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Masters Degrees (Mind Science)

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Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies. Read more

Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies.

You will engage with current debates in science communication and interpretive practice in museums, including cutting-edge art-science practices that are reimagining ways of knowing and being in the 21st Century. Alongside this, you will be encouraged to develop innovative practices of dialogic and participative engagement, developing their own ways of convening public spaces for debate.

You will undertake a range of active learning activities from developing displays, programmes and events to developing digital content and designing their own research projects. You will be supported throughout by an interdisciplinary academic staff team drawn from museum and curatorial studies and the histories and philosophies of science, as well as professionals from our partner institutions.

Students can specialise in their own areas of interest, through choosing from an array of optional modules that explore contemporary curatorial strategies, technologies and media, cultural memory, histories of medicine, audiences, participation and engagement. You will have the option of undertaking a negotiated placement with a museum or heritage organisation.

Course content

All students on the MA in Curating Science will take three core modules.

The History and Theory of Modern Science Communication allows students to explore how science, technology and medicine have been communicated to a wider public in the past. Students will identify how the processes and purposes of science communication has changed over the last two centuries and debate the consequences for science communication of the introduction of new media, ranging from the radio to the internet. The module addresses these questions by surveying the development of science communication since 1750, and by examining the changing theoretical perspectives that have underpinned these developments. Students will learn to re-examine the processes of contemporary science communication in the light of a deeper understanding of this history.

Interpreting Cultures is underpinned by action learning and puts contemporary curation in an international context. From the outset, students work on an interpretation intervention with one of the archives and collections on campus (such as The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery; Special Collections; Treasures of the Brotherton; Marks and Spencer Company Archive; ULITA ― an Archive of International Textiles; Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine). This intensive experience of project planning, management, collaboration and team working prepares students for the option of undertaking a negotiated work placement in the second semester or optional modules exploring audiences, participation or engagement.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either curational approaches or engagement.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Curating Science Individual project (dissertation / practice-led) 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

Learning and teaching

You will be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work. It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to science communication and curation, interpretation and engagement, as well as practical work experience ― a combination which is very valuable to employers.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates of allied MAs have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Placement opportunities

In Semester 2 you will have the option to undertake a negotiated work placement to gain first-hand experience of curating science.

We have close links with many of the major cultural institutions and organisations in the region, meaning there are plenty of opportunities for you to explore. If you have a particular ambition in mind for your placement, we usually try to find a role that suits you.

Students on allied MAs have completed placements in organisations such as Leeds City Museum, Leeds Art Gallery, Harewood House, the Henry Moore Institute, National Science and Media Museum, York City Art Gallery, National Railway Museum, Impressions Gallery, The Tetley, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Lotherton Hall, Abbey House Museum and the Royal Armouries.



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Programme description. Read more

Programme description

How do children learn to reason in increasingly abstract ways? How do they learn language with such remarkable speed and fluidity? How do children use their reasoning and language skills to help them explain and understand people’s behaviour and emotions? Why does the amount of information that we can hold in mind at once increase from early childhood to adulthood? Why does children’s ability to control their own thinking, attention and behaviour improve as they get older? How does the development of children’s brains affect their behaviour, memory and ability to learn?

In this taught programme on Developmental Cognitive Science, you will learn how questions like these can be addressed using research techniques from several inter-related disciplines (e.g., Developmental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Computational Science, Neuroscience, Linguistics).

This programme aims to enhance your understanding of key theoretical and practical issues about typical and atypical development in children and young people, from a cognitive science perspective. It also aims to equip you with the skills required to conduct independent scientific research that addresses key issues in developmental cognitive science.

The University of Edinburgh has a long tradition of research expertise in developmental psychology and in cognitive science. This programme brings these two strands together focusing on a developmental cognitive science approach to both typical and atypical development in children and young people.

You will benefit from the breadth and strength of the interdisciplinary academic community at Edinburgh, for example by having the opportunity to select option courses and attend research seminars across different disciplines.

