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Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies. Read more
Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies.

This new programme gives you an opportunity to consider Muslim minority communities comparatively, within both western and non-western contexts. You will explore key themes such as ethnicity, gender, and the varieties of religious interpretations and practices that have resulted in issues and challenges arising uniquely within different Muslim minority communities. The programme is highly interdisciplinary and offers a flexible combination of module choices including for example, law, history, international relations, and diplomacy.

You will acquire skills necessary to work in a wide range of professions that require an understanding of inter-cultural relations and policy-making at both local and national levels. You will also gain the expertise to evaluate materials from different sources such as the media, government reports and legal documents as well as academic research.

The programme is offered by the Department of Religions and Philosophies http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/ and delivered by the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD) http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/

Structure

Students take four modules (comprising one core and three elective) over two years and write a dissertation

Core modules:

‌•Muslim Minorities in a Global Context
‌•Dissertation

Optional modules:

‌•Introduction to Islam
‌•Muslim Minorities and the State: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
‌•Islamic Law in a Global Context
‌•Religions and Development
‌•The Art of Negotiation
‌•Global Public Policy
‌•International Security
‌•Global Diplomacy: Citizenship and Advocacy
‌•Strategic Studies
‌•Political Islam in South Asia
‌•Contemporary India, State, Society and Politics

Disclaimer

Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules http://www.soas.ac.uk/infocomp/programme-disclaimer/

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning
Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

This programme is taught 100% online through our VLE. In the VLE you will have access to learning materials and course resources anytime so you can fit your studies around your existing commitments. For each module, students will be provided with access, through both the SOAS Library and the University of London’s Online Library, to all necessary materials from a range of appropriate sources.

A key component of the student experience will be peer to peer learning, with students enrolled in discussion forums.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by five written online assessments (‘etivities’*) comprising 30% and one 5,000 word essay comprising 70% of the module mark. The etivities provide formative and summative feedback to students as a means of monitoring their progress and encouraging areas in which they can improve.

Dissertation

The Dissertation is assessed by the submission of a written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, excluding the bibliography and appendices, which will account for 85% of the mark awarded for the module. The remaining 15% of the module mark will be based on the mark obtained for a 1,500 word research proposal.

* An 'e-tivity' is a framework for online, active and interactive learning following a format that states clearly to the students its 'Purpose'; the 'Task' at hand; the contribution or 'Response' type; and the 'Outcome' (Salmon, G. (2002) E-tivities: The Key to Active Online Learning, New York and London: Routledge Falmer.)

How to Apply

You can apply using our online application form http://www.cefims.ac.uk/forms/appform/cisd_appform.shtml

If you have any questions please use our online enquiry form.

The deadlines for applications are as follows:

31 March 2016 for a 20 April 2016 start
Your completed application will be reviewed by a member of academic staff. If your application is successful, we will send you an official offer within ten working days and you will be asked to submit the relevant supporting documentation. Once in receipt of our offer, we
recommend submitting your documents immediately.

Supporting documentation for applications - please view website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/ma-muslim-minorities-in-a-global-context-online/

Email:

Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050

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2015 and 2016 have witnessed enormous changes in international, regional and national politics. Read more
2015 and 2016 have witnessed enormous changes in international, regional and national politics. In terms of migration policy, these past two years have also seen some of the starkest challenges in terms of approaching key communities as they move within, and frequently beyond the boundaries of both maps and political groupings. The question is therefore how best to understand the broad area of politics as a whole, and the specific trends of migration and minority groupings?

Our MSc in Politics will introduce you to the fundamental principles of political interaction in both global and local spheres, and will refine your knowledge with specialist themes covering migration, asylum, and identity. You will learn in a systematic and engaging way about the origins, evolution and multifaceted character of key political systems, before turning to the Migration and Minorities specialism, which provides dedicated insights on the creation and categorization of power, influence and governance within key structures.

