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Masters Degrees (Migration Studies)

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Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration. Read more

Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration.

Drawing on several disciplines, including political science, geography and history, you'll discover why and how migration happens and gain an in-depth understanding of the challenges and opportunities it creates. You can choose to examine topics such as the refugee crisis in Europe, labour migration, multiculturalism and immigration as an election issue.

Learning across disciplines

You'll not only gain an in-depth understanding of migration issues, you'll develop your critical thinking, communications and research skills.

If you're a Master's student, you may have the opportunity to do an internship with an organisation involved in migration policy, research or practice. Or you can choose to complete a 60-point research project instead. Take the opportunity to contribute your own perspectives to the study of migration.

Qualification family structure

The Master of Migration is part of a tiered family of qualifications:

  • Master of Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Migration Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.

Staircasing allows movement in both directions—if you begin by enrolling in the Certificate or Diploma programme you can continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may be awarded the Certificate or Diploma.

What you'll study

The Master of Migration is divided into Part 1 and Part 2.

In Part 1 you'll complete four 30-point courses and you'll have some choice in what you study. In the core course—Approaches to Migration Studies POLS 488—you'll examine how migration is analysed, study the main concepts, theories and debates and prepare a research proposal. In your elective courses you might focus on a particular historical migration flow, explore the challenges of refugee resettlement in New Zealand, study the international or domestic politics of migration or choose to complete an individual research project.

In the second half of your studies, or Part 2, you'll complete a 60-point research essay that builds on your research proposal in Part 1 of the programme. Alternatively, you may have the opportunity to complete an internship and research at a workplace involved in migration.

If you're doing the Diploma, you'll complete Part 1 of the Master's.

Certificate students complete the core course in Part 1 and choose one further course from the MMigS programme.

How you'll learn

For most of your courses you'll attend one three-hour seminar each week that will include classroom discussions and sometimes student presentations.

You'll also complete your own self-directed research under the guidance of your supervisor. You'll meet with them regularly to discuss your progress.

Duration and workload

The MMigS can be completed in one calendar year of full-time study, or in two years part time. You'll need to finish the degree within three years of enrolling.

The PGDipMigS takes two trimesters of full-time study or can be studied over four trimesters part time.

You can complete the PGCertMigS in one trimester, or over two trimesters part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

In the heart of it

In the capital city of Wellington, you'll be at the centre of immigration policy and decision-making. Take advantage of Victoria's links with national organisations that deal with migration such as the Office of Ethnic Communities, the Asia New Zealand Foundation and Immigration New Zealand.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Seminars skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

People with an in-depth knowledge of migration issues are increasingly in demand in governments, NGOs, media and research organisations. You'll be able to apply your understanding of migration in a wide range of professions such as policy analysis, research, international development, community development and refugee resettlement.



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Addressing some of the most challenging issues in today’s world, this programme relates ethnicity and migration to global economic and cultural change, and to systems of domination and resistance movements. Read more

Addressing some of the most challenging issues in today’s world, this programme relates ethnicity and migration to global economic and cultural change, and to systems of domination and resistance movements. You learn to analyse the causes of migration, as well as its consequences for emerging formations of race, gender, labour, citizenship, healthcare, welfare and culture.

The master’s programme is interdisciplinary, integrating the humanities and the social sciences, and is animated by a commitment to critical, innovative and useful approaches to issues and problems within the broad field of ethnic and migration studies.

Students will gain a comprehensive grasp of the field of ethnic and migration studies and will be well prepared for positions in local, national and international organisations, administration, business, government, media and the cultural sector, as well as for further postgraduate studies and research.

The programme consists of a mix of mandatory courses and electives that will allow you an individual specialisation, options to study abroad, options for internships, and research tutorials with faculty. Teaching involves formats with a high level of student participation. Teaching forms include lectures, workshops, seminars and individual/group tutorials. 