Programme structure

You will undertake the following:

Core courses (worth 100 credits in total):

  • Univariate Statistics and Methodology using R (10 credits)
  • Multivariate Statistics and Methodology using R (10 credits)
  • Psychological Research Skills (20 credits)
  • Current Topics in Psychological Research (10 credits)
  • Introduction to Developmental Cognitive Science (10 credits)
  • Research Methods for Developmental Cognitive Science (10 credits)
  • Seminar in Developmental Cognitive Science (10 credits)
  • Current Topics in Developmental Cognitive Science (10 credits)
  • Research Internship in Developmental Cognitive Science (10 credits)

2 option courses worth 20 credits in total:

  • Chosen from a wide range of courses relevant to Developmental Cognitive Science from Psychology or other disciplines, as approved by Programme Director (20 credits in total)

And a Dissertation in Developmental Cognitive Science (60 credits)

Learning outcomes

The overall aim of the proposed programme is to advance students’ understanding of how questions about developmental changes in children’s cognitive abilities can be addressed using scientific methods drawn from a range of fields, including developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, computational modelling, neuroscience and linguistics. More specifically, the programme aims to:

  • enhance students’ understanding of key theoretical and practical issues about typical and atypical development in children and young people, from a cognitive science perspective
  • teach students how to conduct independent scientific research that addresses key issues in developmental cognitive science
  • provide advanced training in critical thinking skills

Students who successfully complete the programme will be able to:

  • carry out high quality original research in developmental cognitive science
  • evaluate published research studies in developmental cognitive science
  • make well-informed contributions to discussions about the interplay between developmental research and real-world applications/implications

Career opportunities

Career opportunities for graduates from this programme include:

  • undertaking a PhD in Developmental Cognitive Science or in a related field
  • undertaking a Professional Doctorate in Clinical or Educational Psychology (applicable only to students who have an accredited undergraduate degree in Psychology)
  • wide variety of careers where it is valuable to be able to use research skills, critical thinking skills and understanding of developmental processes to develop and evaluate practices and policies relating to children and young people – e.g. teaching, speech & language therapy, policy development in education, health and social care.


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Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves. What does it mean to have a mind? How is the brain related to the mind? What is consciousness? How can our mental states drive our actions? Do we have free will?. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research)

Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves: What does it mean to have a mind? How is the brain related to the mind? What is consciousness? How can our mental states drive our actions? Do we have free will?
Traditionally, philosophy of mind is part of the analytical method in philosophy. Recently, however, a more phenomenological approach to typical questions in the philosophy of mind has provided a refreshing new look on old topics. Additionally, the advance of cognitive neuroscience is providing a new method to address old questions. Philosophy of Mind and Cognition in Nijmegen combines traditional analytical theorizing with insights from phenomenology and the empirical sciences.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophy of Mind and Science you study problems such as mental causation, phenomenal consciousness and the nature of mental state attribution from the viewpoint of neurophenomenenology and the embodied embedded cognition paradigm.
The research carried out in this section (‘cognitiefilosofie') covers a number of traditional topics: mental causation, perception of, for example, colour, phenomenal consciousness and qualia, theories of mind, mental content and the nature of folk-psychology.
These subjects are specifically addressed against the backdrop of the idea that cognition is essentially embodied. This is the basic premise of the 'embodied embedded cognition paradigm', the 'enactive' approach to cognition and specific body-based forms of neurophenomenology.
Three smaller research projects take place within this section: (1) 'The Bisected Mind', the idea that folk psychology can be regarded as an interpretation of body-based behavioural tendencies and tries to reconcile indeterminacy of mental state attribution with mental realism (Slors). (2) 'Phenomenal Consciousness and Mental Causation', which addresses the problem of the causal efficacy of phenomenal states as well as the possibility of a science of consciousness (van de Laar). (3) 'Colour Perception', which aims to reconcile different theories on the nature of colour and colour perception by developing the idea that the concept of colour is multi-layered, instead of monolithic (van Leeuwen).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

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Science and technology clearly have a profound influence on society, but the reverse is also true. society significantly shapes the ways in which science and technology evolve. Read more

Overview

Science and technology clearly have a profound influence on society, but the reverse is also true: society significantly shapes the ways in which science and technology evolve. Economic interests, public opinion and policy shifts are decisive for the shaping of science and technology. However, experience has shown that scientists on the one hand and the general public, government and businesses on the other aren’t always able to clearly understand one another. That is why experts with a background in science and an understanding of social processes are indispensable.

The Master's specialisation in Science in Society offers you different perspectives on science and slightly shift your career opportunities by teaching you a different set of skills on top of the research skills learned in the first year of our Master’s programmes.