A fascinating and relevant degree, supported in 2017 by a competitively-awarded Jean Monnet Studentship (£2000), as well as the possibility of in-house internships. CCCU graduates in Politics are well-placed to pursue wide-ranging careers in local, national and international relations, enhanced with an expertise in one of the most pressing issues of today: migration and minorities.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/politics.aspx

Course detail

Through a combination of core and specialist modules, the MSc in Politics will enable you to analyse the multifaceted origins, evolution and development of contemporary political systems, within and beyond Europe. You will explore the application of a range of foundational theories and contemporary concepts that make up the canon of Politics. With the fundaments firmly in place, you will then interrogate the relative merits and shortcomings of political, economic and socio-cultural philosophies, structures of power, and systems of governance in order to better understand the challenges of managing dynamics like migration and balancing majority and minority demands within local and global political systems.

Suitability

The new MSc in Politics offered at Canterbury Christ Church University is established upon a firm foundation of research­led teaching, using innovative and blended learning methods, expertise driven insights, and a clear commitment to guiding and supporting all facets of graduate student development. Our Politics pathway will provide you with the opportunity to gain comprehensive conceptual knowledge of the prime structures and interconnections that make up local, national and international politics, as well as an indispensable practical understanding of institutional, legal, political, economic and socio­cultural actors of European and non-European communities.

Offered both full and part-time, CCCU’s innovative MSc in Politics will help you tackle the ‘big issues’ in contemporary politics with confidence and curiosity, equipping you for career paths in national, European and international arenas thanks to innovative modules and a ‘calling card’ thesis.

Content

• Research Methods 1 and 2 (40 Credits)
• Advanced Research in Politics and International Relations (20 Credits)
• Critical Issues: Shifting Perspectives (20 Credits)
• The Politics of Migration (20 Credits)
• Nationalism, Ethnicity and Minority Politics (20 Credits)
• Dissertation: Assessing Politics, Migration and/or Minorities (60 Credits)

Format

The MSc in Politics programme utilises a wide range of cutting-edge teaching and learning methods, including:
• Interactive lectures
• Practical classes
• Workshops
• Virtual learning environments
• Seminars
• Simulation games
• Problem based learning group work

Tutorials with supervisors, where graduate students will study in an informative, engaging, stimulating and participative environment.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of methods, including essays, briefing notes, book reviews, portfolios, individual and group oral presentations, action research, political role play, simulations, standard examinations, as well as a sustained piece of academic work in the form of a thesis.

What can I do next?

Our students will be able to thoroughly and expertly use a wide range of national and international sources and forms of information to critically assess the challenges and opportunities facing states and institutions, their various distributions of power and influence, and ensuing forms of authority and governance within national, regional and international modes. Students will also be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the numerous forms of migration and asylum policy, as well as the modes of understanding the construction and categorization of given communities.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The Minorities, Rights and the Law Masters is set within the significant and growing field of human rights law and focuses on the specific area of minorities, rights and the law. Read more
The Minorities, Rights and the Law Masters is set within the significant and growing field of human rights law and focuses on the specific area of minorities, rights and the law. It is taught by leading exponents in the field and enables you to concentrate on your chosen interest while gaining an advantage in a competitive field through links with non-governmental organisations. The Head of the Law Department, Professor Joshua Castellino, helped to establish one of the world's most respected programmes in Human Rights Law at the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is also an international expert on minority rights and this expertise is fully integrated into this new course.

- The group of academics teaching on the programme are experts in migration, international human rights, vulnerable groups, globalisation and discrimination
- We offer innovative teaching methods with small group work and close contact with a supervisory tutor.
- You have opportunities to focus on issues of particular interest both in the taught modules and through the dissertation.
- You will be supported to find placements through our dedicated placement service - our London location ensures you have access to the best opportunities.
- Open to non-law graduates, provided they take the short non-assessed -Introduction to Law - module during the induction period.

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Summary. The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field. Read more

Summary

The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

  • Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;
  • Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice;
  • Gain knowledge and skills in carrying out research projects from design to write-up;
  • Enhance skills in critically appraising published and commissioned research;
  • Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;
  • Successful completion may also open up a range of further study and research options.

