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The Postgraduate Certificate in Minor Injury and Illness Management enables UK registered healthcare professionals to achieve professional development and gain experience in preparation for practice as an Emergency Care Practitioner (ECP) or within minor injury or illness focused care within urgent or acute care. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Minor Injury and Illness Management enables UK registered healthcare professionals to achieve professional development and gain experience in preparation for practice as an Emergency Care Practitioner (ECP) or within minor injury or illness focused care within urgent or acute care. You will critically analyse the assessment, diagnosis management and treatment of patients within a range of minor injury and illness conditions across the age spectrum.

You will have the opportunity to develop your knowledge, skills, and understanding of assessment, planning, delivery, and evaluation of care of patients and families in minor injury and/or minor illness environments.

Successful completion of this course allows you to exit with the Postgraduate Certificate in Minor Injury and Illness Management with 60 CATS credits at Level 7.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/postgraduate-certificate-in-minor-injury-and-illness-management/

Why choose this course?

- This postgraduate certificate enables practitioners to become knowledgeable and competent in managing the care of patients and families in minor injury and/or minor illness environments, through evidence based practice and working effectively with colleagues.

- There is an emphasis on practice focused learning throughout, with learning and assessments being based around practice and the workplace.

- Identifying the importance of developing practitioner skills for practice ensures the transferability of the programme to direct service provision.

- Curriculum content is informed by relevant national and international research and evidence based literature to help you expand the breadth of your studies and develop a depth of critical analysis and evaluation of practice.

- Importance is placed on the individual's experience within the educational process and your journey of lifelong learning from both a personal and professional perspective.

- Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and maintain excellent practice links within those areas locally or across the region.

This course in detail

This postgraduate certificate consists of two compulsory modules, one single (20 credits at Level 7) and one double (40 credits at Level 7). Both modules are delivered face to face and make use of online resources.

- Modules:
P44011 Advanced History Taking and Assessment (20 credits)
This single, level 7 practice-focused module provides you with the opportunity to develop your critical thinking through enhanced knowledge and skills in taking a comprehensive patient history and performing a thorough physical and psychosocial assessment.

P44015 Minor Injury and Illness Management (40 credits)
This double, practice related module offers you the opportunity to explore and critique theories, models and strategies used in the examination and clinical decision making in relation to the diagnosis and treatment of minor injuries and illness.

As courses are reviewed regularly, the modules may vary from that shown here.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, learning and assessment strategy of the programme is underpinned by student centred, patient-centred and practice-focused approaches. Each module has an appropriate division between structured learning activities and private study. Opportunities for sharing existing and developing skills, knowledge and experience are maximised. A variety of teaching and learning strategies are employed to make the most of the range of experience, skills and knowledge within the group.

Approach to assessment

You will be assessed in each of the modules. There is a mixture of assessment strategies chosen on the basis of their appropriateness for an individual module and programme learning outcomes and content, the academic standard expected and the different styles of learning present. Assessments are used to give an opportunity to demonstrate knowledge as well as the critical and reflective analysis required for professional practice.

Assessments also provide you with an opportunity to experience a range of postgraduate attributes that will prove valuable in your future career.

How this course helps you develop

The teaching, learning and assessment strategies include the development of a range of the core postgraduate attributes encouraging development of critical self-awareness and personal literacy, digital and information literacy and active citizenship within the context of both academic and research literacy.

Careers

Students who have completed similar health and live sciences postgraduate certificates have been employed within the relevant speciality both locally and nationally. This course enables practitioners to work through the Agenda for Change grading bands to gain career progression and positions such as Emergency Nurse Practitioners/Advanced Paramedic Practitioners, Advanced Care Practitioners in an Emergency Department or Practitioners in urgent or acute care specialities.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in roles which include the assessment and management of patients presenting with minor injury or illness. Read more
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in roles which include the assessment and management of patients presenting with minor injury or illness.

The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context. Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context. The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs. Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less
The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor. Read more
The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context.

Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context. The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes. The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs. Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less
The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. Read more
The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. It is designed to act as a top-up course for students who already hold a 3-year undergraduate degree in physics (or an equivalent subject with similar physics content) and who are likely to wish to subsequently pursue research in physics, either within the department or elsewhere.

The course aims to bring students close to the boundaries of current research, and is thus somewhat linked to the expertise from within the specific research groups in the Department of Physics. Candidates make a series of choices as the year proceeds which allow them to select a bias towards particular broad areas of physics such as condensed matter physics, particle physics, astrophysics, biophysics, or semiconductor physics. The emphasis can range over the spectrum from strongly experimental to highly theoretical physics, and a range of specialist options may be chosen.

