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This masters in Migration, Culture and Global Health Policy focuses on public health and global health issues related to migrant communities across the globe. Read more

Migration and health policy at Queen Mary

This masters in Migration, Culture and Global Health Policy focuses on public health and global health issues related to migrant communities across the globe. It addresses a factor of major importance for those involved in public health and health policy, namely the health of migrants. It considers the nature of migrant and diaspora communities and the ways that health within these communities is related to social, political, economic, and cultural factors. It assesses the important role that culture plays in determining health outcomes in migration by focusing on several ethnographies of migrant communities. It explores the range of health problems faced by migrant communities in host countries. Theoretical themes of relevance to migration and global health will be explored in detail by considering international case studies of mental health, maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and risk perception and lifestyle.

Programme outline

In the first semester modules develop the key concepts and research methods and analysis for studying migration and global health policy. These present students with relevant methodological issues and challenges while providing interdisciplinary foundations. In the second semester students gain a more detailed understanding of areas of special relevance to global public health policy through the specialist module, Migration, Culture and Health, and through elective modules that allow them to focus on the aspects of migration, health policy, or global health of most interest to them.

Core modules

• Epidemiology and Statistics
• Health, Illness and Society
• Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health
• Health Systems, Economics, and Policy

Specialist module

• Migration, Culture and Health

Elective modules

• Advanced Social Determinants of Health
• Globalisation and Health Systems
• Public Health, International Law and Governance
• Primary Health Care: Theory and Practice
• Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics
• Human Rights and Public Health
• Intellectual Property, Medicine, and Health
• Knowledge Innovation and Management

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The International Migration and Public Policy (IMPP) programme is jointly run by academics from the Departments of Government, Sociology and the European Institute. Read more

About the MSc programmes

The International Migration and Public Policy (IMPP) programme is jointly run by academics from the Departments of Government, Sociology and the European Institute. The teaching is interdisciplinary and also involves academic staff from several other LSE departments, including the Department of Geography, the Department of International Relations, the Department of International Development, the Department of Social Policy and the Department of Law. It brings together some of the unique resources of these departments into one interdisciplinary programme on global migration, international mobility and public policy. The programme also has close ties with the LSE Migration Studies Unit, the focal point for migration research at LSE. Key features of the IMPP degree are:

A twelve-month programme that provides the opportunity to study in an internationally renowned set of departments in the only UK university devoted solely to the social sciences.
A faculty with an established record of excellence in teaching, research and consultancy in the area of international migration and public policy.
An international campus in close proximity to national policy makers, offices of international organisations and EU institutions.
A systematic multidisciplinary approach to central controversies in the comparative analysis of public policy responses to immigration and migrant integration issues across different levels of governance (including a focus on the growing role of the EU in European and international migration management).

Programme details

The MSc offers a unique range of courses that will deepen students' knowledge of migration and mobility issues and help them gain new insight into public policy responses to international migration at the global, regional, national and local level. The programme is divided into three parts: foundation – two half unit courses which provide a thorough grounding in immigration and migrant integration issues; specialisation – through a wide range of optional migration- and migration-related courses offered across LSE; and research – a 10,000 word research project on an advanced topic. Students will also have the opportunity to attend and participate in the established public lecture and seminar series organised by the LSE Migration Studies Unit.

Students will take courses to the value of three units and a dissertation as shown. Additionally, if their timetable allows, students are recommended to take the non-assessed course Interdisciplinary Research Methods and Design in preparation for their dissertation.

Compulsory courses

(* half unit)

International Migration and Migrant Integration* examines contemporary sociological perspectives on migrant integration including theories of international migration; labour market incorporation; 'assimilation' and social integration; welfare and social rights; the second generation; educational attainment; and transnationalism.
International Migration and Immigration Management* offers a theoretically informed account of the challenges posed by international migration and resulting policy responses.
Researching Migration: Research Questions and Research Methods (non-assessed) introduces students to a range of possible research strategies and helps them prepare for their dissertation research.
Dissertation.
Students will be expected to choose courses to the value of two units from a range of options.

