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Medical Microbiology primarily deals with microorganisms which cause diseases in humans. Read more
Medical Microbiology primarily deals with microorganisms which cause diseases in humans. The major working fields are the structures of bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, growth properties of microorganisms, pathogenic strategies they enhanced, diagnostic approaches to infectious diseases and efficiency of antimicrobial agents used for therapy. For that purpose, morphological studies based on light microscope, fluorescent microscope, and electron microscope, various cultivation methods and molecular techniques are performed. The Medical Microbiology Masters of Science Program at Koc University offers a comprehensive training to the graduates who are planning to work in the field of medical microbiology or continue to doctoral programs in the same area. The candidates of the program with a bachelor’s degree in health sciences and natural sciences are expected to be equipped with combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills in laboratory methods and applications in the light of latest technological approaches.

Medical Microbiology Masters of Science Program includes minimum 7 courses with a total credit of 21, a seminar and thesis based on independent research.

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Division of Life Science offers rigorous postgraduate programs and research opportunities in a range of cutting-edge areas in the field, particularly in neuroscience, structural biology, cell and developmental biology, marine and environmental biology and biotechnology. Read more
The Division of Life Science offers rigorous postgraduate programs and research opportunities in a range of cutting-edge areas in the field, particularly in neuroscience, structural biology, cell and developmental biology, marine and environmental biology and biotechnology.

We strive to provide an inspirational environment for student learning and for tackling the challenges of modern life science.

Our mission is to sustain and promulgate a reputable academic program in life science by achieving excellence in research and education, and by making significant contributions to biotechnological innovations in regional and international arenas. Currently, the Division has a total of 180 postgraduate students, 120 of whom are PhD students.

The Division is home to the State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience; a recognition of the standard of work being carried out and of its important contribution to Mainland China’s development. In addition, the Division has a large collection of state-of-the-art equipment and is a major stakeholder in HKUST’s Biosciences Central Research Facility.

The MPhil program provides research training in major areas of life science. It enables students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and experience required for research. Submission and successful defense of a thesis based on original research are required.

Research Focus

Research and development within the Division of Life Science emphasizes the following areas:
-Cellular Regulation and Signaling
-Cancer Biology
-Developmental Biology
-Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
-Macromolecular Structure and Function
-Marine and Environmental Science
-Biotechnology and Medicinal Biochemistry

Faculty members working in these areas form a coordinated research team. Such coordination takes full advantage of the faculty’s expertise in generating innovative development and productive research. At the same time, it creates a stimulating atmosphere in which students experience the challenge of modern research through direct participation.

Facilities

The Division is excellently equipped for research in a broad range of areas. The Animal Care and Plant Care Facility provides a centralized and modern facility for animals and plants. Centralized state-of-the-art facilities for biochemical and cellular studies are provided by the Biosciences Central Research Facility. The Division also has the following facilities:

Cell Culture
Facilities for the cultivation, maintenance, characterization and cold storage of animal and plant cells.

Molecular and Cellular Biology
Major equipment includes fluorescence-activated cell sorters, automatic DNA sequencers, real-time PCR machines, ultracentrifuges, spectrophotometers and spectrofluorimeters, MALDI-TOF / TOF and LC-MS mass spectrometers, HPLC and FPLC, gamma and liquid scintillation counters.

Modern Microscopy
The Division has an array of state-of-the-art imaging facilities including several fluorescence microscopes, confocal laser scanning microscopes, atomic force microscope, total internal reflection fluorescence microscope, STED and STORM superresolution microscopes.

Marine / Environmental Biology
The University is bordered by an extensive shoreline of various habitats and has a 19-foot outboard-motor boat for near-shore operations and a wet laboratory of circulating sea water. A high-quality marine laboratory has been built on the campus waterfront.

Biomolecular Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers
Our state-of-the-art NMR facility consists of 500, 750 and 800 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with cryoprobes for structure-function studies. NMR is used to study structure, dynamics and function of proteins, nucleic acids and other bio-molecules in solution. In addition, NMR can also facilitate drug screening and design.