Areas of focus include historical and sociological perspectives on the ways in which migration shapes society; in-depth knowledge in the field of intersectional migration studies; globalisation and its link to changing conditions for work and migration; the European Union asylum policies;, theories of biopolitics, citizenship and exclusion; and the relation of race, ethnicity and migration to cultural and aesthetic expressions such as narratives, visual arts, theatre and cinema.

The faculty will be joined by international guest professors to make up an interdisciplinary and internationally experienced team, covering all aspects of the programme’s curriculum and beyond. The program thus offers a direct interface with ongoing research.

Example of specific focus areas within the programme:

  • Historical perspectives on ethnicity and migration
  • Intersectional migration studies
  • Changing frameworks for citizenship
  • Migration and globalisation in post-colonial perspectives
  • Race, ethnicity and migration in culture and the arts
  • Migration and asylum policy in the European Union
  • Migration and health.


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With more than 230 million global citizens living outside their home countries, international migration is one of the most critical issues facing the global community in the 21st century. Read more

With more than 230 million global citizens living outside their home countries, international migration is one of the most critical issues facing the global community in the 21st century. The challenges that these global citizens face are the focus of this master’s program, which prepares professionals to better the lives of migrants and refugees throughout the world.

Students study topics of global migration with top researchers, professors, project practitioners, and policy makers in the field of migration studies. The program includes an optional semester of study at Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. Graduates are prepared for careers in local, state and national governmental agencies; policy think tanks and policy and planning consulting firms; community-based non profits and non-governmental organizations; international agencies; advocacy and public interest organizations; philanthropic organizations and foundations; and other private-sector entities.

Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  1. Critically analyze the theories, concepts, and research findings in migration studies from an interdisciplinary perspective.
  2. Evaluate the role of governments and civil society organizations in community representation, policy creation, and resource allocation in relation to migration and mobility.
  3. Apply knowledge of the humane, legal, and political characteristics of migration as a social reality and create related social interventions.
  4. Plan, generate, and interpret a research study on an important issue in migration studies.
  5. Develop field studies among migrant communities to understand realities, dynamics and logics of migration.

You can request more information on our website

Careers

Our program prepares students to develop migration policies and provide support services to migrant communities. Graduates can go on to lead local, state, and national governmental agencies; international agencies; policy think tanks and policy planning consulting firms; community-based nonprofits and non-governmental organizations; advocacy and public interest organizations; philanthropic organizations and foundations; and other private-sector entities.

We also provide excellent training for students wishing to pursue further graduate studies in Diplomacy, Law, Public Health, Education, International Studies, or related fields

Scholarships & Assistantships

We offer a limited number of partial scholarships. Program scholarships range from $1,000 to $5,000. All applicants, U.S. and international, are considered for these scholarships at time of admission consideration.

A limited number of teaching assistantships are available.

A separate application is not required for scholarships or assistantships. If you receive a scholarship or teaching assistantship, you are notified in your admission letter.

You can request more information about scholarships and assistantships on our website



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Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies. by distance learning. The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. Read more

Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies

by distance learning

The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. It is unique in being the only programme of its type offered by distance learning.

An introduction

The MA degree will enable you to acquire a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration, developing expertise through a choice of elective modules. You will hone your self-reliance in dealing with - and critiquing - law, policy and practice in the field, and will also learn how to gather, organise and deploy evidence to form balanced judgements and develop policy recommendations.

Who is the course for?

This Masters is relevant to those who already work in the area, for whom a Masters qualification would enable them to progress to higher level work within the sector, whether in multilaterals, governments or NGOs.

It will also appeal to people hoping to establish themselves in the sector - these could be people making a career change or those at an early stage of their careers.

It is also relevant to sector professionals, to provide a deeper understanding of the issues facing refugees and refugee aid organisations.

We are hoping to create a virtual meeting place for students, academics and practitioners from all parts of the globe.

How will the course benefit me?

The programme is designed to develop both academic and vocational skills and experience.

It will enable you not only to think constructively about related policy and law, but to develop actual policy recommendations.

The 'practice based' module provides the opportunity to explore of some of the key vocational aspects relevant to the sector including topics such as advocacy, campaigning, fundraising, policy, law and communications. You can then choose to focus on a specific area for your examined piece of work. In the case of fundraising, for example, you could submit a funding bid that will be assessed by a tutor with significant practical experience in the grants and trusts sector.