All students also undertake a substantial research project, which is expected to take up one third of their time for the year. Details of the current Part III physics course can be found at http://www.phy.cam.ac.uk/students/teaching/current-courses/III_overview . Please note that the courses available to students do change from year to year (especially the Minor Topic courses taken in the Lent Term) and so this year's course listing should only be used as a guide to what courses might be available in future.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphasphy

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- reinforced their broad understanding of physics across the core areas studied in the Cambridge bachelors physics programme.
- developed their knowledge in specialised areas of physics bringing them close to the boundaries of current research.
- developed an understanding of the techniques and literature associated with the project area they have focussed on.
- demonstrated the application of knowledge in a research context and become familiar with the methods of research and enquiry used the further that knowledge.
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of knowledge.
- demonstrated some level of self-direction and originality in tackling and solving research problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and execution of research.

Format

The course begins with taught courses offered in seven core areas: these "Major Topics" are lectured in the Michaelmas Term and cover substantial areas of physics. Students may choose to attend three or more of these for examination in the Lent term. In the Lent term, students take three or more shorter more specialised "Minor Topic" courses (from about twelve) for examination in the Easter Term. Substitutes for Major and Minor Topic courses are available from a small subset of courses taught by or shared with other departments. Throughout the year students also work on a research project that contributes to roughly a third of their mark and at the end of the year sit a three hour unseen paper on General Physics.

Depending on the lecturer for each course, students may be expected to submit work (i.e. problem sets) in advance of the small group sessions for scrutiny and/or present their work to those attending the sessions.

Assessment

The research project will be assessed on the basis of scrutiny of the student's project laboratory notebook and project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with the project supervisor and another member of staff.

It is not usual for submitted work to be returned with detailed annotations. Rather, feedback will be predominantly oral, but lecturers are expected to submit a short written supervision report at the end of each term for each of their students.

Feedback on the research project will be be primarily oral, during the student/supervisor sessions, though a short written supervision report at the end of the Lent term will be provided by each supervisor

Candidates will normally take:

- A two hour unseen examination on three or more of the Major Topic courses. These will be taken at the start of the Lent Term.
- A one and a half hour unseen examination on three or more of the Minor Topic courses. These will normally be taken at the start of the Easter term.
- One three hour unseen General Physics Paper, taken towards the end of the Easter term.
- A number of additional unseen examination papers, if the candidate has chosen to take any of the interdisciplinary courses, Part III Mathematics courses, or other shared courses in lieu of any of the Major or Minor Topic papers.

Candidates who have chosen to substitute a Minor Topic paper with an additional External Project, will be assessed on that work via scrutiny of the student's project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with two members of staff.

Candidates who have taken the Entrepreneurship course, in lieu of a Minor Topic, will be assessed on the basis of the course assignments set by the course co-ordinator.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme enables students to engage critically with the varied aspects of Chinese literature. This new degree covers both pre-modern and modern literatures of China. Read more
This programme enables students to engage critically with the varied aspects of Chinese literature.

This new degree covers both pre-modern and modern literatures of China. It includes the study of literary works written in the original languages, as well as an introduction to literary theory.

The programme comprises two compulsory courses, a minor option, and a dissertation.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cia/degrees/machinlit/

Structure

The MA degree consists of four components:

Not all courses may be available every year.

1. Core Course
Take one of these courses

- Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Modern Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year

2. Compulsory Course
- Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year

3. Minor Courses
For non-fluent Chinese speakers
Students who do not have advanced or native-speaker competence in Chinese are required to select one of the following two courses, which offer advanced training in reading and translating Chinese literary texts. These courses are also taken by fourth-year undergraduate students, but MA students will be required to do additional work.

- Traditional Chinese Language and Literature - 15PCHC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Modern Chinese Literature (MA) - 15PCHC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year

For fluent Chinese speakers:
For students with advanced or native speaker competence in Chinese, alternative minor units may be selected from the MA Sinology programme, or the second core course may be selected as a minor, with approval from the programme convenor.

4. Dissertation
A 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic

MA Chinese Literature - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 28kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cia/degrees/machinlit/file80703.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The degree programme consists of two compulsory courses, a minor option and a dissertation of 10,000 words.
The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and the additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in Chinese Literature from SOAS equips students with essential skills such as competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through the indepth study of Chinese Literature, both pre-modern and modern and the study of literary theory in relation to this literature.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Read more
This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Students will spend their first year at one of the EIT's partner universities in Europe, and can elect to spend their second year at UCL.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/ict-innovation-msc

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 15 February 2016
Fees note: UK/EU full-time fee available on request from the department

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Good
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The thematic core foundations together with modules on Innovation and Entrepreneurship will be taught during the first year. In the second year at UCL, the programme focuses on the two thesis projects and on specialised taught modules. Students at UCL will choose either Human Computer Interaction and Design (HCID) or Digital Media Technology (DMT) as their major specialisation.

This two year dual masters degree has an overall credit value of 120 ECTS.

Students take modules to the value of 60 ECTS (150 Credits) in their second year at UCL, consisting of four taught modules (60 credits), a minor thesis (15 credits) and a master's thesis (75 credits).