About

The Transitional Justice Institute in Northern Ireland is uniquely placed to deliver an effective and stimulating programme of study in this area. Key highlights of the programme include:

  • Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;
  • Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;
  • Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;
  • Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;
  • Enhance the skills you need for working with gender and human rights in a range of sectors;
  • Internship opportunities with a range of organizations. In previous years students have secured internships with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM), all based in Belfast;
  • Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.
  • Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;
  • Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Attendance

Attendance is compulsory for successful completion of the LLM. Modules are delivered through weekly half-day classes or fortnightly full-day classes.

Work placement / study abroad

The Transitional Justice Institute works closely with a range of human rights organisations that regularly offer internship opportunities to our LLM students – including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM).

Career options

Successful completion of the LLM

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.



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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

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The Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling is comprised of the Educational Leadership and Counselor Education Programs. Read more

The Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling is comprised of the Educational Leadership and Counselor Education Programs.

The Masters program in Educational Leadership offers a planned sequence of experiences designed to develop leadership skills essential to the improvement of administration and supervision in schools, and other educational entities. Emphasis is placed upon increased understanding of the school management function. The institution provides a unique setting for the preparation of multicultural leadership. Curricula are designed to prepare the student for entry-level administrative posts in school systems (Level I for Florida Certification) for professional development and improvement and for leadership positions in other educational entities.

The Ph.D. Program in Educational Leadership has been designed as a non-traditional program to insure the academic success of qualified individuals who are interested in serving in rural and urban settings. The full time program is designed to move students to Ph.D. candidacy in two years. Because of the developmental focus of this program, transfer credit will not be accepted. Student cohorts are admitted once each year in the fall semester.

This program will enable graduates to pursue leadership career opportunities in educational settings and organizations involved with education-related issues. The program is designed to provide professionals with theoretical and practical knowledge that will enable them to be effective change agents and successful program managers, particularly in schools and agencies that serve the needs of minority and at-risk populations. This unique program is organized in the cohort format based upon the constructivist philosophical foundation. Inter-and intra-personal development and cultural factors are identified as essential elements for effective leadership and are emphasized as part of the doctoral program. A strong emphasis is also placed upon acquisition of theoretical content and research methodology.

Counselor Education offers graduate study which emphasizes both didactic and affective experiences as necessary dimensions in the growth and development of professional counselors. The program provides a curriculum that is comprehensive, integrated, and sequential and is approved by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and meets State of Florida approval. The course of studies include differentiated patterns of preparation for school counselors, and those persons interested in enhancing their human service skills for employment in other settings such as mental health agencies. Special effort is made to sensitize and provide the learner with experiences and skills relevant in working with individuals, groups, families and populations representing varied backgrounds and motivations. Multi-ethnic and multi-cultural effectiveness constitute a pervasive focus in all program studies.

The Counselor Education program has been in existence at Florida A & M University for over thirty years with a mission of supplying school and community systems with highly qualified counselors in public/private schools, college, community agencies and businesses. Our graduates become certified school counselors or licensed mental health counselors. In both of these professions, there is an under representation of minorities, specifically African-Americans. Our candidates are exposed to instruction which emphasizes multiculturalism so that they are better equipped to address the needs of the current school and community populace.



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The purpose of this course is to develop and consolidate your understanding of the scientific methods that are routinely employed in Psychology. Read more
The purpose of this course is to develop and consolidate your understanding of the scientific methods that are routinely employed in Psychology. Emphasis is placed on training you in the efficient gathering and organising of information as well as the critical evaluation of theory and qualitative and quantitative evidence.

Why study Psychological Research Methods at Dundee?