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This MSc responds to one of the greatest challenges humanity is facing today. the sustainable management of our planet's natural resources and environment, to provide sustainable livelihoods for all people into the twenty-first century and beyond. Read more
This MSc responds to one of the greatest challenges humanity is facing today: the sustainable management of our planet's natural resources and environment, to provide sustainable livelihoods for all people into the twenty-first century and beyond.

The programme :

• is designed for those wishing to develop a career in natural resource management.
• allows you to explore and develop your own interests within a carefully designed and vocationally relevant set of taught modules and a dissertation.
• is taught jointly between ecologists, economists and geographers – meaning that you will study this programme to its fullest breadth and depth.
• offers postgraduates an unrivalled opportunity to understand the scientific basis of natural resource management through lectures, seminars, practical and field-based courses, both in the UK and overseas.


Course modules
Core:
• Research Design and Methods in Geography
• Living with Environmental Change
• Sustainable Management of Biological Resources: Ecosystem and Biodiversity Conservation
• Dissertation
Option modules:
• Earth Observation and Remote Sensing
• Global Climate and Environmental Change
• Biodiversity Conservation and Global Change: Tropical East Africa
• Environmental Economics
• Ecological and Environmental Assessment
• The Changing Water Cycle
• Water Quality Processes and Management

Teaching and Learning

We recognise the need for challenging and diverse methods of assessment. Our methods vary from traditional examinations, individual oral presentations, reports, web pages, research proposals, literature reviews and posters. We also include an amount of field-based teaching and computer practical sessions in our courses. As well as being taught subject knowledge, you will also receive training on how to plan, develop and execute a programme of individual research. We feel that the development of group skills is very important and a number of pieces of coursework involve a team of people. Coursework feedback is given promptly and in considerable detail, enabling you to improve continuously.

Opportunities/ Reasons to study

As a student on our MSc Sustainable Development of Natural Resources programme you will have the opportunity to:

• Engage with leading research and researchers in the field
• Select from a range of optional modules to best fit your interests and career aspirations
• Study part time if preferred, to fit with your existing professional and personal commitments
• Undertake fieldwork in the UK and Kenya
e.g. Biodiversity Conservation and Global Change: Tropical East Africa
The module will take place for ten field days at locations in the Rift Valley Kenya. It will be largely under canvas, in a safari camp that is already maintained by the Department of Biology for its Rift Valley Lakes research.
• Enhance your career prospects
• Complete an in-depth research project for your dissertation, with support from a dedicated supervisor.

World Class Facilities

Students have access to state-of-the-art Physical Geography instrumentation. There are separate laboratories for environmental, molecular stable isotope and palaeoecological research that can be used to reconstruct past climates and environments, the preparation of thin sections, hardware modelling using rainfall simulation and flume channels as well as a large, general-purpose laboratory that recently been completely refurbished.

Additional resources include an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer, a Scanning Electron Microscope, a cold store, a Coulter Laser Diffraction particle size analyser, differential GPS and a wide range of field equipment. A new eddy covariance flux tower was purchased recently to measure carbon, energy and water fluxes between vegetation and the atmosphere.

The department has installed suites of PCs, LINUX work-stations and Virtual Reality Equipment (including a theatre) in several newly refurbished computing laboratories as a result of securing £3.9 million from HEFCE to house a Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) on the subject of spatial literacy and spatial thinking.

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Materials are at the forefront of new technologies in medicine and dentistry, both in preventative and restorative treatment. Read more
Materials are at the forefront of new technologies in medicine and dentistry, both in preventative and restorative treatment. This programme features joint teaching within the School of Engineering and Materials Science and the Institute of Dentistry, bringing together expertise in the two schools to offer students a fresh perspective on opportunities that are available in the fields of dental materials.

* This programme will equip you with a deep understanding of the field of dental materials and the knowledge necessary to participate in research, or product development.
* An advanced programme designed to develop a broad knowledge of the principles underlying the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of Dental Materials.
* Special emphasis is placed on materials-structure correlations in the context of both clinical and non clinical applications.
* Provides an introduction to materials science, focusing on the major classes of materials used in dentistry including polymers, metals, ceramics and composites.
* Provides up-to-date information on dental materials currently used in Clinical Dentistry and in developments for the future It covers the underlying principles of their functional properties, bioactivity and biocompatibility, and also covers specific dental materials applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering and regulatory affairs.

