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Masters Degrees (Migrant)

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This masters in Migration, Culture and Global Health Policy focuses on public health and global health issues related to migrant communities across the globe. Read more

Migration and health policy at Queen Mary

This masters in Migration, Culture and Global Health Policy focuses on public health and global health issues related to migrant communities across the globe. It addresses a factor of major importance for those involved in public health and health policy, namely the health of migrants. It considers the nature of migrant and diaspora communities and the ways that health within these communities is related to social, political, economic, and cultural factors. It assesses the important role that culture plays in determining health outcomes in migration by focusing on several ethnographies of migrant communities. It explores the range of health problems faced by migrant communities in host countries. Theoretical themes of relevance to migration and global health will be explored in detail by considering international case studies of mental health, maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and risk perception and lifestyle.

Programme outline

In the first semester modules develop the key concepts and research methods and analysis for studying migration and global health policy. These present students with relevant methodological issues and challenges while providing interdisciplinary foundations. In the second semester students gain a more detailed understanding of areas of special relevance to global public health policy through the specialist module, Migration, Culture and Health, and through elective modules that allow them to focus on the aspects of migration, health policy, or global health of most interest to them.

Core modules

• Epidemiology and Statistics
• Health, Illness and Society
• Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health
• Health Systems, Economics, and Policy

Specialist module

• Migration, Culture and Health

Elective modules

• Advanced Social Determinants of Health
• Globalisation and Health Systems
• Public Health, International Law and Governance
• Primary Health Care: Theory and Practice
• Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics
• Human Rights and Public Health
• Intellectual Property, Medicine, and Health
• Knowledge Innovation and Management

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This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. Read more
From start to finish, producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry; they generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the project. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalization, digital technology and the multi-channel environment.

This course offers aspiring producers an opportunity to acquire the creative entrepreneurial skills required to enter a rapidly changing film and television universe. The course concentrates on developing creative, managerial, financial and legal capabilities for a successful career in production.

This Master’s degree reflects the global nature of the contemporary media marketplace but its main focus is UK film and television fiction, rather than factual production. It is targeted at those who want to follow a career path as producers, rather than as directors.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/maproducingfilmandtelevision.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course benefits enormously from close links with the film and television industry. Tony Garnett (producer of Cathy Come Home and This Life), whose company World Productions has built up a reputation for challenging and innovative drama, was a guiding force in designing the course and has played a great part in the course's success.

- Professor Jonathan Powell (former Controller of BBC 1, Head of Drama for the BBC and Controller of Drama at Carlton TV), one of this country's most respected and experienced drama producers, now delivers the 'Role of the Producer' and ‘Script Development’ lectures as well as providing you with support and advice.

- You will normally undertake a full-time internship in a production company. In most cases this internship lasts about four weeks. You will be offered guidance and assistance in an effort to obtain industry internships.

- Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

- Regular networking events are arranged where former alumni can make contact with each other and with the current group of students.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of film and television production; how the role of the producer impacts on the production as the creative and managerial driving force, and how the producer communicates meaning to the writer, director, film crew and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the process of producing a film and/or TV programme, from initial concept through distribution and sales

- advanced understanding of script development

- advanced understanding of the various stages of the production process and how to write a pitch, a treatment, business plan, make a deal, write a financial plan, re-coupment schedule and budget as well as all relevant production contracts and documents

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of film and television production and how the roles played by the key players shape and influence the creative as well as business outcomes of a project

- a clear understanding of management structure within the production company and film crew, hands-on experience of production in

- a professionally equipped television studio working with industry professionals as well as fellow students

- a broad understanding of health and safety, industry codes of ethics, best practice and legal undertakings

- an introduction to high quality industry software for budgeting and scheduling, and post production editing

- an understanding of film and television history

- an understanding of what creative and business skills are needed to be successful in the media industries.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, business reports and presentations.

Employability & career opportunities

Students who have graduated from the course are working successfully in independent television and film production, for broadcasters such as the BBC and ITV, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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With more than 230 million global citizens living outside their home countries, international migration is one of the most critical issues facing the global community in the 21st century. Read more

With more than 230 million global citizens living outside their home countries, international migration is one of the most critical issues facing the global community in the 21st century. The challenges that these global citizens face are the focus of this master’s program, which prepares professionals to better the lives of migrants and refugees throughout the world.

Students study topics of global migration with top researchers, professors, project practitioners, and policy makers in the field of migration studies. The program includes an optional semester of study at Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. Graduates are prepared for careers in local, state and national governmental agencies; policy think tanks and policy and planning consulting firms; community-based non profits and non-governmental organizations; international agencies; advocacy and public interest organizations; philanthropic organizations and foundations; and other private-sector entities.

Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  1. Critically analyze the theories, concepts, and research findings in migration studies from an interdisciplinary perspective.
  2. Evaluate the role of governments and civil society organizations in community representation, policy creation, and resource allocation in relation to migration and mobility.
  3. Apply knowledge of the humane, legal, and political characteristics of migration as a social reality and create related social interventions.
  4. Plan, generate, and interpret a research study on an important issue in migration studies.
  5. Develop field studies among migrant communities to understand realities, dynamics and logics of migration.

You can request more information on our website

Careers

Our program prepares students to develop migration policies and provide support services to migrant communities. Graduates can go on to lead local, state, and national governmental agencies; international agencies; policy think tanks and policy planning consulting firms; community-based nonprofits and non-governmental organizations; advocacy and public interest organizations; philanthropic organizations and foundations; and other private-sector entities.

We also provide excellent training for students wishing to pursue further graduate studies in Diplomacy, Law, Public Health, Education, International Studies, or related fields

Scholarships & Assistantships

We offer a limited number of partial scholarships. Program scholarships range from $1,000 to $5,000. All applicants, U.S. and international, are considered for these scholarships at time of admission consideration.

A limited number of teaching assistantships are available.

A separate application is not required for scholarships or assistantships. If you receive a scholarship or teaching assistantship, you are notified in your admission letter.

You can request more information about scholarships and assistantships on our website



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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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Healthcare across the world faces major challenges from the increasing demands of ageing populations and the rise in non-communicable diseases. Read more
Healthcare across the world faces major challenges from the increasing demands of ageing populations and the rise in non-communicable diseases. Strong and effective primary care (also known as family medicine or community medicine) is a major part of the solution. This MSc in Primary Care will equip you with the knowledge and skills required to make a difference to primary healthcare in the 21st century.

Why this programme

-A unique programme to enable students to identify and implement strategies to enhance quality in primary care globally.
-Taught by outstanding, high profile primary care researchers and practitioners in the UK, you can follow a flexible curriculum - studying full-time or part-time, and work towards the full MSc degree or a postgraduate diploma or certificate.
-Internationally renowned guest speakers feature alongside University of Glasgow staff.
-Research interests are focussed on health inequalities, multimorbidity, chronic disease, treatment burden and migrant health, which are reflected in our teaching.
-Research project opportunities in novel and relevant areas of research for primary care, under the supervision of an academic.
-Students come from a wide range of primary care, family, community, and internal medicine disciplines, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists, podiatrists, managers and those working in healthcare and health policy.
-It is delivered within the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, one of the foremost research institutes in the UK focused on improving population health and wellbeing and reducing inequalities in health.
-The online programme has the potential to attract students from across the globe. Our on-campus course has attracted successful students from the UK and a wide range of other countries including Indonesia, Belarus, China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Japan, Pakistan and Oman.

Programme structure

This online MSc programme is modular in structure, with all teaching and interactions delivered online through our virtual learning environment (Moodle). During a course, from week to week you will interact with your teachers and fellow students using online discussion boards. Your teachers will direct and observe the discussion, and respond to student questions about the course content. A variety of teaching approaches will be used including lectures, group based activities, presentations and discussions.
-Three compulsory courses
-Three optional courses
-Research project.

The taught courses are delivered in 11-week blocks, running from September to November, January to March, and April to June. The research project runs across the academic year. Full-time students will complete the majority of their research project work when they have completed their taught components.

The selection of optional courses and the research project can be tailored to meet students’ own interests and career needs.

The postgraduate diploma and certificate require six (120 credits) and three (60 credits) successfully completed courses, respectively.

Core and optional courses

Core courses
-International Primary care principles and systems
-Epidemiology, evidence and statistics for primary care
-Research methods

Optional courses - Having the freedom to choose three optional courses gives you the opportunity to tailor your programme of study to your own special interests. Further optional courses are planned for 2017/18.
-Understanding Evidence for the Real World: Critical Appraisal for Healthcare
-Cardiovascular Disease Management in Primary Care
-Management of Long-term Conditions

Studying online

Online distance learning at the University of Glasgow allows you to benefit from the outstanding educational experience that we are renowned for -without having to relocate to our campus.
You do not need to have experience of studying online as you will be guided through how to access and use all of our online resources.

Virtual learning
You will connect with your fellow students and tutors through our virtual learning environment where you will have access to a multitude of learning resources including:
-Recorded lectures
-Live seminars
-Videos
-Interactive quizzes
-Journal articles
-Electronic books and other web resources

A global community
As an online student at the University you will become part of a global community of learners. Community building and collaborative learning is a key focus of our online delivery and you will be encouraged and supported to interact with your fellow classmates and tutors in a number of ways. For example, through the discussions areas on our virtual learning environment, by skype, during live seminars and in our virtual campus on Second Life.