This specialisation is available in the Master's in Biology, Chemistry, Computing Sciences, Mathematics, Medical Biology, Molecular Life Sciences, Physics and Astronomy, and Science. Students gain advanced knowledge in their preferred science, and also choose a theme to structure their programme to gain specialised skills in one aspect of science management and innovation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/science/scienceinsociety

Career prospects

The intermediary role between science and society is highly sought after. You will be prepared for a dynamic career in various fields and work environments such as policy, advisory bodies, interest groups and governments, as well as interdisciplinary research that connects science and society. Although not part of the compulsory part of the programme, this specialisation can also prepare you for the field of science journalism or communication, for you can make that the focus of your graduation project.

Our research in this field

Top research and facilities
This specialisation is closely connected to the Institute for Science, Innovation & Society (ISIS); this institute brings together a group of experts from various disciplines and backgrounds in order to jointly tackle societal issues.

You also have the unique opportunity of working on a variety of large-scale European research projects that are connected to researchers on the Radboud University campus.

The Nijmegen approach

The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the working, exploring and studying people that you will meet there. No wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, in direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personal Master's programme.

Quality Label

Radboud University was rated Best General University in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2017 (Guide to Master's programmes)

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/science/scienceinsociety

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* Subject to validation, 2017 entry. Liverpool Hope’s MSc Computer Science is a research-informed, academically rigorous course and is designed to provide a flexible, purposeful and challenging set of coherent courses to meet scientific, industrial and employment challenges in this fast-evolving technological area. Read more
* Subject to validation, 2017 entry

Liverpool Hope’s MSc Computer Science is a research-informed, academically rigorous course and is designed to provide a flexible, purposeful and challenging set of coherent courses to meet scientific, industrial and employment challenges in this fast-evolving technological area. Graduates will have developed scientific and analytical skills which are highly valued in the computing, engineering, IT and business industries.

The course offers a mix of compulsory and elective courses, and a research dissertation, so you can focus your skill base and your potential career direction.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, whether it is within IT industry or as a function of other sectors, scientific computing and technical skills are in great demand and therefore highly valued. There are opportunities for placements and enterprise development.

Curriculum

The MSc Computer Science combines academic and practical course, consisting of eight taught courses (four compulsory and four elective) and a dissertation (final research project).

The Compulsory courses are:

· Computational Modelling and Simulation

· Algorithms

· Innovations in Computer Science

· Research Methods for Computer Science

· Dissertation for MSc Computer Science

Elective courses include:

· Embedded Systems and Robotics

· Cloud Computing and Web Services

· Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

· Human Computer Interaction

· E-Business

Course Descriptions

· Computational Modelling and Simulation (compulsory – 15 credits): This course develops understanding and knowledge of the principles, techniques and design of computational modelling and their applications.

· Algorithms (compulsory - 15 credits): This course gives a firm grounding in the philosophy and evolution of algorithmic design and analysis for computer science, engineering and information systems.

· Innovations in Computer Science (compulsory - 15 credits): You will examine the particular research interests of Computer Science Department.

· Research Methods for Computer Science (compulsory - 15 credits): The course will expose you to the established techniques of research and enquiry that are used to extend, create and interpret knowledge in computer science

· Embedded Systems and Robotics (elective - 15 credits): This course will examine the Robotics Operating System and robotic programming languages, such as Urbi.

· Cloud Computing and Web Services (elective - 15 credits): You will study the concepts behind the idea of cloud computing and web services and gain practical knowledge of Azure, the .Net framework and C#.

· Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing (elective - 15 credits): You will examine mobile phone OSs (Android) and Windows Phone 7. You will learn how to develop software for these devices using JavaFX and C#/Silverlight.

· Human Computer Interaction (elective - 15 credits): Human computer interaction (HCI) is the study of interaction between people and computers and is the most multi-disciplinary module available in the MSc Computer Science.

·
* E-Business (elective - 15 credits): E-business encompasses, and is more than, e-commerce. You will examine e-commerce technology, such as the internet and web-based technologies.

· Dissertation for MSc Computer Science (compulsory - 60 credits): This module will allow the students to develop a Masters level research project with the support of an academic supervisor.

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Programme description. This innovative online programme allows you to take advantage of Edinburgh’s remarkable range of expertise in the core philosophical areas of epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Read more

Programme description

This innovative online programme allows you to take advantage of Edinburgh’s remarkable range of expertise in the core philosophical areas of epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of mind and cognitive science.

Thanks to our state-of-the-art e-learning software and extensive digital resources, you can gain a world-class graduate qualification without the expense of relocating. You will also benefit from the flexible structure of the programme, which will allow you to balance your studies with work and family commitments and to develop your own specialised interest under the expert guidance of our distinguished academics.