Why study with us?

Dental Materials is taught jointly by staff from the School of Medicine and Dentistry (SMD), and School of Engineering and Materials Science (SEMS).

Our school of medicine and dentistry is comprised of two world renowned teaching hospitals, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, which have made, and continue to make, an outstanding contribution to modern medicine. We are ranked sixth in the UK for medicine (Complete University Guide 2012), and Dentistry was placed at number two in the UK in last Research Assessment Exercise (2008). Our Materials Department was the first of its kind established in the UK, and was placed at number 1 in the UK in the 2011 National Student Survey.

This degree is aimed at dental surgeons, dental technicians, materials scientists and engineers wishing to work in the dental support industries, and the materials health sector generally. On completion of the course you should have a good knowledge of topics related to dental materials, and in addition, be competent in justifying selection criteria and manipulation instructions for all classes of materials relevant to the practice of dentistry.

There has been a general move away from destructive techniques and interventions towards less damaging cures and preventative techniques. This programme will update your knowledge of exciting new technologies and their applications.

* The programme is taught by experts in the field of dentistry and materials; they work closely together on the latest developments in dental materials.
* Innovations in medical practice, drug development and diagnostic tools are often tested in the mouth due to simpler regulatory pathways in dentistry.
* The programme allows practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge in the latest developments in dental materials.

Facilities

You will have access to state-of-the-art laboratories and equipment, including:

* Cell & Tissue Engineering Laboratories; five dedicated cell culture laboratories, a molecular biology facility and general purpose laboratorie
* Confocal microscopy unit incorporating two confocal microscopes, enabling advanced 3D imaging of living cells
* Mechanical Testing Facilities
* NanoVision Centre; our state-of-the-art microscopy unit bringing together the latest microscope techniques for structural, chemical and mechanical analysis at the nanometer scale
* Spectroscopy Lab
* Thermal Analysis Lab.

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Superb industry links and world-class research come together to make Oxford Brookes one of the best places in the UK to study Mechanical Engineering at postgraduate level. Read more
Superb industry links and world-class research come together to make Oxford Brookes one of the best places in the UK to study Mechanical Engineering at postgraduate level. Being in the heart of one of Europe’s highest concentration of high-tech businesses provides opportunities for industry-focused studies.You will take charge of your career by building on your undergraduate degree and developing your professional skills. It introduces you to research, development and practice in advanced engineering design and equips you for professional practice at senior positions of responsibility.You will gain the skills to take complex products all the way from idea to fully validated designs. Using the most advanced CAD packages, you will learn the techniques required to analyse and test your designs followed by full design implementation. Our teaching is centred around our state-of-the-art laboratories in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Why choose this course?

You will be taught by staff with exceptional knowledge and expertise in their fields, including world-leaders in research on sustainable engineering, materials and joining technology and design engineers leading development of novel products such as carbon and bamboo bike. Our research projects and consultancies are done with partners such as Siemens, Yasa Motors, Stannah Stairlifts, 3M etc. using our facilities including analytical and mechanical test equipment, scanning electron microscope and the latest 3D printing technology. Well-funded research programmes in areas of current concern such as modern composite materials, vehicle end-of-life issues and electric vehicles.

Our research incorporates the latest developments within the sector with high profile visiting speakers contributing to our invited research lectures. In REF 2014 57% of the department's research was judged to be of world leading quality or internationally excellent with 96% being internationally recognised. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide professional perspectives, preparing you for an exciting career, for more information see our industrial lecture series schedule. Our close industry links facilitate industrial visits, providing you with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology - to get a flavour of activities within our department see 2015 highlights.

You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), where you have a chance to put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and The Institute of Engineering and Technology (The IET) as meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the beginning of September.

To qualify for a master's degree you must pass the compulsory modules, two optional modules and the Dissertation.

Compulsory modules
-Advanced Mechanical Engineering Design
-Advanced Strength of Components
-Advanced Engineering Management

Optional modules
-Computation and Modelling
-CAD/CAM
-Advanced Materials Engineering and Joining Technology
-Sustainable Engineering Technology
-Noise, Vibration and Harshness
-Vehicle Crash Engineering
-Engineering Reliability and Risk Management

The Dissertation (core, triple credit) is an individual project on a topic from motorsport engineering, offering an opportunity to specialise in a particular area of motorsport. In addition to developing a high level of expertise in a particular area of motorsport, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. Far-Axon, Clayex/Dymola, Tranquillity Aerospace, Norbar, etc.), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include lectures and seminars to provide a sound theoretical base, and practical work designed to demonstrate important aspects of theory or systems operation.