Supported
Great emphasis is placed on making sure you feel well supported in your learning and that you have good interactions with everyone on the programme. Support is available in a number of ways and you will find out more about this during orientation. All you need to participate in our online programmes is a computer and internet access.

Career prospects

Graduates will have the capacity to take a lead role in primary care and family medicine development, whether in Scotland, the UK or internationally. Post-award opportunities include further study, leadership roles in primary care teams, secondment to positions within government, teaching positions, and sitting on editorial boards of academic journals.

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Explore human resource management (HRM) in an international setting, on a course designed in response to the increasing internationalisation and workforce diversity of organisations. Read more

Explore human resource management (HRM) in an international setting, on a course designed in response to the increasing internationalisation and workforce diversity of organisations.

The course focuses on managing human resources in organisations that operate across national borders and the cross cultural issues of people management. It is for those wishing to develop careers in HRM at a strategic and international level within organisations operating in the international environment.

The course enables you to

  • develop a critical understanding of the philosophies and general practices of international HRM
  • appreciate and critically evaluate the latest theoretical concepts, principles, standards and frameworks of HRM practice
  • develop skills in solving complex scenarios related to improving the activities and functions of modern HRM
  • develop a holistic approach to examining issues and solving complex International HR problems

You develop your professional expertise and improve your employability and career prospects by gaining broader international business, management and leadership knowledge.

We begin by introducing you to organisation theory, which covers organisational design, organisational theory and methodologies for understanding complex organisations. You also develop your critical thinking on issues such as organisational change and innovation.

You then study specialist theory and practice from an international perspective, giving you practical expertise across key areas of international HR, including

  • the context of HRM
  • cross cultural leadership
  • international human resource development
  • comparative approaches to International employee relations
  • organisational ethics and corporate social responsibility

To enable you to manage and interpret financial and management accounting information, you learn skills such as budgeting, ratio analysis and using IT in an HR environment.

We give you the opportunity to work with our academics on suitable research projects. This work leads directly to your dissertation, and in suitable cases you may be able to present a paper at a conference or publish your research. If you already have an interest in a particular area of research for your dissertation, we will provide you with the support that could also lead to a conference paper or publication.

Completing a dissertation develops your ability to research new ideas and approaches from a cross cultural perspective. You also develop the skills to formally present your research findings to your fellow students and course tutor.

Previous students have completed research in cross cultural management and expatriate development programmes. They have also worked on projects for their sponsoring company including • the development of under- represented groups in home countries • the relevance of western practices to home country organisations • migrant labour • global reward.

The course includes attendance at a three day residential held outside Sheffield. The residential gives you hands on experience of managing an HR activity in a strategic and international context. 

Course structure

Full time – September start – typically 12 months

Full time – January start – typically 15 months

Semester one – postgraduate certificate modules

  • organisation analysis and design
  • cross-cultural leadership
  • international human resource development
  • context of HR
  • research methods (part1)

Semester two – postgraduate diploma modules

  • comparative approaches to international employee relations
  • international strategies for HRM
  • information and financial management for HR
  • organisational ethics and corporate social responsibility
  • research methods (part 2)

Semester three – MSc modules

  • dissertation

this is a major project geared to your interest and based on an area of strategic or international importance. Your research must be carried out in an organisational setting.

Assessment

  • coursework
  • dissertation - there are no examinations

Employability

Our students have taken up careers in human resource management with companies and organisations such as • Carrefour • Lenovo • International Hilton Hotels • the banking sector in Nigeria • Da Nang University and many organisations across Russia and the Middle East.



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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. Read more
The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. The opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the continent is a particular advantage of the degree. Students can choose from a range of about 30 modules in fourteen disciplines. Our former students have chosen to study Africa at this level for a wide range of reasons. For some a deep interest in the history and culture or political economy of a particular region is sufficient motivation, but for many students the programme has, in addition, been followed with the intention of furthering their career opportunities. Some go on to work either in Africa or in fields related to Africa. The opportunity to combine study of particular African subjects with an African language is very useful, although some evidence of competence in learning a foreign language is usually required.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/

Structure

Students take three taught module units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three module units from more than one subject. One module unit may be made up of two 0.5 unit modules. The subjects of the programme are: Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Media, Politics, Religious Studies, and Language.

The two minor module units can be taken in the same subject (but different to that of the major), or two different ones.