This programme is designed to offer you a thorough grounding in contemporary philosophical research, particularly in those core areas of philosophy where Edinburgh has particular strengths: epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of mind and cognitive science.

The programme is affiliated with the Eidyn Research Centre and draws on its cutting-edge research in core areas of philosophy.

Online learning

This is an online only programme that will be taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises.

You will have regular access both to faculty and dedicated teaching assistants, including one-to-one interactions. You will also interact with other students on the programme as part of a dedicated virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

You will study compulsory courses in philosophical methodology and the areas of epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Advanced option courses are available in these areas and in philosophy of science.

Students taking the full MSc will write a dissertation (8,000 to 10,000 words) on a research topic developed in consultation with their supervisor.

This programme is taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises with regular interaction, one-to-one with teaching staff or with other students.

Learning outcomes

The MSc/PgDip/PgCert in Epistemology, Ethics and Mind aims to:

  • provide students with a broad knowledge of contemporary philosophical work in epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of mind and cognitive science
  • provide a basis for research in philosophy, especially in the core areas of philosophy constituted by epistemology, ethics and philosophy of mind and cognitive science
  • provide a broad grounding in the research methods of philosophy
  • develop students’ analytical skills

Career opportunities

This programme would be an ideal foundation for further graduate work in philosophy.



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Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Read more

Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Public discourse, professional life, politics and culture revolve around the philosophical, scientific and religious ideas of our age; yet they and their relationship to each other are not well understood.

This programme brings together in an authentically interdisciplinary way leaders in the fields of philosophy, science and theology, based both in Edinburgh and across the world.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Students will develop logical acumen and analytical skills, and the ability to express themselves clearly in writing and in conversation with diverse groups of students from around the world. As well as being a leading research institution in philosophy, theology and the sciences, Edinburgh has lead the way in providing high quality, bespoke and intensive online learning at postgraduate level.

The innovative online format of the programme and the flexibility of study it offers make it accessible to those with family or professional commitments, or who live far from Edinburgh.

This MSc/PGDipl/PGCert in Philosophy, Science and Religion is designed to give you a rigorous grounding in contemporary work in the intersection of philosophy, science and religion.

The programme follows an integrated approach with leading researchers in philosophy, the sciences and theology proving teaching on, respectively, the philosophical, scientific and theological dimensions of the programme.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Online learning

This is an online only programme that will be taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises.

You will have regular access both to faculty and dedicated teaching assistants, including one-to-one interactions. You will also interact with other students on the programme as part of a dedicated virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

You will take options from a wide range of courses offered by the Department of Philosophy and the School of Divinity both jointly and individually, and will be required to write a dissertation.

All students will be required to take two core courses: Philosophy, Science and Religion 1: The Physical World; and Philosophy, Science and Religion 2: Life and Mind.

Courses will include online lectures, tutorials, quizzes, discussion sessions and personal tutor contact.

At the dissertation stage, you will be assigned a supervisor with whom you will meet, through video conferencing, to plan and discuss your research and writing.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Philosophy, Science and Religion aims to develop students to:

  • Demonstrate a good understanding of the key areas in the current science-religion interface—including cosmology, evolution, and the psychology—and will be able to engage with them philosophically.
  • Demonstrate strong analytical skills and philosophical acumen in approaching debates between science and theology.
  • Engage critically with key textual sources in the field.
  • Engage constructively in cross-disciplinary conversations.
  • Demonstrate an openness to personal growth through a commitment to dialogue across intellectual and spiritual boundaries.

Career opportunities

This course is designed to prepare you for doctoral work in relevant areas of philosophy and/or theology.

However, the skills of analytical but creative thinking, clear writing, and the abilities to manage projects that require significant research and to engage in constructive conversations across disciplinary and cultural boundaries, are all highly sought after by employers in a diverse range of fields.



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The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation. Read more
The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation.

The purpose of the programs is to provide the intellectual and practical tools that professionals will need either to pursue or further careers as computer scientists in industry or to pursue a doctorate degree in computer science.

Curriculum

The Master's curriculum is designed with these goals in mind:

• The core modules provide a solid foundation in the fundamental principles of computer science.
• The 500-level electives give exposure to a variety of Computer Science subject areas.
• The 600-level advanced courses give exposure to research topics of current interest and provide in-depth knowledge.

