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Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies. Read more
Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies.

This new programme gives you an opportunity to consider Muslim minority communities comparatively, within both western and non-western contexts. You will explore key themes such as ethnicity, gender, and the varieties of religious interpretations and practices that have resulted in issues and challenges arising uniquely within different Muslim minority communities. The programme is highly interdisciplinary and offers a flexible combination of module choices including for example, law, history, international relations, and diplomacy.

You will acquire skills necessary to work in a wide range of professions that require an understanding of inter-cultural relations and policy-making at both local and national levels. You will also gain the expertise to evaluate materials from different sources such as the media, government reports and legal documents as well as academic research.

The programme is offered by the Department of Religions and Philosophies http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/ and delivered by the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD) http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/

Structure

Students take four modules (comprising one core and three elective) over two years and write a dissertation

Core modules:

‌•Muslim Minorities in a Global Context
‌•Dissertation

Optional modules:

‌•Introduction to Islam
‌•Muslim Minorities and the State: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
‌•Islamic Law in a Global Context
‌•Religions and Development
‌•The Art of Negotiation
‌•Global Public Policy
‌•International Security
‌•Global Diplomacy: Citizenship and Advocacy
‌•Strategic Studies
‌•Political Islam in South Asia
‌•Contemporary India, State, Society and Politics

Disclaimer

Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules http://www.soas.ac.uk/infocomp/programme-disclaimer/

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning
Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

This programme is taught 100% online through our VLE. In the VLE you will have access to learning materials and course resources anytime so you can fit your studies around your existing commitments. For each module, students will be provided with access, through both the SOAS Library and the University of London’s Online Library, to all necessary materials from a range of appropriate sources.

A key component of the student experience will be peer to peer learning, with students enrolled in discussion forums.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by five written online assessments (‘etivities’*) comprising 30% and one 5,000 word essay comprising 70% of the module mark. The etivities provide formative and summative feedback to students as a means of monitoring their progress and encouraging areas in which they can improve.

Dissertation

The Dissertation is assessed by the submission of a written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, excluding the bibliography and appendices, which will account for 85% of the mark awarded for the module. The remaining 15% of the module mark will be based on the mark obtained for a 1,500 word research proposal.

* An 'e-tivity' is a framework for online, active and interactive learning following a format that states clearly to the students its 'Purpose'; the 'Task' at hand; the contribution or 'Response' type; and the 'Outcome' (Salmon, G. (2002) E-tivities: The Key to Active Online Learning, New York and London: Routledge Falmer.)

How to Apply

You can apply using our online application form http://www.cefims.ac.uk/forms/appform/cisd_appform.shtml

If you have any questions please use our online enquiry form.

The deadlines for applications are as follows:

31 March 2016 for a 20 April 2016 start
Your completed application will be reviewed by a member of academic staff. If your application is successful, we will send you an official offer within ten working days and you will be asked to submit the relevant supporting documentation. Once in receipt of our offer, we
recommend submitting your documents immediately.

Supporting documentation for applications - please view website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/ma-muslim-minorities-in-a-global-context-online/

Email:

Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050

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2015 and 2016 have witnessed enormous changes in international, regional and national politics. Read more
2015 and 2016 have witnessed enormous changes in international, regional and national politics. In terms of migration policy, these past two years have also seen some of the starkest challenges in terms of approaching key communities as they move within, and frequently beyond the boundaries of both maps and political groupings. The question is therefore how best to understand the broad area of politics as a whole, and the specific trends of migration and minority groupings?

Our MSc in Politics will introduce you to the fundamental principles of political interaction in both global and local spheres, and will refine your knowledge with specialist themes covering migration, asylum, and identity. You will learn in a systematic and engaging way about the origins, evolution and multifaceted character of key political systems, before turning to the Migration and Minorities specialism, which provides dedicated insights on the creation and categorization of power, influence and governance within key structures.

A fascinating and relevant degree, supported in 2017 by a competitively-awarded Jean Monnet Studentship (£2000), as well as the possibility of in-house internships. CCCU graduates in Politics are well-placed to pursue wide-ranging careers in local, national and international relations, enhanced with an expertise in one of the most pressing issues of today: migration and minorities.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/politics.aspx

Course detail

Through a combination of core and specialist modules, the MSc in Politics will enable you to analyse the multifaceted origins, evolution and development of contemporary political systems, within and beyond Europe. You will explore the application of a range of foundational theories and contemporary concepts that make up the canon of Politics. With the fundaments firmly in place, you will then interrogate the relative merits and shortcomings of political, economic and socio-cultural philosophies, structures of power, and systems of governance in order to better understand the challenges of managing dynamics like migration and balancing majority and minority demands within local and global political systems.