The programme will lead to the award of the MSc in Psychological Research Methods (exit degrees of Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate are also available on this course). The course offers an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in your first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

You will be given practical experience of working in an active researcher's laboratory and you will also design and carry out a substantial research project under the supervision of a different member of the academic staff. You will be given the opportunity to present and discuss your findings in written, oral and poster formats in a supportive and cohesive environment. Our aim is to significantly improve your prospect for employment in a wide range of contexts where insight into human behaviour and/or rigorous evaluation of information are key elements of good decision making.

The School of Psychology has specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital. Learn more about our research facilities via our website.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:
Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.

Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.

Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.

Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis.

Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.

Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.

Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.

Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audiences
Provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

Who should study this course?

The course will provide a first year of research training for students who intend to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

How you will be taught

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

What you will study

Core Modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation
Two Advanced Modules, typically from:

Decision Making
Evolution and Behaviour
Health in Groups
Majorities and Minorities
Comparative Communication and Cognition

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.
Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs and have used the qualification to improve their chances of getting on to clinical and educational psychology courses. Several students take the course to improve their chances of getting jobs as support workers and Assistant Psychologists. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields of business.

Laura Wakeford graduated in 2010 with an MSc in Psychological Research Methods. She is now studying for a PhD here at Dundee. Laura's research focuses on the relationship between fixation location and attention during silent reading; specifically, whether word recognition proceeds in a serial or parallel fashion. The majority of her work uses the Dr Bouis Eye Tracker.

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Our MA programme is designed both for specialists to deepen their knowledge and skills and for graduates of other Humanities disciplines to switch into postgraduate level understanding of our subjects. Read more

Our MA programme is designed both for specialists to deepen their knowledge and skills and for graduates of other Humanities disciplines to switch into postgraduate level understanding of our subjects. The key to us being able to do this is the centring of the courses around high-level, small-group seminar discussion, mainly assessed by essays that form mini-research projects in areas of your interest. These courses are followed by one-to one supervision for a research dissertation. This structure means that if you have studied an undergraduate degree in Religious Studies, Theology, Philosophy, Ethics or related subjects, the MA provides an extended opportunity to work in depth in what fascinated you in your BA, while also offering the chance for exploring other areas that you might have missed. On the other hand, if your degree is in another area of Humanities, the small-group and one-to-one focus gives us the chance to provide tailored help to get up to speed in any area of Religions and Theology. You are also able to join in undergraduate classes, whether that is to have an extended exposure to the basics of a topic or to learn a language. In fact, even students who already have a BA in the field quite often find that they want to pick up a subject that they previously missed. One of Manchester's key distinctive features is that you are very free to do this.

This programme enables specialisation, while stressing a broad, interdisciplinary and comparative approach. Courses can be taken from across the offerings within the discipline and beyond. Courses cover a wide range of topics, including Biblical studies, Jewish studies, Christian studies, South Asian studies, philosophy, ethics, gender studies and politics.

Aims

  • To provide multi-disciplinary curricula informed by the research and scholarly activities of the teaching staff.
  • To develop in students a critical understanding of religion and theology through a range of learning and teaching methods.
  • To equip students with the skills necessary to interpret primary and secondary sources and to make available appropriate language instruction, where feasible. 
  • To help students from diverse backgrounds progress though their programme by providing effective academic and pastoral support. 
  • To equip students for a variety of careers through subject specific knowledge, active engagement in their own learning and the development of analytical and other transferable skills.
  • To provide a stimulating research environment through seminars, tutorials and programmes of guest lectures that will foster postgraduate study
  • To develop skills in research and analysis that will foster postgraduate study.

Special features

Twilight menu of courses available for CPD and other study. The core courses and the main MA course unit options are generally timetabled between 4-6 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday evenings, enabling the MA to be completed by studying in time-slots designed to be as suitable as possible for continuing professional development for school-teachers and others in full or part-time work.

Multi-religious Manchester . We offer the opportunity to study the religious life of one of the world's most ethnically rich cities. Our MA covers a wide range of religious traditions. There are particular dissertation and other learning opportunities in South Asian Studies : study of religions of India, Pakistan and their neighbours, and of UK communities with roots in those countries, ethnic minorities and religious identities.