Core: All four modules (12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC520 — Foundations of Computer Science
CSC530 — Data Structures
CSC540 — Programming Languages
CSC560 — Analysis of Algorithms

Electives: At least four 500-level electives (at least 12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC525 — Operating Systems
CSC535 — Networks and Data Communications
CSC545 — Database System Concepts
CSC555 — Software Engineering
CSC565 — Compiler Design
CSC570 — Computer Architecture
CSC573 — Graphics and User Interfaces
CSC575 — Artificial Intelligence
CSC581 — Topics in Computer Science
CSC582 — Topics in Information Systems
CSC583 — Topics in Computer Security
CSC584 — Topics in Web Technology
CSC585 — User Interfaces in Java
CSC586 — System Administration and Security
CSC587 — Web Services
CSC588 — Wireless Programming and Security
CSC589 — UML and Pattern Design

Advanced: At least two 600-level (at least 6 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC600 — Advanced Seminar
CSC603 — Advanced Seminar in Computer Security
CSC604 — Advanced Seminar in Web Technology
CSC605 — Internship
CSC610 — Independent Research
CSC620 — Master's Thesis

To find out more information about the curriculum please visit the website:

http://www.cs.wcupa.edu/grad/masters.html

Internships

West Chester University students may register for a Computer Science Internship and work part time or full time in Summer II or during regular semesters. Students who are not Computer Science majors should use CSC300 (3 credits). Computer Science majors should use CSC400 (6 credits); of the 6 credits, 3 credits can be used to satisfy the major requirements, and the other 3 credits satisfy general electives. Computer Science graduate students should use the course number CSC605 (3 credits).

For more information please visit the website:

https://www.wcupa.edu/internships/

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This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research. Read more

This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research.

You will study among one of the world’s largest and most vibrant postgraduate communities in philosophy, alongside internationally recognised leaders in the study of mind, of language, and of situated and embodied cognition. By choosing this programme, you will be entering an increasingly popular field in which many large unsolved problems remain.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words written at the end of the second semester. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor with whom you meet to plan your reading and discuss your work.

Compulsory courses:

  • Introduction to Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
  • Advanced Topics in Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
  • Introduction to Philosophical Method (for students without a strong philosophy background)

A wide range of optional courses is offered in the philosophy, psychology, language sciences, informatics and music subject areas. Options may include:

  • Advanced Philosophical Methods
  • Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Critical Social Psychology
  • Evolutionary Psychology
  • Eye Movements and Visual Cognition
  • Foundations of Evolution
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Intelligent Autonomous Robots
  • Irrational Animals
  • Metaphysics of Mind
  • Mind and Body in Early Modern Philosophy
  • Music, Mind and Body: Psychology and Sociology
  • Music, Mind and Body: Physiology and Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology of Perception and Action
  • Origins and Evolution of Language
  • Philosophy of Psychology
  • The Philosophy of Wittgenstein
  • Psychology of Language Learning
  • Self, Agency and Will
  • Social Cognition
  • Theories of Mind Philosophy
  • Topics in Cognitive Modelling

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the training necessary to undertake research in philosophy of cognitive science, and ultimately to pursue a career in academic philosophy. You will also acquire an understanding of the central debates in the sciences of the mind today.

If you do not intend to follow an academic route, the study of philosophy helps to develop general intellectual abilities and enhance analytical, critical, interpretive and problem-solving abilities.



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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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Programme description. This programme combines the scientific study of human cognition with the application of cognitive science to broader societal concerns. Read more

Programme description

This programme combines the scientific study of human cognition with the application of cognitive science to broader societal concerns.

Students focus on core methodologies and theories of cognitive science, but also explore the synergy between cognitive science and its applications. This unifies forms of scholarly activity that are often pursued independently.

You will develop the skills to embark on your own research project and will learn how to communicate research, so if you are interested in developing a research career or in working within science communication, this programme will provide an excellent foundation.

Students who have well-developed written and oral communication skills will be encouraged to take on placement projects for knowledge exchange. Other students may choose to pursue scientific research that has implications for the broader society but aimed primarily at an academic audience.

Completion of the programme would provide the foundations of a research doctoral training programme, or a career in applied research or in science writing for the general public or non-academic professionals.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

The taught component consists of a number of courses that are based around lectures, tutorials or small group seminars, and are assessed by oral presentations, essay or exam.