- Core Modules
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Ergonomics for Design
Affective Interaction
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Virtual Environments
Advanced Modelling, Rendering and Animation
Computational Photography and Capture
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

- Options
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Affective Computing and Human-robot Interaction
Societechnical Systems: IT and the Future of Work
Interfaces and Interactivity
Qualitative Research Methods
Virtual Environments

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Machine Vision
Geometry of Images
Image Processing
Computational Modelling for Biomedical Imaging
Acquisition and Processing of 3D Geometry
Multimedia Systems
Network and Application Programming
Interaction Design
Professional Practice

- Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake a minor thesis and a master's thesis, in collaboration with an external partner. For the master's thesis, students will spend at least two months in the external partner's environment.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, practical sessions, case studies, problem-based learning and project work. Assessment is through coursework assignments, unseen examinations and the two thesis projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site ICT Innovation MSc http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/admissions/msc_ict_innovation/

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Brown Family Bursary - NOW CLOSED FOR 2015/16 ENTRY
Value: £15,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK students
Criteria: Based on both academic merit and financial need

- Computer Science Excellence Scholarships
Value: £4,000 (1)
Eligibility: UK, EU students
Criteria:

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates of this programme will have the key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship necessary for the international market, together with a solid foundation in the technical topics that drive the modern technological economy.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The EIT Digital Master School is a European initiative designed to turn Europe into a global leader in ICT innovation, fostering a partnership between leading companies, research centres and technical universities in Europe.

The school offers two-year programmes where you can choose two universities in two different European institutes to build a curriculum of your choice based on your skills and interest. We offer double degrees, which combine technical competence with a set of skills in innovation and entrepreneurship. While you get an excellent theoretical education, you also get the opportunity to work with leading European research institutes and leading business partners.

Student / staff ratios › 200 staff including 120 postdocs › 650 taught students › 175 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
This programme is suitable for students with a relevant degree who wish to develop key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship together with an advanced education in ICT engineering, for a future career or further study in this field.

The admission procedure for the EIT ICT Labs Master's programme is organised centrally from Sweden by the KTH Admissions Office. Please read the admission requirements and application instructions before sending your documents. For further details of how to apply please visit http://www.eitictlabs.masterschool.eu/programme/application-admission/application-instructions.
Please note that applications after the deadline may be accepted. Late applications will be processed subject to time, availability and resources.

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The Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary Education) offers an opportunity for graduates from a variety of backgrounds to obtain a teaching qualification that is accredited nationally and recognised internationally. Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary Education) offers an opportunity for graduates from a variety of backgrounds to obtain a teaching qualification that is accredited nationally and recognised internationally.

This course enables those with approved qualifications to become certified secondary teachers. As secondary school teachers are usually employed to teach more than one school subject, it is a requirement of the course that you undertake both a major and minor area of study. Your major teaching area is based on the content of your bachelor degree. Your minor teaching area will be a curriculum area that you have studied to a lesser degree and/or an area where you have gained professional experience.

Major Teaching Specialisations

The major teaching area qualifies you to teach lower secondary school and upper-secondary school students.

Major subject specialisations include:

-The Arts (Design, Drama, Media Studies, Visual Arts)
-English
-Languages (Chinese and Japanese)
-Mathematics
-Science (Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Science, Human Biology, Physics, )
-Social Sciences (Economics, Geography, History, Politics and Law).

Minor Teaching Specialisations

The minor teaching area qualifies you to teach lower secondary school students up to year 10.

Minor subject specialisations include:

-The Arts (Visual Arts, Drama, Media Studies, Design)
-English
-Languages (Chinese and Japanese)
-Mathematics
-Science (Human Biology, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Science)
-Social Sciences (History, Geography, Politics and Law, Economics).

This course is not suitable for qualified teachers wishing to change their qualification and/or subject specialisations.

Professional recognition

This course is recognised both nationally and internationally.

Career opportunities

Teaching at any level is a rewarding and interesting career. The Western Australian Department of Education and Training, as a matter of policy, employs teaching graduates from each institution in Western Australia. Many Curtin graduates are also employed by the Catholic education system and independent schools in Western Australia.

Credit for previous study

Applications for credit for recognised learning (CRL) are assessed on an individual basis.

2016 Curtin International Scholarships: Merit Scholarship

Curtin University is an inspiring, vibrant, international organisation, committed to making tomorrow better. It is a beacon for innovation, driving advances in technology through high-impact research and offering more than 100 practical, industry-aligned courses connecting to workplaces of tomorrow.

Ranked in the top two per cent of universities worldwide in the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2015, the University is also ranked 25th in the world for universities under the age of 50 in the QS World University Rankings 2015 Curtin also received an overall five-star excellence rating in the QS stars rating.