For full details of available courses see the Programme Regulations.

Graduate destinations

The programme provides an outstanding preparation for further research work or for a career in international institutions, the public services, NGOs or with one of the growing number of organisations in the private sector that are concerned with immigration issues.

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This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. Read more
From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalization, digital technology and the multi-channel environment.

This course offers aspiring producers an opportunity to acquire the creative entrepreneurial skills required to enter a rapidly changing film and television universe. The course concentrates on developing creative, managerial, financial and legal capabilities for a successful career in production.

This Master’s degree reflects the global nature of the contemporary media marketplace but its main focus is UK film and television fiction, rather than factual production. It is targeted at those who want to follow a career path as producers, rather than as directors.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/maproducingfilmandtelevision.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course benefits enormously from close links with the film and television industry. Tony Garnett (producer of Cathy Come Home and This Life), whose company World Productions has built up a reputation for challenging and innovative drama, was a guiding force in designing the course and has played a great part in the course's success.

- Professor Jonathan Powell (former Controller of BBC 1, Head of Drama for the BBC and Controller of Drama at Carlton TV), one of this country's most respected and experienced drama producers, now delivers the 'Role of the Producer' and ‘Script Development’ lectures as well as providing you with support and advice.

- You will normally undertake a full-time internship in a production company. In most cases this internship lasts about four weeks. You will be offered guidance and assistance in an effort to obtain industry internships.

- Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

- Regular networking events are arranged where former alumni can make contact with each other and with the current group of students.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of film and television production; how the role of the producer impacts on the production as the creative and managerial driving force, and how the producer communicates meaning to the writer, director, film crew and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the process of producing a film and/or TV programme, from initial concept through distribution and sales

- advanced understanding of script development

- advanced understanding of the various stages of the production process and how to write a pitch, a treatment, business plan, make a deal, write a financial plan, re-coupment schedule and budget as well as all relevant production contracts and documents

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of film and television production and how the roles played by the key players shape and influence the creative as well as business outcomes of a project

- a clear understanding of management structure within the production company and film crew, hands-on experience of production in

- a professionally equipped television studio working with industry professionals as well as fellow students

- a broad understanding of health and safety, industry codes of ethics, best practice and legal undertakings

- an introduction to high quality industry software for budgeting and scheduling, and post production editing

- an understanding of film and television history

- an understanding of what creative and business skills are needed to be successful in the media industries.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, business reports and presentations.

Employability & career opportunities

Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This programme offers a unique range of courses that will deepen students' knowledge of migration and mobility issues and help them gain new insight into public policy responses to international migration at the global, regional, national and local level. Read more

About the MSc programmes

This programme offers a unique range of courses that will deepen students' knowledge of migration and mobility issues and help them gain new insight into public policy responses to international migration at the global, regional, national and local level. A systematic multidisciplinary approach to central controversies in the comparative analysis of public policy responses to immigration and migrant integration issues across different levels of governance, including a focus on the growing role of the EU in European and international migration management.

The programme is divided into three parts: foundation – two half unit courses which provide a thorough grounding in immigration and migrant integration issues; specialisation – through a wide range of optional migration- and migration-related courses offered across LSE; and research – a 10,000 word research project on an advanced topic. Students will also have the opportunity to attend and participate in the established public lecture and seminar series organised by the LSE Migration Studies Unit.

Additionally, if your timetable allows, it is recommended that you take the non-assessed course Interdisciplinary Research Methods and Design in preparation for your dissertation.

Graduate destinations

The programme provides an outstanding preparation for further research work or for a career in international institutions, the public services, NGOs or with one of the growing number of organisations in the private sector that are concerned with immigration issues.

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Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. Read more

About the course

Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. International agencies, governments and NGOs are working more intensely than ever before to deliver appropriate policies and interventions.