John Rylands Library . The library houses many collections of world importance, including papyri, manuscripts and the world Methodist archive. As an MA student you are able to access the archives and propose a dissertation topic using archive material, for use of which you will receive training.

Bill Williams Library. A study space for Religions and Theology, housing a major collection on Anglo-Jewish history and other resources for Jewish Studies.

Please see our Facilities section below for further information on:

  • Centre for Jewish Studies
  • Centre for Biblical Studies
  • Lincoln Theological Institute

Coursework and assessment

MA students take two core courses and up to six options, then write a dissertation. The programme takes 12 months full-time or up to 27 months part-time. Assessment is usually by essay on a topic agreed between the student and lecturer. Language course units may also involve an examination. The dissertation is 12-15000 words and you will receive one-to-one supervisory support.

Career opportunities

The primary focus of all our postgraduate degrees is to give people research skills, whether for academic work or for another career. Many professions today require investigative skills. Some in the media spend time researching angles of events that relate to religions. Some in the health service investigate the experiences of various cultural groups in accessing services. Many in museums, libraries and other archives require the textual and historical research skills that our courses teach. Postgraduate study in Religions and Theology gives you a high level qualification for a wide range of investigative tasks.

Our masters degrees qualify you for research study at Manchester or at virtually any other high-level academic institution in the world. Many of our MA students are preparing for PhD study. Other students take Manchester MAs to enhance their understanding of a particular religious tradition, either their own or that of others. The programmes in Biblical Studies and Theology, Culture and Society offer particular opportunities for continuing professional development for church ministers. All of our courses offer valuable further professional development for teachers of Religious Education. In applying for a job in any field, a Manchester postgraduate degree will mark you out as someone with high-level skills and a track-record of successful engagement with serious and complex issues.



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The Social Justice and Education MA will help students to identify, examine and understand key sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice, including issues of race, class, gender and sexuality, and education. Read more

The Social Justice and Education MA will help students to identify, examine and understand key sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice, including issues of race, class, gender and sexuality, and education. Participants will explore the personal and political dimensions of social justice concerns and develop their professional, practical and research skills in this area.

About this degree

This programme provides students with the opportunity to address, in a unique way, the complex links between social justice and education, focusing on key current policy and political debates about the role of education. They will also be able to develop, extend and reflect on their own professional interests, concerns and practice and how to address pressing issues of social justice in their everyday profesional and personal lives. Through their engagmeent with cutting-edge research in this area they will learn tools for fighting for social justice and transformation in the educational areas relevant for them.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or a report (30 credits) and a third optional module (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Sociology of Education
  • Understanding Education Research

Optional modules

  • Rights and Education
  • Gender, Sexuality and Education
  • Sociology of 'Race' and Education
  • Understanding Educational Policy
  • Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
  • Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems

Students can also choose from a wide range of Master's-level optional modules across the IOE offering.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of face-to-face evening sessions and interactive online learning using a variety of teaching and learning styles. Sometimes a conventional lecture-based approach is taken, with the aim of providing an overview of the field. Lectures are usually followed by open discussion or group work. At other times a seminar format is adopted involving, for example, group discussion of set reading, a video or an introductory presentation. Assessment is through coursework essay assignments, plus submission of a report or dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Justice and Education MA

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are leaders, managers, teachers and practitioners in the compulsory education sector across international contexts. Many are working as professionals in NGO organisations specialising in social justice across many countries such as Chille, Japan, Canada and the UK. Graduates can also be found working as civil servants and government officials. In addition, many find places in the higher education sector including across a range of professional roles, as researchers, and as university lecturers worldwide.

Employability

Students develop the capacity to:

  • reflect critically on debates concerning education and social justice across diverse contexts
  • understand the ways in which knowledge forms, and is formed by, education politics, policy, practice and research 
  • consider the implications of theory, research and analyses about social justice in education and how it can impact their own future practice and professional development
  • use oral and written communication skills in order to make arguments, examine evidence and creatively advance social justice and education
  • understand processes entailed in social science and philosophical research and conduct their own unique research in the area of social justice and education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is home to an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the sociology, philosophy and history of education, international development, post-compulsory and vocational education and higher education.