Teaching staff are drawn primarily from the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide further input.

Careers and professional development

Our graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in a wide range of industries.

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In a world where global transport links allow rapid movement of people and animals, disease can spread more quickly than before and is harder to control than ever. Read more
In a world where global transport links allow rapid movement of people and animals, disease can spread more quickly than before and is harder to control than ever. In such a world there is a growing need for trained epidemiologists at the front line of disease surveillance.

The UK leads the way in providing this training and, in order to meet the demand for skilled professionals, the RVC has developed a unique postgraduate veterinary epidemiology course, delivered jointly with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

Under the microscope

This demanding masters in veterinary epidemiology programme is led by veterinary epidemiologists and supported by policy makers from the forefront of UK government and you will gain a fascinating insight into the work of the Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA, formerly AHVLA). Your areas of study will combine LSHTM’s strengths in epidemiological principles and communicable disease epidemiology, with the RVC’s expertise in veterinary epidemiology, animal health and production.

The course

All students are required to study the core units and usually the recommended units. Students are advised to take at most one optional unit unless they are very familiar with the content of several core or recommended units.

Term one core units:
- Extended epidemiology
- Statistics for EPH
- Epidemiological aspects of laboratory investigation
- Surveillance of animal health and production
- Data management using epi-data
- Communication skills in epidemiology

Recommended unit: Public health
Optional units: Epidemiology in context, Introduction to computing

Term two core units:
- Animal health economics
- Epidemiology and control of communicable diseases
- Statistical methods in epidemiology
- Applied risk assessment and management

Term three core unit:
- Advanced statistical methods in veterinary epidemiology

Recommended units: Modelling and dynamics of infectious diseases, Methods of vector control


Projects - you will spend the second part of the year working full-time on an individual project with the guidance of a supervisor. If you have been sponsored by an employer, you may undertake a project related to your work.

Assessment - you will be assessed by two written exams in June, six in-course assessments throughout the year, and a project report with oral examination in September.

How will I learn?

You can choose to complete the Veterinary Epidemiology post-graduate course over one year full-time study, or part time over two years.

All participants begin the course in September. Over three terms, you will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and tutorials. Both MSc and Diploma students complete the Term One foundation module. MSc students then complete a further five compulsory modules over Terms Two and Three, while Diploma students complete a further four modules, with some module choice available.

Students on both courses sit written examination papers in June, after which the veterinary epidemiology MSc students will work on a research project from June to August, culminating in an oral examination in September.

Part-time students attend the course full-time from October to December in year one, followed by classes two to three days a week from January to May. You will usually study the remainder of the course in year two, including the summer research project (MSc students only).

We recognise the need for flexibility, however, and are happy to tailor your part-time study to meet your specific requirements (subject to agreement with the course director).

Learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course you will be able to:

- Demonstrate and understand the key concepts underpinning the discipline of veterinary and medical epidemiology
- Select an appropriate study design when confronted with an epidemiological research question and develop a detailed study protocol capable of answering the research question
- Analyse and interpret epidemiological data derived from cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies
- Review critically the published epidemiological literature
- Apply epidemiological principles to surveillance, and infection and disease control, within animal and human populations
- Communicate effectively with researchers from different disciplinary backgrounds
- Communicate effectively with other people with an interest in human and animal health, including the general public and key policy makers.

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Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Read more
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Specialist veterinary expertise is required in order to diagnose and control diseases in wildlife.

Emerging infectious diseases are also recognised as a serious hazard, both for wild animal species and for the domestic animal and human populations that interact with them. In addition, a large number of wild animal species are kept in captivity – in zoos and in laboratories – which has led to an increased demand for specialist skills and knowledge.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is a world-class specialist postgraduate veterinary science programme taught jointly by the RVC, University of London and the Zoological Society of London.