Anthropology has played a key role in the emergence of new perspectives on humanitarian assistance and the livelihoods of populations caught up in extreme circumstances such as famines, natural disasters and wars.

On the one hand, this has led to a radical re-thinking of what has been happening, but on the other hand, it has led to anthropologists sometimes playing controversial roles in agendas associated with the "war on terror".

This course examines these contemporary issues and debates, and explores their implications. It also sets them in the context of anthropology as a discipline.

The course will appeal to graduates from a variety of backgrounds, including: anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, geography, law and development studies. It is suited for those interested in critically assessing the policies and practices of international development and humanitarian assistance to war-affected regions from an anthropological perspective.

It will provide the necessary training to enable students to seek employment with NGOs (such as Oxfam and Save the Children Fund), international agencies (such as the World Health Organisation and the World Food Programme) and the civil service (such as the UK Department for International Development).

It will also provide a useful stepping stone for those seeking to undertake doctoral research in international development.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

You will discover how the apparent insights and skills of anthropologists have a long history associated with ethnographic work on economics, education, health, deprivation and conceptions of suffering dating back to the origins of the discipline.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Anthropology of International Development
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Optional

Dept. of Social Sciences, Media and Communications (Anthropology)
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Dept of Politics, History and Law
Globalisation
Dept of Clinical Sciences
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Young Lives in the Global South
International Development, Children and Youth
Brunel Law School
Minority and Indigenous Rights
The United Nations Human Rights Regime
Theory and Practice of Human Rights
The Migrant, the State and the Law
Brunel Business School
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Anthropology of International Development
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Year 2

Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Special Features

While its approach is anthropological, this degree offers genuine multi-disciplinary possibilities by drawing on modules from Politics, Health Sciences, Law and Business.

Students will have the opportunity to explore the multiplicity of issues arising from critical shifts in global policy across the following key themes:

The ways in which economic anthropologists have enhanced our understandings of livelihoods in ways that are dramatically different to dominant approaches in economics.
The hazards and limitations of relying solely upon biomedical interventions to alleviate suffering and sickness.
The ostensibly positive relationship between education and development, and the role of education as a vehicle for eradicating illiteracy and lowering fertility and mortality rates.

An exploration of such themes together will make it possible for students to think and engage in new and critical ways about the relationship between anthropology and development.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay and practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise). A final dissertation of approximately 15,000 words based on fieldwork in the UK or abroad, is also required. There are no examinations.

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Psychosocial Studies is a leading department in this interdisciplinary field that brings together social, cultural and psychosocial researchers. Read more
Psychosocial Studies is a leading department in this interdisciplinary field that brings together social, cultural and psychosocial researchers. The department has developed a distinctive approach to research and teaching that draws on a range of critical frameworks including psychoanalytic theory, social theory, feminist and queer theory, cultural and postcolonial studies, and qualitative psychosocial methodologies. In our research we aim to connect discussions of our precarious and increasingly interconnected collective fates with our most intimate personal and psychic life.

This research degree offers an exciting research environment in which to pursue psychosocial research, as well as supervisory expertise across a number of disciplines, including psychoanalytic theory, social theory, philosophy, social anthropology, literature, postcolonial studies, gender and sexuality studies, and media and cultural studies. Our programme aims to provide an excellent forum for students to carry out theoretical or applied research in the broad area of psychosocial studies, focusing particularly on innovative interdisciplinary work. We actively promote interactive graduate life, with multiple resources for fostering a rich postgraduate community at Birkbeck.