Other modules on the course focus on asylum law and policy in specific regions of the world, such as Latin America and Africa or the European Union, whilst others focus on specific thematic issues such as statelessness, internal displacement, healthcare, gender and sexual identity.

Overall the course seeking to provide students with a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration.

How you study

You study this online programme wherever you are in the world and access the course content through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE also gives you access to:

- Associate Tutors who provide expert academic guidance throughout your studies

- academically rigorous and up-to-date learning materials and resources

- online tasks and assessments ('e-tivities') plus seen examinations for each of the modules

- peer to peer learning in online discussion forums

- world-class online library facilities.

Ask a question

To ask a question about this programme, please contact out Student Advice Centre using this form.



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Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?. Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. Read more
Are you involved in – or contemplating – working with migrants, refugees and asylum seekers?

Our course will broaden your understanding of the relevant theories, concepts and policies. We help you examine migration processes and their consequences for today’s societies. You’ll explore issues of development, rights and diversity that shape migrants’ life chances.

You have the opportunity to follow your own interests within migration, development, human rights and refugees, or within migration, ethnicity, cultural diversity and rights.

This MA draws on the expertise of the Sussex Centre for Migration Research.

How will I study?

Across the autumn and spring terms, you learn through core modules and options. You also take a module that prepares you for further research and a professional career. This is delivered as a series of workshops including one that prepares you for your dissertation.

In the summer term, you undertake supervised dissertation work or a dissertation with placement.

You are assessed by term papers, unseen exams, a case analysis on research methods and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Many of our graduates have pursued successful careers in:
-International organisations and NGOs (such as UNHCR)
-Local government authorities
-Charities with a migration focus (such as the Refugee Council).

Others have continued their studies with a PhD, becoming scholars in migration studies.

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What trends in migration have we seen in recent years? Do some societies facilitate adaptation for migrants better than others? Migration, refugees and forced displacement are some of the most pressing and controversial challenges facing contemporary societies and nation states. Read more

What trends in migration have we seen in recent years? Do some societies facilitate adaptation for migrants better than others? Migration, refugees and forced displacement are some of the most pressing and controversial challenges facing contemporary societies and nation states. Our course uniquely explores the study of migration through a sociological perspective and uses a scientific approach to investigate the key challenges that will shape policy agendas and the impact that this could have around the world.

Our MSc Migration Studies combines insights of sociological theory with the methodological rigour highly in demand by government, NGOs and supranational institutions. Drawing on the expertise of leading researchers, you build the methodological skills needed to conduct your own research and make your own contribution to the field of migration. You gain a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research. . 



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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies.

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS.

The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’.

Topics and themes include:

Sedentarism and the study of migration
Polities & economies of migration
Colonialism
Nations, states and territory
Globalisation
(Illegal) workers in the global economy
Place and emplacement
Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination
Transnational migrants & mobile lives
Trafficking
Development and migration
Diasporas and development
Refugees and internally displaced persons
Development-induced displacement
Environment and refugees/displacement
Climate change-related migration
Policy responses to migration
Transformations North and South

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Migration, Mobility and Development. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students work together in small groups to produce a migration related research report. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 78kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/file101784.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars, collaborative research projects and supervised individual study projects.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Dissertation work requires students to make use of theoretical and empirical material and relate this to a migration related topic.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;. Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;

Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;

Students who wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;

Students who come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist migration and diaspora related topics along with regional or language-based study
Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in issues relating to migration and diaspora.
The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.
The programme encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Core course:

- African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit)
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (1 unit)
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology (1 unit). This is recommended for students without a previous anthropology degree.

OPTION COURSES
- Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Option Courses list. A language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Migration and Diaspora Studies and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 253kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/file93570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- To introduce students to important areas of contemporary social theory which deal with issues of migration, globalisation, the postcolonial world, and cultural transformations.