Suitability

The new MSc in Politics offered at Canterbury Christ Church University is established upon a firm foundation of research­led teaching, using innovative and blended learning methods, expertise driven insights, and a clear commitment to guiding and supporting all facets of graduate student development. Our Politics pathway will provide you with the opportunity to gain comprehensive conceptual knowledge of the prime structures and interconnections that make up local, national and international politics, as well as an indispensable practical understanding of institutional, legal, political, economic and socio­cultural actors of European and non-European communities.

Offered both full and part-time, CCCU’s innovative MSc in Politics will help you tackle the ‘big issues’ in contemporary politics with confidence and curiosity, equipping you for career paths in national, European and international arenas thanks to innovative modules and a ‘calling card’ thesis.

Content

• Research Methods 1 and 2 (40 Credits)
• Advanced Research in Politics and International Relations (20 Credits)
• Critical Issues: Shifting Perspectives (20 Credits)
• The Politics of Migration (20 Credits)
• Nationalism, Ethnicity and Minority Politics (20 Credits)
• Dissertation: Assessing Politics, Migration and/or Minorities (60 Credits)

Format

The MSc in Politics programme utilises a wide range of cutting-edge teaching and learning methods, including:
• Interactive lectures
• Practical classes
• Workshops
• Virtual learning environments
• Seminars
• Simulation games
• Problem based learning group work

Tutorials with supervisors, where graduate students will study in an informative, engaging, stimulating and participative environment.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of methods, including essays, briefing notes, book reviews, portfolios, individual and group oral presentations, action research, political role play, simulations, standard examinations, as well as a sustained piece of academic work in the form of a thesis.

What can I do next?

Our students will be able to thoroughly and expertly use a wide range of national and international sources and forms of information to critically assess the challenges and opportunities facing states and institutions, their various distributions of power and influence, and ensuing forms of authority and governance within national, regional and international modes. Students will also be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the numerous forms of migration and asylum policy, as well as the modes of understanding the construction and categorization of given communities.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The Minorities, Rights and the Law Masters is set within the significant and growing field of human rights law and focuses on the specific area of minorities, rights and the law. Read more
The Minorities, Rights and the Law Masters is set within the significant and growing field of human rights law and focuses on the specific area of minorities, rights and the law. It is taught by leading exponents in the field and enables you to concentrate on your chosen interest while gaining an advantage in a competitive field through links with non-governmental organisations. The Head of the Law Department, Professor Joshua Castellino, helped to establish one of the world's most respected programmes in Human Rights Law at the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is also an international expert on minority rights and this expertise is fully integrated into this new course.

- The group of academics teaching on the programme are experts in migration, international human rights, vulnerable groups, globalisation and discrimination
- We offer innovative teaching methods with small group work and close contact with a supervisory tutor.
- You have opportunities to focus on issues of particular interest both in the taught modules and through the dissertation.
- You will be supported to find placements through our dedicated placement service - our London location ensures you have access to the best opportunities.
- Open to non-law graduates, provided they take the short non-assessed -Introduction to Law - module during the induction period.

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Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights. Read more
Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights.

International law and human rights have been at the heart of teaching and scholarly work at Regent’s for many years: this new programme offers a truly unique opportunity to be guided by special guests from Doughty Street alongside our talented team of academics.

You will be introduced to a range of topics in the field including, a history of human rights law, international relations, humanitarian intervention, free speech, prohibition of torture and inhumane treatment and international criminal law, with all theory supplemented by cutting edge research and case studies.

Why should I choose this programme?

The issues covered within this programme have never been so pertinent and in demand. The programme will enable you to address some of the contemporary challenges faced in operational environments which aim to protect and promote human rights. The programme informs those already in professional practice or those aspiring to work in this field with the skills and knowledge and the ability to introduce changes that will improve human rights policies at an international, regional and domestic level.