The Social Justice and Education MA is taught by world-leading sociologists and philosophers within the department who have expertise in theory, research methods, policy analysis and impacting social change. They are experts in issues such as equality and human rights, gender, 'race', sexuality, youth, disability and social class. Those teaching are active researchers and will introduce the latest research and developments in their fields.

This programme explores sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice and equalities and also explores processes of social transformation and change. Key issues debated include understanding and responding to social and educational disparities in international contexts. The programme equips students with essential theoretical and methodological research skills for critically engaging with social justice issues including understanding power relations from various perspectives. The MA attracts a diversity of both home and international students thus providing excellent educational and professional networking opportunities. 

Students gain invaluable opportunities to study with leading scholars and a cohort of internationally diverse students across the IOE MA cluster in sociology, social justice and policy studies in education.



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The Sociology of Education MA will guide students through the latest theories, concepts and research in the sociology of education, exploring the wider political, social and cultural contexts of policy and practice in education. Read more

The Sociology of Education MA will guide students through the latest theories, concepts and research in the sociology of education, exploring the wider political, social and cultural contexts of policy and practice in education. It will encourage them to use sociological research to reflect on their current and future roles in education and provide them with a grounding for evaluating education practice.

About this degree

Students will develop critical theoretical, methodological and analytical skills in educational research in the sociology of education field and learn to apply them in their own professional context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits) orreport (30 credits) plus one further optional module (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Sociology of Education
  • Understanding Education Research

Optional modules

  • Sociology of 'Race' and Education
  • Gender, Sexuality and Education
  • Rights and Education
  • Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
  • Understanding Education Policy
  • Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems

Students can also choose from a wide range of Master's-level optional modules across the IOE offering.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a mix of face-to-face Saturday and evening sessions and interactive online learning. Sometimes a conventional lecture-based approach is taken, with the aim of providing an overview of the field. Lectures are usually followed by open discussion or group work. At other times a seminar format is adopted involving, for example, group discussion of set reading, a video or an introductory presentation. 

Assessment is through coursework essay assignments, plus submission of a report or dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Sociology of Education MA

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as lecturers and teachers, local authority officers, government department officers, members of education think tanks, or as research students (MPhil/PhD, EdD).

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary and Sixth Form Teacher (Sociology and Politics), Unspecifed Academy, Essex
  • Intern, Institute for Democracy and Economic Affairs (IDEAS) and studying MA Sociology of Education, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)
  • Policy and Research Assistant, Unspecified Policy and Research Organisation

Employability

Students develop a capacity to critically engage with and conduct educational research on issues relating to sociology and education.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is home to an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education, international development, post-compulsory and vocational education and higher education.

The Sociology of Education MA is a cutting-edge programme taught by world-leading sociologists within the department who have expertise in research methods, policy analysis, equality and human rights: issues of gender, 'race', sexuality, youth, disability and social class.

Students gain invaluable networking opportunities with leading scholars and a cohort of internationally diverse students across the IOE's MA cluster in sociology, social justice and policy studies in education.



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The Policy Studies in Education MA will introduce students to ways of critically analysing education policy within a broad social, economic and political context, considering contemporary developments in education policy in institutional, local, national and global contexts. Read more

The Policy Studies in Education MA will introduce students to ways of critically analysing education policy within a broad social, economic and political context, considering contemporary developments in education policy in institutional, local, national and global contexts. It will enable them to explore existing policy issues and practices, and apply the insights provided to their own experiences.