- To ground students in the historical basis of these issues

- To encourage transdisciplinary thinking on issues of migration

- To enable students to translate theoretical perspectives for practical application in the material world.

- To provide students with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be expected to grasp the key debates in migration and diaspora studies from a critical perspective

- To understand the global/historical/political and cultural background within which issues of migration and diaspora occur.

- A critical understanding of the ways that migration has shaped the modern world, and the implications of this for future research.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- The development of analytical and theoretical skills based on a detailed understanding of the social science literature on migration and diaspora.

- To approach theories and debates from a critical and reflexive basis.

- To develop their presentation skills and their ability to articulate arguments coherently in order to promote class discussion and critical engagement with ideas and practices.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Communicate effectively in writing, in academic English

- Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources including print and other forms of mass media

- Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.

- Students with no knowledge of media technologies will have the opportunity to learn photographic and film making techniques through the Media unit.

- Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
Students will be expected to learn to:

- Plan, organise and write masters’ level essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
- Understand unconventional ideas.
- Present (non–assessed) material orally.
- Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
- Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
- Be prepared to enter a Social Science PhD programme.
- An ability to work, and be at ease in, a multicultural environment

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. Read more

Migration in today's globalised world stands at the heart of key national and international debates; including migrants' and asylum seekers' rights and citizenship; state security and border management; and the globalisation of skilled labour markets. This interdisciplinary MSc offers the best of migration teaching from across UCL.

About this degree

The programme combines theoretical and policy debates about migration. Students are equipped with the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for the study of global migration and gain the opportunity to apply them in both general and more specialised contexts relating to the processes, policies and politics of migration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), a compulsory methods module (15 credits), five elective modules (75 credits) and the research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Migration
  • Issues in Global Migration
  • Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods I

Elective modules

Students choose from a range of modules offered across UCL which specialise in migration. The list may include the following:

  • Social Science Research Methodologies and Methods II (essential only if intending further research training)
  • Thinking Space
  • Migration and Urban Multiculture
  • Mining Social and Geographic Datasets
  • Globalisation and Security
  • Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
  • Ethnicity, Migration and Health
  • Migration in the European Union
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Gender, Generation and Forced Migration
  • Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
  • Anthropology and Development
  • Postcolonial Cultural Geographies
  • Comparative Human Rights Law
  • Globalisation in the Twentieth Century
  • Equality, Justice and Difference
  • Population and Development
  • Economics of Migration (Economics prerequisites)
  • International and European Refugee Law

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, discussions, independent reading, practicals and workshops. The majority of modules are assessed through coursework although a small number are assessed by examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Global Migration MSc

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well equipped to work with migrants and asylum seekers in different parts of the world, and gain posts in UN, EU, national policy think tanks, government research and policy departments, NGOs, community-based and grassroots organisations. The programme provides an excellent foundation for students wishing to pursue doctorates in the interdisciplinary field of migration studies.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Programme Assistant, Migration Policy Institute Europe
  • Programme Manager, International Network for Aid, Relief and Assistance (INARA)
  • Campaign and Communication Intern, UNHCR (UN Refugee Agency)
  • Paralegal, Law Office of Robert B. Jobe
  • MSc in China and Globalisation, King's College London

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has internationally recognised expertise in the field of migration. It has two established research units, the Migration Research Unit and the Centre for Research on Economic Analysis of Migration. Cutting-edge research on migration also takes place across UCL in many different disciplines including law, public policy, anthropology, development planning, area studies, humanities and health. The involvement of such a wide range of disciplines in teaching on the MSc in Global Migration is unique.

Students benefit from the consolidation of migration expertise across UCL which is complemented by a departmental migration seminar series, and a vibrant and expanding body of PhD students in this field.

Migration research at UCL has a strong international dimension, benefiting from networks across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Geography

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere. Read more
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.

This MA is designed to appeal to students from a variety of backgrounds who:

- Wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;
- Wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;
- Wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;
- Come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

The degree offers students a chance to pursue specialist interests by a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. A broad-based MA for students who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of continuing contemporary research;
2. A special interest MA, enabling students to study diaspora and migration issues in depth in relation to a particular discipline or region.

