Translating Human Rights into Law II: Topics in International Human Rights Law [10 ECTS]
The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America [10 ECTS]
Researching Human Rights: Social Research Methods [10 ECTS]
Business and Human Rights [10 ECTS]
Indigenous Peoples, Minorities and Human Rights [10 ECTS]
Citizenship and New Social Movements in Latin America [10 ECTS]
Human Rights and Everyday Life in Latin America [10 ECTS]
*All modules are subject to availability.

Dissertation

All students must complete a minimum of three compulsory modules and three optional modules, plus a 15,000-words dissertation, in order to fulfil the requirement for the MA (totalling 90 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System)). In addition, students may wish to select one extra optional module (equalling 10 ECTS) and / or the internship (20 ECTS) for additional credit, totalling between 110 and 120 credits.

Assessment

The MA is assessed through essays and examinations, along with more innovative forms of assessment such as legal reports, a media project, mock funding proposal presentations and class participation.

Mode of study

Study options: full-time over one year, or part time over 24 months or 36 months.
Part time students may choose at least three optional modules during the spring term of years 1 or 2. Part time students may undertake more than one internship, e.g. in both years and/or during the summer between years 1 and 2.

Read less
The Comparative Education MA will enhance students' awareness of education systems, traditions and issues in a number of countries, helping them to understand the relationships between education and other social phenomena by introducing the concepts and skills students need for systematic comparison. Read more
The Comparative Education MA will enhance students' awareness of education systems, traditions and issues in a number of countries, helping them to understand the relationships between education and other social phenomena by introducing the concepts and skills students need for systematic comparison.

Degree information

This programme will help students to gain a rigorous multidisciplinary grounding in the comparative analysis of education and society, deepening their understanding of contemporary issues in education in many parts of the world.

Core modules
-Comparative Education: Theories and Methods
-Education and Development in Asia
-Education Traditions and Systems in Europe

Optional modules
-Doing and Using Educational Leadership and Management Research
-Education and international Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
-Education and Muslim Communities
-Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
-Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems
-Planning for Education and Development
-Policy, Research and Pedagogy in Adult Literacy

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Teaching and learning
This programme is delivered via face-to-face evening sessions. Attendance may vary depending on your choice of optional modules. It is assessed by coursework assignments of 5,000 words, and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report. If opted for the report an additional module is required.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as local and central government advisers, while others have jobs as charity managers. Graduates can also be found working as researchers and lecturers.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Secondary School Teacher (English), Vehbi Koc Foundation
-MPhil/PhD Comparative Education (Intergrated Route), Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)
-PhD / Integrated MPhil with Research Methods Education Policy, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)
-Adult English Teacher, Unspecified Education Provider and studying MA Study of Applied Linguistics, Korea University

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society is a multidisciplinary department at UCL Institute of Education bringing together a diverse community of researchers with expertise in the social sciences who have a common interest in exploring education in all its guises: formal, non-formal and informal.

The department has extensive expertise and experience in research, knowledge transfer and consultancy in the UK, Europe and Asia, working closely with transnational bodies, such as, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, government departments, as well as with regional organisations, employer organisations, national institutes, and international organisations.

Read less
Political theory is the study of the good society. Public debate is dominated by controversies such as what justice requires of citizens and the state; what the most important rights and liberties are; and what protection there should be for minorities in majoritarian democracies. Read more

About the MSc programme

Political theory is the study of the good society. Public debate is dominated by controversies such as what justice requires of citizens and the state; what the most important rights and liberties are; and what protection there should be for minorities in majoritarian democracies. Political theory provides a scholarly examination of these questions, informed by adjacent debates in moral philosophy, legal theory, historical study, and political science.

Currently, there are eight political theorists in the Department of Government, which is one of the largest concentrations of specialists in the world. Staff research interests are in diverse areas including comparative political theory, contemporary normative theory, the history of political thought, feminist theory, and rational and social choice theory. We aim to address issues in a global context.

The programme is comprised of a compulsory course and a wide range of optional courses, and you will also complete a dissertation on an approved topic of your choice. The programme is a good preparation for further research work, or for a career in education, public administration, NGOs or the private sector.

Graduate destinations

This programme is a good preparation for further research work or for a career in education, public administration or the private sector.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X