Aimed at qualified veterinarians, the MSc in Wild Animal Health will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of the management of wild animals and the epidemiology, treatment and control of wild animal disease.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Health consists of thee levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Health - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also study four core modules:

- Conservation biology
- The impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Health - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Health, you will study four further modules:

- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


MSc in Wild Animal Health - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Health must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):

- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - in this module we will develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - you will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal health. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments and casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination for all candidates, irrespective of their performance in other parts of the course.

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:

- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animal species
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of wildlife disease
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.

Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Health, you will have gained the analytical skills, the understanding, the confidence and the language to influence thinking and policy making within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Read more
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Recognising this, the RVC, University of London, together with the Zoological Society of London, has developed a unique course aimed at non-veterinary biological science graduates and leading to the MSc in Wild Animal Biology.

Under the microscope

This course has been designed to provide you with practical exposure to wild animal species and an understanding of wild animal health, welfare and conservation, as well as providing training in research methods relevant to the study of wildlife.

You will benefit from working and studying alongside veterinary graduates taking the MSc in Wild Animal Health as well as learning from internationally renowned experts in their field.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology consists of three levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Biology - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also undertake four core modules:
- Conservation biology module
- The Impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Biology - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Biology, you will undertake four further modules of study:
- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):
- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - each MSc student will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal biology. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments, casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination, irrespective of students’ performance in other parts of the course. Project reports are submitted by the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:
- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare·
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animals·
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and control of wildlife disease·
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals·
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health·
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.
- Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Biology, you will have gained the analytical skills, understanding, confidence and the language to progress your career within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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This course is designed to enable graduate students and forensic practitioners to develop the theoretical knowledge underpinning forensic document examination and provide intensive training and practical experience. Read more
This course is designed to enable graduate students and forensic practitioners to develop the theoretical knowledge underpinning forensic document examination and provide intensive training and practical experience. It covers the analysis of handwriting, signatures, questioned and fraudulent documents and provides training in the use of a range of highly specialised techniques, such as VSC, comparison microscopy, ESDA and Raman Spectroscopy.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The dedicated laboratory for this course houses an ESDA and a VSC-5000 and this is where MSc students will take a wide range of practical classes, carry out simulated casework and conduct laboratory-based dissertation research projects. Students will also have access to a wide range of state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation within the Analytical Unit. The Unit houses gas chromatographs with pyrolysis injection capability and FID, MS and EC detectors, ion chromatographs and high performance liquid chromatographs with diode array fluorescence, MS and Differential refractometer detectors. The Unit also houses facilities for Atomic absorption, UV-Visible and Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, NMR spectrometry, Inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy With Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDAX).

Modules will be assessed through theory and practical examinations, and coursework (essays, moot courts, presentations and a dissertation). Students will be required to examine documents and equipment, produce case notes and reports.

Please note that Distance Learning students will be required to attend a two-week residential workshop at UCLan’s Preston campus during Semester 2. More information will be provided about this in Semester 1.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Modules are assessed through theoretical and practical examinations as well as coursework. Assessments include the examination of suspect documents and pieces of equipment from simulated cases and the production of formal case notes and expert reports, as well as essays, mock courtroom trials, group and individual presentations and a dissertation. Upon graduating from this course you will be well placed to gain employment in forensic science laboratories, police investigation teams, fraud departments in major government or private organisations, or to go on to further research in academia.

MSc Document Analysis is designed to enable graduate students and forensic practitioners to understand and develop the theoretical knowledge underpinning all aspects of forensic document examination and to develop skills in a variety of areas, which concern the processing, analysis, identification and interpretation of questioned documents. The course provides intensive training in all areas of forensic document analysis and provides extensive practical training in the areas of the analysis and identification of handwriting, signatures, printing apparatus and fraudulent documents. The course also provides you with training to act as an expert witness and presentation and communication skills.

You will study the principles underpinning the scientific analysis of handwriting and signatures together with the considerations involved when carrying out forensic casework. This course will also provide practical experience in the examination of printing equipment, typewriters, photocopiers and the identification of forged or counterfeit documents. You will be trained in a number of analytical techniques using highly specialised apparatus, such as the use of the video spectral comparator, a comparison microscope, ESDA (Electrostatic Detection Apparatus) and a Raman Spectrometer. In addition, the course will provide you with the opportunity to develop a large number of transferable skills.