The programme attracts students from around the world. It encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.

In the recent past, our students have been highly successful in going on to further study and a number have received scholarships for research degrees at SOAS and elsewhere. Many have also gone on to work with NGOs and in the public sector as well as arts organizations. We have a good staff-student ratio, which ensure the best support for personal academic development and training which enhances future career prospects.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Programme Convenor, Dr Parvathi Raman at an early stage of their application to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study. The programme consists of four elements, three examined courses and a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/mamigdiaspstudies/

DURATION:One calendar year (Full-Time) Two or three years (Part-Time, daytime only) The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework. We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study.

Programme Overview

The course is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests by a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of migration and diaspora who wish to enhance their knowledge in the light of continuing contemporary research.

2. a special interest MA, which will enable students to study diaspora and migration issues in depth in relation to a particular discipline or region.

Prospective students will be encouraged to contact the Programme Convenor, Dr Parvathi Raman, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study. The programme consists of four units, comprised of three examined courses and a dissertation.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 276kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/mamigdiaspstudies/file39769.pdf

Teaching & Learning

During the academic year, teaching is centred mainly around lectures and seminars. For the core course in the first term, there is a one hour thematic lecture, followed by a two hour seminar, where students are encouraged to develop their ability for critical analysis and reflexivity. Students will occasionally be required to give a group presentation, encouraging collaborative work and the creative exchange of ideas, and in selected classes there will also be an in depth reading of a particular text by the whole class. Each week, students will share the responsibility for reading other selected texts, ensuring that a range of arguments and perspectives are discussed.

In the second term, teaching is framed around a two-hour student led seminar session, where a small group of students are responsible for leading each class. They will be guided by pre distributed lecture notes from the class tutors and selected readings from the reading list, and the objective will be to initiate an informed and lively discussion on the week’s topic. The class tutor will mediate the discussion

The teaching format is designed to help students progress intellectually over the year, advance their writing skills, and instil confidence in forming opinions and developing the ability to express their views articulately.

Assessment is by class participation and written assignments.

SOAS also has a large range of options on migration and diaspora related issues across the school. Teaching methods and assessment vary across these options, and their availability will depend on appropriate staff being available in the relevant academic year.

In addition, students are required to attend the weekly seminars held by the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, where they will hear international scholars give papers on a variety of migration and diaspora related topics. The seminars provide an invaluable backdrop for the transdiciplinary approach of the programme overall.

The student learning experience is also be enhanced by the public lectures, films and workshops the Centre organises.

SOAS library also houses an array of texts which complement the course to help fuel independent thinking and learning.

Employment

Studying an MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme with give students specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Do you want to know more about the reasons why people migrate from the Global South? Is it because aid and development initiatives fail to meet their stated goals?. Read more
Do you want to know more about the reasons why people migrate from the Global South? Is it because aid and development initiatives fail to meet their stated goals?

Our interdisciplinary approach gives you a distinctive and critical grounding in international development and migration studies. Learning from our faculty who have detailed and extensive knowledge from working in the field, you’ll gain an advanced understanding of the complex relationship between migration and development.

You’ll benefit from our extensive, world-renowned expertise in international development and migration studies. You’ll become part of the research community of the internationally recognised Sussex Centre for Migration Research, located within the School of Global Studies.

This course is currently subject to validation, in line with our procedures for assuring the quality of our degrees. This means that some course detail may change. The validation process will be concluded before the course starts.

How will I study?

Across the autumn and spring terms, you learn through core modules and options. You also take a module that prepares you for further research and a professional career. This is delivered as a series of workshops including one that prepares you for your dissertation.

In the summer term, you undertake supervised dissertation work or a dissertation with placement.

You are assessed by term papers, unseen exams, a case analysis on research methods and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

This course prepares you for careers in the areas of:
-International organisations and NGOs
-Local government authorities
-Charities with a migration focus

You could also continue your studies with a PhD.