Curtin University strives to give high achieving international students the opportunity to gain an internationally recognised education through offering the Merit Scholarship. The Merit Scholarship will give you up to 25 per cent of your first year tuition fees and if you enrol in an ELB program at Curtin English before studying at Curtin, you will also receive a 10 per cent discount on your Curtin English fees.

For full details and terms and conditions of this scholarship, please visit: curtin.edu/int-scholarships and click on Merit.

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SOAS offers the most comprehensive MA in Japanese Studies available anywhere in Europe. Students are able to choose courses that cover all of Japan’s historical periods, from the earliest to the present and ranging over the social and political sciences as well as humanities. Read more
SOAS offers the most comprehensive MA in Japanese Studies available anywhere in Europe.

Students are able to choose courses that cover all of Japan’s historical periods, from the earliest to the present and ranging over the social and political sciences as well as humanities.

The students who take this degree come from many countries and have a wide variety of academic backgrounds. Some have already studied, or lived in, Japan and wish to broaden their knowledge or understanding. Others wish to focus their previous training on the region, while still others will come from Japan or other East Asian countries wishing to study Japan from the perspective of a different culture and academic tradition.

Knowledge of the Japanese language is not a requirement of the course. Language courses, however, are popular options.

SOAS has its own Japan Research Centre and shares the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures with the University of East Anglia. Both can be of great benefit to students.

Also see the Dual Degree Programme in Global Studies between SOAS and Sophia University (Tokyo) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-japanese-studies-dual-degree/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/majapstud/

Structure

Students take three course units (three full units, six half units, or a combination). One of the units is designated as a major, in relation to which students complete a 10,000 word dissertation. Note that some courses can only be taken as a major and some, notably language courses, only as a minor.

As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three courses from more than one discipline. The two minor units can be taken from the same discipline, but students cannot take a minor unit in the same discipline as their major.

One minor unit can be chosen from a different MA programme, for example the MA Chinese Studies or Korean Studies, subject to the approval of the MA Japanese Studies convenor and the relevant course convenor.

Some disciplines, such as Anthropology, Economics, or Politics, require an appropriate qualification (such as part of a first degree) if any of their courses are to be taken as the major subject. Students interested in such courses are advised to refer to the relevant webpage for details and, if necessary, to contact the convenor. Please note that convenors have discretion in deciding if an applicant's background is sufficient for the course concerned.

All courses are subject to availability

MA Japanese Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/majapstud/file80726.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

The style of teaching in the Japanese Studies programme varies according to subject and teacher, but in most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation.
At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

- Learning Resources

SOAS has its own Japan Research Centre and shares the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures with the University of East Anglia. Both can be of great benefit to students.

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Japanese Studies from SOAS provides its students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Postgraduate students develop linguistic and cultural expertise which will enable them to continue in the field of research. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers. These include written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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We work in close partnership with schools in designing, delivering and assessing our programme. You have the opportunity to work with tutors who are actively engaged in research and are encouraged to take a critical view of policies and practice. Read more
We work in close partnership with schools in designing, delivering and assessing our programme. You have the opportunity to work with tutors who are actively engaged in research and are encouraged to take a critical view of policies and practice.

Key benefits

- The programme at King's is challenging and students are encouraged to take a critical view of policies and practice.

- It is a sociable course where you will be expected to work with others, discussing issues and problems about teaching.

- You have the opportunity to work with tutors who are actively engaged in research in their subject and about teaching.

- MFL PGCE students have the chance to participate in a special Eramsus programme, whereby they may undertake some of teaching practice in France, Spain, Germany or Austria.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/pgce-modern-foreign-languages.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our PGCE MFL programme offers four language combinations:

- French major with German as a minor
- German major with French as a minor
- Spanish major with French as a minor
- French major with Spanish as a minor.

Our programme emphasises learning through critical reflection on theory, practice and research. We maintain close links with partnership schools and colleagues. Unique features of the course are the ERASMUS opportunity to spend time teaching in the country of your second language in the summer term. We further encourage ongoing development of subject knowledge through peer support and our e-learning platform designed in conjunction with colleagues from the King's Modern Language Centre to develop your linguistic competence and pedagogical awareness. Our programme is delivered by tutors who have extensive teaching experience and are actively involved in research of international quality.

The programme is both University-based and School based (24 out of the 36 weeks).

- Course purpose -

Our course aims to equip you with the skills and confidence to become an effective teacher of 11-18 year olds. Our programme will lead to the DfE Standards for QTS which are assessed through teaching practice observation, portfolios and written assignments.

- Course format and assessment -

The 45-credit honours-level module will be assessed by a combination of a written portfolio (equivalent to 8,000 words) and assessment of your teaching practice against the teaching standards as set out by the government’s Department for Education. Progress in meeting the teaching standards will be monitored through three progress reports that will be completed by staff at the placement school.

The 30-credit master’s-level modules will each be assessed by an 8,000-word written assignment.

The 15-credit honours-level module will be assessed by a 4,000-word written assignment.