Upon graduating from this course you will be well placed to gain employment in forensic science laboratories, police investigation teams and fraud departments in major government or private organisations, or to go on to further research in academia at doctoral level.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Electronic and Electrical Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Electronic and Electrical Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

As a student on the Master's course in Electronic and Electrical Engineering, you will develop specialist skills aligned with the College of Engineering’s research interests and reflecting the needs of the electronics industry.

Key Features of MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering

The MSc Electronic and Electrical Engineering course covers the ability to apply the knowledge gained in the course creatively and effectively for the benefit of the profession, to plan and execute a programme of work efficiently, and to be able, on your own initiative, to enhance your skills and knowledge as required throughout your career in Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

Students on the Electronic and Electrical Engineering course benefit from the use of industry-standard equipment, such as a scanning tunnelling microscope for atomic scale probing or an hp4124 parameter analyzer for power devices, for simulation, implementation and communication.

During the Electronic and Electrical Engineering course there will be the opportunity to choose and apply suitable prototyping and production methods and components, gain knowledge in constructing and evaluating advanced models of various manufacturing techniques, and be able to differentiate, analyse and discuss various product lifetime management solutions and how they affect different sectors of Electronic and Electrical Engineering industry.

The MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering programme is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation in Electronic and Electrical Engineering. Students on the Electronic and Electrical Engineering course must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time Delivery mode of MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering

The part-time scheme of the MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option in Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Modules on Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Modules on the MSc Electronic and Electrical Engineering course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

Communication Skills for Research Engineers
Energy and Power Electronics Laboratory
Power Semiconductor Devices
Advanced Power Electronics and Drives
Wide Band-Gap Electronics
Power Generation Systems
Modern Control Systems
Advanced Power Systems
Signals and Systems
Digital Communications
Optical Communications
Probing at the Nanoscale
RF and Microwaves
Wireless Communications

Facilities for Electronic and Electrical Engineering

The new home of the Electronic and Electrical Engineering programme is at the innovative Bay Campus which provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Engineering at Swansea University has extensive IT facilities and provides extensive software licenses and packages to support teaching. In addition the University provides open access IT resources.

Find out more about the facilities used by Electronic and Electrical students at Swansea University, including the electronics lab on our website.

Links with Industry

At Swansea University, Electronic and Electrical Engineering has an active interface with industry and many of our activities are sponsored by companies such as Agilent, Auto Glass, BT and Siemens.

Electronic and Electrical Engineering has a good track record of working with industry both at research level and in linking industry-related work to our postgraduate courses. We also have an industrial advisory board that ensures our taught courses including the MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering maintain relevance.

Our research groups work with many major UK, Japanese, European and American multinational companies and numerous small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to pioneer research. This activity filters down and influences the project work that is undertaken by all our postgraduate students including those on the MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

Careers

Electronic and Electrical Engineering graduates find employment in industry, research centres, government or as entrepreneurs in a wide range of careers, from a design and development role for electronic and electrical equipment or as a technological specialist contributing to a multi-disciplinary team in a range of fields, including medicine, travel, business and education.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

With recent academic appointments strengthening electronics research at the College, the Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) has been re-launched to support these activities.

The Centre aims to represent all major electronics research within the College and to promote the Electrical and Electronics Engineering degree.

Best known for its research in ground-breaking Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics, the Centre is also a world leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.

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Study the dynamic field of efficient information transfer around the globe. We teach this course jointly with the Department of Computer Science so you get up-to-date knowledge and understanding. Read more

About the course

Study the dynamic field of efficient information transfer around the globe. We teach this course jointly with the Department of Computer Science so you get up-to-date knowledge and understanding.

Our graduates are in demand

Many go to work in industry as engineers for large national and international companies, including ARUP, Ericsson Communications, HSBC, Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Intel Asia Pacific.

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

Accreditation

All of our MSc courses are accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), except the MSc(Eng) Advanced Electrical Machines, Power Electronics and Drives and MSc(Eng) Bioengineering: Imaging and Sensing. We are seeking accreditation for these courses.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

Network and Inter-Network Architectures; Network Performance Analysis; Data Coding Techniques for Communications and Storage; Advanced Communication Principles; Mobile Networks and Physical Layer Protocols; (either) Foundations of Object-Orientated Programming (or) Object-Orientated Programming and Software Design; Major Research Project.