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This programme offers an interdisciplinary perspective on migration. Read more
This programme offers an interdisciplinary perspective on migration. You gain an in-depth understanding of the broader field of migration while being able to specialise in a particular migration issue, (eg, human trafficking, asylum or forced migration, or integration and citizenship), and to examine the links between migration and other fields ranging from development economics and conflict analysis to human rights law or international migration law.

The programme brings together theory, policy and the examination of case studies, and is suitable either for students who have recently completed their undergraduate studies or those who have some experience working with migrants/refugees or on migration issues.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/56/international-migration

- Extended programme
The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

About the Brussels School of International Studies

The Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS. Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to the award of a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in International Migration allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying International Migration in the context of International Relations; Conflict and Security; Human Rights Law and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'International Migration with Human Rights Law'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a research-active learning environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of social science in general and migration in particular

- offer a critical perspective of the interplay between migration and political, economic and social systems and processes

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of methodologies for the study of social science in general, and in the application of those understandings to the study of migration in particular

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of major theoretical approaches to migration, the historical development of contemporary migration, and the application of theoretical and historical knowledge to the analysis and understanding of contemporary issues and cases in the field

- ensure that you acquire the necessary skills for advanced assessment of contemporary problems in migration and their solutions

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills).

Research areas

Our research interests span a broad spectrum of the discipline, with particular strengths in the fields of conflict analysis and resolution, political theory and European politics. The strength of the School’s research culture is reflected in the numerous books and articles published and in the existence of its three core research groups: Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Comparative Politics; and Political and Social Thought. We also host four University-recognised research centres: the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC), the Global Europe Centre (GEC), the Centre for Critical Thought (CCT), and the Centre for Federal Studies (CFS).

All members of staff can supervise theses leading to research degrees. We encourage potential research students to refer to our postgraduate research handbook (pdf) for detailed information.

In 2011, the University successfully applied for ESRC recognition as a provider of doctoral training in political science and international studies (and other areas of the social sciences) as part of a consortium. As a result, we are now part of the South East ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, making us one of the key training outlets in our subject in the UK.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. Read more

This programme examines global migrations and social justice by addressing questions such as who moves and why, who is allowed to settle and where, what are the roles of states, institutions and civil societies in these processes. It provides advanced training in social science research methodology to fulfil Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) postgraduate research training requirements.

Why this programme

  • The programme draws on recognised expertise in migration studies, sociology, anthropology, history, criminology, human geography, policy and politics and ethics as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.
  • You will get access to cutting-edge academic research on migration with an emphasis on social justice and learning from non-academic work in this area.
  • You will be taught research methods by expert staff from a wide range of disciplines, allowing you to benefit from specialist knowledge and methodology.
  • The programme is supported through GRAMNet, the University of Glasgow’s internationally recognised research network for Refugees, Asylum and Migration in Scotland. You will benefit from the provisions offered by GRAMNet, such as training, seminars, opportunities for knowledge exchange and spaces for dissemination.
  • The programme is the only Masters programme in Scotland with a focus on migration studies and social justice.
  • This degree is taught jointly with the MSc Global Migrations & Social Justice, which has a stronger focus on the subject, with less emphasis on research methods.

Programme structure

You will take five core courses and one optional course as well as complete a dissertation or a practical project.

Core courses

  • Global migrations: Histories, structures, experiences.
  • Public social science for social justice 
  • Research design
  • Qualitative methods
  • Quantitative data analysis.

Optional courses may include

  • Access, equity, health
  • Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective, 1900-2000
  • Immigration and asylum law 
  • Migration, mobility and settlement: Post-Soviet Migrations
  • Migration, mobility and settlement: Central and East European migration to the UK and Scotland
  • Racism and modernity
  • Texts for diversity: language across learning for children with English as an additional language. 

You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences.

Career Prospects

On completing the programme, you will be equipped to apply your learning to a wide range of opportunities locally, nationally and internationally. This might include working with policy-making bodies, local and national governments, community organisations, NGOs and third sector organisations. The emphasis on applied learning makes this programme relevant to a range of professional settings where graduates may be working with asylum seekers, refugees and migrants, for example in education, social work, housing, equalities, campaigning and advocacy work, community development, human rights advocacy work, social research. The MRes also provides the necessary foundations to students considering further study through doctoral research.