Recent research topics include:

Real fathers and Huffy Henrys: searching for the symbol in Lacan and Berryman
Mothering and the emergence of hate
Helping adolescents: a discursive analysis of young adults' talk of prosocial behaviour
Intimate autonomy: gender as ethical possibility
Being good at maths: a precarious occupation
Living with ADHD diagnosis: a disordering of family life
How are the existing biological relationships with families affected by fostering?
Turkish migrant experiences
The role of national identification in mental structure.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

The Department of Psychosocial Studies has an active and vigorous research culture. This includes regular workshops, many visiting speakers, and numerous collaborative projects both within London, and at national and international levels.
The MPhil/PhD programme provides an excellent forum for you to develop and enhance your specialist, as well as more general transferable, research skills. The programme allows you to gain insight into different research methods and acquire valuable experience both in carrying out large-scale research projects and teaching.
The Department of Psychosocial Studies has a formal link with the University of São Paulo, Brazil. This link enables you to undertake an optional module at the university as part of your programme of study at Birkbeck.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

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Health promotion is the development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion activities and programs in order to influence the health of populations, communities, groups, and individuals. Read more

What is health promotion?

Health promotion is the development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion activities and programs in order to influence the health of populations, communities, groups, and individuals.
This course offers a particular focus on the challenges facing professionals working in tropical, rural, and remote environments. Special attention is given to the needs of high-risk community groups, including refugee and migrant populations, and Indigenous Australians.

Who is this course for?

This course is designed for health professionals wishing to or who currently are working in health promotion roles in a range of government and non-government organisations, as well as those who would like to incorporate health promotion approaches into their practice.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Health Promotion will be able to:
*Integrate and apply a specialised body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of health promotion, with depth in assessing population health needs, planning, implementing and evaluating health promotion initiatives relevant to the health and well-being of individuals and populations in tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise information, data and evidence to devise sustainable and collaborative health promotion practice with key stakeholders and intersectoral partners to optimise the health, well‐being and autonomy of individuals and populations in tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon the socio‐ecological nature of health promotion and its application in optimising the health and well-being of tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon and engage in professional public health practice based on ethical decision‐making and an evidence- based approach, including consideration of recent developments in the field
*Communicate theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and numeracy skills to specialist and non‐specialist audiences
*Demonstrate personal autonomy and accountability for their own future personal and professional development and contribute to the professional development of others, by engaging in critical reflective practice in relation to knowledge, skills and attitudes that develops and enhances health promotion practice.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF HEALTH PROMOTION (GCertHlthProm)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Health Promotion are eligible for entry to either the Graduate Diploma of Health Promotion or the Master of Public Health, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the graduate certificate.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University provides several programs unique to Australia:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories and research facilities.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Health promotion is the development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion activities and programs in order to influence the health of populations, communities, groups, and individuals. Read more

What is health promotion?

Health promotion is the development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion activities and programs in order to influence the health of populations, communities, groups, and individuals.
This course offers a particular focus on the challenges facing professionals working in tropical, rural, and remote environments. Special attention is given to the needs of high-risk community groups, including refugee and migrant populations, and Indigenous Australians.

Who is this course for?

This course is designed for health professionals wishing to or who currently are working in health promotion roles in a range of government and non-government organisations, as well as those who would like to incorporate health promotion approaches into their practice.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Diploma of Health Promotion will be able to:
*Integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of health promotion, with depth in epidemiology, assessing population health needs, planning, implementing and evaluating health promotion initiatives relevant to the health and well-being of individuals and populations in tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise information, data and evidence to devise sustainable and collaborative health promotion practice with key stakeholders and intersectoral partners to optimise the health, well‐being and autonomy of individuals and populations in tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon the socio‐ecological nature of health promotion and its application in optimising the health and well-being of tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Critically reflect upon and engage in professional health promotion practice based on ethical decision‐making and an evidence-based approach, including consideration of recent developments in the field
*Apply advanced human, project and organisational management skills within a health promotion and policy context to effect efficient and equitable gains in public health
*Communicate theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and numeracy skills to specialist and non‐specialist audiences
*Demonstrate personal autonomy and accountability for their own future personal and professional development and contribute to the professional development of others, by engaging in critical reflective practice in relation to knowledge, skills and attitudes that develops and enhances health promotion practice.