Examples of optional modules

Computer Security and Forensics; 3D Computer Graphics; Software Development for Mobile Devices; Cloud Computing; Advanced Signal Processing; Antennas, Propagation and Satellite Systems; Optical Communication Devices and Systems; Computer Vision; Broadband Wireless Techniques; Wireless Packet Data Networks and Protocols; System Design.

Teaching and assessment

We deliver research-led teaching from our department and Computer Science with individual support for your research project and dissertation. Assessment is by examinations, coursework and a project dissertation with poster presentation.

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This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications. Read more

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

Accreditation

All of our MSc courses are accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), except the MSc(Eng) Advanced Electrical Machines, Power Electronics and Drives and MSc(Eng) Bioengineering: Imaging and Sensing. We are seeking accreditation for these courses.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

Semiconductor Materials; Principles of Semiconductor Device Technology; Packaging and Reliability of Microsystems; Nanoscale Electronic Devices; Energy Efficient Semiconductor Devices; Optical Communication Devices and Systems; Compound Semiconductor Device Manufacture; Major Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

Research-led teaching, lectures, laboratories, seminars and tutorials. A large practical module covers the design, manufacture and characterisation of a semiconductor component, such as a laser or light emitting diode. This involves background tutorials and hands-on practical work in the UK’s national III-V semiconductor facility. Assessment is by examinations, coursework or reports, and a dissertation with poster presentation.

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This course will equip you with a critical, systematic understanding of oral pathological conditions that require diagnosis by histopathological methods. Read more

About the course

This course will equip you with a critical, systematic understanding of oral pathological conditions that require diagnosis by histopathological methods. You’ll study the laboratory methods used to prepare oral diagnostic material for histopathological examination and the research tools used to advance the practice of diagnostic oral pathology.

We teach you competence in the microscopical diagnosis of common and significant oral pathological lesions. You’ll learn when further information or additional procedures are needed to confirm a diagnosis.

Your career

We offer clinical and non-clinical courses that will further your career and develop your interests. Many of our clinical graduates go on to specialist dental practice, hospital practice or academic posts.

World-leading dental school

Our internationally recognised oral and dental research is organised into two overarching themes: ‘clinical and person centred’ and ‘basic and applied’. These themes are supported by three interdisciplinary research groups: Bioengineering and Health Technologies, Integrated Bioscience, and Person Centred and Population Oral Health.

We believe that dental science should not be constrained by the traditional boundaries created by specific clinical disciplines and that progress derives from a multidisciplinary approach. Our research supports our teaching enabling a blended approach to learning.
Your course will make the most of virtual learning environments and advanced practical sessions, as well as traditional lectures and seminars.

Facilities

You’ll develop your clinical skills in one of our two clinical skills labs or in our new virtual reality Simulation Suite where you can use haptic technology to undertake a range of clinical techniques.

You’ll complete your clinical training in Sheffield’s Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, part of the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. There are 150 dental units with modern facilities for treatment under sedation, a well-equipped dental radiography department, oral pathology laboratories and a hospital dental production laboratory.

We have new modern research facilities and laboratories for tissue culture, molecular biology, materials science and histology- microscopy. All laboratories have dedicated technical support and academic expertise to guide you.

Health clearance

If you’re starting a course that involves exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissues, you must conform to the national guidelines for the protection of patients, health care workers and students. Before admission to a clinical course we’ll need to check that you’re not an infectious carrier of Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C or HIV and that you do not have tuberculosis. A positive test doesn’t necessarily exclude you from dental training.

Our immunisation requirements are constantly being reviewed to ensure we meet current Department of Health guidance. You need to comply with these if you are offered a place. You’ll get more information when you apply, but if you have any questions on health clearance issues, please get in touch.

Disclosure and Barring Service

If you apply for one of our clinical courses you’ll need a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Enhanced Disclosure. If you do have any criminal convictions or cautions (including verbal cautions) and bind-over orders, please tell us about them on your application form. If you have not lived in the UK in the preceding five years before you commence our programme, you’ll need to provide us with a Certificate of Good Standing from the police authority in your home country. You’ll get more information on the DBS and the Certificate of Good Standing when you apply.