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The International Master’s Degree Program in Israel studies offers students the opportunity to partake in an in-depth study of the State of Israel covering periods of the beginning of the Zionist movement to the present day. Read more

The International Master’s Degree Program in Israel studies offers students the opportunity to partake in an in-depth study of the State of Israel covering periods of the beginning of the Zionist movement to the present day. The course aims to elucidate the theoretical underpinnings of the Zionist project, communities of the Jewish diaspora and their relationship to the modern state of Israel, and the deep complexities of Israeli society in light of its multicultural character.

Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented growth of scholarly interest in Israeli history, politics, society and culture. Numerous programs, research centers and chair endowments in Israel Studies have been established in North America and Europe, adding a new, fresh and innovative dimension to existing programs in Judaic Studies. The Israel Studies program is designed for students who wish to deepen their understanding of the experiences of the Israeli population from a range of perspectives, against the wider backdrop of twentieth-century Jewish history, Middle Eastern politics and society.

What you will study

The program will examine Israeli society from a variety of perspectives, including Aliyah and migration; economics and politics; culture, religion, history and the ties between Israel and Jewish communities abroad. The one-year program is taught in English over three consecutive semesters from October through August. Students wishing to pursue the thesis track will be required to submit a research thesis within one year of completing their coursework.

The field campus is one of the highlights of the program. Students, together with academic staff, spend three days in one of the country's historically rich regions. Locations include the Lower and Upper Galilee, the Negev, Jordan Valley, Beit She’an Valley, Jerusalem and its surroundings. Students engage in an exploration the areas' complexities, of both the past and present. Students meet public figures and Israeli citizens with the aim of developing dialogue and familiarity with Israeli society. The cost of the field campus is included in the tuition fee.

Hebrew and Arabic language courses are also available to students who are interested. Upon completion of the program, students will be awarded an MA in Israel Studies from the Faculty of Humanities and Department of Israel Studies.

Careers

Graduates of the program will be well placed to continue academic careers in their home countries both in Middle Eastern studies and the growing field of Israel studies specifically. They will also find the use for their studies in the fields of diplomacy and journalism; working for a variety of Israel-related NGOs, and points of cultural exchange between Israel and the world.

Courses

  • Religion, Science and Politics in the Cartography of Israel from the Middle Ages to Our Time
  • The Holocaust and the Israeli Society
  • The Zionist Ideology
  • A Social History of Palestinian Society, 1900-1948
  • 1948 War - Field Course
  • Modern Israeli Society
  • Israel Stories: Page, Stage, and Screen
  • Modern Polish-Jewish History and Culture
  • The Arab-Israeli Conflict: History and Diplomacy
  • Crusader Castles and Battle Site (Field trips)
  • Jewish Artists and the Stories of America

For the most recent list of courses, course description and schedule, please visit the program website

Faculty

The director of the Israel Studies department, Professor Gur Alroey, is also the director of the Israel Studies and 20th– century Jewish Histories (ISJH) International MA Program and the chair of the School of History at the University of Haifa. During the years 2009-2011 Alroey was a visiting professor at the Taub Center for Israel Studies at NYU and Schusterman fellow at Rutgers University. He has also authored a number of books related to Israel studies in both Hebrew and English, such as Seeking a Homeland: the Jewish Territorial Organization and its Struggle with the Zionist Movement, 1905-1925; Immigrants: Jewish Immigration to Palestine in the Early Twentieth Century and Bread to Eat & Clothes to Wear: Letters from Jewish Migrants in the Early Twentieth Century.

To explore the rest of the faculty members and their specializations please click here.  

Scholarships

This program is eligible for Masa scholarship. For more scholarship information please visit the Program's Scholarships page.

Faculty scholarships are available up to $4,500US for eligible applicants. Please inquire when applying.  