Career prospects

The majority of trainees go into teaching or other areas of education; many become heads of departments or members of senior management teams; some take up careers in educational administration in the advisory or inspection services.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MSc Advanced Clinical Practice offers registered practitioners a flexible, bespoke and student-centred programme of study that aims to meet their personal and professional development needs as they progress within their role towards advanced expert practice. Read more
The MSc Advanced Clinical Practice offers registered practitioners a flexible, bespoke and student-centred programme of study that aims to meet their personal and professional development needs as they progress within their role towards advanced expert practice.

The Master of Science Award at the University of Lincoln is underpinned by the four framework pillars of advanced clinical practice as outlined by Health Education East Midlands (HEEM); Clinical Skills, Management and Leadership, Education and Research.

It is fundamental to this programme that each bespoke student pathway will contain a minimum level of each pillar in order to be deemed competent, however the individual route-way the practitioner takes will be determined by their own clinical practice role.

Within the award the ‘Clinical Skills’ pillar will always be the most prominent and each combination of modules aims to continuously promote the core principles of Advanced Clinical Practice as defined by HEEM; Autonomous practice, critical thinking, high levels of decision making and problem solving, values based care and improving practice.

All modules below are available as a stand-alone, credit bearing, short course in order to support flexibility in professional development.

Stage 1 - Core
-Pathophysiology for Healthcare (30 credits)
-Assessment, Diagnosis and Clinical Judgement in Practice (30 credits)

Stage 2 - Optional
-People, Personality and Disorder in Mental Health Care (15 credits)
-Best Interests Assessor (15 credits)
-Professional Development Portfolio (15 credits)
-Therapeutic Interventions for Mental Health Recovery (15 credits)
-Supporting Learning and Assessment in Practice (15 credits)
-Assessment and Management of Minor Illness and Minor Injury (30 credits)
-Advanced Urgent Care (30 credits)
-Enhanced Practice in Acute Mental Health Care (30 credits)
-Older Adult Mental Health (30 credits)
-Proactive Management of Long Term Conditions (30 credits)
-Non-Medical Prescribing (60 credits)

Stage 3
-Service Evaluation for Clinical Practice (15 credits)
-Service Transformation Project (45 credits)
OR
-Non-Medical Prescribing (60 credits)

How You Study

Blended teaching and learning is used wherever possible in recognition that students on this programme are working professionals and students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning.

As a student on the MSc Advanced Clinical Practice you will be allocated a named Personal Tutor who will endeavour to support you throughout the programme.

Students are expected to nominate a named Clinical Supervisor who will act as a critical friend, teacher, mentor and assessor throughout the programme. This is designed to provide you with a framework of stability and support in order to fully contextualise your learning and role within your professional service area.

This individual may, if appropriate, act as the Designated Medical Practitioner should you undertake the Non-Medical Prescribing certificate as part of your overall Award. The University will provide the opportunity for your nominated Clinical Supervisor and/or Designated Medical Practitioner to undertake training, guidance and ongoing support to help fulfil their role.

Due to the nature of this programme weekly contact hours may vary. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least two - three hours in independent study. For more detailed information specific to this course please contact the programme leader.

Taught Days module 1: Pathophysiology for Healthcare (30 credits)

Every Thursday commencing 23/02/17 for 10 weeks

Further module timetables to be confirmed.

How You Are Assessed

In line with the learning and teaching strategy for the MSc Advanced Clinical Practice, the assessment and feedback strategy is also based upon the pedagogical philosophy of Student as Producer. The work assessed throughout this Award will be topical, current and will endeavour to be relevant to the student’s professional working practices. Assessments have been designed to be robust, innovative and fit for purpose; therefore allowing you the opportunity to demonstrate that you are consistently competent and capable of the role, both academically and in real-life, complex and dynamic service environments.

Assessments will be undertaken by a range of appropriately experienced and competent assessors, including academic staff, medical practitioners and experienced healthcare professionals, and it is through this collaborative and inter-professional assessment process that the University seeks to gain full assurance that the student is fit for practice as an Advanced Practitioner in their clinical service area.

Assessment methods are likely to include, but are not limited to, written assignments, exams, presentations and projects to test theoretical knowledge, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), case based assessments, direct observation of clinical skills and the development of a clinical competence portfolio. Formative assessments will be conducted whenever possible, aiming to prepare you for the assessment process and to provide developmental feedback to support the learning process. Formative assessment activities are integrated into the programme and focus crucially on developing the autonomy and research capacities of students in line with the Student as Producer ethos. The formative assessment process will promote student engagement and collaboration, to enable peer learning and knowledge discovery and exchange to take place between students, staff and professional colleagues in service areas.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Interviews & Applicant Days

Applicants will be screened in terms of professional suitability, professional references and eligibility for funding and sponsor approval (if required) prior to being made an offer on the programme.