This course is available to International students via external or distance education only

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF HEALTH PROMOTION (GDipHlthProm)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Health Promotion are eligible for entry to the Master of Public Health or Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the graduate diploma.

Entry requirements

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University provides several programs unique to Australia:
*The Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine, which is one of the leading tropical research facilities in the world
*teaching staff awarded the Australian Learning Teaching Councils’ National Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
*cutting-edge teaching laboratories and research facilities.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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You will study various dimensions and aspects of globalisation, notably as this relates to socio-economic and spatial development for different parts of the world, the Global South in particular. Read more

Master's specialisation in Globalisation, Migration and Development

You will study various dimensions and aspects of globalisation, notably as this relates to socio-economic and spatial development for different parts of the world, the Global South in particular. Core issues on which this master specialisation will focus include: changing relationships of global and local societies through the rise of new social and spatial inequalities brought about by global processes, migration and mobility and the emergence of transnational identities versus local interpretations in so-called multicultural societies. Overall we give particular emphasis to the relationship with urban contexts of these issues, but do also link it up with rural domains, e.g. in studying sustainability of livelihood strategies and development policies in different regions.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/gmd

Career prospects

Our graduates are employed in a wide range of jobs in- and outside the Netherlands. To give some insight in the scope of the work they do we have categorised this as follows, adding that this list is not exhaustive:
1. Working for the Dutch government at local, regional, national and international levels regarding development issues such as poverty, livelihoods, social exclusion and empowerment:
- Policymaker / programme researcher for city municipalities focusing on integration and multi-cultural issues, especially in the low-income neighbourhoods;
- Policy development expert for Provincial Governments in The Netherlands;
- Policy expert or programme/field officer with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
- Programme officer with Nuffic (Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher education)

2. Working as an NGO practitioner in development cooperation:
- Field officer for Max Havelaar or Fair Trade, visiting developing countries to establish business contracts with local farmer organisations;
- Research officer for the Centre for the Promotion of Imports from developing countries (http://www.cbi.nl/) promoting and facilitating entry of entrepreneurs from developing countries in the European market.
- Researcher/programme officer with development aid related organisations such as: Cordaid, VSO, SNV, Novib/Oxfam, Hivos and COS (Association of Centres for international cooperation at the provincial level), or a migrant (umbrella) organisation.

3. Pursuing an academic career (research and education) with one of many research institutes studying migration, globalisation, integration or development issues in the Netherlands and abroad:
- Conducting highly innovative PhD research on migration and development, health and urbanisation, the rural impact of globalisation, etc. (see http://www.nwo.nl/ for past research proposals)
- Working for a research institute/organisation involved with migration and globalisation: e.g. MPI, IOM, Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/gmd

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The Master of Applied Linguistics and TESOL covers theoretical and methodological issues relevant to practitioners in a variety of professions whose work is concerned with applied language study. Read more

Overview

The Master of Applied Linguistics and TESOL covers theoretical and methodological issues relevant to practitioners in a variety of professions whose work is concerned with applied language study. It is internationally relevant and focuses on the development of analytic skills and understanding the complex relationship between language use and context, and research in these areas. The degree is designed to allow candidates to study a broad range of topics within the area of Applied Linguistics. In particular, the degree has been designed to provide a strong theoretical and practical foundation in the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language. Much of the content of the program is also relevant to teachers of other languages.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-applied-linguistics-and-tesol

Key benefits

- Allows you the opportunity to study with one of the largest and most diverse Linguistics departments in Australia, which features four research centres
- Offers flexible study options allowing you to study on-campus, distance (online), or mixed
- Provides an internationally relevant and highly regarded qualification
- This degree is recognised and endorsed by leading employment-related bodies including National ELT Accreditation Scheme (NEAS), Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW (BOSTES) and the Adult Migrant English Program(AMEP)
- This degree can be combined with the Master of Translating and Interpreting studies.
- This program can be studied by distance from anywhere in the world.