This programme is unique in its close link with practising professionals and real life cases, allowing you to really explore and understand what’s happening in the world today. We have an exceptionally talented team of lecturers including:

‌•Dr. Sara Bazoobandi, an author on food security and Associate Fellow of Chatham House.
‌•Dr. Mireille Hebing, an expert on migration and refugees.
‌•Dr. Neven Andjelic, recently elected to the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities.
‌•Professor Yossi Mekelberg, expert and author on human rights issues ranging from right for self determination, gender, freedom of speech, refugees, collective punishment and house demolitions, rights of minorities and others. Professor Mekelberg has been a member of the London Committee of Human Rights Watch for the last 7 years and is regularly asked to write in international media about abuses of human rights.

As well as being guided by our team of experts, you will benefit directly from visiting lectures from renowned barristers from the Doughty Street Chambers who include:

‌•Geoffrey Robertson, QC
‌•Kirsty Brimelow, QC
‌•Professor Marc Weller
‌•Graeme Hall
‌•Edward Fitzgerald OBE, QC
‌•Professor Geraldine Van Beuren, QC
‌•Andrea Saccucci
‌•Jen Robinson

Engaging with these distinguished professionals will really bring the subject to life and provide you with a deep and comprehensive understanding of human rights law.

Key skills, aims and objectives

You will gain:

A systematic and comprehensive knowledge of international human rights law
The ability to identify and critically evaluate contemporary issues relating to international human rights
An understanding of how theory relates to practice, with extensive use of current and relevant case studies
The ability to interpret principal source materials as well as understanding relevant concepts, cases, statutes and treaties
Exposure to world renowned human rights lawyers who will share their knowledge and experience of working on landmark cases in the field

Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a number of careers, in areas such as diplomacy, international relations, domestic and international legal practice, international charities, and non-governmental organisations, as well as practising professionals in law, journalism, politics and economics.

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/ma-international-human-rights-law.aspx#tab_course-overview

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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

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The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. Read more

Overview

The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to protect vulnerable groups, including minorities, migrants and peoples with disabilities. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and politics, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.

Placement opportunities with partner civil society organisations, such as Transparency International (Ireland) will be available.

Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations, workshops and masterclasses.

The programme will be very attractive to law graduates who wish to specialise in the field of international law and to non-law graduates who may be interested in undertaking a vocational law programme in the future.


Minimum English language requirements:
•IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
•TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
•TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
•PTE (Pearson): 62

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

Students must complete 90 credits in total, completing 30 taught credits in each semester. A 30 credit dissertation is completed during the summer. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester. Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints.Modules offered include Public International Law, International Human Rights Law, International Criminal law, the rights of Minorities and Indigenous peoples, and Globalisation, Migration and the Law.

Career Options

The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate. Students can gain work experience through optional placements offered as part of the programme.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MH65J

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Minimum English language requirements. IELTS. 6.5 minimum overall score. TOEFL (Paper based test). 585. TOEFL (Internet based test). Read more
Minimum English language requirements:
•IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
•TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
•TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
•PTE (Pearson): 62
National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Overview

The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to protect vulnerable groups, including minorities, migrants and peoples with disabilities. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and politics, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.

Placement opportunities with partner civil society organisations, such as Transparency International (Ireland) will be available.

Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations, workshops and masterclasses.

The programme will be very attractive to law graduates who wish to specialise in the field of international law and to non-law graduates who may be interested in undertaking a vocational law programme in the future.

Course Structure

Students must complete 90 credits in total, completing 30 taught credits in each semester. A 30 credit dissertation is completed during the summer. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester. Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints.Modules offered include Public International Law, International Human Rights Law, International Criminal law, the rights of Minorities and Indigenous peoples, and Globalisation, Migration and the Law.

Career Options

The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate. Students can gain work experience through optional placements offered as part of the programme.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MH64J

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Minimum English language requirements. please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. Read more
Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Overview

The Postgraduate Diploma in International Justice and Law provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to protect vulnerable groups, including minorities, migrants, and peoples with disabilities. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology, and politics, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.
Placement opportunities with partner civil society organisations, such as Transparency International (Ireland) will be available.
Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations, workshops, and masterclasses.
The programme will be very attractive to Law graduates who wish to specialise in the field of International Law and to non-law graduates who may be interested in undertaking a vocational Law programme in the future.