If an applicant has applied for Non-Medical prescribing as part of the programme they will need to also undergo an interview process and meet the individual entry criteria for that programme.

Modules

-Advanced Urgent Care (Option)
-Assessment and management of minor illness and minor injury (Option)
-Assessment, Diagnosis and Clinical Judgement in Practice
-Best Interests Assessor (Option)
-Enhanced practice in acute mental health care (Option)
-Older Adult Mental Health (Option)
-Pathophysiology for Healthcare
-People, Personality and Disorder in Mental Health Care (M) (Option)
-Prescribing Effectively (Option)
-Prescribing in Context (Option)
-Proactive management of long term conditions (Option)
-Professional development portfolio (Option)
-Service Evaluation for Clinical Practice (Option)
-Service transformation project (Option)
-Supporting Learning and Assessment in Practice (Masters Level) (Option)
-The Consultation (Option)
-Therapeutic Interventions for Mental Health Recovery (Level M) (Option)

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Join us on this course and you will develop your systemic knowledge and skills, and increase the effectiveness of your direct work with children and families with children. Read more
Join us on this course and you will develop your systemic knowledge and skills, and increase the effectiveness of your direct work with children and families with children.

Designed as an intermediate year of training for systemic psychotherapy and end-stage training as a systemic practitioner, it is built on the theoretical and practice frameworks established in the foundation year.

It aims to deepen your confidence in employing different approaches encompassed by systems theory, and will encourage you to incorporate reflexive thinking in your work.

This course is delivered in partnership with the Institute of Family Therapy in London.

Choose Intermediate Child Focused Systemic Practice PgCert and:

• Study the application of systemic ideas and learn how they can help you understand the developmental stages of children
• Explore the five major models of systemic practice, including the philosophical underpinnings, main theorists, main theoretical principles, model of change and role of the practitioner with particular reference to work with families with minor aged children and their networks
• Develop your ability to apply systemic practice skills to a number of different client groups and across a range of practice contexts
• Gain the ability to work within the ethical and legal frameworks that are relevant to multiple practice contexts and the particular requirements of organisations
• Benefit from an enhanced ability to use relevant evidence-based research to make assessments, formulate interventions and review the effectiveness of your direct work.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/intermediate-child-focused-systemic-practice#about

Course detail

The course is designed to help professionals to develop and deepen systemic knowledge and skills in order to increase the effectiveness of direct work with individual children and families with minor children across a broad range of contexts. The course is both an intermediate year of training for systemic psychotherapy and end stage training as a systemic practitioner. It is built on the theoretical and practice frameworks established in the foundation year of training. It seeks to deepen students familiarity with and confidence in employing a number of approaches encompassed by systems theory.

The course is suitable for professionals who wish to increase their capacity to work directly with families with young children. This includes nurses, social workers, teachers, counsellors, other health professionals and those in front line services who wish to utilise a systemic approach with clients.

The course stresses the importance of understanding professional contexts and the way in which they relate to work with families with children. Particular emphasis is placed on thinking about ways of working which meet the needs of the most disadvantaged client groups and which take account of the legislative frameworks within which most practitioners will have to work. Attention to issues of difference and the promotion and development of anti-oppressive practice are central to the course philosophy and permeate all aspects of the teaching.

In addition the course focuses on the development of the therapeutic relationship and the use of self in direct work with individuals and families.

Modules

• Intermediate Systemic Child Focused Practice (ASS047-6) Compulsory

Assessment

The course is composed of graded and pass/fail elements of assessment. The pass/fail assessments do not contribute towards your overall mark, but must be completed to a pass standard. There are two pass/fail elements: your log of 60 hours of systemic practice, and your reflective journal which charts your journey through the course.

Careers

On completing the course students are likely to have access to posts that require therapeutic skills in working with families with minor children. One example is in the Health and Social Care fields following the Munro Report on Child Protection which promotes systemic ideas as essential skills for front line workers. This course provides Intermediate training in systemic ideas that are applicable to social care, health, education and other contexts. On successful completion of this course students may describe themselves as systemic practitioners, an end target in itself, and also an intermediate stage in the full systemic psychotherapist training.

Some students enter the course to enhance their current practice with families with minor children or their carers without changing their work context. One example are counsellors who have originally trained to work with individuals and who use this foundation training to move towards working with families in the voluntary sector or as a stepping stone to further training.

For those in the statutory sector, many use the course to expand their practice and to develop routes to promotion into social care, management or supervision.

Students are encouraged to apply all of the learning to their work context which will enhance their career management skills. The course develops a range of practice skills which the student transfers directly into the work place; these include direct work and consultation skills.

On successful completion of the course you can use the title `Systemic Practitioner. This is a title recognised by the Association of Family Therapy and Systemic Practice and is highly regarded by employers in social care, education and the voluntary sector.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of normal and dysfunctional human behaviour and how to influence that behaviour. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of normal and dysfunctional human behaviour and how to influence that behaviour.