Suitable for

Suitable if you are an experienced language professional, working or aiming to work in the areas of teaching, curriculum development, literacy education assessment and program evaluation, bilingualism, teacher education, policy development, management, or a community service where language and communication are critical issues.

Work experience requirements

Work experience is not required however relevant experience may result in credit on the program.

Course duration could be 1-2 years depending on academic background and work experience. Proof of this should be included with the application form.

English language requirements

IELTS of 6.5 overall with minimum 6.0 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Career Opportunities

A Master of Applied Linguistics and TESOL degree can enhance career opportunities in many professions where an in-depth understanding of language and communication is important. The TESOL element enables graduates with prior experience as language teachers to enhance their career prospects in this important field. Our graduates are also employed in a wide range of positions that require effective communication with colleagues, as well as with clients, patients or students. Many work in professions that help others to communicate more effectively in written or spoken form.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-applied-linguistics-and-tesol

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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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Healthcare across the world faces major challenges from the increasing demands of ageing populations and the rise in non-communicable diseases. Read more
Healthcare across the world faces major challenges from the increasing demands of ageing populations and the rise in non-communicable diseases. Strong and effective primary care (also known as family medicine or community medicine) is a major part of the solution. This MSc in Primary Care will equip you with the knowledge and skills required to make a difference to primary healthcare in the 21st century.

Why this programme

-A unique programme to enable students to identify and implement strategies to enhance quality in primary care globally.
-Taught by outstanding, high profile primary care researchers and practitioners in the UK, you can follow a flexible curriculum - studying full-time or part-time, and work towards the full MSc degree or a postgraduate diploma or certificate.
-Internationally renowned guest speakers feature alongside University of Glasgow staff.
-Research interests are focussed on health inequalities, multimorbidity, chronic disease, treatment burden and migrant health, which are reflected in our teaching.
-Research project opportunities in novel and relevant areas of research for primary care, under the supervision of an academic.
-Students come from a wide range of primary care, family, community, and internal medicine disciplines, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists, podiatrists, managers and those working in healthcare and health policy.
-It is delivered within the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, one of the foremost research institutes in the UK focused on improving population health and wellbeing and reducing inequalities in health.
-The online programme has the potential to attract students from across the globe. Our on-campus course has attracted successful students from the UK and a wide range of other countries including Indonesia, Belarus, China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Japan, Pakistan and Oman.

Programme structure

This online MSc programme is modular in structure, with all teaching and interactions delivered online through our virtual learning environment (Moodle). During a course, from week to week you will interact with your teachers and fellow students using online discussion boards. Your teachers will direct and observe the discussion, and respond to student questions about the course content. A variety of teaching approaches will be used including lectures, group based activities, presentations and discussions.
-Three compulsory courses
-Three optional courses
-Research project.

The taught courses are delivered in 11-week blocks, running from September to November, January to March, and April to June. The research project runs across the academic year. Full-time students will complete the majority of their research project work when they have completed their taught components.

The selection of optional courses and the research project can be tailored to meet students’ own interests and career needs.

The postgraduate diploma and certificate require six (120 credits) and three (60 credits) successfully completed courses, respectively.

Core and optional courses

Core courses
-International Primary care principles and systems
-Epidemiology, evidence and statistics for primary care
-Research methods

Optional courses - Having the freedom to choose three optional courses gives you the opportunity to tailor your programme of study to your own special interests. Further optional courses are planned for 2017/18.
-Understanding Evidence for the Real World: Critical Appraisal for Healthcare
-Cardiovascular Disease Management in Primary Care
-Management of Long-term Conditions

Studying online

Online distance learning at the University of Glasgow allows you to benefit from the outstanding educational experience that we are renowned for -without having to relocate to our campus.
You do not need to have experience of studying online as you will be guided through how to access and use all of our online resources.