Course Structure

Students complete a total of 60 ECTS over the course of this programme. Students are required to complete the Public International Law module and then have the opportunity to choose from a wide range of optional modules. Students must complete 60 taught credits over two semesters.
Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester. Modules offered include Public International Law, International Human Rights Law, International Criminal law, the rights of Minorities and Indigenous peoples, and Globalisation, Migration and the Law. Students also undertake a module on Professional Development (No Dissertation).

Career Options

The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate. Students can gain work experience through optional placements offered as part of the programme.

How To Apply

Students complete a total of 60 ECTS over the course of this programme. Students are required to complete the Public International Law module and then have the opportunity to choose from a wide range of optional modules. Students must complete 60 taught credits over two semesters.
Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints. Students may choose any combination of modules they wish, however, they cannot take more than 30 taught credits per semester.
The programme will prepare students for policy and advocacy work in national, regional, and international organisations with a social and economic justice mandate.

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH72J/MH71J

The following information should either be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results and two letters of reference MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Prospective applicants who do not meet the entry requirements can apply to have prior learning and experience recognised for the purposes of admission. For details on how to apply, see the Department of Law's Policy for Assessment of Non-Standard Entrants' Applications for Postgraduate Programmes.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This is a degree aimed at those who want to engage critically, practically and creatively with global and local environmental problems through different disciplinary lenses. Read more
This is a degree aimed at those who want to engage critically, practically and creatively with global and local environmental problems through different disciplinary lenses. The course brings together theories, methods and insights from the social and environmental sciences and applies these to contemporary environmental issues, debates and controversies.

Students are encouraged to take a range of social and natural science modules offered by the Department of Sociology, the Law School and Lancaster Environment Centre (LEC) and will acquire the skills to navigate, interpret and combine these different ways of knowing the environment. There is a strong emphasis on participatory and engaged research, making insights count in engagement with communities and policymakers.

Modules
Compulsory modules:
• Theories and Debates in Environment and Culture
• Methods in Science and Technology Studies
• Independent Research Dissertation

Optional modules:
Choose four; options may vary from year to year
• Capitalism and Crisis
• Climate Change and Society
• Ecology, Conservation and Culture
• Food Security, Agriculture and Climate Change
• Geological hazards
• International Environmental Law
• Mobilities, Society and Change
• Perspectives on Environment and Development
• The Social Life of Science and Technology: Theories and Debates
• The Rights of Peoples, Minorities and Indigenous Peoples

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The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field. Read more
The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

Key benefits

• Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;

• Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;

• Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;

• Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;

• Enhance the skills you need for working with gender and human rights in a range of sectors;

• Internship opportunities with a range of organizations including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM), all based in Belfast;

• Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.

• Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;

• Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/llm-gender-conflict-and-human-rights-ft-jn

Course detail

- Description -

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

• Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;
• Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice
• Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;
• Successful completion may also open up further study and research options.

- Work placement / study abroad -

The LLM offers a range of internships with local human rights organisations.

Career options

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/. Read more
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice.

Human rights are carried by different actors:

-grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
-lawyers and judges
-bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
-journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be.

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices.

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance.

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Kate Nash.

Modules & Structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed.

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign).

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology.

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use.

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in Sociology, Media and Communications, the Centre for Cultural Studies, English and Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Politics, Music and Educational Studies.

This includes the following option module, available to Human Rights students only:

Practising Human Rights (30 credits)
This series of workshops accompanies your placement in an organisation or grassroots activist network. We will discuss diaries that each participant will carry out during the placements in the context of broader debates about human rights on the one hand, and about professional practice, organisations and activism on the other hand. As a requirement for this option, you will negotiate a placement in an organisation whose work can be related to human rights or practical involvement in a grassroots campaign.

Skills & Careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights.

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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In developing a career in the competitive world of government, NGOs, international consultancies or think tanks – as well as in the legal profession - an LLM is an important asset. Read more
In developing a career in the competitive world of government, NGOs, international consultancies or think tanks – as well as in the legal profession - an LLM is an important asset. There are four pathways to choose from at Middlesex: you can take the General LLM programme or specialise in International Business Law, Employment Law or Minorities, Rights and the Law.