About this degree

Students have the opportunity to engage with a broad range of perspectives and develop a comprehensive theoretical understanding of education policy. Students will study major and topical themes within social science (such as globalisation, markets and managerialism) with a particular emphasis on their effects on and relevance to education.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or a report (30 credits) and a third optional module (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Sociology of Education
  • Understanding Education Policy

Optional modules

  • Understanding Education Research
  • Sociology of 'Race' and Education
  • Rights and Education
  • Gender, Sexuality and Education
  • Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
  • Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems

Students can also choose from a wide range of Master's-level optional modules across the IOE offering.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Teaching and learning

This programme delivery includes face-to-face Saturday or evening sessions and interactive online learning. It is assessed by coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Policy Studies in Education MA

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers, while others have jobs as educational policymakers. Graduates can also be found studying for PhDs.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Research Co-Ordinator (Curriculum and Assessment Unit), Ministry of Education - Chile
  • Associate Director of Professional Development, Institute of Education
  • Secondary School Teacher (Head of Citizenship), Unspecified High School

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education is the home of an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education, international development, post-compulsory and vocational education and higher education.

The MA is taught primarily by sociologists within the department who have expertise in policy analysis, gender, 'race', sexuality, youth, and social class. Those teaching you are active researchers and will introduce you to the latest research and developments in their fields. Linking research, policy and practice, the result is an extraordinarily powerful learning community.

The MA attracts both home and international students, with a range of backgrounds and experiences thus providing excellent educational and networking opportunities.



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The Comparative Education MA will enhance students' awareness of education systems, traditions and issues in a number of countries, helping them to understand the relationships between education and other social phenomena by introducing the concepts and skills students need for systematic comparison. Read more

The Comparative Education MA will enhance students' awareness of education systems, traditions and issues in a number of countries, helping them to understand the relationships between education and other social phenomena by introducing the concepts and skills students need for systematic comparison.

About this degree

This programme will help students to gain a rigorous multidisciplinary grounding in the comparative analysis of education and society, deepening their understanding of contemporary issues in education in many parts of the world.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research project (60 credits)

Core modules

  • Comparative Education: Theories and Methods
  • Education and Development in Asia
  • Education Traditions and Systems in Europe

Optional modules

  • Doing and Using Educational Leadership and Management Research
  • Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
  • Education and Muslim Communities
  • Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
  • Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems
  • Planning for Education and Development
  • Policy, Research and Pedagogy in Adult Literacy

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Teaching and learning

This programme is delivered via face-to-face evening sessions. Attendance may vary depending on your choice of optional modules. It is assessed by coursework assignments of 5,000 words, and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report. If the report is opted for an additional optional module is required. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Comparative Education MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as local and central government advisers, while others have jobs as charity managers. Graduates can also be found working as researchers and lecturers.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary School Teacher (English), Vehbi Koc Foundation
  • MPhil/PhD in Comparative Education (Intergrated Route), Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)
  • PhD / Integrated MPhil with Research Methods Education Policy, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)
  • Adult English Teacher, Unspecified Education Provider and studying MA Study of Applied Linguistics, Korea University

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society is a multidisciplinary department at UCL Institute of Education bringing together a diverse community of researchers with expertise in the social sciences who have a common interest in exploring education in all its guises: formal, non-formal and informal.

The department has extensive expertise and experience in research, knowledge transfer and consultancy in the UK, Europe and Asia, working closely with transnational bodies, such as, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, government departments, as well as with regional organisations, employer organisations, national institutes, and international organisations.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Education, Practice & Society

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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About the MSc programme. Political theory is the study of the good society. Public debate is dominated by controversies such as what justice requires of citizens and the state; what the most important rights and liberties are; and what protection there should be for minorities in majoritarian democracies. Read more

About the MSc programme

Political theory is the study of the good society. Public debate is dominated by controversies such as what justice requires of citizens and the state; what the most important rights and liberties are; and what protection there should be for minorities in majoritarian democracies.

Political theory provides a scholarly examination of these questions, informed by adjacent debates in moral philosophy, legal theory, historical study, and political science. Currently, there are eight political theorists in the Department of Government, which is one of the largest concentrations of specialists in the world. Staff research interests are in diverse areas including comparative political theory, contemporary normative theory, the history of political thought, feminist theory, and rational and social choice theory. We aim to address issues in a global context.