Have you always wanted to discover what it is that makes people tick? Do you have questions about human behaviour that have not yet been tackled? Whether you are driven by scientific curiosity or are intrigued by the potential for more accurate diagnoses and for effective interventions in health or education, the Research Master’s in Behavioural Science is for you.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/bs

Multidisciplinary approach

At Radboud University, we believe that a multidisciplinary approach is necessary to gain the best understanding of human behaviour. We combine knowledge and research methods from the fields of psychology, educational sciences and communication science. These disciplines are not taught separately but instead are brought together in most of our courses, making our approach unique.

Half of the programme consists of research experience. There are many issues you could tackle and a large research faculty you could work with. For example, there are over fifty staff members at the Behavioural Science Institute. The institute has internationally renowned researchers with expertise in a very wide range of topics. And that's not counting the other top scientists we invite to give workshops.

Why study Behavioural Science at Radboud University?

- Students get substantial hands-on research with a minor and major research project on different topics.
- We teach our students research methods and statistics, which we bring to life by revealing their applications to current hot issues in the field.
- Students are free to choose courses and research topics to create their own unique programme.
- Students can do the internship for their major research project abroad. Financial support for international research internships is available within Radboud University and the Behavioural Science Institute.
- You will participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.
- Master’s students are free to use any of the state-of-the-art equipment and labs found on campus, including the Virtual Reality Lab, Observational Lab and eye-tracking equipment.
- We have three Faculty Assistant positions for ambitious students to work alongside their course.
- A majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions and many students publish their Master’s thesis in peer-reviewed journals.

Discovering more

Due to our interdisciplinary approach, we accept Bachelor’s students from a wide variety of related fields, like psychology, pedagogy, educational science, biology, artificial intelligence and communication science. Simply put, this programme is for social scientists who want to discover the how and why behind human behaviour.

Quality label

The Master's in Behavioural Science was recently awarded the quality label ‘Top Programme' in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes), which indicates the programme belongs to the very best programmes in Dutch Master's education, across the entire range of disciplines.

Our approach to this field

The staff of the Behavioural Science Institute at Radboud University originate from the fields of psychology, educational sciences and communication science. Together they tackle issues regarding human behaviour. We believe that in order to fully understand human behaviour you need to use knowledge from all these fields together instead of separately. For example, looking at a psychological issue from a communication perspective could offer new and valuable insights that will lead to better diagnosis or interventions.

At Radboud University we will not just teach you existing research methods in the different fields. You will also learn to look beyond conventions and combine or adjust methods from other disciplines to enable you to do research that will answer your questions. You will not only become a highly skilled researcher but also an innovative one.

Our research in this field

More than half of the Master’s programme in Behavioural Science consists of research. In the first year you’ll do a minor project in which you choose from a list research themes that are provided by staff members or PhD students.

In the second year, you’ll do a major project in the form of a nine month internship which provides you with the experience - and data - needed to write your Master’s thesis. Most internships are carried out within the Behavioural Science Institute (BSI), working closely with colleagues, many of whom are internationally renowned researchers. However, there is also the option to arrange an internship abroad.

To broaden your scope, we expect you to choose different research themes for the minor and major projects, preferably in different groups within the BSI.

Examples of Major Projects in the field of Behavioural Science
- Differential behaviours of teachers toward boys and girls in science classes
- The role of maternal pregnancy stress and other general children’s health issues
- The recovery potential of within-workday break activities
- The effectiveness of an intervention promoting water consumption via children’s social networks
- The effectiveness of video games to reduce anxiety in children using a randomised controlled trail
- The role of experience on clinical diagnostic decision-making
- Exploring the underlying cognitive mechanisms to learn more about the ability to learn to categorise new face groups

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Behavioural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni have a job.

- Skills and knowledge
Besides the necessary theoretical knowledge about behavioural science and training in advanced quantitative data analysis, this programme also offers courses (7 EC in total) that will teach you additional skills that every researcher needs: to understand the ethics of research, to understand the process of academic publishing and grant proposals, and to comment on papers and proposals of others. We also encourage students to participate in workshops, colloquia, symposia and conferences to gain experience in the international academic field of behavioural science.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/bs

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In the Master's in Toxicology and Environmental Health you gain knowledge and skills in the recognition and evaluation of human or animal exposure to potentially hazardous factors in the environment. Read more

Toxicology and Environmental Health

In the Master's in Toxicology and Environmental Health you gain knowledge and skills in the recognition and evaluation of human or animal exposure to potentially hazardous factors in the environment.