Compulsory courses:

  • Cognition, Culture and Context
  • Human Cognition: Science and Application to Society
  • Introduction to Statistics and Experimental Design
  • Pragmatics of Linguistic Communication
  • Psychological Research Skills
  • Transferring Knowledge to Society

Option courses may include:

  • Advanced topics in Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
  • Child Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
  • Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology
  • Concepts and Categorisation
  • Disorders of Language Functions
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Maturational Constraints on Language Acquisition
  • Origins and Evolution of Language
  • Psycholinguistics
  • Psychology of Language Learning
  • Simulating Language
  • Working Memory in the Healthy and the Damaged Brain

The dissertation work, based on original research, is completed under the supervision of a member of staff with related research interests.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Cognition in Science and Society aims to:

  • provide a basis for research in the core theories of cognition, language, and communication
  • provide a broad grounding in the research methods of the sciences of human cognition
  • prepare students to undertake advanced cross-disciplinary research
  • facilitate students' ability to integrate relevant cross-disciplinary knowledge
  • prepare students to examine problems of importance to society, and develop strategies for addressing them through appropriate methods in the laboratory or in an applied setting
  • enhance students' ability to communicate scientific findings to both the general public as well to the professionals in the public and private sectors
  • develop students' skills in knowledge transfer

Career opportunities

This programme is intended for those who wish to pursue advanced research in human cognition in science and society. It may also be useful for those who wish to work in science communication.



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Course overview. The program is offered in English and leads to the Master degree in Cognitive Science. Students choose between two tracks. Read more

Course overview

The program is offered in English and leads to the Master degree in Cognitive Science. Students choose between two tracks:

  • Cognitive Neuroscience (CN)
  • Language and Multimodal Interaction (LMI)

Each track offers a selection of specialized courses, to allow students to tailor their training to their academic interests. The curriculum includes courses focusing on neurophysiological aspects of cognitive processes, the study of human behavior, and human-computer interaction.

Two characteristic features of this program are a close relationship between teaching and research practices & a constant interplay between biology-based and technology-based explorations of the human mind and brain.

The programme provides research-focused training with a varied, international group of faculty and researchers. All students are actively involved in developing research projects and have access to the laboratories during the Master’s course, thus gaining invaluable hands-on experience with cutting-edge research technologies. This includes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic encephalography (MEG), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), electroencephalography (EEG), eye tracking, cinematic motion tracking, psychophysics, computational modeling, & comparative cognition (animal models) for the CN track; and for the LMI track, machine learning technologies, like deep learning and multitask learning, will be applied to language understanding in interaction with other modalities.

The knowledge and skills gained during the Master’s course will most of all provide a foundation for advanced scientific research, but also prepare for professional applications in more applied settings.

Specific educational goals of the course

The Master’s degree course in Cognitive Science is aimed at the acquisition of advanced theoretical and methodological knowledge in cognitive science through an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the mind-brain system and of human language through computational models. The perspective adopted is that of the interdisciplinary approach, which integrates the biological, technological and cognitive approaches in order to allow a better understanding of human action, focusing the educational intervention and other educational activities mainly on cognitive neuropsychology and on computational linguistics.

The curriculum is characterized by training experiences and significant research activities at highly qualified laboratories, both in the field of brain-imaging (fMRI, EEG, TMS, etc.) and in the field of natural language processing, also in order to achieve the implementation of the skills acquired. We also offer students the opportunity to attend training courses abroad as part of international exchange programmes and of numerous collaborations with foreign universities. The assessment of the competences acquired will take into consideration both the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills acquired by students, also in the context of integrated courses across multiple disciplines.

Career opportunities

Graduates will be able to apply advanced skills in cognitive science using computational, observational and experimental methodologies in the study of the mind-brain system and computational linguistics. The course of study will also allow students to conduct research activities as part of the analysis and development of systems related to human cognitive performance, conducting empirical research and the development of neural and computational models of cognition. They can perform these tasks as independent professionals or also as consultants at public and private entities.

The Master's degree in Cognitive Science provides access to doctoral courses in the disciplines of cognitive science, both in Italy and in Europe and the United States. The CIMeC offers a PhD program in Cognitive and Brain Sciences.



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IN BRIEF. Study a course that is unique in the UK and has been specifically developed to meet the skills gap. Course content can be applied to very diverse fields- there are many job opportunities in this area. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study a course that is unique in the UK and has been specifically developed to meet the skills gap. Course content can be applied to very diverse fields- there are many job opportunities in this area.
  • Gain SAS certification.
  • Learn to tell a story from data. Become immersed in Big Data techniques and platforms, working with real-world messy data to gain experience across the data science stack.
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Have you ever wanted to ‘Mung’ data? Apply Machine Learning techniques? Search for hidden patterns? Be part of Big Data?      