The programme includes a compulsory course and a wide range of optional courses, and you will also complete a dissertation on an approved topic of your choice. The programme is a good preparation for further research work, or for a career in education, public administration, NGOs or the private sector. 

Graduate destinations

This programme is a good preparation for further research work or for a career in education, public administration or the private sector.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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Who is it for?. The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely. It is designed to help you drill down and follow your specific interests and specialise your knowledge. Read more

Who is it for?

The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely. It is designed to help you drill down and follow your specific interests and specialise your knowledge. The course has been designed to give you the chance to pursue your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t.

The knowledge and skills you develop during the course will enable you to explore a number of rewarding career options – from supporting NGOs to working with the civil service or media.

Objectives

Is the USA a benevolent global leader or a neo-imperial power? How does the shift in power from the West to the Rest reshape international politics in the 21st century? Can states act effectively in a world increasingly shaped by international institutions and global economic actors?

The International Politics MA will challenge your point of view and help you:

  • Explore an expansive and ever-changing subject and gain an advanced specialist education in international politics
  • Learn about the broad contours of the field while developing specialisms backed by real-world research
  • Probe the ideas that structure the way we think about the world and examine the institutions that determine events
  • Focus on how you can use this new understanding to judge global affairs for yourself
  • Examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors and networks, and intergovernmental organizations
  • Gain an advanced conceptualization of global political issues in the 21st century
  • Understand contemporary theoretical debates and the rapid political change in the contemporary world
  • Develop your analytical capacities through a variety of learning techniques
  • Prepare for a diverse range of careers, as well as provide contextual knowledge
  • that will be applicable for life-long learning in a rapidly changing political and social world.

Placements

You may have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage you to create your own placement, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service.

There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which helps you to explore career opportunities with international politics degrees. The day includes:

  • Talks by speakers within the field, including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice, UNESCO and the EU Commission
  • Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators
  • Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams. Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA gives you the flexibility to design your own degree.

The taught modules are completed in Terms 1 and 2, normally over a single academic year for full-time students and over two academic years for part-time students. You are required to take a total of 120 credits in taught modules.

There is one core module – 'Theories of International Politics' (30 credits) taught in the first term (30 credits).

The remaining credits will be made up of elective modules that you must choose from the list of electives opened to students in the MA International Politics. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to pursue your interests by studying across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

The number of elective modules you take will vary depending on the number of 15- and 30-credit modules you choose. All modules run for a minimum of eleven weeks (or one term).

Core modules

  • Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
  • International Politics Research Workshop
  • International Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules

Choose 60 credits from:

Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:

  • Understanding security in the 21st century (15 credits)
  • International organisations in global politics (15 credits)
  • Development and world politics (15 credits)
  • Religion in global politics (15 credits)
  • Global capitalism: past, present and future (30 credits)
  • Global political economy (30 credits)
  • Political economy of global finance (15 credits)
  • The politics of forced displacement and resettlement (15 credits)
  • Global governance (15 credits)
  • International politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
  • Global financial governance (15 credits)
  • Strategy, diplomacy and decision-making (30 credits)
  • US foreign policy (15 credits)
  • Foreign policy analysis (15 credits)
  • Economic diplomacy (15 credits)
  • Russian Foreign Policy from Stalin to Putin (15 credits)
  • Visions of World Order: Ideas and Concepts in the History of International Thought (15 credits).

Typical modules offered by the Sociology Department:

  • Developments in communication policy (30 credits)
  • Transnational media and communication (30 credits)
  • Criminal minds (15 credits)
  • Crime news (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:

  • International human rights in law and practice (30 credits)
  • Human rights in the EU (30 credits)
  • International criminal law: crimes & institutions (30 credits)
  • Law and war (30 credits)
  • Minorities and indigenous people in international law (30 credits)
  • International law & the use of force (30 credits)


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