The Master's programme in Toxicology and Environmental Health deals with the health risks of exposure to potentially harmful agents in the environment, in the workplace and through the food chain. Possible effects on ecosystems are also examined.This two year research programme is comprised of theoretical courses, a major and minor research project to gain practical skills, and the writing of a final Master's thesis. This programme is organised by the Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), an inter-faculty institute of Utrecht University; for your research projects it is therefore possible to work within one of the divisions of IRAS. Your minor project may also be carried out at an institute outside Utrecht University or abroad; or depending upon the career you find most appealing, you may replace your minor research project with a professional profile, including Management, Communication & Education, or Drug Regulatory Sciences. Graduates of the programme are prepared for further PhD studies in fundamental or applied research, or for a post at an academic level; they may work as toxicological risk assessors, occupational hygiene consultants, or forensic specialists.

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The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. Read more
The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. The opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the continent is a particular advantage of the degree. Students can choose from a range of about 30 modules in fourteen disciplines. Our former students have chosen to study Africa at this level for a wide range of reasons. For some a deep interest in the history and culture or political economy of a particular region is sufficient motivation, but for many students the programme has, in addition, been followed with the intention of furthering their career opportunities. Some go on to work either in Africa or in fields related to Africa. The opportunity to combine study of particular African subjects with an African language is very useful, although some evidence of competence in learning a foreign language is usually required.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/

Structure

Students take three taught module units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three module units from more than one subject. One module unit may be made up of two 0.5 unit modules. The subjects of the programme are: Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Media, Politics, Religious Studies, and Language.

The two minor module units can be taken in the same subject (but different to that of the major), or two different ones.

A language module can only be taken as a minor, and only one language module can be taken.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of term to determine which is the most appropriate level of study.

When applying, applicants are asked to specify their preferred major and minor subjects, and asked to give alternative choices as practical considerations such as time tabling and availability of modules may limit freedom of choice.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects and have the opportunity of sampling a variety of subjects through attending lectures etc.

All modules are subject to availability.

MA African Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 31kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/file80693.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Teaching is normally provided by lecture or seminar and students are required to attend such classes. Each student will be assigned a supervisor in connection with his or her dissertation.

- Lectures and Seminars
Most modules involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation
The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African studies from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Some MA African Studies graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. Among a variety of professions, career paths may include: Academia; Charity; Community; Government; NGOs; Media; Publishing and UN Agencies.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:
BBC News
British Embassy
Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa
Goal Nigeria
Government of Canada
Hogan Lovells International LLP
International Institute for Environment and Development
Kenyan Government
Mercy Corps
Migrant Resource Centre
Mo Ibrahim Foundation
The London MENA Film Festival
The University of Tokyo
The World Bank
Think Africa Press
U.S. Embassy
United Nations
University of Namibia
World Vision UK
Zanabazar Museum of Fine Arts

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:
Development Producer
Africa Editor
Copywriter
Director of Trade and Investment
Projects and Fundraising Manager
Head of Desk, Africa
Senior Investment Manager
Sports Writer
Knowledge Management Projects Coordinator
Project Director
Presidential Advisor
Commodity Manager
Publisher
Tutor
Creative Consultant
Lecturer in African Arts and Cultures
East Africa Analyst
Youth Volunteer Advisor
Southern Region Educational Manager
Head Specialists Giving + Insights

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA Israeli Studies is an interdisciplinary degree which explores the history, culture, politics, language and music of Israel. Read more
The MA Israeli Studies is an interdisciplinary degree which explores the history, culture, politics, language and music of Israel. The programme is based on a modular system, so the subjects covered can be as diverse as the political thought of Vladimir Jabotinsky, Christian Zionism, the poetry of Yehuda Amichai, the rise of Palestinian nationalism, the struggle of Soviet Jews for emigration, the writings of Mendele Moykher-Sforim, the music of the hasidim, Palestinian Islamism, the teachings of the Rambam and the Ramban.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maisrstud/

Structure

The programme consists of:

- Three taught courses - one major subject and two minor - which start in October and finish in April
- Two essays - to be completed by the end of the winter and spring terms respectively
- A three-hour examination in May or June
- A dissertation in the major subject to be completed by the following September

Course Options

Two Israeli Studies courses (one major and one minor) from:

Zionist Ideology
Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians
Modern Israel through its Culture
A Historical Approach to Israeli Literature

AND either one further minor from the above lists or one from the following:

Religion, Nationhood and Ethnicity in Judaism, term 2, 0.5 unit (not available 2010-11)
The Holocaust in Theology, Literature and Art, term 2, 0.5 unit
Family, Work, and Leisure in Ancient Judaism, term 1, 0.5 unit
Judaism and Gender, term 2, 0.5 unit (not available 2010-11)
Elementary Hebrew
Intermediate Hebrew
Intensive Modern Hebrew
Advanced Hebrew
Arabic language courses (Masters)
(Language courses are offered at different levels of competence)
African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World
Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature
End of Empire in the Middle East and the Balkans
Modern Palestinian Literature (PG)

MA Israeli Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maisrstud/file80799.pdf

Employment

As a student specialising in Israeli Studies, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of the Middle East.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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