Local NHS policies and procedures

Clinical training in Charles Clifford Dental Hospital requires you to comply with their policies and procedures, which include the Department of Health policy on being ‘bare below the elbow’. For clarification on these policies and procedures before you apply, please see our website.

Core modules

Basic Principles of Pathology; Basic Techniques in Histopathology; Research Problems and Approaches; Laboratory Research Methods; Diagnostic Oral Histopathology; Advanced Oral Histopathology; Current Concepts in Dentistry; Dissertation.

Teaching

Teaching is through an induction period, observational work- shadowing, supervised reporting, staff and student-led seminars, practical laboratory techniques, lectures, literature review, dissertation, independent directed self-study.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed through introductory multi-choice assessment, examinations at the end of each semester consisting of written papers and a microscope-based exam, assessed essays and presentations at journal clubs and seminars, dissertation project.

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The MSc in Veterinary Education is a unique part-time programme designed to promote educational excellence in the field of veterinary education. Read more
The MSc in Veterinary Education is a unique part-time programme designed to promote educational excellence in the field of veterinary education. Developed by experts at the RVC's prestigious LIVE Centre, the programme can be studied as a distance learner, face-to-face at the Hawkshead Campus, Hertfordshire, or using a combination of the two delivery modes. It is a flexible programme of study aimed at:
- Professionals who are involved in the delivery of education and training in the veterinary or para-veterinary sectors at either further education, undergraduate and/or postgraduate levels
- Practising veterinary surgeons and other para-veterinary professionals involved in workplace training.

The programme comprises five separate, progressive courses.Students can begin and end their studies at a point that suits their previous experience, qualifications and career aspirations.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Veterninary Education consists of three levels – the Postgraduate Certificate, the Postgraduate Diploma and the MSc Research project. Each level has a different entry requirement and is offered as distance learning or face-to-face.

The Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) in Veterinary Education is open to graduates with a university degree which is acceptable to University of London and consists of two compulsory core modules of 30 credits each:
- Principles and practice in veterinary education
- Current perspectives in veterinary education

The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) in Veterinary Education comprises the Postgraduate Certificate in Veterinary Education or equivalent, plus four optional modules of 15 credits each, chosen from:
- Enhancing teaching and learning with technology
- Teaching the basic sciences in a clinical context
- Assessment , feedback and learning
- Skills: communication and clinical
- Clinical reasoning and patient-based teaching
- Small group teaching
- Lecturing and large group teaching
- Integrated curriculum design and practice
- Evidence-based veterinary education
- Educational research methods: qualitative and quantitative

The MSc in Veterinary Education is open to those candidates who have successfully completed the PG Diploma in Veterinary Education. In addition, it will include two compulsory core modules:
- Research project (45 credits)
and either:
- Educational research methods: qualitative and quantitative (15 credits)
- Evidence-based veterinary education (15 credits)

How will I learn?

The programme is delivered part time, over a period of 4 months to 6 years (depending on your level of study), and has a flexible structure, designed to give you multiple entry and exit points. We have devised two modes of delivery:

- Mixed mode: a mixture of face-to-face study days with online discussions and support plus some compulsory workshops
- Distance learning: you will study in your own time online, using virtual learning tools, and are not required to attend any workshops.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to:

- Evaluate educational theories, methods and practice which can be applied to veterinary education
- Develop, design and deliver courses and programmes using a wide range of appropriate course development and delivery tools
- Appraise curriculum design and models to ensure that teaching methods comply with standards and quality appropriate to the level of skill development
- Select and use appropriate assessment and evaluation strategies to ensure that learning outcomes are met
- Identify, critically assess and address the emerging needs of the training requirements to match the demands of the local provision
- Adopt new teaching technologies to maximize skill development
- Be a reflective and self-evaluative practitioner
- Critically appraise research in veterinary and related educational fields, and develop skills to undertake qualitative and quantitative research using appropriate methodologies
- Continue to develop independent and lifelong learning skills to promote your own personal and professional development as a veterinary educator, researcher and leader.

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