Whichever path you take, you will broaden your knowledge of law and deepen your understanding of legal methods, concepts and processes. Our General LLM (outlined below), rather than a specialist pathway, is ideal for students who have not yet chosen a more specialised field of interest, or who wish to gain the overview that can achieved by completing modules across different specialisms.

Why study LLM/PGDip/PGCert Law at Middlesex?

The School of Law at Middlesex brings together a staff team that includes world-renowned scholars who are expert in communicating the latest developments in and thinking about legal questions. You will be taught by these staff members, who combine instruction in core topics with the fruits of their current research. As a student, you will also benefit from their networks of contacts, notably as regards internship opportunities in national and international organisations such as the United Nations, in on-campus litigation centre (the European Human Rights Advocacy Centre), through involvement in our regular client-facing Intellectual Property Clinics, or in the form of placements in a range of local companies providing professional legal services.

The Law Department at Middlesex is known for high quality research, teaching and seminar events on current legal topics, all taking place in a lively and supportive environment. Led by award-winning European Law specialist and Head of Department Prof. Laurent Pech, our scholars and legal experts include Prof William Schabas (a world expert on genocide, the death penalty and international criminal law), Dr. Erica Howard (an expert on EU equality and anti-discrimination law), Prof Philip Leach (Director of the European Human Rights Advocacy Centre), Prof. David Lewis (internationally regarded for his scholarship on whistleblowing and Employment Law), Prof. Rohan Kariyawasam (commercial and digital law), Prof Alan Durant (media and communication law), Dr. Helena Wray (international and UK migration law and policy, and editor of the Journal of Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Law), and Prof Joshua Castellino (international law and human rights law, currently member of the Leadership Council of the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network). Across all our specialist pathways you will work with outstanding and professionally engaged staff who combine expert teaching with professional lessons gained through external research and consultancy.

Course highlights:

- Around 75% of Middlesex Law graduates find employment within six months of graduating (the remaining 25% mostly pursue further study).
- Your studies are located within easy reach of London's major legal institutions, such as the law courts, the House of Lords and the Inns of Court. Visits to relevant institutions such as the London Court of International Arbitration are incorporated into modules.
- The Department has an exchange agreement with Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, providing an exceptional opportunity to be awarded a double degree combining a degree from a US Law School with an LLM award from Middlesex University.
- The Middlesex Law Society is a well-established and active professional association of local lawyers, offering students events and professional links.
- A rapidly growing number of international placements offers you opportunities in leading organisations within and beyond the UK. - These include the Practicum in International Organisations, which gives you the chance to intern at institutions such as the United Nations, Global Union Federations and NGOs.
- The LLM is open to non-law graduates with appropriate experience, subject to taking a short 'Introduction to Law' course.
- We have a proud record of attracting and supporting international students over several decades and place great emphasis on supporting students from all parts of the world.
- As a student of this course you'll receive a free electronic textbook for every module.

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The Master’s programme in Pedagogical Sciences has two English and five Dutch specialisations, each aimed at a certain development domain. Read more
The Master’s programme in Pedagogical Sciences has two English and five Dutch specialisations, each aimed at a certain development domain. Your programme will consist of a few general subjects and two courses that are specifically geared to your specialisation of choice. Coaching is an important part of the programme. The coaching skills you learn can be used in a profession where the role of remedial educationalists is becoming more and more important.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/pedagogicalsciences

Why study Pedagogical Sciences at Radboud University?

- In 2014, the programme was named the best Master’s programme within this field by the Keuzegids Masters.

- You’ve got some freedom when picking your courses. You choose one of seven Master’s specialisations and can still take (additional) courses belonging to other specialisations. The schedule is geared to this: electives are never taught simultaneously.

- Teaching takes place in small groups allowing for plenty of opportunity for questions and discussion.

- Upon completing your programme, you have a broad pedagogical basis and are specialised in a certain field.

- You will be trained according to the scientist-practitioner model. This means that you will navigate between science and practice. Your actions in the field are based on academic theories and in turn you’ll test your experiences in the field to the same theories. Your teachers, all experts in their field, will help you make the link between application and research.

- In most instances, when you’ve completed your Master’s programme in Pedagogical Sciences you will also receive a diagnostic certification. This will allow you to further develop in the clinical professional within the Netherlands.

Specialisations in Pedagogical Sciences

Read more about the specialisations in Pedagogical Sciences, including comprehensive information on our approach to this field, the programme outline and career prospects. Two are offered in English and the rest are taught in Dutch.