This course is your opportunity to specialize as a Data Scientist, one of the most in demand roles across all sectors including health, retail, and energy. Companies such as Google and Microsoft, and also public organisations such as the NHS are struggling to fill their vacancies in this field due to    a  lack of suitably qualified people. This course is unique in the UK in that it has been developed as a MSc conversion course – if you have a good honours degree in any discipline with a demonstrable mathematical aptitude, an enquiring mind, a practical and analytical approach to problem solving,    and  an ambition for a career in data science; then this course is for you.    

During your time with us, you will develop an awareness of the latest developments in the fields of Data Science and Big Data including advanced databases, data mining and big data tools such as Hadoop. You will also gain substantial knowledge and skills with the SAS business intelligence software suite  due  to    the  partnership of the University with the SAS Student Academy.  

"We are especially pleased to endorse the new MSc in Data Science. With the explosion of interest and investment in data science teams, our customers cannot get enough graduates with SAS-based analytical skills. Courses such as this new MSc are an important step forward by the University to addressing this skills shortage, especially amongst home students." - SAS

COURSE DETAILS

This course covers a very comprehensive range of topics split in to four large modules worth 30 credits each plus the MSc Project worth 60 credits. External speakers from blue-chip and local companies will give seminars to complement your learning, that will be real-world case studies related to the subjects you are studying in your modules. These are designed to improve the breadth of your learning and could lead to ideas that you can develop for your MSc Project.

TEACHING

The course is focused around the underpinning knowledge and practical skills needed for employment within the data sciences industry. There will be 22 hours of lectures; 11 hours of tutorials and 22 hours workshops; 2 hours of examination-based assessment; and 245 hours of independent study, assessed coursework and preparation for examination. This makes a total of 300 hours total learning experience.

  • Lectures will be used to introduce ideas, and to stimulate group discussions.
  • Tutorials will be used to develop problem solving strategies and to provide practice and feedback with scenarios to help with exam preparation.
  • Workshops will be used to develop expertise in SAS tools, by analysing example datasets of increasing complexity.

ASSESSMENT

  • 50% of the assessment will comprise a practical project where students will be given some data, will devise and carry out an analysis strategy and will present their interpretations and explain their strategy. 
  • 50% will comprise an examination, which will assess more theoretical aspects of the course and will explore students’ immediate response to unseen scenarios or data.

CAREER PROSPECTS

A recent report by e-Skills and SAS (Big Data Analytics: An assessment of the demand for labour and skills, 2012-1017) indicates the demand forecast for staff with big data skills is predicted to ”rise by 92% between 2012 and 2017, and by 2017 there will be at least 28,000 job openings for big data staff in the UK each year…”

With this qualification, you’ll be equipped with the skill set and technical knowledge relevant for the data science and big data job market.

FURTHER STUDY

The Informatics Research Centre in the School of Computing, Science and Engineering at the University of Salford builds on the history, success and achievements of the research in Computer Science and Information Systems developed at the University of Salford over the last thirty years.

Evolving around Data and Information in all their types and usages, the Centre covers all phases and processes from data pre-processing to engineering and visualisation. The Centre is developing novel methods and systems for the analysis and recognition of various data sets, learning behaviours and causal models. The techniques and systems developed have a wide range of potential applications including digitisation of historical documents, medical diagnosis, semantic tagging, segmentation of types of viewers and their behaviours, text mining and retrieval and data visualisation.

Forensic computing, digital investigation and Cyber security is another area of expertise supported by the centre both at the theoretical and application levels.

Many students go on to further research in the fields of:

  • Actionable Knowledge Discovery and Semantic Web
  • Software Engineering and applications
  • Big Data, Data Mining and Analytics
  • Image and document processing and analysis
  • Cyber Security and Forensics
  • Information visualisation and virtual environments

FACILITIES

Facilities include a new Dell Cloud Computing platform with OpenStack and lab workstations, providing access to software platforms and languages specialized in Machine Learning, Data Mining, Statistical Analysis and Big Data including:

  • R, SAS Enterprise Guide & Miner, Python, Apache Hadoop & Spark, RapidMiner
  • NoSQL databases ie MongoDB


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The MRes Science course provides two key ingredients for early-career researchers. a width of transferable research skills combined with a depth of expertise in your chosen subject. Read more

Why take this course?

The MRes Science course provides two key ingredients for early-career researchers: a width of transferable research skills combined with a depth of expertise in your chosen subject.