Virtual learning
You will connect with your fellow students and tutors through our virtual learning environment where you will have access to a multitude of learning resources including:
-Recorded lectures
-Live seminars
-Videos
-Interactive quizzes
-Journal articles
-Electronic books and other web resources

A global community
As an online student at the University you will become part of a global community of learners. Community building and collaborative learning is a key focus of our online delivery and you will be encouraged and supported to interact with your fellow classmates and tutors in a number of ways. For example, through the discussions areas on our virtual learning environment, by skype, during live seminars and in our virtual campus on Second Life.

Supported
Great emphasis is placed on making sure you feel well supported in your learning and that you have good interactions with everyone on the programme. Support is available in a number of ways and you will find out more about this during orientation. All you need to participate in our online programmes is a computer and internet access.

Career prospects

Graduates will have the capacity to take a lead role in primary care and family medicine development, whether in Scotland, the UK or internationally. Post-award opportunities include further study, leadership roles in primary care teams, secondment to positions within government, teaching positions, and sitting on editorial boards of academic journals.

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If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017. Read more
If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017.
http://www.shu.ac.uk/VCAwardJanuary2017

Explore human resource management (HRM) in an international setting, on a course designed in response to the increasing internationalisation and workforce diversity of organisations.

The course focuses on managing human resources in organisations that operate across national borders and the cross cultural issues of people management. It is for those wishing to develop careers in HRM at a strategic and international level within organisations operating in the international environment.

The course enables you to:
-Develop a critical understanding of the philosophies and general practices of international HRM.
-Appreciate and critically evaluate the latest theoretical concepts, principles, standards and frameworks of HRM practice.
-Develop skills in solving complex scenarios related to improving the activities and functions of modern HRM.
-Develop a holistic approach to examining issues and solving complex International HR problems.

You develop your professional expertise and improve your employability and career prospects by gaining broader international business, management and leadership knowledge.

We begin by introducing you to organisation theory, which covers organisational design, organisational theory and methodologies for understanding complex organisations. You also develop your critical thinking on issues such as organisational change and innovation.

You then study specialist theory and practice from an international perspective, giving you practical expertise across key areas of international HR, including:
-The context of HRM.
-Cross cultural leadership.
-International human resource development.
-Comparative approaches to International employee relations.
-Organisational ethics and corporate social responsibility.

To enable you to manage and interpret financial and management accounting information, you learn skills such as budgeting, ratio analysis and using IT in an HR environment.

We give you the opportunity to work with our academics on suitable research projects. This work leads directly to your dissertation, and in suitable cases you may be able to present a paper at a conference or publish your research. If you already have an interest in a particular area of research for your dissertation, we will provide you with the support that could also lead to a conference paper or publication.

Completing a dissertation develops your ability to research new ideas and approaches from a cross cultural perspective. You also develop the skills to formally present your research findings to your fellow students and course tutor.

Previous students have completed research in cross cultural management and expatriate development programmes. They have also worked on projects for their sponsoring company including:
-The development of under- represented groups in home countries the relevance of western practices to home country organisations.
-Migrant labour.
-Global reward.

The course includes attendance at a three day residential held outside Sheffield. The residential gives you hands on experience of managing an HR activity in a strategic and international context.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/msc-international-human-resource-management

Course structure

Full time.
January and September start – 13 to15 months.

Semester One – Postgraduate Certificate modules
-Organisation analysis and design
-Cross-cultural leadership
-International human resource development
-Context of HR
-Research methods (part1)

Semester Two – Postgraduate Diploma modules
-Comparative approaches to international employee relations
-International strategies for HRM
-Information and financial management for HR
-Organisational ethics and corporate social responsibility
-Research methods (part 2)

Semester Three – MSc modules
-Dissertation – this is a major project geared to your interest and based on an area of strategic or international importance. Your research must be carried out in an organisational setting.

Assessment: coursework; dissertation. There are no examinations.

Other admission requirements

Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English must normally produce evidence of competence in English. An IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level.

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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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