- Diversities in Youth Care
The specialisation Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look at care giving and welfare policies differently. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people.

- Gifted Education
You will learn how to identify the needs of a gifted pupil. Giftedness is more than IQ. You will study how personal characteristic abilities, and surroundings influence each other. You will investigate the conflict between stimulating talent and being fearful of doing so.

Specialisaton 1: Diversities in Youth Care

The specialisation Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look at care giving and welfare policies differently. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people.
In this programme you can focus on policy, research and/or counseling. Moreover you can choose a specific target group or theme (e.g. ethnic minorities, sex, sexuality) and follow courses like ‘Gender and Diversities in Organizations', 'Poverty, Wellbeing and Social Justice', 'Migratie en Interreligieuze Studies', 'Feminist Classics', and ‘Community Outreach Project'. You are encouraged to match both the practical training and the writing of your master thesis with the subject of your interest. We will facilitate your practical training abroad in the spring semester.

Specialisation 2: Gifted Education

You will learn how to identify the needs of a gifted pupil. Giftedness is more than IQ. You will study how personal characteristic abilities, and surroundings influence each other. You will investigate the conflict between stimulating talent and being fearful of doing so.
In lectures and study groups (one of which will be in a university abroad) about learning processes and learning environment, the Master's student will gain insights in the specific characteristics and problems of students in general and gifted children, adolescents and young adults in particular. In the course ‘Educating the Gifted' you will focus on specific research and practices concerning gifted education and work on practical cases of individuals and/or groups of gifted students.
You will improve your academic research skills and learn about diagnostics and treatment of problems related to giftedness, and you will learn to apply this theoretical knowledge within a specific educational situation with gifted students. After completing the program students will be able to recognise, analyse and investigate problems concerning giftedness and be able to contribute in the solution of these problems.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/pedagogicalsciences

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The MA in International Communication and Cultures aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding of communication as a cultural process. Read more
The MA in International Communication and Cultures aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding of communication as a cultural process.

You will discover how cultural meanings are carried within every message and what their effects are at an international level – how they are mediated, interpreted and translated. You will gain the skills required to critically explore the (trans)formation and effects of messages and their meanings in a globalised world. You will also learn how to translate and interpret the delivery of these messages to international audiences and markets, and develop the ability to negotiate and promote intended meaning.

The programme is ideal for those who have studied culture or communication (history, education, communication, social sciences, linguistics or languages) and wish to gain a more practical element with a focus on international markets, or those who have worked in the industry and would like to get a more thorough understanding of transcultural communication, which is linked to their experience.

In the first semester, you will take modules in global studies of communication and culture and in relevant research methods (textual and image analysis). You will be introduced to a range of optional modules for further specialisation, such as, Negotiation and Business Strategies, Documentary Film-making or Intercultural Rhetoric, Translation and Mediation. In the second semester, you will consolidate the knowledge, understanding and skills acquired in the previous semester in the field of international media and intercultural communication. New aspects of your learning in semester two will be an introduction to cultural practices (cultural management, innovation and creativity), but also to the role and use of languages across different cultures. You will be introduced to a range of optional modules for further specialisation, such as World literature, Global Media Events and Latin-America Cinema.

Core modules:
•Analysing transnational and intercultural meaning: Images and film/Language, texts and discourses
•Negotiation in international contexts: The use of language across cultures
•Representing intercultural meaning: Exhibition project or film festival (alternate years)
•Transnational flows, mediascapes and global meaning-making in intercultural contexts

Optional modules:
•Global cultural cities: The visual representation of Barcelona – tourism, football, architecture, festivals
•Global media events: Spectacles, festivals and conferences
•Global online communication: Self-expression and identity
•Intercultural rhetoric, translation and mediation: Promotional, educational and public communication
•Mediating distant suffering: Pity, trauma and victimhood in a transnational context
•Memory beyond borders: The transnational politics of memory and remembering
•Cinematic Representations of Latin America: Local versus global
•Representing intercultural meaning: Film project
•Theories of culture and communication
•Transcultural and transnational aesthetic practices: Cinema, magazines, fashion and museums
•Understanding multilingual contexts: Ethnic minorities and the glocal level
•World literature: Narratives, genres and networks

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