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Learning and living Europe. Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul. The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies. Read more

Learning and living Europe: Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the present times. Its encompassing teaching method at the crossroads of theory and practice helps the students to gain thorough academic expertise in European affairs as well as a first hand-insight into the work as a Policy Officer at a European institution or international organisation. With its leitmotiv "Learning and living Europe", the programme follows an original approach that distinguishes it from other Master's courses in European Studies and International Relations: the European integration and global studies programme is taught in English and takes place in three different study locations: Berlin, Nice, Rome or Istanbul. After two common terms, the participants have the possibility to chose between two options for the spring term: they can opt to finish their studies either in Rome or in Istanbul.

Programme

Berlin, Germany

The academic year starts in Berlin (from October to December), it encompasses classes on the basics of all the four modules (Conflict and cooperation in the international system, European integration and external action; Federalism and multi-level governance; Globalisation and sustainable development), completed by the seminar « Project cycle management », the core part of the fifth module "Professional Skills Workshops".

Nice, France

In Nice, teaching focuses on the current international order, examining the reasons for conflict and the perspectives for cooperation. Lectures explore Europe's policies in diverse fields (trade, democracy promotion, conflict resolution, climate change, development aid) to explain how important a role the EU plays on the international stage.

At the same time, the programme looks into the current challenges the European integration project is facing (euroscepticism, the challenges of economic governance, Brexit, refugee crisis). During this term, students take their mid-term exams.

A one-week study trip takes the students to European and international institutions in Brussels, Strasbourg and Luxembourg. Visits to the European Council, the European Commission and NATO are highlights of the stay in Brussels, whereas Strasbourg hosts not only the headquarters of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rignts, but also the plenary sessions of the European Parliament.

Rome, Italy or Istanbul, Turkey

According to their choice, students will do their third trimester either in Rome or in Istanbul.

In Rome, special focus is given to the Mediterranean region and Africa with particular emphasis on the issues of migration, poverty and food security. Students will visit relevant UN institutions.

In Istanbul, students study the changing EU-Turkey relations and focus on area studies of the Black Sea region, the Caucasus including ENP, and Central Asia.

During the third term, students have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict and cooperation in the international system

A theoretically grounded approach to revisit the continuities and changes of international relations. Following a theoretical introduction into the grand schools of thought of international relations theory, we will approach the interdisciplinary field of conflict and violence studies. From its very beginning, understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of 'International Relations' as an academic discipline. A special focus will be given to inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts in both the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Ukraine to Syria.

European Integration and external action

This module aims at familiarising the students, who could well become the next generation of European and international decision-makers, with an expert knowledge of the structures, institutions, and problems of the European Union.We focus firstly on the historical development of European integration and then go on to analyse the Union’s institutions and study the basics of EU law. The last part of the program is devoted to the different policies of the EU and especially emphasises the challenges of enlargement.

Federalism, multi-level governance and conflict resolution

For the last fifteen years, federalism has known a revival as an international field of studies. In this framework, three major developments can be considered. The first is the study of the European Union, not analysed any more as a process of integration but in terms of federal institutional comparative approach. The second development is multi-level governance, that can be conceived as an extension of federalism as it deals with any form of multi-tier institutional system. This cooperative/competitive approach has appeared to understand the institutional consequences of the process of globalisation in post-industrialised societies, and of the subsequent changing of nature of sovereignty in the relevant states. Eventually, federalism has become a tool of conflict resolution, in order to resolve violent conflicts all over the world.

Economy, globalisation and sustainable development

The module puts a specific focus on the role of the EU as an economic actor on the global stage, with its opportunities and challenges driven both by European specific evolutions and globalisation trends. Finally, the module proposes an introduction to global sustainable development issues (climate change, access to water, etc.), as they are among the most decisive challenges that will shape the future of the world economy.

Professional Skills Workshops

This module equips the participants with the professional skills and competences that will enable them to work in the context of the European and international organisations. They will take actively part in several simulation games and follow workshops on project cycle management, intercultural management, as well as on mediation and negotiation.

Application deadline is 30 June of the current year.



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