You will join the day-to-day life of a research group and undertake an original project or study with an experienced supervisor. Along the way you will have sessions focussed on the skills and abilities needed to be an effective researcher.

A list of suggested project titles can be found below, in the 'Structure & Teaching' section.

What will I experience?

You will have the opportunity to focus your research interests on one or two areas of science, allowing you to become an expert in subject knowledge. It also provides the environment to translate your findings into research related outputs such as: preparation of a peer reviewed publication, critical review, grant application, conference presentation or intellectual property submission.

The course also contains taught elements of the nationally recognised Researcher Development Framework (RDF, vitae.ac.uk). Overall, you will experience a satisfying intellectual challenge within a productive research community, aided by supportive supervision.

What opportunities might it lead to?

The benefits of studying for an MRes include: preparation for doctoral study, having an extended and informed experience of research in a specific domain of expertise, and developing higher transferable skills for research-related careers. Many of our students have gone on to successful PhD positions and higher-grade science and business posts.

Module Details

You can study as either a full-time (one year) or part-time (two years) postgraduate student. You may start in either mid-September or mid-January of any academic year.

The course has two units:

Research Project (120 credits). This is the main part of the course, with an extended research project undertaken in one of the eight Schools and Departments in the Faculty of Science, plus a research paper, funding application, conference poster and research talk.

Research Preparation and Development (60 credits). This includes a wide range of RDF skills, including: personal effectiveness, research management, professional skills, networking, research organisation, science communication, impact, literature review and job application.

During the course you will work with a 1st and 2nd supervisor, who will help you develop your research skills, knowledge and experience. Assessment for each unit is by regularly-spaced coursework items, that build a complete skill set for successful career development.

Programme Assessment

Both units involve a number of taught sessions, which are selected by the supervisory team and you, from the Graduate School Development Programme (GSDP) and from Faculty and Department/School subject-specific provision.

The first place to start is to discuss some possible project ideas with any member of research staff in the Faculty of Science. If you know the University already, you may decide to approach a lecturer in the School/Department you are familiar with. If you are unsure about the wide range of research we do here, please have a look at the research pages of the relevant department, noting people and areas of research that interest you.

Once you have a person or project in mind, please talk to them about your plans and possible projects. They can help you put together a one-page research proposal. We recommend that you apply during the final year of your undergraduate degree. However, you can still apply up to the beginning of September and the end of January. You will be invited to a 30 minute interview, to discuss the proposed project and your science career plans. Please allow at least one working month for the various stages of the process to be completed. Following interview, the final decision of the supervisory team is reached and you will be contacted with a letter and welcome pack if successful.

Student Destinations

Those students completing the MRes Science course will have moved to the next level of qualifications with the advantages that this offers in terms of learning and employability. They will also be in an excellent position to apply for any related doctoral training programme, research assistant positions, graduate teaching positions, or general research related roles.

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Data. Knowledge. Action. these three words symbolize steps in the data science value chain. The UBC Master of Data Science curriculum covers all stages of this chain, providing you with skills to focus on the “knowledge” section. Read more
Data. Knowledge. Action: these three words symbolize steps in the data science value chain.

The UBC Master of Data Science curriculum covers all stages of this chain, providing you with skills to focus on the “knowledge” section. Over 10 months, you will learn how to extract data for use in experiments, how to apply state-of-the-art techniques in data analysis and how to present extracted knowledge effectively to domain experts.

Data science can open your mind—and career path—to infinite possibilities. There is a growing need in many fields for people who can apply computational and statistical techniques to data and then effectively communicate results from analyses to various stakeholders.

The new UBC Master of Data Science is a professional program developed by the combined expertise of the UBC departments of Computer Science and Statistics to help meet this need and give students a fast track to a great career.

Utilizing descriptive and prescriptive techniques, students extract and analyze data from both unstructured and structured forms and then communicate the findings of those analyses in ways to enable organizations to make informed decisions based on data.

What Makes The Program Unique?

The program provides practical, real-world-applicable experience via integrating real-world data sets across the courses.

Many other programs typically focus on producing graduates that are specialized either in statistical methods, or computational methods, but not both. UBC’s new Master of Data Science program enables graduates to span both the statistical and computational perspectives and effectively communicate those results to different stakeholders.

Career Options

Candidates graduate with the skills to extract and analyze data and then communicate the findings of those analyses in compelling and clear ways to help organizations put data to work. The UBC Master of Data Science program gives you experience with a variety of data across a range of domains, and therefore exposure to a multitude of potential career avenues.

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