A language module can only be taken as a minor, and only one language module can be taken.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of term to determine which is the most appropriate level of study.

When applying, applicants are asked to specify their preferred major and minor subjects, and asked to give alternative choices as practical considerations such as time tabling and availability of modules may limit freedom of choice.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects and have the opportunity of sampling a variety of subjects through attending lectures etc.

All modules are subject to availability.

MA African Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 31kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/file80693.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Teaching is normally provided by lecture or seminar and students are required to attend such classes. Each student will be assigned a supervisor in connection with his or her dissertation.

- Lectures and Seminars
Most modules involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation
The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African studies from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Some MA African Studies graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. Among a variety of professions, career paths may include: Academia; Charity; Community; Government; NGOs; Media; Publishing and UN Agencies.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:
BBC News
British Embassy
Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa
Goal Nigeria
Government of Canada
Hogan Lovells International LLP
International Institute for Environment and Development
Kenyan Government
Mercy Corps
Migrant Resource Centre
Mo Ibrahim Foundation
The London MENA Film Festival
The University of Tokyo
The World Bank
Think Africa Press
U.S. Embassy
United Nations
University of Namibia
World Vision UK
Zanabazar Museum of Fine Arts

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:
Development Producer
Africa Editor
Copywriter
Director of Trade and Investment
Projects and Fundraising Manager
Head of Desk, Africa
Senior Investment Manager
Sports Writer
Knowledge Management Projects Coordinator
Project Director
Presidential Advisor
Commodity Manager
Publisher
Tutor
Creative Consultant
Lecturer in African Arts and Cultures
East Africa Analyst
Youth Volunteer Advisor
Southern Region Educational Manager
Head Specialists Giving + Insights

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme explores how people learn new languages and how to teach the English Language most effectively. Read more

This programme explores how people learn new languages and how to teach the English Language most effectively.

Designed for TESOL professionals, you will consider how to analyse and describe the English language for pedagogic purposes, and examine different approaches and principles to teaching the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking.

You can also choose to specialise in certain aspects of TESOL: for example, teacher education, materials development, curriculum reform, the teaching of grammar and vocabulary, the use of ICT, or language assessment.

MEd TESOL follows the same syllabus as the MA TESOL programme, but asks you to apply a more practical, rather than theoretical, orientation to your final critical study. You will focus upon a professional issue within language education and apply ideas from your reading and a small-scale research study to find solutions to genuine English Language teaching problems.

The Language Education team in the School of Education is nationally and internationally recognised for its range of teaching, research, knowledge transfer and consultancy work in TESOL, ELT, EFL, ESOL, EAL, Modern Foreign Languages, and Applied Linguistics.

We’re one of the largest Language Education teams in the UK. As education practitioners, we have a wide range of experience of teaching and teacher education work in many contexts in the UK and around the world.

As researchers, we have a broad range of expertise across the discipline with ongoing research projects in teacher development, language use in migrant communities, learning with digital technologies, and IELTS preparation courses.

Course content

MEd TESOL is a comprehensive programme that will allow you to develop both academically and professionally.

In semester one, you will deepen your understanding of teaching the English Language. You will focus on how people learn languages, how to describe and explain language to learners, and the approaches you can take to teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.

In semester two, you will expand your knowledge of more specialist areas. You will choose from a range of optional modules to suit your own interests and professional contexts: for example, the development of TESOL materials, teaching young learners, or language learning assessment. Alternatively, you could choose modules from another area of the School’s provision: for example, you may want to study digital learning, international educational management or theories of childhood and youth.

In the final part of the year, you will use your newly-acquired knowledge and skills to carry out a small-scale piece of research. Your critical study can be related to your own interests within the field of education. As a condition of the MEd programme, your study needs to have a practical focus and respond to a real-life professional issue in TESOL education.

To support your work on the project, you will take a non-assessed research methods course. Help with your academic writing is available throughout the year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Learning and Teaching in TESOL 30 credits
  • Investigating Language for TESOL 30 credits
  • Research Methods for TESOL (non-assessed module)

Optional modules

  • Directed Study in Education 1 30 credits
  • Technology Enhanced Language Learning 30 credits
  • The Practice of Supporting Language Teacher Learning 15 credits
  • Learning and Teaching Vocabulary 15 credits
  • Grammar, Learning and Teaching 15 credits
  • Teaching Academic English 15 credits
  • Corpus Linguistics in the Classroom 15 credits
  • Teacher Education for TESOL 15 credits
  • Assessing Language Learning 15 credits
  • Materials Development for TESOL 15 credits
  • Teaching Languages to Young Learners 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MEd Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MEd Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You will generally have around eight to ten hours of classes per week including seminars, tutorials and lectures. However, independent study is an important aspect of this programme, either alone or in a group, as it allows you to develop key research, analysis and communication skills and develop your own ideas.

Assessment

We assess most of our modules through written assignments; you will be able to choose from a range of assignment topics. To help you prepare, you’ll be able to submit a draft to your tutor for comment beforehand.

Career opportunities

Our students frequently find that new career opportunities open up for them, either in their home countries or in new international settings.

Some of our graduates have started work in teacher training, materials creation, or curriculum design. Others have started their own private language teaching business or moved from school to university teaching.

We also encourage students who do particularly well on the programme to consider doctoral level study with a view to an academic career. Students who return to their original classrooms often find they have fresh perspectives and their work becomes more rewarding and effective.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Do you have a passion for research and work in the field of globalisation and development, rooted in undergraduate studies or experience in the field? Are… Read more

Do you have a passion for research and work in the field of globalisation and development, rooted in undergraduate studies or experience in the field? Are you interested in individuals and communities, as well as in the broader relations between the Global North and South? Do you have the ambition to develop your academic research skills and to use academic insights to make a positive impact in the world? If so, this may be the right programme for you. The master’s in Globalisation & Development Studies is a social science programme that focuses on how the dynamics of globalisation affect developing areas. You will develop the theoretical, analytical and practical skills that are essential for either an academic or professional career in globalisation and development.

Why this programme?

The master’s programme in Globalisation & Development Studies is a social science programme that focuses on how globalisation trends affect and interconnect different areas of the globe while marginalising others and how they produce diverse ‘local’ responses. While acknowledging the roles of the state and the market, you will examine the processes of globalisation and development ‘from the ground up’. You will look at how they are experienced in the everyday lives of families, indigenous communities, migrant diasporas, grassroots organisations and NGOs.

This programme builds on 20 years of globalisation and development teaching at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. It has a pronounced global and transnational orientation: from the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion, to emancipation and empowerment, hybrid identities, transnational social and political formations, and new possibilities for transforming society. You will develop a sound knowledge basis in the concepts, theories and issues relating to globalisation and development. Using Problem-Based Learning (PBL), which is very well suited for Globalisation and Development Studies, your learning is problem-driven and theory-driven and requires students to be active rather than passive.



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One of the University’s larger modern language subject areas, German has earned its place as a significant centre for research, with half of our research ranked as internationally excellent or world leading in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

One of the University’s larger modern language subject areas, German has earned its place as a significant centre for research, with half of our research ranked as internationally excellent or world leading in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

The size of our graduate school means we are able to support a broad range of German and Austrian cultural and literary research themes, from the medieval period to the present.

Current interests include:

  • 18th century and Romanticism studies
  • censorship studies
  • contemporary German literature
  • cultural and political studies and literary theory
  • gender studies
  • German and Austrian Jewish literature
  • identity studies
  • literature and culture of the German/Austrian fin-de-siècle
  • literature and culture of the Weimar Republic and the National Socialist era
  • migrant literature in German
  • palaeography and Medieval textual studies
  • post-Holocaust literature
  • post-war West and East German literary and cultural studies
  • the Medieval German epic
  • theatre and performance studies
  • travel writing
  • Turkish-German literature

Training and support

We promote the connection between language and culture through a number of extracurricular programmes, both formal and informal.

You will have the opportunity to take part in our annual play, which is commonly a collaborative effort with a noted German author or playwright.

We organise regular film nights, followed by Stammtisch, and gallery visits are also offered.

We maintain close links with the Scottish arm of the Goethe Institut and the Edinburgh German Circle, which both provide opportunities to make contacts and socialise with the city’s sizeable German community.

Facilities

Testament to our breadth of research expertise and lively graduate school community, our RAE ranking also reflects world-class resources (such as our well-stocked libraries and the expansive Karin McPherson collection of GDR writing) and commitment to publishing, most notably through our production of the esteemed Edinburgh German Yearbook.



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The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts. Read more
The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts.

This course combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective and is ideally suited to students from a law, history, politics, or other social sciences background.

It is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice and international development as well as those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-human-rights-law/

Why choose this course?

- It enables you to specialise in areas such as international criminal law, the laws of armed conflict, humanitarian intervention and post-conflict reconstruction, international development and globalisation, refugee and migrant law, and the promotion and application of human rights as part of legal reform in the developing world.

- It is ideal for those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations, as well as in government and academic posts. Recent graduates from this course have gained positions in international organisations, such as UNICEF.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard human rights law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practice legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high flying diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Research is fundamental to the Law School - one of the reasons we performed so well in the latest REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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